Indiana

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Start your engines for fast paced jobs in the Crossroads of America! The state of Indiana is ready for workers with disabilities to cross the finish line of career success! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Indiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
6,732,219
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
467,446
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
183,819
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
39.32%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.13%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.73%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 6,666,818 6,691,878 6,732,219
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 477,660 472,444 467,446
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 184,343 178,093 183,819
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,778,797 2,826,602 2,832,590
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.59% 37.70% 39.32%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.65% 79.83% 79.73%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.30% 3.40% 3.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.40% 20.50% 19.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.40% 12.00% 10.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 446,521 433,422 437,015
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 468,531 461,646 457,720
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 786,393 765,177 764,451
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 87,124 87,025 84,964
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,356 34,450 34,758
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,233 3,114 5,234
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,519 7,730 8,576
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 21,427 20,764 19,842
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,145 10,648 11,361

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,841 6,841 6,923
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.50% 5.50% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 205,562 201,734 198,695

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 18,747 19,079 18,554
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 32,810 35,500 30,628
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 71,357 69,656 68,802
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 26.30% 27.40% 27.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.30% 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.80% 5.50% 3.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 0.80% 0.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 26.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,203 1,038 1,108
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 4,800 4,475 2,752
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 879 647 678
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 21,355

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,186 11,335 10,590
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 982 1,197 521
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 539 640 292
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 53.00% 56.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 8.20 9.67 4.41

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 31.00% 34.00% 29.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 9,702 10,469 10,923
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 300,521 297,747 296,180
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 250 493 592
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 339 385 421

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,278,000 $2,659,000 $2,213,972
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,522,000 $15,625,000 $17,778,195
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,738,000 $26,254,000 $31,433,606
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $42,837,000 $45,873,000 $27,220,719
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 10.00% 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 11,428 12,741 9,461
Number of people served in facility based work. 4,748 4,712 4,552
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 6,877 7,346 7,605
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.00 25.80 22.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.40% 72.62% 73.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.42% 9.84% 9.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.02% 1.86% 1.82%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 86.36% 85.47% 86.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 30.00% 31.15% 36.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.71% 70.49% 63.78%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.14% 86.07% 88.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.71% 39.34% 27.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,825,018
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,360
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 238,730
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 283,720
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 522,451
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 515
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 258
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 773
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,426,931
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,636,380

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 34 40 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35 41 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,457 3,590 615
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,457 3,590 615

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Indiana Association of People Supporting Employment First (IN-APSE): BRS and IN-APSE share a common mission in that competitive, integrated employment should be the first and preferred option for all individuals with disabilities. BRS participates in IN-APSE events including the annual IN-APSE conference, and BRS staff regularly participate in planning as well as presenting at the conference. The IN-APSE statement on Employment First is based on several underlying principles including a presumption that all work age adults and youth with disabilities can work in jobs fully integrated with the general workforce, earning minimum wage or higher; and that employees with disabilities, as with all other individuals, require assistance and support to ensure job success and should have access to adequate, long term supports necessary to succeed in the workplace. These underlying principles are very much in line with BRS priorities, especially in light of WIOA and enhanced requirements to ensure that individuals receiving counseling, information and referral regarding alternatives to subminimum wage employment.

Other: VR maintains a collaborative working relationship with several advocacy and consumer support groups and organizations with a presence in Indiana. These include: the National Employment Team (The NET) which includes a national network of the 80 public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs supports a united or “one company” approach to working with business customers. The NET vision is to create a coordinated approach to serving business customers through a national VR team that specialized in employer development, business consulting and corporate relations; the Indiana Resource Center for Families with Special Needs (INSOURCE); the Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities in Indiana (INARF); the Indiana Council of Community Mental Health Centers, Employment Committee; and the Arc of Indiana. Input from many of these groups is obtained through various workgroups such as the transition advisory council and the VR employment advisory group. (Page 139) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title IV

VR purchases an array of services from a variety of vendors and community rehabilitation providers. Community Rehabilitation Providers specifically provide discovery, employment services, vocational evaluation, job shadow, placement, and supported employment services. VR promotes consumer choice in the provision of services. There are a total of 90 agencies with Provider Agreements for providing employment services in Indiana. Purchased employment services follow a new Employment Service Model that is based on a consumer-centric, individualized, and flexible outcome-based payment model, blended with an hourly fee-for-service structure for Discovery activities and Supported Employment services. (Information regarding the VR Employment Services Model may be found at www.vrs.in.gov.) The 90 providers include Community Rehabilitation Programs and Community Mental Health Centers. (Page 144) Title IV

In 2015, Indiana made major changes to its Employment Services Model. While retaining many of the components of the Results Based Funding (RBF) system, the rate structure now also includes hourly fees for services such as Discovery and for additional work place supports that are needed by consumers. Extensive trainings were held statewide, over the course of several months, to explain the new model and to address questions and concerns on the changes. Those who attended the trainings were primarily from VR and community rehabilitation programs, but individuals from the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services, DWD, advocates, and school personnel were also in attendance. (Page 162) Title IV

Employment services include discovery services, job readiness training, outcome-based employment services, supported employment services, on-the-job supports short-term, and job search/job placement assistance. Specific allowable costs are limited to costs of staffing to increase capacity to carry out employment services to VR applicable or eligible individuals, and costs to improve and expand training for employment services staff. Training methods consist of new and/or enhanced classroom-based and hands-on training, ensuring staff appropriately apply supports and techniques with ongoing coaching and mentoring. Quarterly reporting of measureable objectives provides BRS with progress updates on improved timeliness of initiation of services; increased provisions of SE services or on-the-job supports short-term; and increased quality and quantity of competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

Introductory one-day training on Discovery was attended by 285 individuals. A more detailed, two-day training on the Discovery process was held statewide, with 268 individuals attending from over 74 community rehabilitation programs. Indiana currently has VR employment service agreements with 89 community rehabilitation programs across the state. (Page 163) Title IV

Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury (Page 163) Title IV

What are the main needs of students and you with disabilities? The WIOA legislation continues to be a main focus for Vocational Rehabilitation and other state agencies. A major focus area is the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to studentswith disabilities, which includes: 1) job exploration counseling 2) work based learning opportunities 3) counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education 4) workplace readiness training and 5) self-advocacy. The recent revisions to the VR Employment Service Model increase emphasis on Discovery activities through an enhanced menu of services and a modified funding structure that funds discovery services individually instead of through a milestone payment. These revisions are especially timely in light of the new requirement for VR to utilize 15% of Title I funds for Pre-ETS. Discovery activities include services such as job shadowing, situational assessments, work experiences, informational interviews, vocational counseling and guidance, vocational testing and other services needed to evaluate consumer strengths, interests, abilities and ideal work conditions. (Page 168) Title IV

What are your perceived needs to improve Community Employment Programs?
Are there service gaps? If so, what? 147 80% Is there a need for expanded services? If so, in what area? 93 51% Is there a need for additional staff development? If so in what area? 115 63% Are there needed Improvements in service delivery? If so what? 96 52%
Gaps were identified, specifically, coordination of services between agencies and staff turnover at all agencies. The need for expanded services, including transition services and services to rural areas was also mentioned. Staff development needs were identified in the areas of job coaching and development. Improvements were noted again in the area of communication between agencies.
Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury. (Page 163) Title IV

