Idaho

States - Big Screen

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,787,065
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.57%
Change from
2018 to 2019
121,908
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
54,417
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.73%
Change from
2018 to 2019
44.64%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
2.23%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.90%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,716,943 1,754,208 1,787,065
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 125,743 117,561 121,908
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 54,948 49,464 54,417
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 868,236 700,555 727,649
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 43.70% 42.08% 44.64%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.40% 78.12% 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.20% 2.80% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.00% 18.40% 18.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.20% 10.80% 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 131,698 125,413 130,411
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 108,446 108,081 110,980
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 217,135 213,909 215,640
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,880 1,431 775
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,198 18,344 24,440
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,027 4,817 4,072
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,438 2,635 2,248
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,993 6,396 6,885
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,289 4,234 11,538

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,118 2,164 2,306
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.10% 7.30% 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 44,432 43,971 43,495

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,409 1,488 1,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,212 3,179 3,186
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 11,431 11,905 11,943
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.30% 12.50% 13.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 3.40% 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 10.00% 0.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.50% 4.10% 4.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 17.70% 16.50% 15.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 422 486 308
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 15 11 8
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 606 586 610
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 2,391 2,344 2,243

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 14,064 11,705 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 31 33 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 25 31 29
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 81.00% 94.00% 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.55 1.87 1.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.00% 27.00% 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,724 1,704 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 66,709 66,856 66,932
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 84 120 107
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 80 115 102

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2020
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,937,040 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,416,493 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $224,026,855 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% N/A N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,230 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,297 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.25 N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.55% 60.81% 62.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.86% 9.48% 9.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.58% 1.57% 1.42%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.43% 90.30% 98.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.01% 16.93% 17.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 41.71% 38.19% 50.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 54.03% 59.45% 67.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.70% 21.26% 33.01%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 5 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 5 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 310 224 160
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 310 224 160

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~For example, hypothetically, our Vocational Rehabilitation program is able to put people with autism—who have social communication deficits—into employment options today via a,b, c means. People with autism—who have no/minimal communication and/or disabling behaviors at times—can (in the future) be placed in a “Customized Employment” track. (Page 233) Title IV

IDVR intends to provide a comprehensive array of services to individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, as identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 by expanding Supported Employment services, implementing customized employment services, developing and delivering benefits planning to those individuals who receive Social Security benefits and are in need of this service. The Division is currently involved in a Customized Employment Pilot project. This project will help inform policy and statewide service delivery. (Page 233) Title IV

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. This five day face-to-face training was relevant to all stakeholders and coordinated not only school and VR staff, but talent from a wide array of sources to establish a foundation for the coordinated provision of transition personnel development. (Page 257) Title IV

There are two primary areas where needs are present to establish, develop, or improve CRPs within the state of Idaho:
108. Meeting the need of emerging/novel requirements of WIOA and expanding the statewide capacity of CRPs to deliver these services with fidelity (e.g. Customized Employment, Pre-ETS and similar services to youth, Youth Extended Services).
109. Monitoring and improving Community Rehabilitation Program performance through a collaborative iterative learning process. (Page 261) Title IV

Furthermore, the Division has launched a Customized Employment (CE) pilot project with the aim of increasing the capacity of the state to deliver CE services with fidelity and seeks to expand CE offerings statewide following the conclusion of pilot activities. The Division has engaged with multiple national technical assistance providers on this project including WINTAC, NTACT, and Y-TAC. IDVR’s process also allowed the cross-training of internal VR staff, DEI staff, special educators, and CRP personnel in the CE process. (Page 270) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Once the participating programs were identified, the Combined State Plan was drafted by a working group of core and partner programs. The group consisted of a representative(s) from each agency that administers a core or partner program as follows (in alphabetical order):
• Idaho Commission on Aging - Raul Enriquez, Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC)/SCSEP Program Specialist. Raul represented the Combined Partner program of Senior Community Service Employment Program.
• Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired - Rocio Gil, Counselor; Jeff Weeks, Counselor; and Mike Walsh, Rehabilitation Services Chief. Rocio, Jeff and Mike represented Title IV programs administered by the Commission.
• Idaho Department of Labor - Cheryl Foster, Senior Planner. Cheryl represented all core and partner programs administered by the Department, including Title I-B, Title III, Veterans Employment, and Trade Adjustment Assistance.
• Idaho Division of Professional-Technical Education - Amelia Valasek, State Coordinator for Adult Basic Education and GED Administrator. Amelia served as the State Plan Lead, represented Title II programs, and also provided a link to Carl D. Perkins programs via the Division (the Perkins program did not participate in the Plan, but is a close partner in the workforce development system).
• Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - Teresa Pitt, Planning and Evaluation Manager; and Matt Markve, Program Evaluation Analyst. Teresa and Matt represented Title IV programs administered by the Division. (Page 139) Title I

Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 172) Title I

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. (Page 257) Title IV

Staff recommendation to improve services contained in the CSNA indicated the next focus should be on transition age youth. Sections (o)(3) and (o) (4) of IDVR’s program specific strategies (contained above) further elaborate on how the Division will address equitable access and participation as it relates to this section, including coordination of outreach efforts with combined plan partners at IDOL and DEI.
Funding for the State VR Services Program has been reduced to zero. (Page 277) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Benefits planning and financial literacy are identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan and have been included as elements in IDVR’s 4-year work plan. (Page 233) Title IV

The Division plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV
 

School to Work Transition

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title I

The Commission will revise and update its cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation that outlines the coordination between the two VR agencies and the school system in the provision of Pre-ETS services to students from school to work or higher education. (Page 80) Title I

Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 83-84) Title I

IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high schools participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 238) Title IV

The Division has also improved coordinated activities by having our VR Counselors work collaboratively with local school personnel to develop effective referral and outreach strategies to maximize opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in Pre-ETS activities. These strategies also include opportunities for students who are receiving accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. VR Counselors are attending numerous IEP meetings and are working with districts to develop better process for providing timely invitation to VR Counselors to attend these meetings. (Page 240) Title IV

The agencies agree to:
46. Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
47. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members.
48. IDVR and ICBVI counselors are available to consult with educators concerning pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services for students to assist them toward employment.
49. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will collaborate with the LEAs in their service area to identify a process for the counselors to provide input and participate in the development of the transition services included in IEPs.
50. IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors may attend IEP team meetings for each referred student upon timely invitation by school personnel and the student and/or student’s parent or legal guardian. VR counselors may attend either in person or via video or telephone. The IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors will provide written recommendations, if requested, for use in developing IEPs when unable to attend.
51. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will consult with educators concerning referral of students to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, including pre-employment transition services. Students with blindness or visual impairments should be referred to ICBVI. Students with multiple disabilities may have dual cases with both IDVR and ICBVI to provide rehabilitation services.
52. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will accept referrals for pre-employment transition or vocational rehabilitation services, when appropriate, and will work collaboratively with input from the student’s IEP team, for service provision and/or to develop an IPE. The vocational rehabilitation counselor, student, student’s parent or legal guardian, and members of the student’s IEP team will collaborate to identify required vocational rehabilitation services that will move the student towards their employment goal. (Page 241-242) Title IV

Expected outcomes include increase interagency collaboration, increase the number of students receiving pre-employment transition services or educational transition services that they need, increase student knowledge of agencies and other services, increase families knowledge of agencies and services, and provide more effective Pre-ETS based on student need.
Furthermore the formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree:

1. To cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 243) Title IV

The Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) agrees to:
o Assume the role of lead agency in facilitating interagency planning with LEAs and implementation of educational programs and transition services for students with disabilities from high school to post-high school services.
o Support LEAs in their efforts to write IEPs using an outcome oriented focus and to coordinate transition activities for each IEP eligible student, beginning no later than the IEP before the student turns age 16 years old (earlier if appropriate), and to address future student needs in the areas of post-secondary education, vocational training, employment, and adult living and communication participation, including assistive technology.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI to provide information regarding their services, including their role as an IEP team member to school district personnel, students, and their families.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, to participate as members of IEP teams for students who have been referred to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, or earlier if appropriate.
o Work with IDVR and ICBVI Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors to identify a process for such counselors to provide input and participate in the development of a student’s IEP, including pre-employment transition services, when appropriate.
o Identify appropriate school personnel who, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, will initiate the referral process of students receiving special education services, and students who have a 504 Plan (Rehabilitation Act of 1973), or students with disabilities (e.g., physical, medical, or visual, etc.) who are not eligible for special education services, to IDVR and/or ICBVI for pre-employment transition services and/or vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 244) Title IV

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) and Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agree to:
o Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
o IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members. (Page 244) Title IV

Continue current funding of IDVR School to Work Counselors in conjunction with matching funds from participating school districts. IDVR also ensures that in schools where School to Work Counselors are located, cooperative agreements are developed or continued between the LEA and IDVR to identify each agency’s responsibilities to this partnership. The continuation and development of the IDVR/LEA School to Work Counselor positions are dependent on the receipt of adequate funding from the federal government and/or Idaho state legislature. (Page 245) Title IV

VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired (IESDB Staff), school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14, however they are not eligible to receive Pre-Employment Transition Services until age 15. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed within 90 days of eligibility determination (unless an extension is agreed upon) to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work. (Page 295) Title IV

The formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree to cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 297) Title IV

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) agree:
o To encourage staff to work closely with school district personnel to ensure coordination between education services and vocational rehabilitation services.
o That ICBVI and IDVR counselors will provide training to school district personnel, students and families on all aspects of vocational rehabilitation services, including their roles as IEP team members. (Page 298) Title IV

The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agrees:
o To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 299) Title IV

According to the 2017 CSNA, the most common themes that emerged in the needs of students include:
o Transition services for all youth in Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) seem to be lacking.
o Transition-age youth need more exposure to prior to exiting the school system.
o There needs to be better coordination between the schools and ICBVI regarding the provision of assistive technology.
o There is lack of information regarding ICBVI services and opportunities. (Page 310) Title IV

ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students: 1) School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and, 2) College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of Pre-ETS. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 317) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I

 

Career Pathways

~~The Division will implement a sector strategy and a career pathways model. The career pathways model is currently in development by the Idaho Career &Technical Education and will be implemented upon completion. The Idaho Department of Labor has already established a sector strategy model. The Division will utilize this model to help ensure that counselors are well informed of labor market trends and regional job predictions in order to better match qualified people with disabilities to high quality competitive integrated employment. (Page 74) Title IV

IDVR is currently exploring the expansion of its Career Index Plus utilization to improve planned service connections to Labor Market Information/Career Pathways and better inform customer career choice in the 21st century. The Division will continue to work with WINTAC to further this initiative. (Page 271) Title IV

Recommendations to improve Transition Services include:
o Better coordination between ICBVI and IDVR in contacting schools. There appears to be confusion in school districts across the state.
o Increased cross-training between ICBVI, IESDB and schools.
o More focus on career pathways rather than just job placement. (Page 310) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeships - The Department of Labor is actively working with employers to develop apprenticeships for training dislocated workers. However the apprenticeship development effort includes many partners besides the Department of Labor programs. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. Another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 78) Title IV

ApprenticeshipIdaho, a statewide partnership of the Idaho Department of Labor, Department of Commerce, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Career & Technical Education, and the college’s Workforce Training Centers, is bringing a focus on integrated, rather than siloed, business outreach and assistance, ensuring identification and development of career pathways and industry-recognized credentials as each new Registered Apprenticeship is developed. (Page 93) Title I Idaho’s Workforce Development Council serves as the State Workforce Board under section 101(a). The Council’s membership brings together a well-integrated mix of business and industry, education, labor, community and government representatives to establish the vision and plan for Idaho’s workforce development system. Executive Order No 2017-13 provides for council membership as follows: • 17 positions appointed by the Governor representing industry and nominated by statewide and regional business organizations; • Seven positions appointed by the Governor representing the workforce, including two labor union representatives, two registered apprenticeship program representatives, one representative of a community-based organization for veterans, one representative of a community-based organization for the disabled, and one representative of a community-based organization for out-of-school youth; • Nine positions appointed by the Governor representing government, including representatives from the Department of Labor, State Board of Education, Division of Career-Technical Education, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health and Welfare, Department of Commerce, an elected city official, an elected county official, and a community college representative. • One member from each chamber of the Idaho Legislature, including a member of the Senate appointed by the Senate President Pro Tem, and a member of the House of Representatives appointed by the House Speaker; • The Governor or his designee. (Page 102) Title I Since the original submission of the WIOA Combined State Plan in 2015, Idaho has made significant progress in the effort now called Apprenticeship Idaho. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. In addition to the Idaho Department of Labor, another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 156) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Division Partner-provided services are also accessible to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by Montana State University, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 136) Title I

The state’s EO officer is charged with ensuring that all of the Idaho Department of Labor local offices and American Job Centers are compliant with WIOA 188 and applicable sections of the Americans with Disabilities Act. To minimize duplicate efforts by the state’s one-stop operator and Workforce Development Staff, the EO officer will coordinate the annual AJC assessments and ensure the information is satisfactory for one-stop certification. (Page 136) Title I

Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 237) Title IV

Idaho Department of Labor as an Employment Network: The Idaho Department of Labor (IDOL) has recently become an approved Employment Network. IDVR and IDOL are collaborating to formalize an agreement regarding coordinated service delivery. The agreement will describe the referral process between IDVR and IDOL under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program authorized under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-170, Title 1, Subtitle A, 42 U.S.C. 1320b-19 et seq.) and the revised regulations Social Security promulgated under 20 CFR Part 411 that took effect July 21, 2008. The Agreement will further describe the responsibilities of each agency in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. (Page 237) Title I

IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee for service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several nonprofit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 246) Title IV

In October 2017 IDVR held a statewide in-service. IDVR staff received training in various general sessions including: online resources from Live Better Idaho - a virtual one-stop, a presentation from the national VR employment team (the NET), communication skills training, information on SSA’s Ticket to Work Program and work incentives planning, WIOA core partner cross training with Title II’s Career and Technical Education program (emphasizing career pathways within the trades), and updates on IDVR’s pre-employment transition services. (Page 256) Title IV

There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 46,120. Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016, SSI benefits were received by 21,177 individuals while 6,369 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 60,928 individuals represent 6.1% of all working age Idahoans.
According to internal data, IDVR took applications on 5,570 cases in FFY 2017 including 734 cases where SSDI benefits were verified and 895 cases where SSI benefits were verified. This represents a presumptive eligibility rate of 29.3% at application. The Division anticipates an increase in this rate as Pre-ETS requirements increase the likelihood of the establishment and implementation of an Order of Selection and the subsequent referral of candidates on the waiting list to other partner agencies. (plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV

Priority 4: Offer benefits planning to all customer receiving SSI and/or SSDI entering, during and exiting the IDVR process to include Partnership Plus.
IDVR continues to make progress toward this priority, however more still needs to be done.
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority, continues to see overall increases. Referrals increased 49% in FFY 2016 from FFY 2015, while referrals declined slightly by 5.8% in FFY 2017 from FFY 2016 levels. Idaho has fewer in state resources for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals for the entire state. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale.
A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a more timely manner. (Page 279) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~IDVR will work with employers to provide general and customized technical assistance and support services to businesses and industries including:
• Work-based learning experiences
• Section 503 technical assistance for federal contractors and subcontractors
• Training employees with disabilities
• Promote awareness of disability-related obstacles and stigma reduction
• Linking business with state and federal financial incentives for supporting individuals with disabilities (e.g. Work Opportunity Tax Credit).
• Other customized training, consultation, and technical assistance as allowed by WIOA regulations (Page 247) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Programs under Title IV of WIOA are administered by both the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), as well as the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI). The intake process for both agencies is similar. The intake process typically begins with a referral, in which the applicant may be asked to fill out an application form. The applicant then meets for a face-to-face interview with a counselor. The individual may also need to complete additional assessments to determine eligibility (such as medical evaluations). Data collected during the application process is entered into each agency’s respective MIS (Aware for IDVR and IRIS for ICBVI). Supporting documentation is also collected during this time and may be scanned into the system or filed as appropriate. (Page 97-98) Title IV

The second set of performance measures reflect the extent that veterans are served by the state’s labor exchange as a whole. These veterans may have been served by LVERs, DVOPs or other One-Stop system staff or they may simply have accessed the labor exchange system on their own. These measures are listed below. Again, the first three measures (8-10) refer to all veterans and eligible persons served and the second three measures (11-13) include only disabled veterans served. 8. Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate (VEER) 9. Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate (VERR) 10. Veterans’ Average Earnings (VAE) (Six-Months) 11. Disabled Veterans’ EER (DVEER) 12. Disabled Veterans’ ERR (DVERR) 13. Disabled Veterans’ AE (DVAE) (Six Months) (Page 120) Title I The State invests significant funds to meet this statutory requirement which includes: eligible providers, outreach, service delivery strategies, accessibility and workforce information. Unless granted a waiver, the state’s eligible training provider performance reporting system will continue to receive investments to support eligible training providers and comply with increased regulations. (Page 150) Title I

IDVR has modified and streamlined the quarterly update report to include the current common performance measures and will incorporate the new goals and priorities, based on the recent CSNA, developed in collaboration with the SRC for a more comprehensive product. The SRC will continue to be asked for input on these as well as any additional indicators that might be helpful in the report. The end product of these quarterly status revisions will be a quarterly report to the SRC that is based on SRC WIOA related goals and priorities that includes quarterly updates on WIOA mandatory primary performance indicators. (Page 229) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~A draft notice of rulemaking was presented at the SRC’s May 4, 2017 meeting where members were requested to provide input on three policy changes to comply with WIOA involving:
• Supported Employment
• Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Services to Individuals who are Seeking Employment at Subminimum Wage (Page 228) Title IV

The models are mentioned by SDSU referenced the Customized Employment (CE) Pilot Project and process requirements for Section 511 Subminimum Wage Employment. Customized Employment is incorporated into the Goals and Priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan under Goal 1, Priority 2. The Division has developed the process and policy to meet the requirements of Section 511. (Page 232) Title IV

Prohibition on entering into an arrangement with an entity holding a 14(c) special wage certificate for the purpose of operating a program where people with disabilities are engaged in work at subminimum wage.
The current draft agreement is expected to be finalized sometime in 2018. (Page 244; Page 297-298) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The state’s equal opportunity (EO) officer works with the Idaho Department of Labor EO officer, who acts as the liaison with other units of the department such as the Disability Determinations Service and the Human Rights Commission, as well as external disability support organizations such as the vocational rehabilitation agencies and the Council on Developmental Disabilities, to ensure policies are communicated and to foster these groups as resources for customers with disabilities. (Page 135) Title I

All American Job Centers are equipped with accessible computers built primarily with ADA equipment and software to accommodate a variety of disabilities. Customers with disabilities can come to the centers during office hours and access center programs and information sources. State policy requires all partner programs that provide services at the One-Stop centers do so in a manner that meets requirements of Section 188 affording programmatic and physical access to services. (Page 136) Title I

The Idaho Department of Labor is the service provider and location manager of all comprehensive and affiliate American Job Center locations in Idaho. The Idaho Department of Labor maintains a comprehensive policy clarifying the Department’s responsibility for providing persons with limited English proficiency meaningful access to agency programs and services as required by Executive Order 13166, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. This policy not only includes instructions on reasonable steps to provide meaningful access, it describes potential discriminatory practices, staff training and processes for monitoring and complaints. (Page 137) Title I