Goal 2: VR Supported Employment providers will increase knowledge and skills on the provision of supported employment services, including greater understanding and focus on development of natural supports, job readiness training techniques, customized employment, and strategies for achieving stabilization on the job.
Measure: BRS will invest in training for supported employment providers including classroom-based, web-based, and hands-on workshops that focus on job coaching and job readiness training techniques. BRS will examine strategies for improvement of community rehabilitation providers to ensure capacity to carry out increased expectations under the new model, such as provision of funding for Establishment projects. At least 500 individuals will attend training annually, beginning in FFY16. (Page 186) Title IV

With the employment service changes, VR has collaborated with IIDC and Griffin and Hammis to provide additional training and technical assistance to Community Rehabilitation Providers and VR in the area of Discovery statewide. The training focused on Discovery, which is an individualized information gathering process that will guide employment services for the consumer. The training provided a framework to develop and implement a person-centered employment plan. While Discovery is important for many consumers, it is critical for consumers with the most significant disabilities and has an impact on their supported employment needs. VR continues to work collaboratively with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS), the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA), the Department of Education, IIDC, INARF, INAPSE, the Arc of Indiana, and other key stakeholders to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for consumers with the most significant disabilities through supported employment. Interagency collaboration will aim to increase the quality of SE services, including customized employment, and ensure appropriate extended services are appropriately utilized when necessary for long-term supports.  (Page 187) Title IV

Key revisions included: • Increased focus and re-emphasis on Discovery and Supports needed to achieve true stabilization; • Discovery activities are provided prior to milestone payments, funded per activity, and are no longer paid under a milestone. The menu of VR-funded Discovery activities is greatly enhanced. • SE services (including ongoing support services) funding is available in addition to milestone payments. • Increased flexibility to allow for more individualization based on consumer needs; • Elimination of 2 separate tiered milestone payments • Development of 3 new Milestones: o Milestone 1 = Job Development and Placement (1 week on the job) o Milestone 2 = Support and Short-term Retention (4 weeks on the job) o Milestone 3 = Retention (90 days AFTER stabilization) • Reduced financial incentive to quickly reach ‘stabilization’ and closure by ensuring adequate supports are available, including up to 24 months of VR-funded SE services to ensure true stabilization. • Changes to rates and expectations • Increased VR Counselor engagement in the employment services process This year, VR also continued its presence on social media, including Twitter and Facebook. Social media followers has nearly doubled from 2016 to 2017, and this platform helps communicate a consistent message about the program. (Page 188) Title IV

One of the key VR employment service revisions is an increase in VR-funded Discovery activities. The menu of services and activities that is available through the Discovery process has been enhanced, and may include work experience, situational assessments, job shadows, informational interviews, vocational testing, and other related activities. BRS recognizes the importance of Discovery for job seekers with disabilities, and particularly for youth or other individuals with disabilities who have little or no work history, or a history of jobs that were not quite the right ‘fit.’ Through an evaluation of the revised employment services model, implemented July, 2015, individuals receiving services through a CRP received, on average, 22.3 hours of discovery at the end of FFY 2017. VR has also increased outreach and education to transition aged youth, including development of a brief video that has been widely disbursed including posted through social media. BRS has a dedicated youth services director, as well as a youth services coordinator, who have worked to expand and improve relationships with key transition stakeholders, largely through facilitation of the VR Transition Advisory Council, engaging in one-on-one conversations, and presenting and educating various stakeholder groups about VR and pre-employment transition services. The Transition Advisory Council has been instrumental in increasing outreach and education related to transition aged youth. Specifically, collaboration with representatives from IIDC, DOE, and DWD on the council has aided in outreach to school systems, training of educators on transition, VR, and pre-ETS, and services available to transition-aged youth through DWD and other sources. In late 2017, student mentoring days were held at two separate business sites (an automotive manufacturing plant and a plastics manufacturer) in partnership with local schools, self-advocates of Indiana, and the local Work One. (Pages 189-190) Title IV

As mentioned above, the VR employment service revisions implemented July 2015 increased access to discovery activities and supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who require supported employment services. The previous RBF model did not always allow for appropriate service provision or provide a funding structure necessary for those VR consumers with the most significant disabilities who have very high support needs. (Pages 191-192) Title IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 3.3: Both the number of training opportunities and training topics increased in 2016. As an example, a ‘check and connect’ webinar training series was implemented in 2016 in partnership with Indiana University’s Center on Community Living and Careers, Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (CCLC/IIDC), which has featured topics on supported employment, discovery, customized employment, and a variety of other topics. Additionally, CCLC/IIDC under contract with BRS, provided one-on-one training and technical assistance to more than 20 CRPs in 2016 and 2017. Additionally, BRS entered into Establishment project contracts with 47 CRPs in 2017 for the purpose of enhancing training and building sufficient staffing capacity to provide high-quality, responsive services to VR applicants and eligible individuals. Through this funding, CRP’s have been able to increase the provision of training, including hands-on foundational skills training, to their direct services staff. (Page 197) Title IV

Outcome: Achieved: BRS, in partnership with Indiana University, offered ample training opportunities to VR providers throughout 2016 and 2017, including a refresher on employment services, employment specialist training, supported employment, discovery, customized employment, and additional training topics. Hundreds of individuals participate in webinars throughout 2016 including a web-based training series called ‘check and connect’ that is focused on employment services. In March/April 2016, approximately 350 Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) staff attended a half-day refresher training on the revised VR employment service model, including training regarding supported employment services. Well over half of CRPs participated in at least one training event in 2016.
Goal 3: VR will increase the quantity and quality of job outcomes for students and youth with the most significant disabilities through Project SEARCH. (Page 198) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~DWD or agency partners will conduct training for One-stop office staff, (including youth staff), to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. VR, Mental Health Centers, and the Department of Correction will also be invited to attend these events and asked to present on relevant topics. Disability Resource Coordinators sustained through Indiana’s Disability Employment Initiative (IN-DEI) grant will be utilized as subject matter experts in the field and also assist with training staff on serving individuals with disabilities. Best practices will be identified by these coordinators and shared with the WDBs for implementation when appropriate.

Within the One-stop offices, staff have been and will be further trained to follow established procedures to ensure inclusion and compliance. Starting with intake, staff is trained to ask every customer if they require accommodations during the intake process. Customer and One-stop office staff orientations should include a discussion of Equal Opportunity (EO) and the right to file a complaint. Following orientation, services should be reviewed with the client by determining the client’s eligibility and need for services in an integrated setting. Ongoing training will need to occur to educate staff on the services, funding, and the resources available to determine when it is appropriate to refer to partner agencies and possibly blend funding. Agency partners will seek to coordinate efforts and leverage funding between partner agencies to meet the employment and training needs of the customer. Memorandums of Understanding may be developed or reviewed, as necessary, to outline the responsibilities of each partner. (Page 72) Title I

BENEFITS COUNSELING VR should continue to support benefits counseling as this is a key concern for families. It was recommended that benefits counseling resources and knowledge be shared across WIOA core partners. This could be achieved through collaboration with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Grants, through education and training of WIOA partners, and be exploring the availability of benefits counseling in the local Work One centers.

VR Response: VR plans to continue to support benefits counseling through the funding of the Benefits Information Network (BIN), and agrees that counseling on the impact of working on benefits and available federal and state work incentives is critical in helping consumers to make informed choices about working and in working toward self-sufficiency. VR will include discussion on the importance of benefits counseling in conversations with WIOA partners. (Page 133) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Commission also suggested that further exploration is necessary on the provision of work experience services to students, including those working toward a High School diploma. Financial literacy and self-disclosure are also important issues for individuals with disabilities and VR is encouraged to ensure resources are in place to meet these needs. Additional suggestions regarding services to youth with disabilities included looking at best practices from a School-to-work pilot project utilizing career coaches in schools and providing work experiences prior to a student’s exit from school.

VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program (http://www.in.gov/fssa/ddrs/4901.htm) provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. (Page 14) Title I

Host work-and-learn events: Indiana, through the Indiana Career Council, the Indiana Works Councils and other partners, is hosting an event on 11/10/15 that will focus on successful programs across the state that are creating learning opportunities for students and educators, through a variety of methods, programs, and experiences. The inaugural Indiana Sectors Summit was held in October 2016 to grow and expand sector partnerships across Indiana, as well as continue to explore how we utilize sector partnerships as the vehicle to develop industry-driven career pathways in Indiana. To continue the momentum and progress generated from the summit, DWD contracted with Jobs for the Future (JFF) to provide strategic guidance, training, technical assistance and support including facilitation and planning of the 2016 Indiana Sectors Summit, mapping where sector partnerships exist and the assets that support sector partnership development, convening stakeholders for working groups and regional workshops, and organization and planning of the 2017 Indiana Sectors Summit. The second annual summit was held in November 2017 with the goal to deepen understanding and relationships between launching, advancing, and/or sustaining sector partnerships in collaboration with the Skill UP 3 grant opportunity incorporating tailored technical assistance requested from local partners. More information can be found at http://www.in.gov/dwd/sectorpartnerships.htm.

o Collaborate with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 504 overview materials for Indiana based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) and resources for employers. (Page 35) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. (Pages 44-45) Title I

Staff will also be trained to use multiple resources and tools to ensure accessibility to services. One such resource that staff will be encouraged to use is the Guidepost for Success, which is a set of key educational and intervention strategies for youth, including those with disabilities. Additionally, One-stop assessments, Individual Education Program (IEPs), and Academic and Career Planning (ACPs) tools will continue to be utilized to identify career paths, barriers to employment, training or service needs, and employability skills. These assessments will also assist with identifying hidden disabilities and the potential need for accommodations. DWD and agency partners will implement policies to support accessibility to services throughout the state. Development of a Reasonable Accommodation Policy will be explored that requires the WDBs to formally track when a reasonable accommodation is requested and whether it is approved or denied. This policy may include, but will not be limited to: the process for handling and tracking reasonable accommodation requests; examples of reasonable accommodations (i.e., frequent breaks, ensuring a quiet testing environment, reading the test aloud); providing training and information regarding One-stop procedures; and a process for notifying the state regarding the approval/denial of the request(s). The state will track both informal and formal complaints received in the One-stop offices through the State’s Quarterly Customer Service Record Log, located at http://www.in.gov/dwd/files/complaint log.xls . This will help the state identify any patterns for alleged discrimination of individuals with disabilities. Along these same lines, when DWD or a One-stop office removes a job order that prohibits individuals with disabilities from applying, the employer’s contact information will be logged on the Quarterly Customer Service Record Log for tracking purposes. (Pages 72-73) Title I

The Commission also suggested that further exploration is necessary on the provision of work experience services to students, including those working toward a High School diploma. Financial literacy and self-disclosure are also important issues for individuals with disabilities and VR is encouraged to ensure resources are in place to meet these needs. Additional suggestions regarding services to youth with disabilities included looking at best practices from a School-to-work pilot project utilizing career coaches in schools and providing work experiences prior to a student’s exit from school.

VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title IV

As of December, 2017, progress from the work plan touched on all 5 of the goals identified by the group: early work experience, postsecondary education, family expectations, system integration, seamless transition, and professional supports and incentives. These accomplishments included over 61,000 early work experiences being provided to students with disabilities statewide, over 3,000 sessions related to education on postsecondary options provided to students with disabilities, outreach to families and educators related to transition expectations through webinars and in-person trainings sponsored by IN*Source, About Special Kids, and local transition cadres, training to pre-ETS providers on supplementing rather than supplanting training available through local education agencies to ensure seamless transition and system integration, as well as discussion of appropriate qualifications for transition providers. VR works closely with IIDC at IU on several transition-related priorities. IIDC promotes partnerships between Indiana schools and various state agencies and other support organizations. IIDC’s focus is on career development, secondary education, and transition to adult life. As part of the need to establish an infrastructure and ensure sustainability of transition services, including pre-ETS, VR works with the existing Transition Cadres in Indiana. Established in 2011 and dedicated to improving secondary transition outcomes for students, a network of Transition Cadres throughout Indiana (funded by DOE) is working collaborative, both regionally and statewide. The efforts are focused on implementing promising practices and creating innovative strategies, tools, and resources for teachers and other transition professionals. VR has provided training on VR and its services to the Cadres and is attending the regularly scheduled cadre meetings to continue the joint collaboration. For more information please see: http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/cadre-leaders. In coordination with IIDC, VR developed written informational materials for educators and students. Three VR fact sheets, entitled “Working with Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation” are in the process of being updated to include information on pre-ETS, order of selection, and other programmatic updates. The fact sheets provide resources for students, teachers, and families about VR at students’ Transition IEP meetings. Another important informational and educational tool that was created to improve outreach and education about VR is the “Working with Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation” Video. This video provides a quick 5 minute overview of VR in an entertaining manner in hopes to provide a unique mode of educating transition-aged students and families. (Video may be viewed at www.vrs.in.gov.) VR has counselors assigned to each school for outreach and education to teachers, students, and parents. These VR counselors collaborate with the school staff to enable a seamless transition to life after high school. The goal for each student is for a VR application to be completed, and, for eligible consumers who are being served, to have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place, before exiting high school. LEA’s and VR confer at least one time per year to identify students who may require VR services. VR Counselors are invited to IEP meetings and make it a priority to attend when schedules permit. VR counselors and/or area supervisors are also involved in local transition councils if they exist in the community. Councils are made up of local stakeholders who are involved in the transition from school to work and adult life. Councils could include students/family, school personnel, service providers, etc. In addition, VR is responsible for providing written information to students and their families regarding adult services. (Page 142) Title IV

VR and DOE maintain an interagency agreement, which was updated in recent years to capture expanded federal requirements under WIOA. The interagency agreement states that: the roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities and methods for determining which partner agency and qualified personnel is responsible for transition services are: 1. The student’s Transition IEP will define the services and responsible payer for each of the services. If VR is responsible for payment of a service, this responsibility will be described in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). 2. Each agency will maximize coordination in the use of federal funds. 3. Decisions related to which entity will be financially responsible for providing transition or pre-ETS that can be considered both a special education and a VR service must be made at the local level as part of the collaboration between the VR agency, state educational agency, and the local educational agency. The Partner Agencies will collaborate to develop the required procedures and processes that VR area offices and local educational agencies will use when considering and assigning the financial responsibility of each agency for the provision of transition and pre-ETS to students with disabilities. The required procedures and processes will be based, at least in part, on the following criteria: a. Is the purpose of the service related to an employment outcome or education? b. Is the service one that the school customarily provides under IDEA, Part B? c. Is the student receiving special education services 14 years or older or entered grade 9? 4. The partner agencies will develop procedures and processes for outreach efforts and identification of eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities. These efforts will occur as early as possible during the transition process and will include: a description of pre-ETS available to students who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services; the purpose of the VR program; eligibility requirements; application process; and the scope of services that may be provided to eligible individuals. Any formal training on the topic of transition from school to adult life will include appropriate stakeholders, e.g., VR area office staff, school personnel, and students/families. The interagency agreement between VR and DOE is in the process of being reviewed and will be updated by June, 2018. The review of the interagency agreement between VR and DOE will include an assessment of current strategies and identification of new strategies to maximize transition opportunities for students. This will include the types of consultation and technical assistance VR will provide to educational agencies, methods that VR can use to provide consultation and technical assistance, including through alternative means, such as conference calls and webinars, how DOE and VR will work together in the development and facilitation of the IEP and IPE, cross-training opportunities between the VR and DOE, and coordination with non-educational agencies for out-of-school youth.  (As appropriate, describe the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