Veterans

The JSVG program is administered by the Idaho Department of Labor. This program provides veterans a full range of employment and training assistance through the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) and the Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) program. Both the DVOP and LVER program staff provide services to eligible veterans under Title 38, but their efforts are concentrated, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, on (1) outreach to and on behalf of veterans and (2) providing direct client services to those who have been identified as most in need of intensive employment and training assistance. Program staff, through outreach with employers, develop increased hiring opportunities within the local workforce by making employers aware of the availability and the benefit of hiring veterans. The DVOP staff provide a wide range of workforce services to veterans and other eligible persons with their primary focus on identifying veterans who require or would benefit from individualized career services. Staff also coordinate services through the case management approach, focusing especially on veterans with barriers to employment and with special workforce needs. Through the LVER program, staff is strategically placed in American Job Centers throughout the state to serve as regional representatives, whose primary job is to conduct outreach on behalf of veteran customers, promote job developments with employers and market the Department’s services to employers. These staff are also responsible for ensuring veterans are provided the full range of workforce services in the American Job Centers, facilitating and coordinating services and strategies targeting veterans and leveraging resources of other veteran service and community-based organizations. Program services are accessible by phone or on a walk-in basis through DVOP and LVER staff working at the American Job Centers in the One-Stop system across the state. Staff are cross-trained in each of the state’s One-Stop workforce programs and services. The state also requires veteran program staff to provide veterans’ program training to all One-Stop staff including priority of service to veterans and covered persons. (Page 45) Title I

The VETS program provides two distinct sets of services, which are each measured against specific performance indicators: the Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialists (DVOPs). The LVERs outreach to employers on behalf of veteran jobseekers and ensure that veterans have priority access to all of the services in the One-Stop center. The DVOPs serve only qualified veterans or eligible spouses of qualified veterans who are one or more of the following: disabled veteran, special disabled veteran, homeless, long-term unemployed, a recently released offender, lacking a high school diploma or equivalent, or low-income. The DVOP staff identify and provide primarily intensive case management services directly to those veterans with barriers to employment and special workforce needs. (Page 119) Title I

Idaho covers a large geographic area with limited funding making it unfeasible to station a DVOP in every local office. In order to improve employment outcomes for veterans, the IDOL strategically stations our DVOP’s and LVER throughout the state. In 2015, the agency reorganized its service delivery organization by establishing a regional structure of its local office network. Seven regional offices in Kootenai County, Lewiston, Canyon County, Meridian, Magic Valley, Pocatello and Idaho Falls serve as central coordinators for all department activity within their geographic regions. The remaining offices within each region coordinate workforce activities and report to the regional offices. This reorganization was necessary to deal with a 20-25% reduction in staff at the local American Job Centers. DVOP staff are primarily assigned to local offices with the highest numbers of registered veterans. Another factor considered is whether or not an area has a large educational institution that can translate to large numbers of Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) participants. (Page 334) Title I

IDOL employs a full-time regional Local Veterans Representative (LVER) who works in the largest labor market area in the state: Boise/Meridian/Nampa. There is also a full time DVOP presence in these three offices. In rural areas of the state where fewer veterans reside, IDOL assigns DVOPs on a half-time basis, Idaho has two part time (20 hours a week) DVOPs. In an effort to ensure that all veterans have access to our most knowledgeable resource, a DVOP conducts monthly outreach to rural areas of the state where there is no permanently stationed DVOPs to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBEs). Our DVOPs work closely with the state’s Business Solutions Specialists (BSS). The BSS staff are trained to work with employers in certain high growth industries and to provide job developments, and recruit veterans for employment. Our DVOP staff notify the BSS’s when they have a veteran that is work ready. The BSS reviews the veteran’s resume and case management file to insure appropriate referrals are made to employers. (Page 334-335) Title I

A veteran who enters one of the state’s larger American Job Centers with full-time grant-funded staff receives the same services as a veteran who enters a small center with a half-time DVOP Specialist. If a veteran is in need of more than core services from one of the 15 AJC offices without an assigned DVOP Specialist they are assessed and referred to the nearest DVOP Specialist, if appropriate. An appointment is made during their next rural office visit. During this visit the veteran receives all the services available to veterans in the larger offices. The state’s “shareable” website EPIC was recently enhanced so AJCs without a DVOP Specialist can provide the same information that is provided to veterans in urban areas. This tool is available to all DVOP Specialists as well as managers and other employment staff who serve veterans. All training documents are uploaded to EPIC for all AJC staff to view. (Page 335) Title I

USDOL VETS (United States Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service) instructs states to serve disabled and special disabled Veterans. However, Idaho DVOPs (disabled veteran outreach program) specialists see a significant number of disabled Veterans who fall outside the definition of this SBE (significant barrier to employment.) This population has disabilities that are either waiting for a disability rating by the VA (Veterans Administration) or who sustained a disability after their military service. As a result, Idaho Department of Labor is adding an additional SBE - Disabled. Our DVOPs will contact the Idaho Industrial Commission, including drug and alcohol treatment centers to assist in the outreach effort to this population. We will document this population through self-attestation. (Page 339) Title I

The VR&E National Technical Assistance Guide (TAG) formalized a partnership and process that has been in place in Idaho for years. However, when the TAG was released, the IDOL worked closely with the VA VR&E and our DVET to update our local agreement. The Idaho TAG was finalized and signed in March, 2009. The IDOL’s central point of contact for the VR&E program is the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a half-time position filled by a full-time DVOP. The ISC is out-stationed at the Boise VA Regional Office, but veterans enrolled in the VR&E program are referred to Idaho DVOPs from counselors assigned to Spokane, Seattle, and Salt Lake City. The ISC or assigned DVOP provides Labor Market Information (LMI) as part of the vocational evaluation process. The VA VR&E develops a rehabilitation plan and then approximately 90 days prior to the participant’s expected completion of training or education, the VR&E office completes a Job Ready Assessment and refers the veteran to the IDOL ISC or appropriate DVOP for intensive employment assistance. The VA VR&E office and IDOL jointly monitor the job seeking process to determine when the veteran has entered employment and when the veteran can be considered “rehabilitated.” (Page 340) Title I

Idaho has DVOPs strategically placed in areas near Native American reservations. Outreach activities are conducted at the state’s option and conducted with approval of the tribes. A fulltime DVOP is located minutes away from the Shoshone Bannock reservation in Southeast Idaho and provides outreach and intensive services to the disabled veterans in that area. (Page 341) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Vocational Rehabilitation services in Idaho are provided through two agencies: the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (the Commission). Both agencies serve individuals with disabilities that constitute or result in substantial barriers to employment. For the IDVR, these include, but are not limited to alcohol dependency, mental health disorders, learning disabilities, diabetes, deafness, amputation, and traumatic brain injury. The Commission specifically serves individuals whose primary disability is blindness or visual impairments, including those who may experience co-occurring disabilities. (Page 44) Title I

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Division of Behavioral Health, Adult Mental Health (H&W-Behavioral Health): The IDVR and H&W-Behavioral Health update this agreement annually for the purpose of better serving Idahoans experiencing severe and persistent mental illness. A team approach will be used to ensure that the Idahoans served by this agreement will benefit as to remaining de-institutionalized and successfully integrated into their respective communities from a psychological, psychosocial, and employment perspective. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed not eligible for this program will be referred to the general IDVR counselor. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed ineligible for IDVR services will be referred to other appropriate resources for assistance. A designated VR counselor and staff member are assigned to an H&W Behavioral Health Region to better serve customers. The Department of Health and Welfare provides certifiable non-federal monies for IDVR services per explained in the interagency cooperative agreement. (Page 235-236; Page 249) Title IV

The Division conducts various outreach activities to identify and involve individuals with disabilities from underserved backgrounds. These include but are not limited to:
• Monthly participation in the Amigo Round Table hosted by the Mexican Consulate
• Working with community based mental health programs to identify leads for potential outreach
• Continuing meetings with Boise State University’s Hispanic equivalency recruiter
• Meeting with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare’s bilingual staff as well as ongoing meetings with DHW’s Targeted Service Coordinators to identify potential referrals
• Collaborating with Idaho Youth Ranch to look at ways of better serving individuals who are minorities
• Participation in the multi-partner Refugee Employment Networking and Training group hosted by the Idaho Department of Labor (Page 272-273) Title IV

The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 276) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 53

SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Individual Support Plan Instruction Manual - 01/01/2019

~“The purpose of the Individual Support Plan (ISP) Instruction Manual is to help plan developers complete all of the forms required for an ISP”  Supported Employment is part of the ISP. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2018 Idaho Transition Institute - 11/29/2018

~~The 2018 Idaho Transition Institute serves as a powerful opportunity for school district and charter teams to connect with partnering Idaho agencies and higher education offering transition resources and experiences to students with disabilities. With an array of transition focused experts and leaders on hand, school and community teams will go through a facilitated planning process toward developing an annual roadmap for maximizing transition opportunities and outcomes for the students they serve; while also participating in focused breakout and keynote sessions.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Boise Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~“VA’s Boise Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Idaho. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Field Services Policy Manual - 07/01/2018

~~“Supported Employment–for customers with the most severe disabilities for whom a vocational objective of supported employment has been determined appropriate, the following must be addressed:•A description of time-limited services to be provided by IDVR not to exceed eighteen (18) months in duration, unless under specialcircumstances, the eligible customer and theVRC jointly agree to extend the time to achieve the employment outcome;•A description of an identified source of funding for the extended services needed (long-term support).  If it is not possible to identify the source of such funding, a statement that there is a reasonable expectation that extended services will be available. Extended services are provided by aState agency, a private non-profit organization, employer, or otherappropriate resource, from funds other than IDVR.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Able to Work: Connecting people with disabilities to employment opportunities - 11/03/2017

~~“Your participation in the workforce is in demand. Find out what you need to know before you start a job search. Learn how to plan a successful job search. Discover what you and employers need to know about disabilities and accommodations in the workplace.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Transition From School to Full Adult Life - 01/01/2019

~Session 1: “Possibilities for Employment and Community Living for People with Significant Disabilities”Session 2: “What is New in Terms of Laws and Federal Directives with Regards to Transition?"Session 3: “Connecting with Agencies in Your Community" 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/25/2018

~~" The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with developmental disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2018

~~“Secondary Transition Planning

In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday.  This chapter includes the steps required to complete a Secondary Transition Plan. 

Transition Planning at 16

Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 10/25/2017

~“The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self  advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with development disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

EEOC News: Jacksons Food To Pay $158K To Settle 2nd Disability Discrimination Suit This Year - 12/21/2018

~“Meridian-based Jackson Energy, a division of Jacksons Food Stores, Inc., will pay $158,000 to a former dispatcher and implement other preventative measures to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today. This is the agency’s second disability discrimination settlement with this employer this year.

According to the EEOC’s suit, Jacksons violated federal law when it failed to accommodate an employee recovering from wrist surgery and fired her because of her disability.

The EEOC said that Jacksons ignored Wightman’s requests for an accommodation, such as speech recognition software, that potentially would have allowed her to continue to perform her dispatcher duties, and instead the company fired her when she exhausted her leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) before making a full recovery.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan Resubmission - 10/03/2018

~“Effective October 3, 2018, Idaho became the tenth state to receive Final Approval for the Home and Community Based Services  (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan. CMS’ letter to Idaho can be found under the resources tab to the right in the Statewide Transition Plan link.Moving forward, all HCBS providers will need to follow IDAPA rules, including creating and maintaining policies and procedures, while offering HCB services.Idaho has updated the ongoing monitoring processes to ensure each provider offering HCBS will be reviewed for compliance at least every three years. Idaho will use a variety of program staff and the Division of Licensing and Certification to make sure each HCBS setting quality is reviewed. Additionally, all new providers enrolling with Medicaid through the New Provider Enrollment process will be expected to produce policies and procedures that comply with the IDAPA rules identified in the Medicaid Enhanced Benefits Plan 16.03.10.310-318.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Draft 1915(b) Waiver Application - 10/01/2018

~~“Program Title:Aged and Disabled WaiverC. Waiver Number:ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.0

The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Aged and Disabled (A&D) 1915(c) waiver is to align with the 1915(b) waiver application for the Idaho Medicaid Plus program. Idaho Medicaid Plus is a mandatory managed care program for individuals who are eligible for Medicare Parts A and B and full coverage Medicaid, otherwise known as "dual-eligibles." The purpose of Idaho Medicaid Plus is to offer improved coordination of Medicaid-primary services, including behavioral health, Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), and institutional care. Idaho has offered a voluntary program for dual-eligibles, including A&D waiver beneficiaries, since 2014 under the Medicare Medicaid Coordinated Plan (MMCP). The MMCP is administered by participating Managed Care Entities (MCEs) under a 1915(a)/(c) combination authority.

Idaho Medicaid Plus is a program that will require dual-eligibles who have not enrolled in the MMCP to enroll with a participating MCE that administers Idaho Medicaid Plus. The 1915(b) waiver is being submitted to permit mandatory enrollment in counties in which there are two or more participating MCEs with a phased-in implementation approach. The program will be piloted in Twin Falls county beginning on October1, 2018, to be expanded into additional counties upon successful implementation and meeting performance thresholds.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services IDAPA 16.03.10.320-330 - 03/16/2018

~~“Supported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disability, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.a. Supported employment services rendered under this waiver are not available under a program funded by either the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Documentation must be maintained in the file of each individual receiving this service verifying that the service is not otherwise available or funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

Community Support Services IDAPA 16.03.10.702-706 - 03/16/2018

~~“Community support services provide goods and supports that are medically necessary and/or minimize the Enrollee's need for institutionalization and address the Enrollee's preferences for:Job support to help the Enrollee secure and maintain employment or attain job advancement; Personal support to help the Enrollee maintain health, safety, and basic quality of life; Relationship support to help the Enrollee establish and maintain positive relationships with immediate family members, friends, spouse, or others in order to build a natural support network and community; Emotional support to help the Enrollee learn and practice behaviors consistent with his goals and wishes while minimizing interfering behaviors; Learning support to help the Enrollee learn new skills or improve existing skills that relate to his identified goals; Transportation support to help the Enrollee accomplish his identified goals; Adaptive equipment identified in the Enrollee's plan that meets a medical or accessibility need and promotes his increased independence, and Skilled nursing supports.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

XXXIII. Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (IHCMFP) - 03/16/2018

~~“A.  IDHW will:1. Make all final determinations regarding IHCMFP enrollment; and

B. The Health Plan shall implement and maintain policies and procedures to provide information, choice, and to enroll eligible Enrollees who consent to participate in the IHCMFP upon transition from a Qualified Institution to a Qualified Residence within the community that include:1. Dissemination of information, including program requirements and processes, to eligible Enrollees;2. Processes to update Enrollees’ Individualized Care Plans and complete and submit required referral, consent forms, and documentation to the IDHW IHCMFPCoordinator;3. Processes that ensure sufficient contact between Care Coordinators and Enrollees during the Enrollee’s participation in IHCMFP;4. Collaboration with qualified Transition Managers or a transition management Agency to provide up to seventy-two (72) hours of Transition Management Servicesand up to two thousand dollars ($2,000.00) of Transition Services for each Enrollee participating in IHCMFP; and5. Methods to track each Enrollee’s residency during IHCMFP participation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho §1915(i) State plan - 10/31/2017

~~“Idaho Medicaid furnishes Adult DD 1915(i) HCBS Benefit services in one type of provider owned or controlled residential setting: CFHs. The results of Idaho’s analysis of this residential setting are summarized below, including an overview of existing support for each regulation. The state hasincluded, where applicable, the full IDAPA citations to identify where IDAPA supports the HCBS requirement, in addition to indicating if IDAPA is silent. The state did not identify any IDAPA provision that conflicts with the HCBS requirements. Additionally, the chart includes Idaho’s plan on how to transition these settings into full compliance with the new regulations….

The setting includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive,integrated settings to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,787,065
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.57%
Change from
2018 to 2019
121,908
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
54,417
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.73%
Change from
2018 to 2019
44.64%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
2.23%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.90%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,716,943 1,754,208 1,787,065
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 125,743 117,561 121,908
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 54,948 49,464 54,417
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 868,236 700,555 727,649
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 43.70% 42.08% 44.64%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.40% 78.12% 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.20% 2.80% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.00% 18.40% 18.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.20% 10.80% 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 131,698 125,413 130,411
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 108,446 108,081 110,980
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 217,135 213,909 215,640
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,880 1,431 775
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,198 18,344 24,440
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,027 4,817 4,072
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,438 2,635 2,248
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,993 6,396 6,885
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,289 4,234 11,538

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,118 2,164 2,306
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.10% 7.30% 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 44,432 43,971 43,495

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,409 1,488 1,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,212 3,179 3,186
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 11,431 11,905 11,943
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.30% 12.50% 13.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 3.40% 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 10.00% 0.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.50% 4.10% 4.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 17.70% 16.50% 15.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 422 486 308
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 15 11 8
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 606 586 610
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 2,391 2,344 2,243

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 14,064 11,705 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 31 33 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 25 31 29
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 81.00% 94.00% 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.55 1.87 1.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.00% 27.00% 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,724 1,704 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 66,709 66,856 66,932
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 84 120 107
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 80 115 102

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2020
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,937,040 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,416,493 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $224,026,855 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% N/A N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,230 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,297 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.25 N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.55% 60.81% 62.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.86% 9.48% 9.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.58% 1.57% 1.42%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.43% 90.30% 98.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.01% 16.93% 17.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 41.71% 38.19% 50.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 54.03% 59.45% 67.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.70% 21.26% 33.01%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 5 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 5 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 310 224 160
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 310 224 160

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~For example, hypothetically, our Vocational Rehabilitation program is able to put people with autism—who have social communication deficits—into employment options today via a,b, c means. People with autism—who have no/minimal communication and/or disabling behaviors at times—can (in the future) be placed in a “Customized Employment” track. (Page 233) Title IV

IDVR intends to provide a comprehensive array of services to individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, as identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 by expanding Supported Employment services, implementing customized employment services, developing and delivering benefits planning to those individuals who receive Social Security benefits and are in need of this service. The Division is currently involved in a Customized Employment Pilot project. This project will help inform policy and statewide service delivery. (Page 233) Title IV

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. This five day face-to-face training was relevant to all stakeholders and coordinated not only school and VR staff, but talent from a wide array of sources to establish a foundation for the coordinated provision of transition personnel development. (Page 257) Title IV

There are two primary areas where needs are present to establish, develop, or improve CRPs within the state of Idaho:
108. Meeting the need of emerging/novel requirements of WIOA and expanding the statewide capacity of CRPs to deliver these services with fidelity (e.g. Customized Employment, Pre-ETS and similar services to youth, Youth Extended Services).
109. Monitoring and improving Community Rehabilitation Program performance through a collaborative iterative learning process. (Page 261) Title IV

Furthermore, the Division has launched a Customized Employment (CE) pilot project with the aim of increasing the capacity of the state to deliver CE services with fidelity and seeks to expand CE offerings statewide following the conclusion of pilot activities. The Division has engaged with multiple national technical assistance providers on this project including WINTAC, NTACT, and Y-TAC. IDVR’s process also allowed the cross-training of internal VR staff, DEI staff, special educators, and CRP personnel in the CE process. (Page 270) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Once the participating programs were identified, the Combined State Plan was drafted by a working group of core and partner programs. The group consisted of a representative(s) from each agency that administers a core or partner program as follows (in alphabetical order):
• Idaho Commission on Aging - Raul Enriquez, Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC)/SCSEP Program Specialist. Raul represented the Combined Partner program of Senior Community Service Employment Program.
• Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired - Rocio Gil, Counselor; Jeff Weeks, Counselor; and Mike Walsh, Rehabilitation Services Chief. Rocio, Jeff and Mike represented Title IV programs administered by the Commission.
• Idaho Department of Labor - Cheryl Foster, Senior Planner. Cheryl represented all core and partner programs administered by the Department, including Title I-B, Title III, Veterans Employment, and Trade Adjustment Assistance.
• Idaho Division of Professional-Technical Education - Amelia Valasek, State Coordinator for Adult Basic Education and GED Administrator. Amelia served as the State Plan Lead, represented Title II programs, and also provided a link to Carl D. Perkins programs via the Division (the Perkins program did not participate in the Plan, but is a close partner in the workforce development system).
• Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - Teresa Pitt, Planning and Evaluation Manager; and Matt Markve, Program Evaluation Analyst. Teresa and Matt represented Title IV programs administered by the Division. (Page 139) Title I

Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 172) Title I

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. (Page 257) Title IV

Staff recommendation to improve services contained in the CSNA indicated the next focus should be on transition age youth. Sections (o)(3) and (o) (4) of IDVR’s program specific strategies (contained above) further elaborate on how the Division will address equitable access and participation as it relates to this section, including coordination of outreach efforts with combined plan partners at IDOL and DEI.
Funding for the State VR Services Program has been reduced to zero. (Page 277) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Benefits planning and financial literacy are identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan and have been included as elements in IDVR’s 4-year work plan. (Page 233) Title IV

The Division plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV
 

School to Work Transition

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title I

The Commission will revise and update its cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation that outlines the coordination between the two VR agencies and the school system in the provision of Pre-ETS services to students from school to work or higher education. (Page 80) Title I

Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 83-84) Title I

IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high schools participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 238) Title IV

The Division has also improved coordinated activities by having our VR Counselors work collaboratively with local school personnel to develop effective referral and outreach strategies to maximize opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in Pre-ETS activities. These strategies also include opportunities for students who are receiving accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. VR Counselors are attending numerous IEP meetings and are working with districts to develop better process for providing timely invitation to VR Counselors to attend these meetings. (Page 240) Title IV

The agencies agree to:
46. Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
47. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members.
48. IDVR and ICBVI counselors are available to consult with educators concerning pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services for students to assist them toward employment.
49. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will collaborate with the LEAs in their service area to identify a process for the counselors to provide input and participate in the development of the transition services included in IEPs.
50. IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors may attend IEP team meetings for each referred student upon timely invitation by school personnel and the student and/or student’s parent or legal guardian. VR counselors may attend either in person or via video or telephone. The IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors will provide written recommendations, if requested, for use in developing IEPs when unable to attend.
51. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will consult with educators concerning referral of students to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, including pre-employment transition services. Students with blindness or visual impairments should be referred to ICBVI. Students with multiple disabilities may have dual cases with both IDVR and ICBVI to provide rehabilitation services.
52. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will accept referrals for pre-employment transition or vocational rehabilitation services, when appropriate, and will work collaboratively with input from the student’s IEP team, for service provision and/or to develop an IPE. The vocational rehabilitation counselor, student, student’s parent or legal guardian, and members of the student’s IEP team will collaborate to identify required vocational rehabilitation services that will move the student towards their employment goal. (Page 241-242) Title IV

Expected outcomes include increase interagency collaboration, increase the number of students receiving pre-employment transition services or educational transition services that they need, increase student knowledge of agencies and other services, increase families knowledge of agencies and services, and provide more effective Pre-ETS based on student need.
Furthermore the formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree:

1. To cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 243) Title IV

The Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) agrees to:
o Assume the role of lead agency in facilitating interagency planning with LEAs and implementation of educational programs and transition services for students with disabilities from high school to post-high school services.
o Support LEAs in their efforts to write IEPs using an outcome oriented focus and to coordinate transition activities for each IEP eligible student, beginning no later than the IEP before the student turns age 16 years old (earlier if appropriate), and to address future student needs in the areas of post-secondary education, vocational training, employment, and adult living and communication participation, including assistive technology.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI to provide information regarding their services, including their role as an IEP team member to school district personnel, students, and their families.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, to participate as members of IEP teams for students who have been referred to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, or earlier if appropriate.
o Work with IDVR and ICBVI Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors to identify a process for such counselors to provide input and participate in the development of a student’s IEP, including pre-employment transition services, when appropriate.
o Identify appropriate school personnel who, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, will initiate the referral process of students receiving special education services, and students who have a 504 Plan (Rehabilitation Act of 1973), or students with disabilities (e.g., physical, medical, or visual, etc.) who are not eligible for special education services, to IDVR and/or ICBVI for pre-employment transition services and/or vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 244) Title IV

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) and Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agree to:
o Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
o IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members. (Page 244) Title IV

Continue current funding of IDVR School to Work Counselors in conjunction with matching funds from participating school districts. IDVR also ensures that in schools where School to Work Counselors are located, cooperative agreements are developed or continued between the LEA and IDVR to identify each agency’s responsibilities to this partnership. The continuation and development of the IDVR/LEA School to Work Counselor positions are dependent on the receipt of adequate funding from the federal government and/or Idaho state legislature. (Page 245) Title IV

VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired (IESDB Staff), school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14, however they are not eligible to receive Pre-Employment Transition Services until age 15. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed within 90 days of eligibility determination (unless an extension is agreed upon) to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work. (Page 295) Title IV

The formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree to cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 297) Title IV

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) agree:
o To encourage staff to work closely with school district personnel to ensure coordination between education services and vocational rehabilitation services.
o That ICBVI and IDVR counselors will provide training to school district personnel, students and families on all aspects of vocational rehabilitation services, including their roles as IEP team members. (Page 298) Title IV

The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agrees:
o To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 299) Title IV

According to the 2017 CSNA, the most common themes that emerged in the needs of students include:
o Transition services for all youth in Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) seem to be lacking.
o Transition-age youth need more exposure to prior to exiting the school system.
o There needs to be better coordination between the schools and ICBVI regarding the provision of assistive technology.
o There is lack of information regarding ICBVI services and opportunities. (Page 310) Title IV

ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students: 1) School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and, 2) College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of Pre-ETS. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 317) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I

 

Career Pathways

~~The Division will implement a sector strategy and a career pathways model. The career pathways model is currently in development by the Idaho Career &Technical Education and will be implemented upon completion. The Idaho Department of Labor has already established a sector strategy model. The Division will utilize this model to help ensure that counselors are well informed of labor market trends and regional job predictions in order to better match qualified people with disabilities to high quality competitive integrated employment. (Page 74) Title IV

IDVR is currently exploring the expansion of its Career Index Plus utilization to improve planned service connections to Labor Market Information/Career Pathways and better inform customer career choice in the 21st century. The Division will continue to work with WINTAC to further this initiative. (Page 271) Title IV

Recommendations to improve Transition Services include:
o Better coordination between ICBVI and IDVR in contacting schools. There appears to be confusion in school districts across the state.
o Increased cross-training between ICBVI, IESDB and schools.
o More focus on career pathways rather than just job placement. (Page 310) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeships - The Department of Labor is actively working with employers to develop apprenticeships for training dislocated workers. However the apprenticeship development effort includes many partners besides the Department of Labor programs. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. Another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 78) Title IV

ApprenticeshipIdaho, a statewide partnership of the Idaho Department of Labor, Department of Commerce, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Career & Technical Education, and the college’s Workforce Training Centers, is bringing a focus on integrated, rather than siloed, business outreach and assistance, ensuring identification and development of career pathways and industry-recognized credentials as each new Registered Apprenticeship is developed. (Page 93) Title I Idaho’s Workforce Development Council serves as the State Workforce Board under section 101(a). The Council’s membership brings together a well-integrated mix of business and industry, education, labor, community and government representatives to establish the vision and plan for Idaho’s workforce development system. Executive Order No 2017-13 provides for council membership as follows: • 17 positions appointed by the Governor representing industry and nominated by statewide and regional business organizations; • Seven positions appointed by the Governor representing the workforce, including two labor union representatives, two registered apprenticeship program representatives, one representative of a community-based organization for veterans, one representative of a community-based organization for the disabled, and one representative of a community-based organization for out-of-school youth; • Nine positions appointed by the Governor representing government, including representatives from the Department of Labor, State Board of Education, Division of Career-Technical Education, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health and Welfare, Department of Commerce, an elected city official, an elected county official, and a community college representative. • One member from each chamber of the Idaho Legislature, including a member of the Senate appointed by the Senate President Pro Tem, and a member of the House of Representatives appointed by the House Speaker; • The Governor or his designee. (Page 102) Title I Since the original submission of the WIOA Combined State Plan in 2015, Idaho has made significant progress in the effort now called Apprenticeship Idaho. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. In addition to the Idaho Department of Labor, another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 156) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Division Partner-provided services are also accessible to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by Montana State University, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 136) Title I

The state’s EO officer is charged with ensuring that all of the Idaho Department of Labor local offices and American Job Centers are compliant with WIOA 188 and applicable sections of the Americans with Disabilities Act. To minimize duplicate efforts by the state’s one-stop operator and Workforce Development Staff, the EO officer will coordinate the annual AJC assessments and ensure the information is satisfactory for one-stop certification. (Page 136) Title I

Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 237) Title IV

Idaho Department of Labor as an Employment Network: The Idaho Department of Labor (IDOL) has recently become an approved Employment Network. IDVR and IDOL are collaborating to formalize an agreement regarding coordinated service delivery. The agreement will describe the referral process between IDVR and IDOL under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program authorized under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-170, Title 1, Subtitle A, 42 U.S.C. 1320b-19 et seq.) and the revised regulations Social Security promulgated under 20 CFR Part 411 that took effect July 21, 2008. The Agreement will further describe the responsibilities of each agency in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. (Page 237) Title I

IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee for service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several nonprofit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 246) Title IV

In October 2017 IDVR held a statewide in-service. IDVR staff received training in various general sessions including: online resources from Live Better Idaho - a virtual one-stop, a presentation from the national VR employment team (the NET), communication skills training, information on SSA’s Ticket to Work Program and work incentives planning, WIOA core partner cross training with Title II’s Career and Technical Education program (emphasizing career pathways within the trades), and updates on IDVR’s pre-employment transition services. (Page 256) Title IV

There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 46,120. Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016, SSI benefits were received by 21,177 individuals while 6,369 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 60,928 individuals represent 6.1% of all working age Idahoans.
According to internal data, IDVR took applications on 5,570 cases in FFY 2017 including 734 cases where SSDI benefits were verified and 895 cases where SSI benefits were verified. This represents a presumptive eligibility rate of 29.3% at application. The Division anticipates an increase in this rate as Pre-ETS requirements increase the likelihood of the establishment and implementation of an Order of Selection and the subsequent referral of candidates on the waiting list to other partner agencies. (plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV

Priority 4: Offer benefits planning to all customer receiving SSI and/or SSDI entering, during and exiting the IDVR process to include Partnership Plus.
IDVR continues to make progress toward this priority, however more still needs to be done.
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority, continues to see overall increases. Referrals increased 49% in FFY 2016 from FFY 2015, while referrals declined slightly by 5.8% in FFY 2017 from FFY 2016 levels. Idaho has fewer in state resources for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals for the entire state. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale.
A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a more timely manner. (Page 279) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~IDVR will work with employers to provide general and customized technical assistance and support services to businesses and industries including:
• Work-based learning experiences
• Section 503 technical assistance for federal contractors and subcontractors
• Training employees with disabilities
• Promote awareness of disability-related obstacles and stigma reduction
• Linking business with state and federal financial incentives for supporting individuals with disabilities (e.g. Work Opportunity Tax Credit).
• Other customized training, consultation, and technical assistance as allowed by WIOA regulations (Page 247) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Programs under Title IV of WIOA are administered by both the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), as well as the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI). The intake process for both agencies is similar. The intake process typically begins with a referral, in which the applicant may be asked to fill out an application form. The applicant then meets for a face-to-face interview with a counselor. The individual may also need to complete additional assessments to determine eligibility (such as medical evaluations). Data collected during the application process is entered into each agency’s respective MIS (Aware for IDVR and IRIS for ICBVI). Supporting documentation is also collected during this time and may be scanned into the system or filed as appropriate. (Page 97-98) Title IV

The second set of performance measures reflect the extent that veterans are served by the state’s labor exchange as a whole. These veterans may have been served by LVERs, DVOPs or other One-Stop system staff or they may simply have accessed the labor exchange system on their own. These measures are listed below. Again, the first three measures (8-10) refer to all veterans and eligible persons served and the second three measures (11-13) include only disabled veterans served. 8. Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate (VEER) 9. Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate (VERR) 10. Veterans’ Average Earnings (VAE) (Six-Months) 11. Disabled Veterans’ EER (DVEER) 12. Disabled Veterans’ ERR (DVERR) 13. Disabled Veterans’ AE (DVAE) (Six Months) (Page 120) Title I The State invests significant funds to meet this statutory requirement which includes: eligible providers, outreach, service delivery strategies, accessibility and workforce information. Unless granted a waiver, the state’s eligible training provider performance reporting system will continue to receive investments to support eligible training providers and comply with increased regulations. (Page 150) Title I

IDVR has modified and streamlined the quarterly update report to include the current common performance measures and will incorporate the new goals and priorities, based on the recent CSNA, developed in collaboration with the SRC for a more comprehensive product. The SRC will continue to be asked for input on these as well as any additional indicators that might be helpful in the report. The end product of these quarterly status revisions will be a quarterly report to the SRC that is based on SRC WIOA related goals and priorities that includes quarterly updates on WIOA mandatory primary performance indicators. (Page 229) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~A draft notice of rulemaking was presented at the SRC’s May 4, 2017 meeting where members were requested to provide input on three policy changes to comply with WIOA involving:
• Supported Employment
• Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Services to Individuals who are Seeking Employment at Subminimum Wage (Page 228) Title IV

The models are mentioned by SDSU referenced the Customized Employment (CE) Pilot Project and process requirements for Section 511 Subminimum Wage Employment. Customized Employment is incorporated into the Goals and Priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan under Goal 1, Priority 2. The Division has developed the process and policy to meet the requirements of Section 511. (Page 232) Title IV

Prohibition on entering into an arrangement with an entity holding a 14(c) special wage certificate for the purpose of operating a program where people with disabilities are engaged in work at subminimum wage.
The current draft agreement is expected to be finalized sometime in 2018. (Page 244; Page 297-298) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The state’s equal opportunity (EO) officer works with the Idaho Department of Labor EO officer, who acts as the liaison with other units of the department such as the Disability Determinations Service and the Human Rights Commission, as well as external disability support organizations such as the vocational rehabilitation agencies and the Council on Developmental Disabilities, to ensure policies are communicated and to foster these groups as resources for customers with disabilities. (Page 135) Title I

All American Job Centers are equipped with accessible computers built primarily with ADA equipment and software to accommodate a variety of disabilities. Customers with disabilities can come to the centers during office hours and access center programs and information sources. State policy requires all partner programs that provide services at the One-Stop centers do so in a manner that meets requirements of Section 188 affording programmatic and physical access to services. (Page 136) Title I

The Idaho Department of Labor is the service provider and location manager of all comprehensive and affiliate American Job Center locations in Idaho. The Idaho Department of Labor maintains a comprehensive policy clarifying the Department’s responsibility for providing persons with limited English proficiency meaningful access to agency programs and services as required by Executive Order 13166, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. This policy not only includes instructions on reasonable steps to provide meaningful access, it describes potential discriminatory practices, staff training and processes for monitoring and complaints. (Page 137) Title I

Veterans

The JSVG program is administered by the Idaho Department of Labor. This program provides veterans a full range of employment and training assistance through the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) and the Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) program. Both the DVOP and LVER program staff provide services to eligible veterans under Title 38, but their efforts are concentrated, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, on (1) outreach to and on behalf of veterans and (2) providing direct client services to those who have been identified as most in need of intensive employment and training assistance. Program staff, through outreach with employers, develop increased hiring opportunities within the local workforce by making employers aware of the availability and the benefit of hiring veterans. The DVOP staff provide a wide range of workforce services to veterans and other eligible persons with their primary focus on identifying veterans who require or would benefit from individualized career services. Staff also coordinate services through the case management approach, focusing especially on veterans with barriers to employment and with special workforce needs. Through the LVER program, staff is strategically placed in American Job Centers throughout the state to serve as regional representatives, whose primary job is to conduct outreach on behalf of veteran customers, promote job developments with employers and market the Department’s services to employers. These staff are also responsible for ensuring veterans are provided the full range of workforce services in the American Job Centers, facilitating and coordinating services and strategies targeting veterans and leveraging resources of other veteran service and community-based organizations. Program services are accessible by phone or on a walk-in basis through DVOP and LVER staff working at the American Job Centers in the One-Stop system across the state. Staff are cross-trained in each of the state’s One-Stop workforce programs and services. The state also requires veteran program staff to provide veterans’ program training to all One-Stop staff including priority of service to veterans and covered persons. (Page 45) Title I

The VETS program provides two distinct sets of services, which are each measured against specific performance indicators: the Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialists (DVOPs). The LVERs outreach to employers on behalf of veteran jobseekers and ensure that veterans have priority access to all of the services in the One-Stop center. The DVOPs serve only qualified veterans or eligible spouses of qualified veterans who are one or more of the following: disabled veteran, special disabled veteran, homeless, long-term unemployed, a recently released offender, lacking a high school diploma or equivalent, or low-income. The DVOP staff identify and provide primarily intensive case management services directly to those veterans with barriers to employment and special workforce needs. (Page 119) Title I

Idaho covers a large geographic area with limited funding making it unfeasible to station a DVOP in every local office. In order to improve employment outcomes for veterans, the IDOL strategically stations our DVOP’s and LVER throughout the state. In 2015, the agency reorganized its service delivery organization by establishing a regional structure of its local office network. Seven regional offices in Kootenai County, Lewiston, Canyon County, Meridian, Magic Valley, Pocatello and Idaho Falls serve as central coordinators for all department activity within their geographic regions. The remaining offices within each region coordinate workforce activities and report to the regional offices. This reorganization was necessary to deal with a 20-25% reduction in staff at the local American Job Centers. DVOP staff are primarily assigned to local offices with the highest numbers of registered veterans. Another factor considered is whether or not an area has a large educational institution that can translate to large numbers of Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) participants. (Page 334) Title I

IDOL employs a full-time regional Local Veterans Representative (LVER) who works in the largest labor market area in the state: Boise/Meridian/Nampa. There is also a full time DVOP presence in these three offices. In rural areas of the state where fewer veterans reside, IDOL assigns DVOPs on a half-time basis, Idaho has two part time (20 hours a week) DVOPs. In an effort to ensure that all veterans have access to our most knowledgeable resource, a DVOP conducts monthly outreach to rural areas of the state where there is no permanently stationed DVOPs to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBEs). Our DVOPs work closely with the state’s Business Solutions Specialists (BSS). The BSS staff are trained to work with employers in certain high growth industries and to provide job developments, and recruit veterans for employment. Our DVOP staff notify the BSS’s when they have a veteran that is work ready. The BSS reviews the veteran’s resume and case management file to insure appropriate referrals are made to employers. (Page 334-335) Title I

A veteran who enters one of the state’s larger American Job Centers with full-time grant-funded staff receives the same services as a veteran who enters a small center with a half-time DVOP Specialist. If a veteran is in need of more than core services from one of the 15 AJC offices without an assigned DVOP Specialist they are assessed and referred to the nearest DVOP Specialist, if appropriate. An appointment is made during their next rural office visit. During this visit the veteran receives all the services available to veterans in the larger offices. The state’s “shareable” website EPIC was recently enhanced so AJCs without a DVOP Specialist can provide the same information that is provided to veterans in urban areas. This tool is available to all DVOP Specialists as well as managers and other employment staff who serve veterans. All training documents are uploaded to EPIC for all AJC staff to view. (Page 335) Title I

USDOL VETS (United States Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service) instructs states to serve disabled and special disabled Veterans. However, Idaho DVOPs (disabled veteran outreach program) specialists see a significant number of disabled Veterans who fall outside the definition of this SBE (significant barrier to employment.) This population has disabilities that are either waiting for a disability rating by the VA (Veterans Administration) or who sustained a disability after their military service. As a result, Idaho Department of Labor is adding an additional SBE - Disabled. Our DVOPs will contact the Idaho Industrial Commission, including drug and alcohol treatment centers to assist in the outreach effort to this population. We will document this population through self-attestation. (Page 339) Title I

The VR&E National Technical Assistance Guide (TAG) formalized a partnership and process that has been in place in Idaho for years. However, when the TAG was released, the IDOL worked closely with the VA VR&E and our DVET to update our local agreement. The Idaho TAG was finalized and signed in March, 2009. The IDOL’s central point of contact for the VR&E program is the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a half-time position filled by a full-time DVOP. The ISC is out-stationed at the Boise VA Regional Office, but veterans enrolled in the VR&E program are referred to Idaho DVOPs from counselors assigned to Spokane, Seattle, and Salt Lake City. The ISC or assigned DVOP provides Labor Market Information (LMI) as part of the vocational evaluation process. The VA VR&E develops a rehabilitation plan and then approximately 90 days prior to the participant’s expected completion of training or education, the VR&E office completes a Job Ready Assessment and refers the veteran to the IDOL ISC or appropriate DVOP for intensive employment assistance. The VA VR&E office and IDOL jointly monitor the job seeking process to determine when the veteran has entered employment and when the veteran can be considered “rehabilitated.” (Page 340) Title I

Idaho has DVOPs strategically placed in areas near Native American reservations. Outreach activities are conducted at the state’s option and conducted with approval of the tribes. A fulltime DVOP is located minutes away from the Shoshone Bannock reservation in Southeast Idaho and provides outreach and intensive services to the disabled veterans in that area. (Page 341) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Vocational Rehabilitation services in Idaho are provided through two agencies: the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (the Commission). Both agencies serve individuals with disabilities that constitute or result in substantial barriers to employment. For the IDVR, these include, but are not limited to alcohol dependency, mental health disorders, learning disabilities, diabetes, deafness, amputation, and traumatic brain injury. The Commission specifically serves individuals whose primary disability is blindness or visual impairments, including those who may experience co-occurring disabilities. (Page 44) Title I

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Division of Behavioral Health, Adult Mental Health (H&W-Behavioral Health): The IDVR and H&W-Behavioral Health update this agreement annually for the purpose of better serving Idahoans experiencing severe and persistent mental illness. A team approach will be used to ensure that the Idahoans served by this agreement will benefit as to remaining de-institutionalized and successfully integrated into their respective communities from a psychological, psychosocial, and employment perspective. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed not eligible for this program will be referred to the general IDVR counselor. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed ineligible for IDVR services will be referred to other appropriate resources for assistance. A designated VR counselor and staff member are assigned to an H&W Behavioral Health Region to better serve customers. The Department of Health and Welfare provides certifiable non-federal monies for IDVR services per explained in the interagency cooperative agreement. (Page 235-236; Page 249) Title IV

The Division conducts various outreach activities to identify and involve individuals with disabilities from underserved backgrounds. These include but are not limited to:
• Monthly participation in the Amigo Round Table hosted by the Mexican Consulate
• Working with community based mental health programs to identify leads for potential outreach
• Continuing meetings with Boise State University’s Hispanic equivalency recruiter
• Meeting with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare’s bilingual staff as well as ongoing meetings with DHW’s Targeted Service Coordinators to identify potential referrals
• Collaborating with Idaho Youth Ranch to look at ways of better serving individuals who are minorities
• Participation in the multi-partner Refugee Employment Networking and Training group hosted by the Idaho Department of Labor (Page 272-273) Title IV

The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 276) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 53

SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Individual Support Plan Instruction Manual - 01/01/2019

~“The purpose of the Individual Support Plan (ISP) Instruction Manual is to help plan developers complete all of the forms required for an ISP”  Supported Employment is part of the ISP. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2018 Idaho Transition Institute - 11/29/2018

~~The 2018 Idaho Transition Institute serves as a powerful opportunity for school district and charter teams to connect with partnering Idaho agencies and higher education offering transition resources and experiences to students with disabilities. With an array of transition focused experts and leaders on hand, school and community teams will go through a facilitated planning process toward developing an annual roadmap for maximizing transition opportunities and outcomes for the students they serve; while also participating in focused breakout and keynote sessions.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Boise Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~“VA’s Boise Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Idaho. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Field Services Policy Manual - 07/01/2018

~~“Supported Employment–for customers with the most severe disabilities for whom a vocational objective of supported employment has been determined appropriate, the following must be addressed:•A description of time-limited services to be provided by IDVR not to exceed eighteen (18) months in duration, unless under specialcircumstances, the eligible customer and theVRC jointly agree to extend the time to achieve the employment outcome;•A description of an identified source of funding for the extended services needed (long-term support).  If it is not possible to identify the source of such funding, a statement that there is a reasonable expectation that extended services will be available. Extended services are provided by aState agency, a private non-profit organization, employer, or otherappropriate resource, from funds other than IDVR.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Able to Work: Connecting people with disabilities to employment opportunities - 11/03/2017

~~“Your participation in the workforce is in demand. Find out what you need to know before you start a job search. Learn how to plan a successful job search. Discover what you and employers need to know about disabilities and accommodations in the workplace.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Transition From School to Full Adult Life - 01/01/2019

~Session 1: “Possibilities for Employment and Community Living for People with Significant Disabilities”Session 2: “What is New in Terms of Laws and Federal Directives with Regards to Transition?"Session 3: “Connecting with Agencies in Your Community" 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/25/2018

~~" The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with developmental disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2018

~~“Secondary Transition Planning

In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday.  This chapter includes the steps required to complete a Secondary Transition Plan. 

Transition Planning at 16

Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 10/25/2017

~“The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self  advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with development disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

EEOC News: Jacksons Food To Pay $158K To Settle 2nd Disability Discrimination Suit This Year - 12/21/2018

~“Meridian-based Jackson Energy, a division of Jacksons Food Stores, Inc., will pay $158,000 to a former dispatcher and implement other preventative measures to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today. This is the agency’s second disability discrimination settlement with this employer this year.

According to the EEOC’s suit, Jacksons violated federal law when it failed to accommodate an employee recovering from wrist surgery and fired her because of her disability.

The EEOC said that Jacksons ignored Wightman’s requests for an accommodation, such as speech recognition software, that potentially would have allowed her to continue to perform her dispatcher duties, and instead the company fired her when she exhausted her leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) before making a full recovery.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan Resubmission - 10/03/2018

~“Effective October 3, 2018, Idaho became the tenth state to receive Final Approval for the Home and Community Based Services  (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan. CMS’ letter to Idaho can be found under the resources tab to the right in the Statewide Transition Plan link.Moving forward, all HCBS providers will need to follow IDAPA rules, including creating and maintaining policies and procedures, while offering HCB services.Idaho has updated the ongoing monitoring processes to ensure each provider offering HCBS will be reviewed for compliance at least every three years. Idaho will use a variety of program staff and the Division of Licensing and Certification to make sure each HCBS setting quality is reviewed. Additionally, all new providers enrolling with Medicaid through the New Provider Enrollment process will be expected to produce policies and procedures that comply with the IDAPA rules identified in the Medicaid Enhanced Benefits Plan 16.03.10.310-318.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Draft 1915(b) Waiver Application - 10/01/2018

~~“Program Title:Aged and Disabled WaiverC. Waiver Number:ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.0

The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Aged and Disabled (A&D) 1915(c) waiver is to align with the 1915(b) waiver application for the Idaho Medicaid Plus program. Idaho Medicaid Plus is a mandatory managed care program for individuals who are eligible for Medicare Parts A and B and full coverage Medicaid, otherwise known as "dual-eligibles." The purpose of Idaho Medicaid Plus is to offer improved coordination of Medicaid-primary services, including behavioral health, Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), and institutional care. Idaho has offered a voluntary program for dual-eligibles, including A&D waiver beneficiaries, since 2014 under the Medicare Medicaid Coordinated Plan (MMCP). The MMCP is administered by participating Managed Care Entities (MCEs) under a 1915(a)/(c) combination authority.

Idaho Medicaid Plus is a program that will require dual-eligibles who have not enrolled in the MMCP to enroll with a participating MCE that administers Idaho Medicaid Plus. The 1915(b) waiver is being submitted to permit mandatory enrollment in counties in which there are two or more participating MCEs with a phased-in implementation approach. The program will be piloted in Twin Falls county beginning on October1, 2018, to be expanded into additional counties upon successful implementation and meeting performance thresholds.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services IDAPA 16.03.10.320-330 - 03/16/2018

~~“Supported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disability, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.a. Supported employment services rendered under this waiver are not available under a program funded by either the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Documentation must be maintained in the file of each individual receiving this service verifying that the service is not otherwise available or funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

Community Support Services IDAPA 16.03.10.702-706 - 03/16/2018

~~“Community support services provide goods and supports that are medically necessary and/or minimize the Enrollee's need for institutionalization and address the Enrollee's preferences for:Job support to help the Enrollee secure and maintain employment or attain job advancement; Personal support to help the Enrollee maintain health, safety, and basic quality of life; Relationship support to help the Enrollee establish and maintain positive relationships with immediate family members, friends, spouse, or others in order to build a natural support network and community; Emotional support to help the Enrollee learn and practice behaviors consistent with his goals and wishes while minimizing interfering behaviors; Learning support to help the Enrollee learn new skills or improve existing skills that relate to his identified goals; Transportation support to help the Enrollee accomplish his identified goals; Adaptive equipment identified in the Enrollee's plan that meets a medical or accessibility need and promotes his increased independence, and Skilled nursing supports.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

XXXIII. Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (IHCMFP) - 03/16/2018

~~“A.  IDHW will:1. Make all final determinations regarding IHCMFP enrollment; and

B. The Health Plan shall implement and maintain policies and procedures to provide information, choice, and to enroll eligible Enrollees who consent to participate in the IHCMFP upon transition from a Qualified Institution to a Qualified Residence within the community that include:1. Dissemination of information, including program requirements and processes, to eligible Enrollees;2. Processes to update Enrollees’ Individualized Care Plans and complete and submit required referral, consent forms, and documentation to the IDHW IHCMFPCoordinator;3. Processes that ensure sufficient contact between Care Coordinators and Enrollees during the Enrollee’s participation in IHCMFP;4. Collaboration with qualified Transition Managers or a transition management Agency to provide up to seventy-two (72) hours of Transition Management Servicesand up to two thousand dollars ($2,000.00) of Transition Services for each Enrollee participating in IHCMFP; and5. Methods to track each Enrollee’s residency during IHCMFP participation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho §1915(i) State plan - 10/31/2017

~~“Idaho Medicaid furnishes Adult DD 1915(i) HCBS Benefit services in one type of provider owned or controlled residential setting: CFHs. The results of Idaho’s analysis of this residential setting are summarized below, including an overview of existing support for each regulation. The state hasincluded, where applicable, the full IDAPA citations to identify where IDAPA supports the HCBS requirement, in addition to indicating if IDAPA is silent. The state did not identify any IDAPA provision that conflicts with the HCBS requirements. Additionally, the chart includes Idaho’s plan on how to transition these settings into full compliance with the new regulations….

The setting includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive,integrated settings to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,787,065
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.57%
Change from
2018 to 2019
121,908
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
54,417
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.73%
Change from
2018 to 2019
44.64%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
2.23%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.90%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,716,943 1,754,208 1,787,065
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 125,743 117,561 121,908
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 54,948 49,464 54,417
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 868,236 700,555 727,649
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 43.70% 42.08% 44.64%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.40% 78.12% 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.20% 2.80% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.00% 18.40% 18.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.20% 10.80% 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 131,698 125,413 130,411
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 108,446 108,081 110,980
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 217,135 213,909 215,640
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,880 1,431 775
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,198 18,344 24,440
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,027 4,817 4,072
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,438 2,635 2,248
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,993 6,396 6,885
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,289 4,234 11,538

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,118 2,164 2,306
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.10% 7.30% 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 44,432 43,971 43,495

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,409 1,488 1,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,212 3,179 3,186
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 11,431 11,905 11,943
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.30% 12.50% 13.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 3.40% 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 10.00% 0.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.50% 4.10% 4.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 17.70% 16.50% 15.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 422 486 308
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 15 11 8
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 606 586 610
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 2,391 2,344 2,243

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 14,064 11,705 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 31 33 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 25 31 29
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 81.00% 94.00% 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.55 1.87 1.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.00% 27.00% 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,724 1,704 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 66,709 66,856 66,932
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 84 120 107
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 80 115 102

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2020
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,937,040 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,416,493 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $224,026,855 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% N/A N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,230 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,297 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.25 N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.55% 60.81% 62.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.86% 9.48% 9.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.58% 1.57% 1.42%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.43% 90.30% 98.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 18.01% 16.93% 17.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 41.71% 38.19% 50.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 54.03% 59.45% 67.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.70% 21.26% 33.01%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 5 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 5 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 310 224 160
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 310 224 160

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~For example, hypothetically, our Vocational Rehabilitation program is able to put people with autism—who have social communication deficits—into employment options today via a,b, c means. People with autism—who have no/minimal communication and/or disabling behaviors at times—can (in the future) be placed in a “Customized Employment” track. (Page 233) Title IV

IDVR intends to provide a comprehensive array of services to individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, as identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 by expanding Supported Employment services, implementing customized employment services, developing and delivering benefits planning to those individuals who receive Social Security benefits and are in need of this service. The Division is currently involved in a Customized Employment Pilot project. This project will help inform policy and statewide service delivery. (Page 233) Title IV

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. This five day face-to-face training was relevant to all stakeholders and coordinated not only school and VR staff, but talent from a wide array of sources to establish a foundation for the coordinated provision of transition personnel development. (Page 257) Title IV

There are two primary areas where needs are present to establish, develop, or improve CRPs within the state of Idaho:
108. Meeting the need of emerging/novel requirements of WIOA and expanding the statewide capacity of CRPs to deliver these services with fidelity (e.g. Customized Employment, Pre-ETS and similar services to youth, Youth Extended Services).
109. Monitoring and improving Community Rehabilitation Program performance through a collaborative iterative learning process. (Page 261) Title IV

Furthermore, the Division has launched a Customized Employment (CE) pilot project with the aim of increasing the capacity of the state to deliver CE services with fidelity and seeks to expand CE offerings statewide following the conclusion of pilot activities. The Division has engaged with multiple national technical assistance providers on this project including WINTAC, NTACT, and Y-TAC. IDVR’s process also allowed the cross-training of internal VR staff, DEI staff, special educators, and CRP personnel in the CE process. (Page 270) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Once the participating programs were identified, the Combined State Plan was drafted by a working group of core and partner programs. The group consisted of a representative(s) from each agency that administers a core or partner program as follows (in alphabetical order):
• Idaho Commission on Aging - Raul Enriquez, Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC)/SCSEP Program Specialist. Raul represented the Combined Partner program of Senior Community Service Employment Program.
• Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired - Rocio Gil, Counselor; Jeff Weeks, Counselor; and Mike Walsh, Rehabilitation Services Chief. Rocio, Jeff and Mike represented Title IV programs administered by the Commission.
• Idaho Department of Labor - Cheryl Foster, Senior Planner. Cheryl represented all core and partner programs administered by the Department, including Title I-B, Title III, Veterans Employment, and Trade Adjustment Assistance.
• Idaho Division of Professional-Technical Education - Amelia Valasek, State Coordinator for Adult Basic Education and GED Administrator. Amelia served as the State Plan Lead, represented Title II programs, and also provided a link to Carl D. Perkins programs via the Division (the Perkins program did not participate in the Plan, but is a close partner in the workforce development system).
• Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - Teresa Pitt, Planning and Evaluation Manager; and Matt Markve, Program Evaluation Analyst. Teresa and Matt represented Title IV programs administered by the Division. (Page 139) Title I

Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 172) Title I

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. (Page 257) Title IV

Staff recommendation to improve services contained in the CSNA indicated the next focus should be on transition age youth. Sections (o)(3) and (o) (4) of IDVR’s program specific strategies (contained above) further elaborate on how the Division will address equitable access and participation as it relates to this section, including coordination of outreach efforts with combined plan partners at IDOL and DEI.
Funding for the State VR Services Program has been reduced to zero. (Page 277) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Benefits planning and financial literacy are identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan and have been included as elements in IDVR’s 4-year work plan. (Page 233) Title IV

The Division plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV
 

School to Work Transition

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title I

The Commission will revise and update its cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation that outlines the coordination between the two VR agencies and the school system in the provision of Pre-ETS services to students from school to work or higher education. (Page 80) Title I

Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 83-84) Title I

IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high schools participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 238) Title IV

The Division has also improved coordinated activities by having our VR Counselors work collaboratively with local school personnel to develop effective referral and outreach strategies to maximize opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in Pre-ETS activities. These strategies also include opportunities for students who are receiving accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. VR Counselors are attending numerous IEP meetings and are working with districts to develop better process for providing timely invitation to VR Counselors to attend these meetings. (Page 240) Title IV

The agencies agree to:
46. Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
47. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members.
48. IDVR and ICBVI counselors are available to consult with educators concerning pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services for students to assist them toward employment.
49. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will collaborate with the LEAs in their service area to identify a process for the counselors to provide input and participate in the development of the transition services included in IEPs.
50. IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors may attend IEP team meetings for each referred student upon timely invitation by school personnel and the student and/or student’s parent or legal guardian. VR counselors may attend either in person or via video or telephone. The IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors will provide written recommendations, if requested, for use in developing IEPs when unable to attend.
51. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will consult with educators concerning referral of students to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, including pre-employment transition services. Students with blindness or visual impairments should be referred to ICBVI. Students with multiple disabilities may have dual cases with both IDVR and ICBVI to provide rehabilitation services.
52. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will accept referrals for pre-employment transition or vocational rehabilitation services, when appropriate, and will work collaboratively with input from the student’s IEP team, for service provision and/or to develop an IPE. The vocational rehabilitation counselor, student, student’s parent or legal guardian, and members of the student’s IEP team will collaborate to identify required vocational rehabilitation services that will move the student towards their employment goal. (Page 241-242) Title IV

Expected outcomes include increase interagency collaboration, increase the number of students receiving pre-employment transition services or educational transition services that they need, increase student knowledge of agencies and other services, increase families knowledge of agencies and services, and provide more effective Pre-ETS based on student need.
Furthermore the formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree:

1. To cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 243) Title IV

The Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) agrees to:
o Assume the role of lead agency in facilitating interagency planning with LEAs and implementation of educational programs and transition services for students with disabilities from high school to post-high school services.
o Support LEAs in their efforts to write IEPs using an outcome oriented focus and to coordinate transition activities for each IEP eligible student, beginning no later than the IEP before the student turns age 16 years old (earlier if appropriate), and to address future student needs in the areas of post-secondary education, vocational training, employment, and adult living and communication participation, including assistive technology.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI to provide information regarding their services, including their role as an IEP team member to school district personnel, students, and their families.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, to participate as members of IEP teams for students who have been referred to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, or earlier if appropriate.
o Work with IDVR and ICBVI Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors to identify a process for such counselors to provide input and participate in the development of a student’s IEP, including pre-employment transition services, when appropriate.
o Identify appropriate school personnel who, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, will initiate the referral process of students receiving special education services, and students who have a 504 Plan (Rehabilitation Act of 1973), or students with disabilities (e.g., physical, medical, or visual, etc.) who are not eligible for special education services, to IDVR and/or ICBVI for pre-employment transition services and/or vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 244) Title IV

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) and Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agree to:
o Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
o IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members. (Page 244) Title IV

Continue current funding of IDVR School to Work Counselors in conjunction with matching funds from participating school districts. IDVR also ensures that in schools where School to Work Counselors are located, cooperative agreements are developed or continued between the LEA and IDVR to identify each agency’s responsibilities to this partnership. The continuation and development of the IDVR/LEA School to Work Counselor positions are dependent on the receipt of adequate funding from the federal government and/or Idaho state legislature. (Page 245) Title IV

VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired (IESDB Staff), school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14, however they are not eligible to receive Pre-Employment Transition Services until age 15. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed within 90 days of eligibility determination (unless an extension is agreed upon) to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work. (Page 295) Title IV

The formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree to cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 297) Title IV

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) agree:
o To encourage staff to work closely with school district personnel to ensure coordination between education services and vocational rehabilitation services.
o That ICBVI and IDVR counselors will provide training to school district personnel, students and families on all aspects of vocational rehabilitation services, including their roles as IEP team members. (Page 298) Title IV

The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agrees:
o To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 299) Title IV

According to the 2017 CSNA, the most common themes that emerged in the needs of students include:
o Transition services for all youth in Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) seem to be lacking.
o Transition-age youth need more exposure to prior to exiting the school system.
o There needs to be better coordination between the schools and ICBVI regarding the provision of assistive technology.
o There is lack of information regarding ICBVI services and opportunities. (Page 310) Title IV

ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students: 1) School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and, 2) College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of Pre-ETS. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 317) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I

 

Career Pathways

~~The Division will implement a sector strategy and a career pathways model. The career pathways model is currently in development by the Idaho Career &Technical Education and will be implemented upon completion. The Idaho Department of Labor has already established a sector strategy model. The Division will utilize this model to help ensure that counselors are well informed of labor market trends and regional job predictions in order to better match qualified people with disabilities to high quality competitive integrated employment. (Page 74) Title IV

IDVR is currently exploring the expansion of its Career Index Plus utilization to improve planned service connections to Labor Market Information/Career Pathways and better inform customer career choice in the 21st century. The Division will continue to work with WINTAC to further this initiative. (Page 271) Title IV

Recommendations to improve Transition Services include:
o Better coordination between ICBVI and IDVR in contacting schools. There appears to be confusion in school districts across the state.
o Increased cross-training between ICBVI, IESDB and schools.
o More focus on career pathways rather than just job placement. (Page 310) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeships - The Department of Labor is actively working with employers to develop apprenticeships for training dislocated workers. However the apprenticeship development effort includes many partners besides the Department of Labor programs. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. Another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 78) Title IV

ApprenticeshipIdaho, a statewide partnership of the Idaho Department of Labor, Department of Commerce, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Career & Technical Education, and the college’s Workforce Training Centers, is bringing a focus on integrated, rather than siloed, business outreach and assistance, ensuring identification and development of career pathways and industry-recognized credentials as each new Registered Apprenticeship is developed. (Page 93) Title I Idaho’s Workforce Development Council serves as the State Workforce Board under section 101(a). The Council’s membership brings together a well-integrated mix of business and industry, education, labor, community and government representatives to establish the vision and plan for Idaho’s workforce development system. Executive Order No 2017-13 provides for council membership as follows: • 17 positions appointed by the Governor representing industry and nominated by statewide and regional business organizations; • Seven positions appointed by the Governor representing the workforce, including two labor union representatives, two registered apprenticeship program representatives, one representative of a community-based organization for veterans, one representative of a community-based organization for the disabled, and one representative of a community-based organization for out-of-school youth; • Nine positions appointed by the Governor representing government, including representatives from the Department of Labor, State Board of Education, Division of Career-Technical Education, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health and Welfare, Department of Commerce, an elected city official, an elected county official, and a community college representative. • One member from each chamber of the Idaho Legislature, including a member of the Senate appointed by the Senate President Pro Tem, and a member of the House of Representatives appointed by the House Speaker; • The Governor or his designee. (Page 102) Title I Since the original submission of the WIOA Combined State Plan in 2015, Idaho has made significant progress in the effort now called Apprenticeship Idaho. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. In addition to the Idaho Department of Labor, another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 156) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Division Partner-provided services are also accessible to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by Montana State University, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 136) Title I

The state’s EO officer is charged with ensuring that all of the Idaho Department of Labor local offices and American Job Centers are compliant with WIOA 188 and applicable sections of the Americans with Disabilities Act. To minimize duplicate efforts by the state’s one-stop operator and Workforce Development Staff, the EO officer will coordinate the annual AJC assessments and ensure the information is satisfactory for one-stop certification. (Page 136) Title I

Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 237) Title IV

Idaho Department of Labor as an Employment Network: The Idaho Department of Labor (IDOL) has recently become an approved Employment Network. IDVR and IDOL are collaborating to formalize an agreement regarding coordinated service delivery. The agreement will describe the referral process between IDVR and IDOL under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program authorized under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-170, Title 1, Subtitle A, 42 U.S.C. 1320b-19 et seq.) and the revised regulations Social Security promulgated under 20 CFR Part 411 that took effect July 21, 2008. The Agreement will further describe the responsibilities of each agency in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. (Page 237) Title I

IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee for service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several nonprofit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 246) Title IV

In October 2017 IDVR held a statewide in-service. IDVR staff received training in various general sessions including: online resources from Live Better Idaho - a virtual one-stop, a presentation from the national VR employment team (the NET), communication skills training, information on SSA’s Ticket to Work Program and work incentives planning, WIOA core partner cross training with Title II’s Career and Technical Education program (emphasizing career pathways within the trades), and updates on IDVR’s pre-employment transition services. (Page 256) Title IV

There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 46,120. Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016, SSI benefits were received by 21,177 individuals while 6,369 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 60,928 individuals represent 6.1% of all working age Idahoans.
According to internal data, IDVR took applications on 5,570 cases in FFY 2017 including 734 cases where SSDI benefits were verified and 895 cases where SSI benefits were verified. This represents a presumptive eligibility rate of 29.3% at application. The Division anticipates an increase in this rate as Pre-ETS requirements increase the likelihood of the establishment and implementation of an Order of Selection and the subsequent referral of candidates on the waiting list to other partner agencies. (plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV

Priority 4: Offer benefits planning to all customer receiving SSI and/or SSDI entering, during and exiting the IDVR process to include Partnership Plus.
IDVR continues to make progress toward this priority, however more still needs to be done.
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority, continues to see overall increases. Referrals increased 49% in FFY 2016 from FFY 2015, while referrals declined slightly by 5.8% in FFY 2017 from FFY 2016 levels. Idaho has fewer in state resources for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals for the entire state. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale.
A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a more timely manner. (Page 279) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~IDVR will work with employers to provide general and customized technical assistance and support services to businesses and industries including:
• Work-based learning experiences
• Section 503 technical assistance for federal contractors and subcontractors
• Training employees with disabilities
• Promote awareness of disability-related obstacles and stigma reduction
• Linking business with state and federal financial incentives for supporting individuals with disabilities (e.g. Work Opportunity Tax Credit).
• Other customized training, consultation, and technical assistance as allowed by WIOA regulations (Page 247) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Programs under Title IV of WIOA are administered by both the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), as well as the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI). The intake process for both agencies is similar. The intake process typically begins with a referral, in which the applicant may be asked to fill out an application form. The applicant then meets for a face-to-face interview with a counselor. The individual may also need to complete additional assessments to determine eligibility (such as medical evaluations). Data collected during the application process is entered into each agency’s respective MIS (Aware for IDVR and IRIS for ICBVI). Supporting documentation is also collected during this time and may be scanned into the system or filed as appropriate. (Page 97-98) Title IV

The second set of performance measures reflect the extent that veterans are served by the state’s labor exchange as a whole. These veterans may have been served by LVERs, DVOPs or other One-Stop system staff or they may simply have accessed the labor exchange system on their own. These measures are listed below. Again, the first three measures (8-10) refer to all veterans and eligible persons served and the second three measures (11-13) include only disabled veterans served. 8. Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate (VEER) 9. Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate (VERR) 10. Veterans’ Average Earnings (VAE) (Six-Months) 11. Disabled Veterans’ EER (DVEER) 12. Disabled Veterans’ ERR (DVERR) 13. Disabled Veterans’ AE (DVAE) (Six Months) (Page 120) Title I The State invests significant funds to meet this statutory requirement which includes: eligible providers, outreach, service delivery strategies, accessibility and workforce information. Unless granted a waiver, the state’s eligible training provider performance reporting system will continue to receive investments to support eligible training providers and comply with increased regulations. (Page 150) Title I

IDVR has modified and streamlined the quarterly update report to include the current common performance measures and will incorporate the new goals and priorities, based on the recent CSNA, developed in collaboration with the SRC for a more comprehensive product. The SRC will continue to be asked for input on these as well as any additional indicators that might be helpful in the report. The end product of these quarterly status revisions will be a quarterly report to the SRC that is based on SRC WIOA related goals and priorities that includes quarterly updates on WIOA mandatory primary performance indicators. (Page 229) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~A draft notice of rulemaking was presented at the SRC’s May 4, 2017 meeting where members were requested to provide input on three policy changes to comply with WIOA involving:
• Supported Employment
• Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Services to Individuals who are Seeking Employment at Subminimum Wage (Page 228) Title IV

The models are mentioned by SDSU referenced the Customized Employment (CE) Pilot Project and process requirements for Section 511 Subminimum Wage Employment. Customized Employment is incorporated into the Goals and Priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan under Goal 1, Priority 2. The Division has developed the process and policy to meet the requirements of Section 511. (Page 232) Title IV

Prohibition on entering into an arrangement with an entity holding a 14(c) special wage certificate for the purpose of operating a program where people with disabilities are engaged in work at subminimum wage.
The current draft agreement is expected to be finalized sometime in 2018. (Page 244; Page 297-298) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The state’s equal opportunity (EO) officer works with the Idaho Department of Labor EO officer, who acts as the liaison with other units of the department such as the Disability Determinations Service and the Human Rights Commission, as well as external disability support organizations such as the vocational rehabilitation agencies and the Council on Developmental Disabilities, to ensure policies are communicated and to foster these groups as resources for customers with disabilities. (Page 135) Title I

All American Job Centers are equipped with accessible computers built primarily with ADA equipment and software to accommodate a variety of disabilities. Customers with disabilities can come to the centers during office hours and access center programs and information sources. State policy requires all partner programs that provide services at the One-Stop centers do so in a manner that meets requirements of Section 188 affording programmatic and physical access to services. (Page 136) Title I

The Idaho Department of Labor is the service provider and location manager of all comprehensive and affiliate American Job Center locations in Idaho. The Idaho Department of Labor maintains a comprehensive policy clarifying the Department’s responsibility for providing persons with limited English proficiency meaningful access to agency programs and services as required by Executive Order 13166, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. This policy not only includes instructions on reasonable steps to provide meaningful access, it describes potential discriminatory practices, staff training and processes for monitoring and complaints. (Page 137) Title I

Veterans

The JSVG program is administered by the Idaho Department of Labor. This program provides veterans a full range of employment and training assistance through the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) and the Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) program. Both the DVOP and LVER program staff provide services to eligible veterans under Title 38, but their efforts are concentrated, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, on (1) outreach to and on behalf of veterans and (2) providing direct client services to those who have been identified as most in need of intensive employment and training assistance. Program staff, through outreach with employers, develop increased hiring opportunities within the local workforce by making employers aware of the availability and the benefit of hiring veterans. The DVOP staff provide a wide range of workforce services to veterans and other eligible persons with their primary focus on identifying veterans who require or would benefit from individualized career services. Staff also coordinate services through the case management approach, focusing especially on veterans with barriers to employment and with special workforce needs. Through the LVER program, staff is strategically placed in American Job Centers throughout the state to serve as regional representatives, whose primary job is to conduct outreach on behalf of veteran customers, promote job developments with employers and market the Department’s services to employers. These staff are also responsible for ensuring veterans are provided the full range of workforce services in the American Job Centers, facilitating and coordinating services and strategies targeting veterans and leveraging resources of other veteran service and community-based organizations. Program services are accessible by phone or on a walk-in basis through DVOP and LVER staff working at the American Job Centers in the One-Stop system across the state. Staff are cross-trained in each of the state’s One-Stop workforce programs and services. The state also requires veteran program staff to provide veterans’ program training to all One-Stop staff including priority of service to veterans and covered persons. (Page 45) Title I

The VETS program provides two distinct sets of services, which are each measured against specific performance indicators: the Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialists (DVOPs). The LVERs outreach to employers on behalf of veteran jobseekers and ensure that veterans have priority access to all of the services in the One-Stop center. The DVOPs serve only qualified veterans or eligible spouses of qualified veterans who are one or more of the following: disabled veteran, special disabled veteran, homeless, long-term unemployed, a recently released offender, lacking a high school diploma or equivalent, or low-income. The DVOP staff identify and provide primarily intensive case management services directly to those veterans with barriers to employment and special workforce needs. (Page 119) Title I

Idaho covers a large geographic area with limited funding making it unfeasible to station a DVOP in every local office. In order to improve employment outcomes for veterans, the IDOL strategically stations our DVOP’s and LVER throughout the state. In 2015, the agency reorganized its service delivery organization by establishing a regional structure of its local office network. Seven regional offices in Kootenai County, Lewiston, Canyon County, Meridian, Magic Valley, Pocatello and Idaho Falls serve as central coordinators for all department activity within their geographic regions. The remaining offices within each region coordinate workforce activities and report to the regional offices. This reorganization was necessary to deal with a 20-25% reduction in staff at the local American Job Centers. DVOP staff are primarily assigned to local offices with the highest numbers of registered veterans. Another factor considered is whether or not an area has a large educational institution that can translate to large numbers of Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) participants. (Page 334) Title I

IDOL employs a full-time regional Local Veterans Representative (LVER) who works in the largest labor market area in the state: Boise/Meridian/Nampa. There is also a full time DVOP presence in these three offices. In rural areas of the state where fewer veterans reside, IDOL assigns DVOPs on a half-time basis, Idaho has two part time (20 hours a week) DVOPs. In an effort to ensure that all veterans have access to our most knowledgeable resource, a DVOP conducts monthly outreach to rural areas of the state where there is no permanently stationed DVOPs to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBEs). Our DVOPs work closely with the state’s Business Solutions Specialists (BSS). The BSS staff are trained to work with employers in certain high growth industries and to provide job developments, and recruit veterans for employment. Our DVOP staff notify the BSS’s when they have a veteran that is work ready. The BSS reviews the veteran’s resume and case management file to insure appropriate referrals are made to employers. (Page 334-335) Title I

A veteran who enters one of the state’s larger American Job Centers with full-time grant-funded staff receives the same services as a veteran who enters a small center with a half-time DVOP Specialist. If a veteran is in need of more than core services from one of the 15 AJC offices without an assigned DVOP Specialist they are assessed and referred to the nearest DVOP Specialist, if appropriate. An appointment is made during their next rural office visit. During this visit the veteran receives all the services available to veterans in the larger offices. The state’s “shareable” website EPIC was recently enhanced so AJCs without a DVOP Specialist can provide the same information that is provided to veterans in urban areas. This tool is available to all DVOP Specialists as well as managers and other employment staff who serve veterans. All training documents are uploaded to EPIC for all AJC staff to view. (Page 335) Title I

USDOL VETS (United States Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service) instructs states to serve disabled and special disabled Veterans. However, Idaho DVOPs (disabled veteran outreach program) specialists see a significant number of disabled Veterans who fall outside the definition of this SBE (significant barrier to employment.) This population has disabilities that are either waiting for a disability rating by the VA (Veterans Administration) or who sustained a disability after their military service. As a result, Idaho Department of Labor is adding an additional SBE - Disabled. Our DVOPs will contact the Idaho Industrial Commission, including drug and alcohol treatment centers to assist in the outreach effort to this population. We will document this population through self-attestation. (Page 339) Title I

The VR&E National Technical Assistance Guide (TAG) formalized a partnership and process that has been in place in Idaho for years. However, when the TAG was released, the IDOL worked closely with the VA VR&E and our DVET to update our local agreement. The Idaho TAG was finalized and signed in March, 2009. The IDOL’s central point of contact for the VR&E program is the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a half-time position filled by a full-time DVOP. The ISC is out-stationed at the Boise VA Regional Office, but veterans enrolled in the VR&E program are referred to Idaho DVOPs from counselors assigned to Spokane, Seattle, and Salt Lake City. The ISC or assigned DVOP provides Labor Market Information (LMI) as part of the vocational evaluation process. The VA VR&E develops a rehabilitation plan and then approximately 90 days prior to the participant’s expected completion of training or education, the VR&E office completes a Job Ready Assessment and refers the veteran to the IDOL ISC or appropriate DVOP for intensive employment assistance. The VA VR&E office and IDOL jointly monitor the job seeking process to determine when the veteran has entered employment and when the veteran can be considered “rehabilitated.” (Page 340) Title I

Idaho has DVOPs strategically placed in areas near Native American reservations. Outreach activities are conducted at the state’s option and conducted with approval of the tribes. A fulltime DVOP is located minutes away from the Shoshone Bannock reservation in Southeast Idaho and provides outreach and intensive services to the disabled veterans in that area. (Page 341) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Vocational Rehabilitation services in Idaho are provided through two agencies: the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (the Commission). Both agencies serve individuals with disabilities that constitute or result in substantial barriers to employment. For the IDVR, these include, but are not limited to alcohol dependency, mental health disorders, learning disabilities, diabetes, deafness, amputation, and traumatic brain injury. The Commission specifically serves individuals whose primary disability is blindness or visual impairments, including those who may experience co-occurring disabilities. (Page 44) Title I

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Division of Behavioral Health, Adult Mental Health (H&W-Behavioral Health): The IDVR and H&W-Behavioral Health update this agreement annually for the purpose of better serving Idahoans experiencing severe and persistent mental illness. A team approach will be used to ensure that the Idahoans served by this agreement will benefit as to remaining de-institutionalized and successfully integrated into their respective communities from a psychological, psychosocial, and employment perspective. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed not eligible for this program will be referred to the general IDVR counselor. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed ineligible for IDVR services will be referred to other appropriate resources for assistance. A designated VR counselor and staff member are assigned to an H&W Behavioral Health Region to better serve customers. The Department of Health and Welfare provides certifiable non-federal monies for IDVR services per explained in the interagency cooperative agreement. (Page 235-236; Page 249) Title IV

The Division conducts various outreach activities to identify and involve individuals with disabilities from underserved backgrounds. These include but are not limited to:
• Monthly participation in the Amigo Round Table hosted by the Mexican Consulate
• Working with community based mental health programs to identify leads for potential outreach
• Continuing meetings with Boise State University’s Hispanic equivalency recruiter
• Meeting with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare’s bilingual staff as well as ongoing meetings with DHW’s Targeted Service Coordinators to identify potential referrals
• Collaborating with Idaho Youth Ranch to look at ways of better serving individuals who are minorities
• Participation in the multi-partner Refugee Employment Networking and Training group hosted by the Idaho Department of Labor (Page 272-273) Title IV

The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 276) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 53

SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Individual Support Plan Instruction Manual - 01/01/2019

~“The purpose of the Individual Support Plan (ISP) Instruction Manual is to help plan developers complete all of the forms required for an ISP”  Supported Employment is part of the ISP. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2018 Idaho Transition Institute - 11/29/2018

~~The 2018 Idaho Transition Institute serves as a powerful opportunity for school district and charter teams to connect with partnering Idaho agencies and higher education offering transition resources and experiences to students with disabilities. With an array of transition focused experts and leaders on hand, school and community teams will go through a facilitated planning process toward developing an annual roadmap for maximizing transition opportunities and outcomes for the students they serve; while also participating in focused breakout and keynote sessions.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Boise Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~“VA’s Boise Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Idaho. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Field Services Policy Manual - 07/01/2018

~~“Supported Employment–for customers with the most severe disabilities for whom a vocational objective of supported employment has been determined appropriate, the following must be addressed:•A description of time-limited services to be provided by IDVR not to exceed eighteen (18) months in duration, unless under specialcircumstances, the eligible customer and theVRC jointly agree to extend the time to achieve the employment outcome;•A description of an identified source of funding for the extended services needed (long-term support).  If it is not possible to identify the source of such funding, a statement that there is a reasonable expectation that extended services will be available. Extended services are provided by aState agency, a private non-profit organization, employer, or otherappropriate resource, from funds other than IDVR.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Able to Work: Connecting people with disabilities to employment opportunities - 11/03/2017

~~“Your participation in the workforce is in demand. Find out what you need to know before you start a job search. Learn how to plan a successful job search. Discover what you and employers need to know about disabilities and accommodations in the workplace.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Transition From School to Full Adult Life - 01/01/2019

~Session 1: “Possibilities for Employment and Community Living for People with Significant Disabilities”Session 2: “What is New in Terms of Laws and Federal Directives with Regards to Transition?"Session 3: “Connecting with Agencies in Your Community" 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/25/2018

~~" The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with developmental disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2018

~~“Secondary Transition Planning

In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday.  This chapter includes the steps required to complete a Secondary Transition Plan. 