VR has a Statewide Transition Coordinator on staff to train and notify VR field staff of all changes and initiatives related to working with transition-aged students. In addition, VR will be adding a Statewide Transition Director. IIDC continues to serve as a transition resource to VR and DOE. Training and technical assistance is offered statewide and the targeted audience is parents, students, school officials, VR professionals, and CRP staff. Initiatives are currently ongoing to develop and update transition guides that will be available to all appropriate stakeholders. The Transition Alliance workgroup will be expanded in the coming year to serve as an advisory group pertaining to statewide VR Transition initiatives. Partners who sit on this group include parent advocates, DOE, schools, DWD, VR, IIDC, etc. VR is investigating opportunities for cross-training with VR and appropriate school personnel. Targeted training and technical assistance is ongoing for the VR field staff; specifically, VR has held webinars and face-to-face trainings on transition-related topics, such as special education overview, Transition IEPs, 504 Plans, special education eligibility, transition services, etc. All of these strategies will support VRs’ priority to increase outreach efforts and access to VR services for transition aged youth (Pages 144- 145) Title IV

Gap in services from school to work (student leaves school without connections to services) • Lack of information on available services • Concerns related to loss of Social Security benefits or health benefits • Lack of timeliness of services, that is, time from referral to job placement • Lack of high expectations from families • Lack of high expectations from school and agency personnel What strategies do you recommend to improve/expand VR services for students and youth with disabilities? The 250 respondents to this question gave a variety of responses. The most frequently noted was to have VR involved with students at a much earlier age, which would include having more frequent presence of VR counselors in the school and dedicated transition counselors. It was noted that better coordination is needed with the schools and VR. Another strategy that was frequently mentioned was that of more involvement with families to address expectations and impact of work on benefits. (Page 162) Title IV

Priority 1.4: Ensure VR staff is trained, highly knowledgeable, and are providing information on services across WIOA core programs, and other appropriate programs that may assist individuals with disabilities achieve their employment outcome. New staff will participate in both web-based and classroom-based training throughout, at minimum, the first year of employment.
Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A plan for joint data collection will be developed by the end of FFY17.

GOAL 2: Increase the number of people with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment. (Pages176-177) Title IV

Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 503 overview materials for Indiana-based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A strategy for required collection and report of business engagement efforts will be identified by late 2017. (Page 193) Title I

Indiana’s Supported Employment (SE) services are highly individualized and involve ongoing support services and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain an individual with the most significant disability (MSD), including youth with the most significant disabilities in SE for a period of time that generally does not exceed 24 months. Such services, such as job coaching, are for individuals who have SE and long-term supports identified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Often, because of the nature and severity of the individuals’ disability, there is a need for extended services that are provided by a State agency, private nonprofit organization, natural supports, or any other appropriate resources that are funded outside of VR. VR funding is available for the provision of extended services to Youth with a MSD, for a period not to exceed four years, if the youth has exhausted 24 months of SE services, and is not eligible for extended services through other agencies. Eligible VR participants with the most significant disabilities obtain SE services through Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) across the state. The service delivery requirements are to provide appropriate ongoing support services to individuals with MSD for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of the significance of the disability, and who requires SE services. SE services are provided from the time of job placement through achievement of stabilization and retention (90 days after stabilization). The expected outcome of SE services is to ensure that stabilization on the job has appropriately occurred after a period of gradually decreasing needed supports and a correlated demonstration of increased independence. The intensive level of support needs should be well-documented by the CRPs in the Employment Support and Retention Plan, and the expectation of fading (i.e., decreasing the amount of support as a consumer becomes more proficient in completing job duties) is important to reach optimal independence. VR acknowledges that fading of supports may not always occur in a completely linear process, and levels of SE support may ebb and flow depending on the needs of the individual. However, a pattern of increased independence and reduced need for support (fading) should be evident prior to the identification that stabilization has occurred for an individual needing SE services. More specifics regarding Supported Employment may be found in the Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services — Manual of Employment Services at www.vrs.in.gov. (Pages 199- 200) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~VR Response: VR plans to continue to support benefits counseling through the funding of the Benefits Information Network (BIN), and agrees that counseling on the impact of working on benefits and available federal and state work incentives is critical in helping consumers to make informed choices about working and in working toward self-sufficiency. VR will include discussion on the importance of benefits counseling in conversations with WIOA partners. (Page 133) Title IV

The Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS) and Office of Medicaid Policy and Procedure (OMPP) maintain a written agreement to outline responsibilities in serving consumers. This MOU states that OMPP has financial responsibility for necessary medical services covered by Indiana’s Medicaid Program for consumers who are eligible for both VR and Medicaid. VR has provided education and outreach regarding Indiana’s Medicaid buy-in program (called M.E.D. Works) to increase access to competitive, integrated employment for individuals with disabilities receiving Medicaid. Through the VR-funded Benefits Information Network (BIN), VR consumers also receive information about M.E.D. Works and how this program can enable them to both work and maintain their needed Medicaid benefits. The BIN process also educates VR consumers to make overall informed choices about working, providing education not only about the impact on Medicaid, but also the impact on other federal and state benefits, and the use of federal and state work incentives to assist in achieving gainful employment. (Page 147) Title IV

FFY17 ACTUAL (Applicants: 10,942; Eligible: 8,777) FFY18 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,050; Eligible: 8,860) FFY19 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,160; Eligible: 8,950) FFY20 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,270; Eligible: 9,040) FFY21 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,380; Eligible: 9,130) It is anticipated that VR will see a similar trend in the number of applicants, or an increase in applicants and eligible consumers in the coming years, due to increased outreach and education at schools statewide through the provision of pre-employment transition services, and through outreach to individuals employed at sub-minimum wage through provision of career counseling and information and referral services. VR is planning outreach efforts aimed at increasing VR applicants and expects the application trend to gradually increase over the next several years. A counselor-consumer ratio of not more than 1:100 is best practice to maintain efficient caseload management and quality service. As the number of applicants and people who are eligible are anticipated to increase, the number of staff needed to meet consumer needs may increase as well. As of this submission, 35 VR Counselors, 11 VR Case Coordinators, 5 secretaries, 5 area supervisors, and 2 regional managers are eligible for retirement.

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years 1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 175 11 35 2 VR Area Supervisors 22 0 5 3 VR Region Managers 4 0 2 4 BRS Management/Leadership Staff 7 0 1 5 VR Case Coordinators 60 0 11 6 VR Area Secretaries 19 8 5 7 Blind/VI/Deaf programs 7 1 2 8 BRS Central Office Staff 16 2 5
ii. the number of personnel currently needed by the State agency to provide VR services, broken down by personnel category; and
Please see response to A(i) above
iii. projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the State agency to provide VR services in 5 years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors. (Pages 148-149) Title IV

Identified training needs for Job Site Training and Supports were: • Developing employment support and retention plans • Teaching social and self-management skills • Developing and building natural supports • Developing accommodations • Onsite systematic instruction and support strategies
Off-site support training needs included: • Developing employment support and retention plans • Teaching social and self-management skills • Strategies for anger management and anxiety reduction • Benefits planning and management (social security and work incentives) • Other (time management, marking VR to partner agencies, training for job coaches and VR vendors, peer communication on job, fiscal/billing, soft skills)
Survey participants identified that they wanted training to be a hybrid of face-to-face and webinars. From the information generated, Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services is working with the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (IIDC) at Indiana University to provide the needed training. (Page 164) Title IV

BRS is working to implement an electronic claims payment system to streamline billing processes and anticipates this system to ‘go-live’ in 2018. While much improvement has been realized through efforts to improve staff capacity, including decreased retention and improved retention seen over the past several months, overall challenges with staff capacity remain. With the addition of new federal requirements under WIOA, BRS is forecasting an annual budget deficit starting with federal fiscal year 2018. While the VR Federal grant provides sufficient resources to Indiana, BRS is unable to draw all federal funds due to insufficient non-federal match dollars. BRS does not have sufficient funds to serve all eligible individuals, increase staffing and comply with all requirements under WIOA, including earmarking 15% of federal funds for pre-employment transition services, provision of career counseling and information and referral services to over 4,000 individuals employed at sub-minimum wage, and participating in infrastructure funding agreements to support the operation of One Stop locations throughout the state. BRS has identified and implemented several cost savings initiatives over the past few years, however even with the initiatives outlined below, a budget gap of approximately $5 million is anticipated, starting in FFY18. (Page 182) Title IV

BRS does not have sufficient resources to serve eligible individuals who are SD or NSD who require specific services or equipment to maintain employment, with the exception of providing specific services or equipment for individuals in post-employment services. Post-employment services are limited to individuals who had previously achieved a successful employment outcome and require additional services to maintain, re-enter, or advance in employment and are of limited scope and duration. BRS will be sharing relevant resources with individuals unable to be served by VR who are in need of assistance to obtain or maintain employment, such as facilitating a referral to the local Work One. Other resources may include Ticket to Work Employment Networks, Centers for Independent Living, College and Universities, the IN Data Assistive Technology program, and other state and local resources. (Page 185) Title IV

With the VR employment service changes mentioned above, VR and BDDS worked collaboratively to update an extended service definition for Indiana’s Family Supports Waiver and Community Integration and Habilitation Waiver in order to clarify extended services activities and compliment the supported employment changes made in VR. Both changes became effective on July 1, 2015.
Extended services are ongoing support and other appropriate services that are needed to support and maintain a youth with a most significant disability in supported employment and that are provided by a State agency, a private nonprofit organization, employer, or any other appropriate resource. There are times when extended services are required for the youth to maintain employment but may not be available through traditional sources (e.g., the youth does not qualify for BDDS funding or a Medicaid Waiver, or natural supports are not available). In these instances, VR may provide funding to assist youth with the most significant disabilities in maintaining an employment outcome in supported employment. (Page 186) Title IV

BRS has partnered with the Arc of Indiana and Self-Advocates of Indiana to provide career counseling and information and referral services (CCIR) to individuals employed at subminimum wage. CCIR services are provided in a one-on-one or group setting. Group settings include a presentation which incorporated videos and success stories; and typically occurs at the sub-minimum wage employee’s worksite during the lunch hour. Guardians are welcome and encouraged to attend. During the presentation, attendees receive information about local resources regarding employment services and other-related information; discuss potential competitive, integrated employment opportunities and ways to learn more about a new career field (i.e. informational interviewing or job-shadowing); and discuss the importance of seeking assistance and guidance from a support network, such as family members or friends. Following the Q&A portion of the presentation, attendees receive a certificate of participation documenting completion of the CCIR activities, and the Arc submits a copy of each certificate to BRS for record-keeping purposes. (Page 192) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~DWD is in the process of implementing a customer relationship management tool for employer engagement activities tracking. DWD and VR will utilize this tool to track employer engagement activities, share data across agencies, and report federally from a single data source.
o Evaluate the employment and training services being provided to recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), identifying options for consolidating programs and services that would increase coordination, efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability. In 2017 the FSSA awarded the contract for TANF and SNAP services to a new vendor. DWD was part of the scoring committee. This vendor change will allow more collaboration and coordination at the local level for clients who are recipients of TANF/SNAP and DWD services. (Page 31) Title I

Collaborate with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 504 overview materials for Indiana based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) and resources for employers. (Page 34) Title I

Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (individuals who have functional limitations to employment in three or more areas) and Supported Employment (providing job coaching and additional supports to individuals as needed) needs:
What barriers exist in serving individuals through supported employment?
Employer Engagement (how to involve employers):
What strategies would enhance the engagement of employers in assisting individuals with disabilities, including students, in obtaining integrated employment (employment in the community with at least minimum wage)?
What services or resources would be beneficial to support employers in hiring individuals with disabilities (e.g., disability awareness training, ADA workplace accommodations, etc.)?
What do you see as barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities?
Partnerships with the statewide workforce development system (i.e. WorkOnes):
What suggestions do you have in developing a partnership with WorkOne to assist individuals with disabilities?
Please rate the current relationships between Vocational Rehabilitation Services and WorkOne offices. (Page 171) Title IV

Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A plan for joint data collection will be developed by the end of FFY17. (Pages 176-177) Title IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 1.4: In late 2017 and early 2018, all VR staff received face-to-face training regarding DWD and Work One programs and services. VR Intake Counselors provide information about Work One during intake meetings with VR applicants and make referrals as applicable. Further training strategies will be explored in 2018.
Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 503 overview materials for Indiana-based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A strategy for required collection and report of business engagement efforts will be identified by late 2017. (Pages 193) Title IV

Data Collection

By establishing KPIs and program performance measures/themes and more purposefully using data, the core programs can lay the foundation needed to most effectively support operational and organizational improvement. , In addition to establishing agency wide KPIs, DWD has worked in collaboration with Regional Partners to develop regional dashboards to visualize data at the regional level for regions to use as a management tool. VR & DWD will continue to reassess state employee performance appraisal goals with the core indicators in mind. Currently staff are measured on select prior indicators and these will be updated to be in better alignment with the new common performance measures. Both agencies will also be modifying the outcome data elements that are captured for their respective providers to ensure appropriate alignment with the common performance measures. (Page 24) Title I