Transition Planning at 16

Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 10/25/2017

~“The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self  advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with development disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
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EEOC News: Jacksons Food To Pay $158K To Settle 2nd Disability Discrimination Suit This Year - 12/21/2018

~“Meridian-based Jackson Energy, a division of Jacksons Food Stores, Inc., will pay $158,000 to a former dispatcher and implement other preventative measures to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today. This is the agency’s second disability discrimination settlement with this employer this year.

According to the EEOC’s suit, Jacksons violated federal law when it failed to accommodate an employee recovering from wrist surgery and fired her because of her disability.

The EEOC said that Jacksons ignored Wightman’s requests for an accommodation, such as speech recognition software, that potentially would have allowed her to continue to perform her dispatcher duties, and instead the company fired her when she exhausted her leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) before making a full recovery.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan Resubmission - 10/03/2018

~“Effective October 3, 2018, Idaho became the tenth state to receive Final Approval for the Home and Community Based Services  (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan. CMS’ letter to Idaho can be found under the resources tab to the right in the Statewide Transition Plan link.Moving forward, all HCBS providers will need to follow IDAPA rules, including creating and maintaining policies and procedures, while offering HCB services.Idaho has updated the ongoing monitoring processes to ensure each provider offering HCBS will be reviewed for compliance at least every three years. Idaho will use a variety of program staff and the Division of Licensing and Certification to make sure each HCBS setting quality is reviewed. Additionally, all new providers enrolling with Medicaid through the New Provider Enrollment process will be expected to produce policies and procedures that comply with the IDAPA rules identified in the Medicaid Enhanced Benefits Plan 16.03.10.310-318.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Draft 1915(b) Waiver Application - 10/01/2018

~~“Program Title:Aged and Disabled WaiverC. Waiver Number:ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.0

The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Aged and Disabled (A&D) 1915(c) waiver is to align with the 1915(b) waiver application for the Idaho Medicaid Plus program. Idaho Medicaid Plus is a mandatory managed care program for individuals who are eligible for Medicare Parts A and B and full coverage Medicaid, otherwise known as "dual-eligibles." The purpose of Idaho Medicaid Plus is to offer improved coordination of Medicaid-primary services, including behavioral health, Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), and institutional care. Idaho has offered a voluntary program for dual-eligibles, including A&D waiver beneficiaries, since 2014 under the Medicare Medicaid Coordinated Plan (MMCP). The MMCP is administered by participating Managed Care Entities (MCEs) under a 1915(a)/(c) combination authority.

Idaho Medicaid Plus is a program that will require dual-eligibles who have not enrolled in the MMCP to enroll with a participating MCE that administers Idaho Medicaid Plus. The 1915(b) waiver is being submitted to permit mandatory enrollment in counties in which there are two or more participating MCEs with a phased-in implementation approach. The program will be piloted in Twin Falls county beginning on October1, 2018, to be expanded into additional counties upon successful implementation and meeting performance thresholds.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services IDAPA 16.03.10.320-330 - 03/16/2018

~~“Supported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disability, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.a. Supported employment services rendered under this waiver are not available under a program funded by either the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Documentation must be maintained in the file of each individual receiving this service verifying that the service is not otherwise available or funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

Community Support Services IDAPA 16.03.10.702-706 - 03/16/2018

~~“Community support services provide goods and supports that are medically necessary and/or minimize the Enrollee's need for institutionalization and address the Enrollee's preferences for:Job support to help the Enrollee secure and maintain employment or attain job advancement; Personal support to help the Enrollee maintain health, safety, and basic quality of life; Relationship support to help the Enrollee establish and maintain positive relationships with immediate family members, friends, spouse, or others in order to build a natural support network and community; Emotional support to help the Enrollee learn and practice behaviors consistent with his goals and wishes while minimizing interfering behaviors; Learning support to help the Enrollee learn new skills or improve existing skills that relate to his identified goals; Transportation support to help the Enrollee accomplish his identified goals; Adaptive equipment identified in the Enrollee's plan that meets a medical or accessibility need and promotes his increased independence, and Skilled nursing supports.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

XXXIII. Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (IHCMFP) - 03/16/2018

~~“A.  IDHW will:1. Make all final determinations regarding IHCMFP enrollment; and

B. The Health Plan shall implement and maintain policies and procedures to provide information, choice, and to enroll eligible Enrollees who consent to participate in the IHCMFP upon transition from a Qualified Institution to a Qualified Residence within the community that include:1. Dissemination of information, including program requirements and processes, to eligible Enrollees;2. Processes to update Enrollees’ Individualized Care Plans and complete and submit required referral, consent forms, and documentation to the IDHW IHCMFPCoordinator;3. Processes that ensure sufficient contact between Care Coordinators and Enrollees during the Enrollee’s participation in IHCMFP;4. Collaboration with qualified Transition Managers or a transition management Agency to provide up to seventy-two (72) hours of Transition Management Servicesand up to two thousand dollars ($2,000.00) of Transition Services for each Enrollee participating in IHCMFP; and5. Methods to track each Enrollee’s residency during IHCMFP participation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho §1915(i) State plan - 10/31/2017

~~“Idaho Medicaid furnishes Adult DD 1915(i) HCBS Benefit services in one type of provider owned or controlled residential setting: CFHs. The results of Idaho’s analysis of this residential setting are summarized below, including an overview of existing support for each regulation. The state hasincluded, where applicable, the full IDAPA citations to identify where IDAPA supports the HCBS requirement, in addition to indicating if IDAPA is silent. The state did not identify any IDAPA provision that conflicts with the HCBS requirements. Additionally, the chart includes Idaho’s plan on how to transition these settings into full compliance with the new regulations….

The setting includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive,integrated settings to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,787,065
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.57%
Change from
2018 to 2019
121,908
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
54,417
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.73%
Change from
2018 to 2019
44.64%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
2.23%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.90%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 1,787,065
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 121,908
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 54,417
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 727,649
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 44.64%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 130,411
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 110,980
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 215,640
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 775
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 24,440
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,072
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,248
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,885
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 11,538

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,306
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 7.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 43,495

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 3,186
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 11,943
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 15.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 308
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 8
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 610
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 2,243

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,263
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 37
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 29
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 78.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.75

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,754
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 66,932
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 107
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 102

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2020
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.42%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 17.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 50.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.01%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 826,034
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,049
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 47,881
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 585,721
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 633,602
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 176
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 606
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 782
AbilityOne wages (products). $296,602
AbilityOne wages (services). $8,126,422

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 160
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 160

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~For example, hypothetically, our Vocational Rehabilitation program is able to put people with autism—who have social communication deficits—into employment options today via a,b, c means. People with autism—who have no/minimal communication and/or disabling behaviors at times—can (in the future) be placed in a “Customized Employment” track. (Page 233) Title IV

IDVR intends to provide a comprehensive array of services to individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, as identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 by expanding Supported Employment services, implementing customized employment services, developing and delivering benefits planning to those individuals who receive Social Security benefits and are in need of this service. The Division is currently involved in a Customized Employment Pilot project. This project will help inform policy and statewide service delivery. (Page 233) Title IV

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. This five day face-to-face training was relevant to all stakeholders and coordinated not only school and VR staff, but talent from a wide array of sources to establish a foundation for the coordinated provision of transition personnel development. (Page 257) Title IV

There are two primary areas where needs are present to establish, develop, or improve CRPs within the state of Idaho:
108. Meeting the need of emerging/novel requirements of WIOA and expanding the statewide capacity of CRPs to deliver these services with fidelity (e.g. Customized Employment, Pre-ETS and similar services to youth, Youth Extended Services).
109. Monitoring and improving Community Rehabilitation Program performance through a collaborative iterative learning process. (Page 261) Title IV

Furthermore, the Division has launched a Customized Employment (CE) pilot project with the aim of increasing the capacity of the state to deliver CE services with fidelity and seeks to expand CE offerings statewide following the conclusion of pilot activities. The Division has engaged with multiple national technical assistance providers on this project including WINTAC, NTACT, and Y-TAC. IDVR’s process also allowed the cross-training of internal VR staff, DEI staff, special educators, and CRP personnel in the CE process. (Page 270) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Once the participating programs were identified, the Combined State Plan was drafted by a working group of core and partner programs. The group consisted of a representative(s) from each agency that administers a core or partner program as follows (in alphabetical order):
• Idaho Commission on Aging - Raul Enriquez, Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC)/SCSEP Program Specialist. Raul represented the Combined Partner program of Senior Community Service Employment Program.
• Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired - Rocio Gil, Counselor; Jeff Weeks, Counselor; and Mike Walsh, Rehabilitation Services Chief. Rocio, Jeff and Mike represented Title IV programs administered by the Commission.
• Idaho Department of Labor - Cheryl Foster, Senior Planner. Cheryl represented all core and partner programs administered by the Department, including Title I-B, Title III, Veterans Employment, and Trade Adjustment Assistance.
• Idaho Division of Professional-Technical Education - Amelia Valasek, State Coordinator for Adult Basic Education and GED Administrator. Amelia served as the State Plan Lead, represented Title II programs, and also provided a link to Carl D. Perkins programs via the Division (the Perkins program did not participate in the Plan, but is a close partner in the workforce development system).
• Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - Teresa Pitt, Planning and Evaluation Manager; and Matt Markve, Program Evaluation Analyst. Teresa and Matt represented Title IV programs administered by the Division. (Page 139) Title I

Youth with disabilities are a priority group for the WIOA Title I Youth program and are also the target group for the state’s current Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. The state has made significant efforts to ensure that services to youth with disabilities are provided in the same capacity as those without disabilities and the needs of this population are properly addressed. WIOA Youth program staff are trained by or partnered with DEI staff for service provision. Regional business specialists and other WIOA partner staff providing services to employers develop key relationships with businesses to provide opportunities for work-based activities for youth with disabilities. Strong partnerships with the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind are utilized to develop and undertake activities as diverse as Ropes courses for teamwork and leadership development to week-long work readiness camps that help these youth achieve success by building their confidence, self-esteem and job seeking skills. (Page 172) Title I

Training opportunities offered by IDVR which are germane to both educators and vocational rehabilitation professionals will be opened to school staff for participation when practicable. For example, in PY 2017, IDVR brought together public educators, DEI staff from the Idaho Department of Labor, VR counselors, CRP staff, central office staff from IDVR, SDE and ICDD, national technical assistance providers for youth, students and people with disabilities for a Customized Employment Pilot training which was applicable to all parties involved. (Page 257) Title IV

Staff recommendation to improve services contained in the CSNA indicated the next focus should be on transition age youth. Sections (o)(3) and (o) (4) of IDVR’s program specific strategies (contained above) further elaborate on how the Division will address equitable access and participation as it relates to this section, including coordination of outreach efforts with combined plan partners at IDOL and DEI.
Funding for the State VR Services Program has been reduced to zero. (Page 277) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Benefits planning and financial literacy are identified in Goal 1, Priority 2 of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan and have been included as elements in IDVR’s 4-year work plan. (Page 233) Title IV

The Division plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV
 

School to Work Transition

~~In addition to leveraging the activities of other core partners described earlier in this section, the Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Corrections. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 80) Title I

The Commission will revise and update its cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation that outlines the coordination between the two VR agencies and the school system in the provision of Pre-ETS services to students from school to work or higher education. (Page 80) Title I

Coordination of service provision will take place at the local area level. Local agreements will be established among One-Stop partners that promote communication and include arrangements for cost sharing to enable the full utilization of external funding sources. The Division will support informational training on programs. The Division will continue to support coordination and co-location with external plan agencies such as the Division of Behavioral Health, the Idaho Department of Correction and our school to work transition partners. (Page 83-84) Title I

IDVR counselors are either located in high schools or travel to those high schools participating in the project. This increases accessibility to the students eligible and/or potentially eligible for IDVR services. Counselors maintain a dedicated caseload of transitioning students and youth with disabilities until case closure. Dedicated school to work counselors collocated in schools creates closer working relationships with school personnel, provides for more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state. (Page 238) Title IV

The Division has also improved coordinated activities by having our VR Counselors work collaboratively with local school personnel to develop effective referral and outreach strategies to maximize opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in Pre-ETS activities. These strategies also include opportunities for students who are receiving accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. VR Counselors are attending numerous IEP meetings and are working with districts to develop better process for providing timely invitation to VR Counselors to attend these meetings. (Page 240) Title IV

The agencies agree to:
46. Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
47. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members.
48. IDVR and ICBVI counselors are available to consult with educators concerning pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services for students to assist them toward employment.
49. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will collaborate with the LEAs in their service area to identify a process for the counselors to provide input and participate in the development of the transition services included in IEPs.
50. IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors may attend IEP team meetings for each referred student upon timely invitation by school personnel and the student and/or student’s parent or legal guardian. VR counselors may attend either in person or via video or telephone. The IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors will provide written recommendations, if requested, for use in developing IEPs when unable to attend.
51. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will consult with educators concerning referral of students to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, including pre-employment transition services. Students with blindness or visual impairments should be referred to ICBVI. Students with multiple disabilities may have dual cases with both IDVR and ICBVI to provide rehabilitation services.
52. IDVR and ICBVI counselors will accept referrals for pre-employment transition or vocational rehabilitation services, when appropriate, and will work collaboratively with input from the student’s IEP team, for service provision and/or to develop an IPE. The vocational rehabilitation counselor, student, student’s parent or legal guardian, and members of the student’s IEP team will collaborate to identify required vocational rehabilitation services that will move the student towards their employment goal. (Page 241-242) Title IV

Expected outcomes include increase interagency collaboration, increase the number of students receiving pre-employment transition services or educational transition services that they need, increase student knowledge of agencies and other services, increase families knowledge of agencies and services, and provide more effective Pre-ETS based on student need.
Furthermore the formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree:

1. To cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 243) Title IV

The Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) agrees to:
o Assume the role of lead agency in facilitating interagency planning with LEAs and implementation of educational programs and transition services for students with disabilities from high school to post-high school services.
o Support LEAs in their efforts to write IEPs using an outcome oriented focus and to coordinate transition activities for each IEP eligible student, beginning no later than the IEP before the student turns age 16 years old (earlier if appropriate), and to address future student needs in the areas of post-secondary education, vocational training, employment, and adult living and communication participation, including assistive technology.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI to provide information regarding their services, including their role as an IEP team member to school district personnel, students, and their families.
o Invite IDVR and/or ICBVI counselors, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, to participate as members of IEP teams for students who have been referred to IDVR and/or ICBVI for rehabilitation services, or earlier if appropriate.
o Work with IDVR and ICBVI Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselors to identify a process for such counselors to provide input and participate in the development of a student’s IEP, including pre-employment transition services, when appropriate.
o Identify appropriate school personnel who, with prior consent from adult students or parents or legal guardians, as appropriate, will initiate the referral process of students receiving special education services, and students who have a 504 Plan (Rehabilitation Act of 1973), or students with disabilities (e.g., physical, medical, or visual, etc.) who are not eligible for special education services, to IDVR and/or ICBVI for pre-employment transition services and/or vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 244) Title IV

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) and Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agree to:
o Encourage staff to work closely with LEAs to ensure coordination between education services, pre-employment transition services, and vocational rehabilitation services.
o IDVR and ICBVI counselors will provide training and information to school district personnel, students and families on pre-employment transition and vocational rehabilitation services, including their role as IEP team members. (Page 244) Title IV

Continue current funding of IDVR School to Work Counselors in conjunction with matching funds from participating school districts. IDVR also ensures that in schools where School to Work Counselors are located, cooperative agreements are developed or continued between the LEA and IDVR to identify each agency’s responsibilities to this partnership. The continuation and development of the IDVR/LEA School to Work Counselor positions are dependent on the receipt of adequate funding from the federal government and/or Idaho state legislature. (Page 245) Title IV

VR counselors regularly meet with the Special Education teachers, teachers of the visually impaired (IESDB Staff), school counselors, school nurses and other personnel involved in school work transition. Students can be referred to ICBVI at age 14, however they are not eligible to receive Pre-Employment Transition Services until age 15. A transition Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed within 90 days of eligibility determination (unless an extension is agreed upon) to assist the student with their successful transition from school to work. (Page 295) Title IV

The formal interagency agreement with the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE), the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) contains a number of provisions designed to facilitate the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs). The agencies agree to cooperate in the development of transitioning students’ Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and any relevant Individual Plan for Employment (IPEs). Development of the IEP is vested with the IEP team, including the student and his/her parent or guardian. Approval of the IPE is vested with the IDVR or ICBVI, the student and his/her parent or guardian. (Page 297) Title IV

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) agree:
o To encourage staff to work closely with school district personnel to ensure coordination between education services and vocational rehabilitation services.
o That ICBVI and IDVR counselors will provide training to school district personnel, students and families on all aspects of vocational rehabilitation services, including their roles as IEP team members. (Page 298) Title IV

The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI) agrees:
o To continue serving school districts across the state. All Idaho school districts are served through each regional office. ICBVI does not maintain any cooperative agreements with school districts specific to the funding of school to work transition counselors. (Page 299) Title IV

According to the 2017 CSNA, the most common themes that emerged in the needs of students include:
o Transition services for all youth in Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) seem to be lacking.
o Transition-age youth need more exposure to prior to exiting the school system.
o There needs to be better coordination between the schools and ICBVI regarding the provision of assistive technology.
o There is lack of information regarding ICBVI services and opportunities. (Page 310) Title IV

ICBVI is committed to working collaboratively with the IESDB, IDVR, and all regional school districts to identify all eligible (or potentially eligible) secondary students in the state of Idaho. Furthermore, ICBVI is committed to reaching out to rural communities in this effort. ICBVI currently has two summer programs that are targeted towards high school students: 1) School to Work Experience Program (SWEP) and, 2) College Days. Curriculum in both of these programs is being reviewed and modified, as appropriate, to ensure they meet all of the criteria of Pre-ETS. Additionally, both of these programs will be expanded to include more participants. (Page 317) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I

 

Career Pathways

~~The Division will implement a sector strategy and a career pathways model. The career pathways model is currently in development by the Idaho Career &Technical Education and will be implemented upon completion. The Idaho Department of Labor has already established a sector strategy model. The Division will utilize this model to help ensure that counselors are well informed of labor market trends and regional job predictions in order to better match qualified people with disabilities to high quality competitive integrated employment. (Page 74) Title IV

IDVR is currently exploring the expansion of its Career Index Plus utilization to improve planned service connections to Labor Market Information/Career Pathways and better inform customer career choice in the 21st century. The Division will continue to work with WINTAC to further this initiative. (Page 271) Title IV

Recommendations to improve Transition Services include:
o Better coordination between ICBVI and IDVR in contacting schools. There appears to be confusion in school districts across the state.
o Increased cross-training between ICBVI, IESDB and schools.
o More focus on career pathways rather than just job placement. (Page 310) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeships - The Department of Labor is actively working with employers to develop apprenticeships for training dislocated workers. However the apprenticeship development effort includes many partners besides the Department of Labor programs. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. Another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 78) Title IV