PREVALENCE RATE The percentage of men and women, aged 16-64, who reported a sensory, physical, mental, or self-care disability in 2013 was 9.9% in Indiana and 9.7% in the U.S. The 2013 data indicated that the percentage of non-institutionalized males or females in Indiana, ages 16-64, regardless of ethnicity, with all education levels who reported a disability is 10.2% compared to a national rate of 12%. The current population in Indiana, based on 2011 U.S. Census Bureau estimates, is more than 6.5 million, with approximately 62% of the population that are working age (18 through 64). Of the working-age population, 8.9% adults have self-reported as having been diagnosed with a disability. EMPLOYMENT Indiana’s employment rate in 2013 for 487,266 individuals with disabilities, ages 18-64 living in the community was 33.8% (164,556). The employment rate for individuals without disabilities is 76%. This is an employment gap of 42.3%. Indiana’s Department of Workforce Development reported that in June 2015, Indiana’s unemployment rate of the general population was reported at 4.9%, closely mirroring the national average of 5.4%. EMPLOYMENT DEMAND IN INDIANA Indiana’s Department of Workforce Development has a list of Hoosier Hot 50 Jobs. The list's ranking is based on expected demand and wages in 2022 for the state of Indiana. It is anticipated that there will continue to be need for employees over the next decade for each of the following (from most to least): registered nurses, K-12 teachers, truck drivers (heavy and tractor-trailer), sales representatives (wholesale and manufacturing), general operations managers, licensed practical nurses, postsecondary educators, accountants/auditors, office managers, and electricians. Even though this list reflects needs through 2022, all ten of these positions are listed as currently in demand. POVERTY The percentage of non-institutionalized persons, aged 21 to 64 years, with a disability in the United States who were living below the poverty line in 2013 was 28.2%. In Indiana that same group living in poverty was 29.3 %. In 2013, the poverty rate of individuals without disabilities, ages 18 to 64 years, living in the community was 13.3%—a poverty gap of 15.6 percentage points. In 2013, an estimated 31.9% of civilian, non-institutionalized men and women with a work limitation, aged 18-64, in the United States lived in families with incomes below the poverty line. This rate was 35.4% for individuals with work limitations residing in Indiana. In Indiana, an estimated 15.4% of the general population lived in poverty according to Census data, and the median household income was $47,508 in 2013. SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME The percentage of non-institutionalized persons, aged 21 to 64 years with a disability, who were receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits in 2013 was 17.7% in Indiana and 18.9% for the U.S. Nationally, in December 2012, of the 8,262,877 individuals who received federally administered payments from the SSI program, 1,156,188 were eligible, 67,725 were eligible based on blindness, and 7,038,964 were eligible based on disability. (Pages 155-156) Title IV

INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES The Institute for Community Inclusion data for 2013 shows that Indiana reported 31% of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities were served in integrated employment services. Indiana VR showed a 59.96%employment rate for individuals with a cognitive disability in 2013. The 2015 Day and Employment Services Outcome System reports on 12,972 individuals from 57 Indiana employment providers. Twenty six percent were served in integrated employment, 27% in sheltered/facility-based work, 27% in alternative to work (seeking employment, volunteer work) and 18% in non-employment day services. Commission on Rehabilitation Services Input VR staff received the following comments from the members of the Commission on Rehabilitation Services: • An emphasis on the importance on benefits counseling services to families as impact of employment on benefits remains a key concern for families. • A need for increased education and collaboration with WIOA partners on serving individuals with disabilities. • A need for financial literacy for individuals with disabilities as a strategy for working toward self-sufficiency. • A need to educate individuals with disabilities about self-disclosure. • Educating school personnel including special education teachers, guidance counselors and transition coordinators about services offered through WIOA partners, including WorkOne services. • Continued emphasis on service youth with disabilities through outreach, use of career coaches, work experience opportunities, and increasing expectations for employment. • Increased collaboration with other partners such as Department of Correction regarding services to shared consumers. • Improved marketing including sharing of success stories and improving website information. • Revision to hiring criteria for VR Counselors to address staff shortage and staff retention issues, including implementation of revised CSPD criteria to allow for hiring of qualified candidates with a Bachelor’s degree. Consumer Input Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services surveyed 697 consumers who had their VR cases closed due to successful job placements, and 168 individuals whose cases were closed unsuccessfully. This survey was for the first six months of 2015. The table below compares the outcomes of this survey to the past two years. (Page 157) Title IV

The projected average cost per individual and total projected costs for client services in FFY2018: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served % of Total Projected Number of Rehabilitations Average Cost per individual Projected Costs 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 8510 63.5% 4255 $3,000 $25.5M 2) Significant Disability (SD) *4557 34% 2278 $3,000 $13.7M 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) *335 2.5% 251 $1800 $603K Total 13400 6784(average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE) $39.8M *Individuals in all priority categories who had an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place prior to the implementation of the order of selection will continue to be served once the order is implemented. The projected average cost per individual and total projected costs for client services in FFY2019: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Number of Rehabilitations Average Cost per individual Projected Costs 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 9782 73% 4891 $3,000 $29.3M 2) Significant Disability (SD) *3484 26% 1742 $3,000 $10.5M 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) *134 1% 101 $1800 $240K Total 13400 6734 (average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE) $40M *Individuals in all priority categories who had an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place prior to the implementation of the order of selection will continue to be served once the order is implemented. (Page 175) Title IV

Total annual funding available in FFY18 and FFY19 for serving individuals in Title I ($38.5 million) and VI-B ($500,000), program income ($1 million), administrative costs including personnel ($32 million), and the required pre-employment transition services set aside ($9.5 million) is $81.5 million. Additional staffing would be necessary to provide the full range of services to all eligible individuals in an equitable and expeditious manner. A fiscal deficit is projected due to a need to shift funding to meet federal requirements under WIOA, including earmarking 15% of Title I federal funds on pre-employment transition services and contributing to the operation costs of the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) Work One centers through infrastructure funding agreements, as well as the need to modify data collection systems to meet enhanced federal reporting requirements. The anticipated projected annual deficit for FFY18 and FFY19 is $5 million. Therefore, an annual budget of approximately $86.5 million would be needed in FFY18 and FFY19 to serve all eligible individuals, which is at minimum 15,000. The current ratio of VR Counselors to eligible consumers receiving services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is 1:126. BRS believes that a counselor-consumer ratio of no more than 1:100 is optimal to maintain efficient caseload management and high quality services. At this time, additional VR Counselors are needed to work toward this optimal ratio, however there are challenges with expanding the number of VR Counselor positions, including lack of availability of qualified candidates, and challenges with fiscal resources. This is further discussed below. Staff retention of VR Counselors has been a major concern for VR over the past few years. In recent years, the turnover rate for all VR field positions has been 41%, with turnover of 56% for VR Counselor positions. This turnover has been a major contributing factor to BRS’ diminished capacity to serve all individuals seeking VR services, and the inability to serve consumers already in the system in a timely manner. BRS has experienced improvements in the retention rate over the past 9 months, and as of March, 2018 the turnover rate of VR Counselors has decreased to 31%. (Page 180) IV

VR has continued to serve all consumers who were receiving services under an approved IPE prior to implementation of the order of selection on August 1, 2017. Based on review of data on the number of individuals served in each category during the first six months under the order of selection, the number of individuals projected to be served in each priority category in FFY18, as well as the number of individuals projected to achieve their vocational outcomes are as follows: • Priority category 1: 8,560 Individuals with a Most Significant Disability (MSD) are projected to be served. o 4,280 individuals with a MSD will achieve their employment goals • Priority category 2: 4,583 individuals with a Significant Disability (SD) are projected to be served. This number represents individuals who had an IPE in place prior to implementation of the Order of Selection. o 2,292 individuals with a SD will achieve their employment goals • Priority category 3: 337 individuals with a Non-Significant Disability (NSD) are projected to be served. This number represents individuals who had an IPE in place prior to implementation of the Order of Selection. o 253 individuals with a NSD will achieve their employment goals The table in section D further illustrates this data. Both FFY18 and FFY19 projections are included under Section D. (Page 183) IV

4,280 individuals with a MSD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 593 days • 2,292 individuals with a SD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 649 days • 253 individuals with a NSD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 227 days. Projections for FY 2018: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Percentage of total rehabilitations Projected Number of Rehabilitations 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 8510 50% 4255 2) Significant Disability (SD) 4557 50% 2278 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) 335 75% 251 Total 13400 *6784 * The number of rehabilitation figures above do not reflect the number of placements in one FFY, as the average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE. Projections for FY 2019: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Percentage of total rehabilitations Projected Number of Rehabilitations 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 9782 50% 4891 2) Significant Disability (SD) 3484 50% 1742 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) 134 75% 101 Total 13400 *6734 * The number of rehabilitation figures above do not reflect the number of placements in one FFY, as the average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE. (Page 184) IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 3.1: An evaluation of services and outcomes under the revised employment service model, compared to services and outcomes under the previous Results Based Funding (RBF) employment service model has been ongoing since August, 2016. Baseline data was obtained in August, 2016, and an initial summary report was completed and posted on the VR website in November, 2016. Data has continued to be updated and shared in subsequent VR employment service evaluation reports, with the most recent report completed November, 2017. Within the first two years following implementation of the new model, VR participants who received employment services through a CRP, had increased access to discovery and supported employment services, and the quality of employment outcomes began to improve, with an average hourly wage of $9.26 in 2017 for those placed through a CRP, compared to an average hourly wage of $8.67 in 2015, which was a 7% increase over the two-year time period. This indicates good progress, however more improvement is needed. The overall average wage obtained by all VR participants achieving employment outcomes increased by 16% during this same time period, with average wages of $12.06 in FFY15 and $13.97 in FFY17. Additionally, VR has achieved an increase in the number of individuals obtaining competitive, integrated employment during the first quarter of FFY18 (970), compared to the first quarter of FFY17 (846). Also, VR has seen a decrease in the number of individuals exiting the program without employment after development of an IPE in the first quarter of FFY18 (600), compared to the first quarter of FFY17 (694). This is a positive trend that BRS will be closely monitoring throughout FFY18. Priority 3.2: Continue development of VR staff through professional development and training, including the creation of a web-based training curriculum (VR Leadership Academy) that can be shared across WIOA core programs to ensure consistency in information and increased knowledge about VR service delivery. VR will introduce new training by March 2016 that will aim to increase focus on counseling and guidance. (Page 196) IV

BRS has begun to report data through the revised and expanded RSA-911 report. Baseline data collected between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018 will assist the joint efforts of VR and RSA to set specific measures for each performance expectation. The existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between BRS and DWD was updated to ensure that BRS can obtain employment and wage data through DWD. Additionally, other resources are being investigated to aid VR in meeting data collection and reporting requirements either through other State agencies and public or private sources, including post-exit data. (Page 199) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~GOAL 2: Increase the number of people with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment.
Priority 2.1: Develop a coordinated process with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services and State and local educational agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities who are considering subminimum wage employment or who are already employed, at a subminimum wage, to maximize opportunities to achieve competitive integrated employment. Provide initial career counseling and information and referral (CCIR) services, and appropriate documentation, to youth seeking sub-minimum wage employment as well as ensure that all individuals employed at sub-minimum wage receive CCIR services by July, 2017, an annually thereafter. (Page 177) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. DWD will develop marketing materials made available through a broad range of media, (i.e., online, print, and social media), to promote universal access and equal opportunity for adults and youth with disabilities. The marketing materials will include positive images of people with disabilities and the types of available services, assistance, and accommodations provided in the WorkOne offices. (Page 71) Title I

DWD will explore development of a non-English translated marketing materials made available through a broad range of media, (i.e., online, print, and social media), to promote equal opportunity for limited English proficiency individuals. The marketing materials will include positive images of people of different origins and the types of available services, assistance, and accommodations provided in the WorkOne offices. Additionally, DWD and partners will continue to enhance the engagement of LEP individuals through online sources and websites. Finally, in order to help non-speaking English clients better understand how to receive benefits and interact with the one-stop system, One-stop partners will identify “vital” documents containing important information about client rights, responsibilities and/or benefits. Section 188 of the regulations require that a Babel notice be given when a client encounters a vital document, whether hard copy or electronically. A Babel notice is a short notice included in a document or electronic medium in multiple languages informing the reader that the communication contains vital information, and explains how to access language services to have the contents of the communication provided in other languages. Sample language for the Babel notice is below: English IMPORTANT! This document or application contains important information about your rights, responsibilities and/or benefits. It is critical that you understand the information in this document and/or application, and we will provide the information in your preferred language at no cost to you. Please contact your local Indiana WorkOne Office near you for assistance in the translation and understanding of the information in this document and/or application. (Pages 74-75) Title I

Veterans

* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 11) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program (http://www.in.gov/fssa/ddrs/4901.htm) provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. The workforce development programs of the mandatory and optional partners, including Career and Technical Education (CTE), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation (UC) programs, and YouthBuild, are listed below: (Page 14) Title I

Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program: This program operates in Indiana’s WorkOne centers. Under normal operating circumstances, all WorkOne customers are greeted by the welcome team and moved on to the appropriate staff for assistance. The majority of veterans should be served by Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff rather than the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Veterans’ staff. This allows JVSG Veterans’ staff efforts to focus on veteran customers with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE). Welcome team staff should identify those veterans with SBE’s and direct those veterans to the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialist for assistance, intensive services and case management. In the event that a DVOP is not available, the veteran or spouse should be referred to the appropriate Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff and not held up until a DVOP is available. (Page 16) Title I

The strengths of the workforce development activities identified in (A) above are: • Three of the four core programs (Titles I, II and III) and five of the required one-stop partners (post-secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, and Unemployment Compensation programs) are located within one state agency (DWD), increasing the ease of coordination. (Page 19) Title I

DWD also has responsibility for the following mandatory one-stop partners: post-secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, and Unemployment Compensation programs. FSSA also has responsibility for the TANF program. Additionally the following state agencies administer programs falling within the mandatory one-stop partners: • the Office of Community and Rural Affairs administers the Workforce Development Program grant, a HUD Employment and Training Program; and • the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) is the designated state agency for purposes of carrying out state activities for the federal Community Services Block Grant. (Page 20) Title I

The Core partners and the following state representatives of the mandatory partners meet regularly throughout 2016 to assess alignment and coordination of activities described (A) above: Career and Technical Education (Perkins) post-secondary, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs. Indiana also includes child welfare and corrections in the meetings. (Page 39) Title I

As indicated above, the core partners and the following state representatives of the mandatory partners meet regularly to assess alignment and coordination of activities described (A) above: Career and Technical Education (Perkins) post-secondary, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs. Indiana also includes child welfare and corrections in the meetings. (Page 40) Title I

Many of the one stop partner programs are under the responsibility of DWD (i.e., Post-Secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs). Currently, DWD is providing monitoring and technical assistance to these programs, but DWD will work on a process to ensure quality and consistency of assessment, including a process for consistent review of partner goals outlined within each region’s local plan and the progress made by the partners. (Page 60) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. (Page 68) Title I