ApprenticeshipIdaho, a statewide partnership of the Idaho Department of Labor, Department of Commerce, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Idaho Career & Technical Education, and the college’s Workforce Training Centers, is bringing a focus on integrated, rather than siloed, business outreach and assistance, ensuring identification and development of career pathways and industry-recognized credentials as each new Registered Apprenticeship is developed. (Page 93) Title I Idaho’s Workforce Development Council serves as the State Workforce Board under section 101(a). The Council’s membership brings together a well-integrated mix of business and industry, education, labor, community and government representatives to establish the vision and plan for Idaho’s workforce development system. Executive Order No 2017-13 provides for council membership as follows: • 17 positions appointed by the Governor representing industry and nominated by statewide and regional business organizations; • Seven positions appointed by the Governor representing the workforce, including two labor union representatives, two registered apprenticeship program representatives, one representative of a community-based organization for veterans, one representative of a community-based organization for the disabled, and one representative of a community-based organization for out-of-school youth; • Nine positions appointed by the Governor representing government, including representatives from the Department of Labor, State Board of Education, Division of Career-Technical Education, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health and Welfare, Department of Commerce, an elected city official, an elected county official, and a community college representative. • One member from each chamber of the Idaho Legislature, including a member of the Senate appointed by the Senate President Pro Tem, and a member of the House of Representatives appointed by the House Speaker; • The Governor or his designee. (Page 102) Title I Since the original submission of the WIOA Combined State Plan in 2015, Idaho has made significant progress in the effort now called Apprenticeship Idaho. The Office of Registered Apprenticeship is a major partner in this effort. In addition to the Idaho Department of Labor, another major contributor is the Idaho Career & Technical Education which administers the Carl D. Perkins programs. Representatives from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare representing Temporary Assistance to Needy Families and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are also engaged in this effort to develop apprenticeships and create opportunities for their program participants. The Center for Refugees has actively participated in the effort to help New Americans use their existing skills to re-enter the workforce through apprenticeships. (Page 156) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Division Partner-provided services are also accessible to meet specific One-Stop customer needs. Braille, tape or large print of written information are available through the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired or a directory of Sign Language and Oral Interpreters is available through the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Other non-required partner services are also common points of One-Stop referral such as those provided by Montana State University, which operates the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in the state and provides counseling to customers on how employment affects Social Security benefits. (Page 136) Title I

The state’s EO officer is charged with ensuring that all of the Idaho Department of Labor local offices and American Job Centers are compliant with WIOA 188 and applicable sections of the Americans with Disabilities Act. To minimize duplicate efforts by the state’s one-stop operator and Workforce Development Staff, the EO officer will coordinate the annual AJC assessments and ensure the information is satisfactory for one-stop certification. (Page 136) Title I

Partnership Plus: IDVR has established four Partnership Plus agreements with Employment Networks (EN’s) throughout the state. The Partnership Plus agreements facilitate referrals between the IDVR and the EN under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. The Agreement defines the responsibilities of each party in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. This partnership is created for instances where the IDVR has been serving a Ticket Holder under the IDVR CR program and is closing a beneficiary’s case with the beneficiary in employment. This agreement establishes the basis for the coordination of vocational rehabilitation services provided by the IDVR with the provision of ongoing support services, benefits counseling, job retention services, and other types of services and supports provided by the EN to assist beneficiaries in maintaining employment and increasing their earnings. (Page 237) Title IV

Idaho Department of Labor as an Employment Network: The Idaho Department of Labor (IDOL) has recently become an approved Employment Network. IDVR and IDOL are collaborating to formalize an agreement regarding coordinated service delivery. The agreement will describe the referral process between IDVR and IDOL under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program authorized under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (P.L. 106-170, Title 1, Subtitle A, 42 U.S.C. 1320b-19 et seq.) and the revised regulations Social Security promulgated under 20 CFR Part 411 that took effect July 21, 2008. The Agreement will further describe the responsibilities of each agency in working with Social Security beneficiaries (those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits) under the Vocational Rehabilitation Cost Reimbursement (CR) program. (Page 237) Title I

IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers. Services are purchased on a fee for service basis. IDVR does have cooperative agreements with several nonprofit CRPs for the coordination of services provided by Employment Networks for individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are Ticket holders. These cooperative agreements describe the coordination between both agencies. (Page 246) Title IV

In October 2017 IDVR held a statewide in-service. IDVR staff received training in various general sessions including: online resources from Live Better Idaho - a virtual one-stop, a presentation from the national VR employment team (the NET), communication skills training, information on SSA’s Ticket to Work Program and work incentives planning, WIOA core partner cross training with Title II’s Career and Technical Education program (emphasizing career pathways within the trades), and updates on IDVR’s pre-employment transition services. (Page 256) Title IV

There is a strong correlation between those individuals requiring supported employment (SE) services and presumptively eligible participants in the VR program. To approximate the potential need for SE services, the Division will utilize counts of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries.
Individuals who qualify for SSI/SSDI are by law presumptively eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation services. The United States Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016 the number of Idahoans age 18-64 who received SSDI was 46,120. Social Security Administration (SSA) estimates that as of December 2016, SSI benefits were received by 21,177 individuals while 6,369 people concurrently received SSI and SSDI during the same period. These 60,928 individuals represent 6.1% of all working age Idahoans.
According to internal data, IDVR took applications on 5,570 cases in FFY 2017 including 734 cases where SSDI benefits were verified and 895 cases where SSI benefits were verified. This represents a presumptive eligibility rate of 29.3% at application. The Division anticipates an increase in this rate as Pre-ETS requirements increase the likelihood of the establishment and implementation of an Order of Selection and the subsequent referral of candidates on the waiting list to other partner agencies. (plans to work toward a comprehensive benefits planning and financial literacy program in the next two-years which will include the following strategies:
o To develop and make available statewide comprehensive benefits planning to be delivered by qualified providers to all SSI/SSDI customers
o To develop and make available financial literacy curriculum to all customers (Page 271) Title IV

Priority 4: Offer benefits planning to all customer receiving SSI and/or SSDI entering, during and exiting the IDVR process to include Partnership Plus.
IDVR continues to make progress toward this priority, however more still needs to be done.
WIPA referrals, one of IDVR’s benchmarks to meet this priority, continues to see overall increases. Referrals increased 49% in FFY 2016 from FFY 2015, while referrals declined slightly by 5.8% in FFY 2017 from FFY 2016 levels. Idaho has fewer in state resources for benefits planning. Montana State University - Billings is now the lead agency for WIPA referrals for the entire state. In the Treasure Valley, Living Independence Network Corporation (LINC) provides benefits counseling in their designated geographical locale.
A second benchmark, Social Security reimbursements to VR is difficult to compare due to large fluctuations in the dates cost reimbursements are processed. SSA has developed a new processing system and hopes to phase-in all programs soon. This will make for a more legitimate benchmark as SSA will conduct payment requests in a more timely manner. (Page 279) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~IDVR will work with employers to provide general and customized technical assistance and support services to businesses and industries including:
• Work-based learning experiences
• Section 503 technical assistance for federal contractors and subcontractors
• Training employees with disabilities
• Promote awareness of disability-related obstacles and stigma reduction
• Linking business with state and federal financial incentives for supporting individuals with disabilities (e.g. Work Opportunity Tax Credit).
• Other customized training, consultation, and technical assistance as allowed by WIOA regulations (Page 247) Title IV
 

Data Collection

Programs under Title IV of WIOA are administered by both the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), as well as the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI). The intake process for both agencies is similar. The intake process typically begins with a referral, in which the applicant may be asked to fill out an application form. The applicant then meets for a face-to-face interview with a counselor. The individual may also need to complete additional assessments to determine eligibility (such as medical evaluations). Data collected during the application process is entered into each agency’s respective MIS (Aware for IDVR and IRIS for ICBVI). Supporting documentation is also collected during this time and may be scanned into the system or filed as appropriate. (Page 97-98) Title IV

The second set of performance measures reflect the extent that veterans are served by the state’s labor exchange as a whole. These veterans may have been served by LVERs, DVOPs or other One-Stop system staff or they may simply have accessed the labor exchange system on their own. These measures are listed below. Again, the first three measures (8-10) refer to all veterans and eligible persons served and the second three measures (11-13) include only disabled veterans served. 8. Veterans’ Entered Employment Rate (VEER) 9. Veterans’ Employment Retention Rate (VERR) 10. Veterans’ Average Earnings (VAE) (Six-Months) 11. Disabled Veterans’ EER (DVEER) 12. Disabled Veterans’ ERR (DVERR) 13. Disabled Veterans’ AE (DVAE) (Six Months) (Page 120) Title I The State invests significant funds to meet this statutory requirement which includes: eligible providers, outreach, service delivery strategies, accessibility and workforce information. Unless granted a waiver, the state’s eligible training provider performance reporting system will continue to receive investments to support eligible training providers and comply with increased regulations. (Page 150) Title I

IDVR has modified and streamlined the quarterly update report to include the current common performance measures and will incorporate the new goals and priorities, based on the recent CSNA, developed in collaboration with the SRC for a more comprehensive product. The SRC will continue to be asked for input on these as well as any additional indicators that might be helpful in the report. The end product of these quarterly status revisions will be a quarterly report to the SRC that is based on SRC WIOA related goals and priorities that includes quarterly updates on WIOA mandatory primary performance indicators. (Page 229) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~A draft notice of rulemaking was presented at the SRC’s May 4, 2017 meeting where members were requested to provide input on three policy changes to comply with WIOA involving:
• Supported Employment
• Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Services to Individuals who are Seeking Employment at Subminimum Wage (Page 228) Title IV

The models are mentioned by SDSU referenced the Customized Employment (CE) Pilot Project and process requirements for Section 511 Subminimum Wage Employment. Customized Employment is incorporated into the Goals and Priorities section of the VR Services Portion of the State Plan under Goal 1, Priority 2. The Division has developed the process and policy to meet the requirements of Section 511. (Page 232) Title IV

Prohibition on entering into an arrangement with an entity holding a 14(c) special wage certificate for the purpose of operating a program where people with disabilities are engaged in work at subminimum wage.
The current draft agreement is expected to be finalized sometime in 2018. (Page 244; Page 297-298) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The state’s equal opportunity (EO) officer works with the Idaho Department of Labor EO officer, who acts as the liaison with other units of the department such as the Disability Determinations Service and the Human Rights Commission, as well as external disability support organizations such as the vocational rehabilitation agencies and the Council on Developmental Disabilities, to ensure policies are communicated and to foster these groups as resources for customers with disabilities. (Page 135) Title I

All American Job Centers are equipped with accessible computers built primarily with ADA equipment and software to accommodate a variety of disabilities. Customers with disabilities can come to the centers during office hours and access center programs and information sources. State policy requires all partner programs that provide services at the One-Stop centers do so in a manner that meets requirements of Section 188 affording programmatic and physical access to services. (Page 136) Title I

The Idaho Department of Labor is the service provider and location manager of all comprehensive and affiliate American Job Center locations in Idaho. The Idaho Department of Labor maintains a comprehensive policy clarifying the Department’s responsibility for providing persons with limited English proficiency meaningful access to agency programs and services as required by Executive Order 13166, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. This policy not only includes instructions on reasonable steps to provide meaningful access, it describes potential discriminatory practices, staff training and processes for monitoring and complaints. (Page 137) Title I

Veterans

The JSVG program is administered by the Idaho Department of Labor. This program provides veterans a full range of employment and training assistance through the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) and the Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) program. Both the DVOP and LVER program staff provide services to eligible veterans under Title 38, but their efforts are concentrated, according to their respective roles and responsibilities, on (1) outreach to and on behalf of veterans and (2) providing direct client services to those who have been identified as most in need of intensive employment and training assistance. Program staff, through outreach with employers, develop increased hiring opportunities within the local workforce by making employers aware of the availability and the benefit of hiring veterans. The DVOP staff provide a wide range of workforce services to veterans and other eligible persons with their primary focus on identifying veterans who require or would benefit from individualized career services. Staff also coordinate services through the case management approach, focusing especially on veterans with barriers to employment and with special workforce needs. Through the LVER program, staff is strategically placed in American Job Centers throughout the state to serve as regional representatives, whose primary job is to conduct outreach on behalf of veteran customers, promote job developments with employers and market the Department’s services to employers. These staff are also responsible for ensuring veterans are provided the full range of workforce services in the American Job Centers, facilitating and coordinating services and strategies targeting veterans and leveraging resources of other veteran service and community-based organizations. Program services are accessible by phone or on a walk-in basis through DVOP and LVER staff working at the American Job Centers in the One-Stop system across the state. Staff are cross-trained in each of the state’s One-Stop workforce programs and services. The state also requires veteran program staff to provide veterans’ program training to all One-Stop staff including priority of service to veterans and covered persons. (Page 45) Title I

The VETS program provides two distinct sets of services, which are each measured against specific performance indicators: the Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialists (DVOPs). The LVERs outreach to employers on behalf of veteran jobseekers and ensure that veterans have priority access to all of the services in the One-Stop center. The DVOPs serve only qualified veterans or eligible spouses of qualified veterans who are one or more of the following: disabled veteran, special disabled veteran, homeless, long-term unemployed, a recently released offender, lacking a high school diploma or equivalent, or low-income. The DVOP staff identify and provide primarily intensive case management services directly to those veterans with barriers to employment and special workforce needs. (Page 119) Title I

Idaho covers a large geographic area with limited funding making it unfeasible to station a DVOP in every local office. In order to improve employment outcomes for veterans, the IDOL strategically stations our DVOP’s and LVER throughout the state. In 2015, the agency reorganized its service delivery organization by establishing a regional structure of its local office network. Seven regional offices in Kootenai County, Lewiston, Canyon County, Meridian, Magic Valley, Pocatello and Idaho Falls serve as central coordinators for all department activity within their geographic regions. The remaining offices within each region coordinate workforce activities and report to the regional offices. This reorganization was necessary to deal with a 20-25% reduction in staff at the local American Job Centers. DVOP staff are primarily assigned to local offices with the highest numbers of registered veterans. Another factor considered is whether or not an area has a large educational institution that can translate to large numbers of Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) participants. (Page 334) Title I

IDOL employs a full-time regional Local Veterans Representative (LVER) who works in the largest labor market area in the state: Boise/Meridian/Nampa. There is also a full time DVOP presence in these three offices. In rural areas of the state where fewer veterans reside, IDOL assigns DVOPs on a half-time basis, Idaho has two part time (20 hours a week) DVOPs. In an effort to ensure that all veterans have access to our most knowledgeable resource, a DVOP conducts monthly outreach to rural areas of the state where there is no permanently stationed DVOPs to provide intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBEs). Our DVOPs work closely with the state’s Business Solutions Specialists (BSS). The BSS staff are trained to work with employers in certain high growth industries and to provide job developments, and recruit veterans for employment. Our DVOP staff notify the BSS’s when they have a veteran that is work ready. The BSS reviews the veteran’s resume and case management file to insure appropriate referrals are made to employers. (Page 334-335) Title I

A veteran who enters one of the state’s larger American Job Centers with full-time grant-funded staff receives the same services as a veteran who enters a small center with a half-time DVOP Specialist. If a veteran is in need of more than core services from one of the 15 AJC offices without an assigned DVOP Specialist they are assessed and referred to the nearest DVOP Specialist, if appropriate. An appointment is made during their next rural office visit. During this visit the veteran receives all the services available to veterans in the larger offices. The state’s “shareable” website EPIC was recently enhanced so AJCs without a DVOP Specialist can provide the same information that is provided to veterans in urban areas. This tool is available to all DVOP Specialists as well as managers and other employment staff who serve veterans. All training documents are uploaded to EPIC for all AJC staff to view. (Page 335) Title I

USDOL VETS (United States Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service) instructs states to serve disabled and special disabled Veterans. However, Idaho DVOPs (disabled veteran outreach program) specialists see a significant number of disabled Veterans who fall outside the definition of this SBE (significant barrier to employment.) This population has disabilities that are either waiting for a disability rating by the VA (Veterans Administration) or who sustained a disability after their military service. As a result, Idaho Department of Labor is adding an additional SBE - Disabled. Our DVOPs will contact the Idaho Industrial Commission, including drug and alcohol treatment centers to assist in the outreach effort to this population. We will document this population through self-attestation. (Page 339) Title I

The VR&E National Technical Assistance Guide (TAG) formalized a partnership and process that has been in place in Idaho for years. However, when the TAG was released, the IDOL worked closely with the VA VR&E and our DVET to update our local agreement. The Idaho TAG was finalized and signed in March, 2009. The IDOL’s central point of contact for the VR&E program is the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a half-time position filled by a full-time DVOP. The ISC is out-stationed at the Boise VA Regional Office, but veterans enrolled in the VR&E program are referred to Idaho DVOPs from counselors assigned to Spokane, Seattle, and Salt Lake City. The ISC or assigned DVOP provides Labor Market Information (LMI) as part of the vocational evaluation process. The VA VR&E develops a rehabilitation plan and then approximately 90 days prior to the participant’s expected completion of training or education, the VR&E office completes a Job Ready Assessment and refers the veteran to the IDOL ISC or appropriate DVOP for intensive employment assistance. The VA VR&E office and IDOL jointly monitor the job seeking process to determine when the veteran has entered employment and when the veteran can be considered “rehabilitated.” (Page 340) Title I

Idaho has DVOPs strategically placed in areas near Native American reservations. Outreach activities are conducted at the state’s option and conducted with approval of the tribes. A fulltime DVOP is located minutes away from the Shoshone Bannock reservation in Southeast Idaho and provides outreach and intensive services to the disabled veterans in that area. (Page 341) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Vocational Rehabilitation services in Idaho are provided through two agencies: the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), and the Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (the Commission). Both agencies serve individuals with disabilities that constitute or result in substantial barriers to employment. For the IDVR, these include, but are not limited to alcohol dependency, mental health disorders, learning disabilities, diabetes, deafness, amputation, and traumatic brain injury. The Commission specifically serves individuals whose primary disability is blindness or visual impairments, including those who may experience co-occurring disabilities. (Page 44) Title I

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Division of Behavioral Health, Adult Mental Health (H&W-Behavioral Health): The IDVR and H&W-Behavioral Health update this agreement annually for the purpose of better serving Idahoans experiencing severe and persistent mental illness. A team approach will be used to ensure that the Idahoans served by this agreement will benefit as to remaining de-institutionalized and successfully integrated into their respective communities from a psychological, psychosocial, and employment perspective. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed not eligible for this program will be referred to the general IDVR counselor. Those customers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed ineligible for IDVR services will be referred to other appropriate resources for assistance. A designated VR counselor and staff member are assigned to an H&W Behavioral Health Region to better serve customers. The Department of Health and Welfare provides certifiable non-federal monies for IDVR services per explained in the interagency cooperative agreement. (Page 235-236; Page 249) Title IV

The Division conducts various outreach activities to identify and involve individuals with disabilities from underserved backgrounds. These include but are not limited to:
• Monthly participation in the Amigo Round Table hosted by the Mexican Consulate
• Working with community based mental health programs to identify leads for potential outreach
• Continuing meetings with Boise State University’s Hispanic equivalency recruiter
• Meeting with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare’s bilingual staff as well as ongoing meetings with DHW’s Targeted Service Coordinators to identify potential referrals
• Collaborating with Idaho Youth Ranch to look at ways of better serving individuals who are minorities
• Participation in the multi-partner Refugee Employment Networking and Training group hosted by the Idaho Department of Labor (Page 272-273) Title IV

The Division will coordinate activities with mandatory One-Stop partners by sharing program contact information, eligibility criteria, and training on program services and mission. The Division will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Centers for Independent Living, and the Idaho Department of Correction. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 276) Title IV

The Commission will maximize services to individuals with disabilities through increased collaboration and integrated service delivery with various partners in One-Stop centers. Comprehensive information and training will be provided to outside organizations such as, the Department of Mental Health and Welfare’s Division of Behavioral Health, School to Work Transition, American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services, and Centers for Independent Living. Participants will be encouraged to co-enroll in applicable services at the local One-Stop to ensure participants can benefit from the full range of services available to them. (Page 318) Title I
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

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SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 1330 Relating to Extended Employment Services; Amending Title 33, Idaho Code, By the Addition of a New Chapter 62, Title 33, Idaho Code, To Define Terms, To Establish an Extended Employment Services Program, To Provide Eligibility Requirements and To - 03/26/2020

“33-6202. PROGRAM ESTABLISHED. (1) There is hereby established in the board an extended employment services (EES) program for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for program participants. The program shall be administered by the division. Extended employment services offered under the program are separate and apart from any federal program but may be collaborative with and supportive of federal programs. Administrative costs charged to the EES program shall be limited, subject to federal indirect cost rate matching requirements, and subject to audit and review.

(2) Program services shall be:

(a) Provided when eligible individuals do not have access to comparable services or have fully utilized comparable services for which they are eligible; and

(b) Separate and apart from and delivered subsequent to vocational rehabilitation services as defined in 29 U.S.C. 705(40), provided by the division.

33-6203. ELIGIBILITY. (1) A person is eligible to participate in the program if the person::

(a) Has a disability that constitutes a barrier to maintaining paid employment without long-term vocational support…”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Idaho House Bill 41 – Individuals with Disabilities/ ABLE Accounts - 07/01/2017

~~“INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES – Adds to existing law to provide that accounts established under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act shall be disregarded when determining an applicant’s eligibility for certain programs or grants and to provide for certain assistance subject to appropriation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Idaho Senate Bill 1268 “Relating to the Council on Developmental Disabilities; Amending Section 267-6704, Idaho Code, To Revise Provisions Regarding Council Membership and to Make Technical Corrections” - 07/01/2016

“67-6704.COMPOSITION.(1) The council shall consist of twenty-three 23) members to be appointed by the governor, at least sixty percent (60%)of whom shall be individuals with developmental disabilities, parents or Guardians of children with developmental disabilities, or immediate relatives or guardians of adults with mentally impairing developmental disabilities who cannot advocate for themselves. These members shall not represent any other category of membership. (2) At least five (5) of the members shall Be persons with a developmental disability, and at least seven (7) of the members shall be parents or guardians of children with a developmental disability”

Systems
  • Other

Idaho HB 476 - 03/18/2014

“Idaho Code 56-255 (3) (e) (ii) describes Medicaid services for people with developmental disabilities. The total amount of Medicaid developmental disability services a person can receive is limited by an individual budget amount, determined by a formula based on individual assessments. In 2011, H 260 added language to this Section which limited individual budget modifications to only those services needed to protect the health or safety of the person. One unintended consequence of this change was that it prohibited budget modifications that would allow the person to obtain or maintain employment. Medicaid can pay for Community Supported Employment (CSE) services or specialized training and support for a person with a developmental disability in a job setting. The effect of this limitation was to reduce the number of people getting on-the-job training and support, from 275 participants in 2010, to 182 participants in 2013. This bill would allow people with developmental disabilities to modify their individual budgets by adding Community Supported Employment services to their plan, when these services are needed to obtain or maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Veterans Services - 09/27/2019

~~“More than 130,000 Idahoans are veterans of the Armed Forces. If you are a veteran, you have earned benefits for yourself and potentially for your family, but you must apply to receive these benefits. More information about veterans benefits available to you can be found by accessing the web-link,"

Systems
  • Other

Resources for Individuals with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~“This is a listing of SILC resources that individuals with disabilities may find helpful. These are suggestions only. The SILC is not responsible for their content or the services that they provide. This list is not all inclusive”One category of resources is for employment 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Services – DD Waiver - 01/17/2019

~“Service DescriptionSupported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities, for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disabilities, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Transitioning from School to Employment - 01/03/2019

~“Young adults with disabilities who are getting ready to move on from school to employment may be eligible for several vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

VR counselors work with you, your parents and/or the school district to develop a coordinated transition plan. This includes your school history, interests, employment goals and your future needs for training.

Pre-employment transition services provide opportunities for students with disabilities to learn through work and education. These services are coordinated by a VR counselor. For more information, see the Pre-Employment Transition Services page at Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Individual Support Plan Instruction Manual - 01/01/2019

~“The purpose of the Individual Support Plan (ISP) Instruction Manual is to help plan developers complete all of the forms required for an ISP”  Supported Employment is part of the ISP. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

2018 Idaho Transition Institute - 11/29/2018

~~The 2018 Idaho Transition Institute serves as a powerful opportunity for school district and charter teams to connect with partnering Idaho agencies and higher education offering transition resources and experiences to students with disabilities. With an array of transition focused experts and leaders on hand, school and community teams will go through a facilitated planning process toward developing an annual roadmap for maximizing transition opportunities and outcomes for the students they serve; while also participating in focused breakout and keynote sessions.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Services Offered by the Boise Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~“VA’s Boise Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Idaho. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Field Services Policy Manual - 07/01/2018

~~“Supported Employment–for customers with the most severe disabilities for whom a vocational objective of supported employment has been determined appropriate, the following must be addressed:•A description of time-limited services to be provided by IDVR not to exceed eighteen (18) months in duration, unless under specialcircumstances, the eligible customer and theVRC jointly agree to extend the time to achieve the employment outcome;•A description of an identified source of funding for the extended services needed (long-term support).  If it is not possible to identify the source of such funding, a statement that there is a reasonable expectation that extended services will be available. Extended services are provided by aState agency, a private non-profit organization, employer, or otherappropriate resource, from funds other than IDVR.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Able to Work: Connecting people with disabilities to employment opportunities - 11/03/2017

~~“Your participation in the workforce is in demand. Find out what you need to know before you start a job search. Learn how to plan a successful job search. Discover what you and employers need to know about disabilities and accommodations in the workplace.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation “Field Services Policy Manual “ - 08/11/2016

A field policy manual for all aspects of operation of Idaho’s Vocational Rehabilitation Department “The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) program assists eligible persons with disabilities to prepare for and achieve an employment outcome. “Employment outcome” means entering or retaining full-time, or if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent possible.… Competitive employment is work performed in the integrated labor market in which the customer is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and benefits paid for the same or similar work performed by customers who do not have a disability.” Approved 8/11/2016 Effective 7/1/2017

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Partners in Policymaking 2016

Idaho Partners in Policymaking is an innovative leadership development program for adults with developmental disabilities and parents of children with disabilities. Partners receive information, training, resources, and skill building so they may have the best possible life experiences for themselves and for their children. Partners in Policymaking was created in 1986 by Colleen Wieck, Executive Director of the Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities. The program was developed specifically to teach people with disabilities and families of young children with disabilities to: Work on long-term change. Become active partners with policymakers who will shape policies that impact people with disabilities and families. Understand possibilities and how to create them.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Consortium for Idahoans with Disabilities

The mission of CID is “to protect, promote and advance the rights and interests of people with disabilities of all ages in Idaho in a manner consistent with the following principles:    1. CID will promote and protect the rights of people with disabilities to meaningful personal choice and self determination.    2. CID will promote the right to independence and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.    3. CID will promote the right to inclusive, adapted, accessible services, residences, education, health care and employment for people with disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho State Rehabilitation Council

“Working on behalf of Idahoans with disabilities, the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council endeavors to provide consumers, service providers and others the opportunity to participate in constructive dialogue and public input to continually improve the quality of Vocational Rehabilitation services to residents of Idaho. The Idaho State Rehabilitation Council monitors the policies and practices of the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Council can make recommendations to IDVR about eligibility, the scope and effectiveness of services provided and functions performed that affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to achieve rehabilitation goals.   The Council prepares and submits an annual report on the status of Vocational Rehabilitation programs in Idaho, and makes that report available to the public.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Idaho Cooperative Services Agreement: DoE, VR & Blind and Visually Impaired

“This Cooperative Services Agreement has been developed with multiple purposes in mind. First, this agreement is intended to provide a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary to post-school activities. Beyond that, the information contained in this agreement serves to provide guidance to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). The Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI), and the Idaho State Department of Education (SDE) regarding roles and responsibilities around issues related to transition.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Disability Employment Initiative Round 7 - 09/14/2016

State of Idaho $2,500,000 Grantees of this year’s awards will use the funds to: •Improve employment outcomes and increase the number of individuals with disabilities who earn credentials. •Provide more and diversified job-driven training opportunities. •Facilitate academic and employment transition among youth. •Incorporate flexible approaches to designing and providing training and supportive services, including customized employment strategies to help jobseekers with significant disabilities. •Build effective community partnerships and collaborations across multiple service delivery systems and the effective blending and braiding of resources. •Promote more active engagement with the business sector.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Idaho Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2013

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2013, Idaho was awarded a Round 4 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. This will end in 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Idaho Money Follows the Person

“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Demonstration designed to help states try new ways of delivering Medicaid services. The Demonstration is designed to help people to move, also called transition, from an institution into home- and community-based living settings, such as a home or an apartment. In Idaho, the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration is known as Idaho Home Choice.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Conducting an IEP Meeting - 04/30/2019

~~This document gives guidance in how to prepare and conduct IEP meetings

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Tools for Life - 03/04/2019

~~“Tools for Life Fairs is a secondary transition conference for students with disabilities, families, and secondary transition professionals. The event is presented as a typical professional conference with national keynote speakers and breakout sessions.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Transition From School to Full Adult Life - 01/01/2019

~Session 1: “Possibilities for Employment and Community Living for People with Significant Disabilities”Session 2: “What is New in Terms of Laws and Federal Directives with Regards to Transition?"Session 3: “Connecting with Agencies in Your Community" 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services: Training Conference on Disabilities and Mental Health - 10/25/2018

~~" The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with developmental disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

“Idaho IEP Guidance Handbook” State Department of Education - 08/01/2018

~~“Secondary Transition Planning

In order to best meet IDEA and to prepare our students for post-secondary education, training, employment and independent living, transition plans must be in place before a student’s 16th birthday.  This chapter includes the steps required to complete a Secondary Transition Plan. 

Transition Planning at 16

Beginning when the child is age 16 (or younger, if appropriate), the IEP must state what transition services are needed to help the child to prepare for leaving school.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Idaho Partnerships Conference on Human Services - 10/25/2017

~“The Western Partnerships Conference on Human Services provides quality disability and mental health training to human service professionals, teachers, counselors, parents, self  advocates and community members who serve and support individuals with development disabilities and mental illness.Training sessions provide the most innovative, cutting edge techniques and information in the disability services field to our attendees. Speaker presentations will offer new ideas, insights and strategies to inspire and challenge our audience. Our sessions are designed to empower attendees to put into practice what they learn, interact with each other and find inspiration. The conference provides an exciting forum for the exchange of practical knowledge and new strategies.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ID Department of Labor: Job Hunting Guide for People with Disabilities

“This book can help Idahoans with disabilities: understand their strengths and knowledge concerning work, organize their job search, Identify potential work areas, prepare for job interview questions, understand their rights and protection under the ADA, and locate agencies and governmental programs to assist them. This book can help Idaho employers: ensure equality of opportunity for individuals with disabilities, understand the rights and protections granted to individuals with disabilities under the ADA, and understand and be reassured that individuals with disabilities are capable workers."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Idaho "Able to Work" Project

This portal of employment information for employment seekers, business, and service providers seeks to promote more and better employment opportunities for people with disabilities in Idaho.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

EEOC News: Jacksons Food To Pay $158K To Settle 2nd Disability Discrimination Suit This Year - 12/21/2018

~“Meridian-based Jackson Energy, a division of Jacksons Food Stores, Inc., will pay $158,000 to a former dispatcher and implement other preventative measures to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today. This is the agency’s second disability discrimination settlement with this employer this year.

According to the EEOC’s suit, Jacksons violated federal law when it failed to accommodate an employee recovering from wrist surgery and fired her because of her disability.

The EEOC said that Jacksons ignored Wightman’s requests for an accommodation, such as speech recognition software, that potentially would have allowed her to continue to perform her dispatcher duties, and instead the company fired her when she exhausted her leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) before making a full recovery.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

2019 Division of Medicaid Strategic Plan and Annual Key Initiatives - 06/08/2019

~~“The Division of Medicaid has identified three key objectives to help meet the Department’s goals and increase the self-sufficiency of individuals, improve the overall health of Idahoans, and enhance Idaho’s healthcare delivery system. These objectives are:•Objective #1-Shift reimbursement from volume to value.•Objective #2-Rationally implement federal and state initiatives.•Objective #3-Maintain operational excellence with an eye toward continual improvements” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.1076.R06.04 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Aged and Disabled Waiver B. Waiver Number: ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.04C.This amendment provides for the addition of Transition Service benefits to the A&D Waiver. This transition aids in the sustainability of the Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person (IHCMFP) Demonstration grant into waiver and state plan services. The addition of Transition Services to this waiver requires updates to Appendices C, I, and J” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Request for an Amendment to a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Amendment Number: ID.0076.R06.02 - 01/01/2019

~“Program Title: Idaho Developmental Disabilities Waiver (renewal)B. Waiver Number: ID.0076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.0076.90.R3B

The purposes of this amendment to Idaho’s Developmental Disabilities Waiver are as follows: 1. To add transition services to the services furnished under this waiver (Appendix C-1-a, C-1 Service Specification / C-3 provider Specifications for Service) for both traditional and participant-directed community support services; 2. To describe the method used to establish the benefit limit for transition services (Appendix I-2-a); and 3. To revise the Composite Overview and Demonstration of Cost-Neutrality Formula (Appendix J-1) and the Estimate of Factor D tables for Waiver Years 1-5 (Appendix J-2-d) to reflect the addition of transition services as the standalone “Transition Service” and transition expenses as a portion of "Community Support Services (Participant Direction)" for WY2 – WY5”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho State Transition Plan Resubmission - 10/03/2018

~“Effective October 3, 2018, Idaho became the tenth state to receive Final Approval for the Home and Community Based Services  (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan. CMS’ letter to Idaho can be found under the resources tab to the right in the Statewide Transition Plan link.Moving forward, all HCBS providers will need to follow IDAPA rules, including creating and maintaining policies and procedures, while offering HCB services.Idaho has updated the ongoing monitoring processes to ensure each provider offering HCBS will be reviewed for compliance at least every three years. Idaho will use a variety of program staff and the Division of Licensing and Certification to make sure each HCBS setting quality is reviewed. Additionally, all new providers enrolling with Medicaid through the New Provider Enrollment process will be expected to produce policies and procedures that comply with the IDAPA rules identified in the Medicaid Enhanced Benefits Plan 16.03.10.310-318.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Draft 1915(b) Waiver Application - 10/01/2018

~~“Program Title:Aged and Disabled WaiverC. Waiver Number:ID.1076Original Base Waiver Number: ID.1076.90.R3A.0

The purpose of this amendment to Idaho's Aged and Disabled (A&D) 1915(c) waiver is to align with the 1915(b) waiver application for the Idaho Medicaid Plus program. Idaho Medicaid Plus is a mandatory managed care program for individuals who are eligible for Medicare Parts A and B and full coverage Medicaid, otherwise known as "dual-eligibles." The purpose of Idaho Medicaid Plus is to offer improved coordination of Medicaid-primary services, including behavioral health, Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), and institutional care. Idaho has offered a voluntary program for dual-eligibles, including A&D waiver beneficiaries, since 2014 under the Medicare Medicaid Coordinated Plan (MMCP). The MMCP is administered by participating Managed Care Entities (MCEs) under a 1915(a)/(c) combination authority.

Idaho Medicaid Plus is a program that will require dual-eligibles who have not enrolled in the MMCP to enroll with a participating MCE that administers Idaho Medicaid Plus. The 1915(b) waiver is being submitted to permit mandatory enrollment in counties in which there are two or more participating MCEs with a phased-in implementation approach. The program will be piloted in Twin Falls county beginning on October1, 2018, to be expanded into additional counties upon successful implementation and meeting performance thresholds.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Services IDAPA 16.03.10.320-330 - 03/16/2018

~~“Supported employment consists of competitive work in integrated work settings for individuals with the most severe disabilities for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a severe disability. Because of the nature and severity of their disability, these individuals need intensive supported employment services or extended services in order to perform such work.a. Supported employment services rendered under this waiver are not available under a program funded by either the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Documentation must be maintained in the file of each individual receiving this service verifying that the service is not otherwise available or funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, or the IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

Community Support Services IDAPA 16.03.10.702-706 - 03/16/2018

~~“Community support services provide goods and supports that are medically necessary and/or minimize the Enrollee's need for institutionalization and address the Enrollee's preferences for:Job support to help the Enrollee secure and maintain employment or attain job advancement; Personal support to help the Enrollee maintain health, safety, and basic quality of life; Relationship support to help the Enrollee establish and maintain positive relationships with immediate family members, friends, spouse, or others in order to build a natural support network and community; Emotional support to help the Enrollee learn and practice behaviors consistent with his goals and wishes while minimizing interfering behaviors; Learning support to help the Enrollee learn new skills or improve existing skills that relate to his identified goals; Transportation support to help the Enrollee accomplish his identified goals; Adaptive equipment identified in the Enrollee's plan that meets a medical or accessibility need and promotes his increased independence, and Skilled nursing supports.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

XXXIII. Idaho Home Choice Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration (IHCMFP) - 03/16/2018

~~“A.  IDHW will:1. Make all final determinations regarding IHCMFP enrollment; and

B. The Health Plan shall implement and maintain policies and procedures to provide information, choice, and to enroll eligible Enrollees who consent to participate in the IHCMFP upon transition from a Qualified Institution to a Qualified Residence within the community that include:1. Dissemination of information, including program requirements and processes, to eligible Enrollees;2. Processes to update Enrollees’ Individualized Care Plans and complete and submit required referral, consent forms, and documentation to the IDHW IHCMFPCoordinator;3. Processes that ensure sufficient contact between Care Coordinators and Enrollees during the Enrollee’s participation in IHCMFP;4. Collaboration with qualified Transition Managers or a transition management Agency to provide up to seventy-two (72) hours of Transition Management Servicesand up to two thousand dollars ($2,000.00) of Transition Services for each Enrollee participating in IHCMFP; and5. Methods to track each Enrollee’s residency during IHCMFP participation” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Idaho §1915(i) State plan - 10/31/2017

~~“Idaho Medicaid furnishes Adult DD 1915(i) HCBS Benefit services in one type of provider owned or controlled residential setting: CFHs. The results of Idaho’s analysis of this residential setting are summarized below, including an overview of existing support for each regulation. The state hasincluded, where applicable, the full IDAPA citations to identify where IDAPA supports the HCBS requirement, in addition to indicating if IDAPA is silent. The state did not identify any IDAPA provision that conflicts with the HCBS requirements. Additionally, the chart includes Idaho’s plan on how to transition these settings into full compliance with the new regulations….

The setting includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive,integrated settings to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Process Updates: Requests for Corrective Action Plans - 04/26/2017

~~“This communication impacts all Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) providers, including Certified Family Homes (CFH), Residential Assisted Living Facilities (RALF), Adult Day Health (ADH), Developmental Disability Agencies (DDA), Supported-Living providers, Personal Care Services (PCS), Supported Employment, and any other entity providing HCBS.

 Any time a Medicaid provider is found to be in violation of IDAPA rules and requirements, they may be asked to complete a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) explaining how the violation will be corrected and prevented in the future.  Previously, each program providing oversight to the various provider types had their own process related to CAPs.”

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The Employment First movement is perpetual in Idaho, where anybody with the will to work is never stuck being a "couch potato."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Idaho’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,787,065
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.57%
Change from
2018 to 2019
121,908
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
54,417
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.73%
Change from
2018 to 2019
44.64%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
2.23%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.90%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 1,787,065
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 121,908
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 54,417
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64).