Welcome team staff identify those veterans with SBE’s and direct those veterans to the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialist for assistance, intensive services and case management. In the event that a DVOP is not available, the veteran or spouse should be referred to the appropriate Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff and not held up until a DVOP is available. In accordance with Veteran Program Letter (VPL) 07-09, for a service such as classroom training, priority of service applies to the selection procedure, as follows: • First, if there is a waiting list for the formation of a training class, priority of service is intended to require a veteran or eligible spouse to go to the top of that list. • Second, priority of service applies up to the point at which an individual is both: (a) approved for funding; and, (b) accepted or enrolled in a training class. Therefore, once a non-covered person has been both approved for funding an accepted/ enrolled in a training class, priority of service is not intended to allow a veteran or eligible spouse who is identified subsequently to “bump” the non-covered person from that training class. (Page 69) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Additionally, DWD will continue to enhance the Job Seekers with Disabilities website, http://www.in.gov/dwd/2416.htm, to include resources for both job seekers and employers. DWD will also strengthen existing partnerships with groups such as the Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (including Blind and Deaf Services, Developmental Disability Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, Independent Living Centers, and Project SEARCH), Division of Family Resources, and the Office of Medicaid Policy and Planning by defining the process for referred or shared customers and improving the delivery of available services. Collaboration with these partners will also help to support October’s National Disability Awareness Month and March’s Disability Awareness Month through joint marketing materials and awareness efforts.. (Pages 71-72) Title I

DWD or agency partners will conduct training for One-stop office staff, (including youth staff), to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. VR, Mental Health Centers, and the Department of Correction will also be invited to attend these events and asked to present on relevant topics. Disability Resource Coordinators sustained through Indiana’s Disability Employment Initiative (IN-DEI) grant will be utilized as subject matter experts in the field and also assist with training staff on serving individuals with disabilities. Best practices will be identified by these coordinators and shared with the WDBs for implementation when appropriate. (Pages 72) Title I

Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA): DMHA is a division within Family Social Services Agency, which enables VR to partner with DMHA on employment initiatives. VR staff work closely at a local level with the DMHA funded Community Mental Health Centers (CMHC). Through a contract, the Indiana Institute of Disability and Community provides training and consultation to all employment services providers, including mental health centers and VR staff regarding employment for people with disabilities, including a focus on mental health. There are approximately 25 CMHCs across the State that are community rehabilitation providers. DMHA continues to promote employment for persons with mental illness by including employment and career planning as measures in consumer services reviews. VR Leadership meets quarterly with the Mental Health Employment Council to discuss new initiatives and identify how initiatives, such as the recent Employment Service Model Revisions, impact CMHC’s and consumers with mental illness. CMHC employment staff also serve on the Employment Service workgroup. Additionally, a representative from DMHA is an appointed member of the VR Commission. (Page 137) Title IV

Other: VR maintains a collaborative working relationship with several advocacy and consumer support groups and organizations with a presence in Indiana. These include: the National Employment Team (The NET) which includes a national network of the 80 public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs supports a united or “one company” approach to working with business customers. The NET vision is to create a coordinated approach to serving business customers through a national VR team that specialized in employer development, business consulting and corporate relations; the Indiana Resource Center for Families with Special Needs (INSOURCE); the Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities in Indiana (INARF); the Indiana Council of Community Mental Health Centers, Employment Committee; and the Arc of Indiana. Input from many of these groups is obtained through various workgroups such as the transition advisory council and the VR employment advisory group.

In order to address underserved and unserved populations, VR has initiated interagency cooperation with the following programs: Indiana Civil Rights Commission, Commission on the Social Status of Black Males, and the Burmese American Association. (Page 139) Title IV

VR developed training briefs for VR staff to help them understand the impact of Order of Selection on pre-ETS. Additional written materials are in development for educators and parents, which will be distributed to school systems courtesy of the Department of Education (DOE). VR, in collaboration with DOE, established a Statewide Transition Advisory Council to identify and address the barriers that continue to impact students, and develop and implement strategies and services to make the transition successful for students and youth with disabilities. The Transition Advisory Council established a work plan based upon the Transition to Careers Subcommittee Chapter recommendations (one of the four created by the full Transition Advisory Committee on Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities (ACICIEID)). The Statewide Transition Advisory Council includes representation from a wide range of key partners and stakeholders, including the following: VR, DOE, local educational agencies’ school personnel and administrators, Indiana Council of Administrators of Special Education (ICASE), the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services (BDDS), the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), Department of Corrections, Center for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Education (CDHHE), Community Mental Health Centers, First Steps, Indiana Association of People Supporting Employment First (INAPSE), Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (INARF), Indiana Institute of Disability and Community (IIDC), parent representation, the Arc of Indiana, INSOURCE, and other family advocacy groups. As of December, 2017, progress from the work plan touched on all 5 of the goals identified by the group: early work experience, postsecondary education, family expectations, system integration, seamless transition, and professional supports and incentives. These accomplishments included over 61,000 early work experiences being provided to students with disabilities statewide, over 3,000 sessions related to education on postsecondary options provided to students with disabilities, outreach to families and educators related to transition expectations through webinars and in-person trainings sponsored by IN*Source, About Special Kids, and local transition cadres, training to pre-ETS providers on supplementing rather than supplanting training available through local education agencies to ensure seamless transition and system integration, as well as discussion of appropriate qualifications for transition providers. VR works closely with IIDC at IU on several transition-related priorities. IIDC promotes partnerships between Indiana schools and various state agencies and other support organizations. IIDC’s focus is on career development, secondary education, and transition to adult life (Pages 141-142) Title IV

VR purchases an array of services from a variety of vendors and community rehabilitation providers. Community Rehabilitation Providers specifically provide discovery, employment services, vocational evaluation, job shadow, placement, and supported employment services. VR promotes consumer choice in the provision of services. There are a total of 90 agencies with Provider Agreements for providing employment services in Indiana. Purchased employment services follow a new Employment Service Model that is based on a consumer-centric, individualized, and flexible outcome-based payment model, blended with an hourly fee-for-service structure for Discovery activities and Supported Employment services. (Information regarding the VR Employment Services Model may be found at www.vrs.in.gov.) The 90 providers include Community Rehabilitation Programs and Community Mental Health Centers. (Page 144) Title IV

VR staff also works closely at a local level with the Division of Mental Health and Addiction’s (DMHA) funded Centers for Mental Health. VR has a training contract which provides training and consultation to all employment services providers, including mental health centers and VR staff regarding employment for people with disabilities. The majority of mental health centers across the state have employment service agreements with VR for the provision of placement services including supported employment. Additionally, stakeholder members from these centers, along with stakeholders from Community Rehabilitation Providers, participated in the VR employment services workgroup which resulted in the roll-out of substantial modifications to the VR employment service model. These revisions were designed to better serve all consumers, including those with the most significant disabilities and the highest support needs. Several revisions were made to the new draft model based on feedback from these workgroup members to ensure the new model is effective in serving all individuals.
A representative from both BDDS and DMHA were appointed to the VR Commission in FFY18 and are active participants on the commission. (Page 147) Title IV

A workgroup was established to guide the development of the revised Employment Service model. The workgroup is composed of BRS Leadership Staff, VR field staff, Community Rehabilitation Program, Community Mental Health Centers, INARF, and the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (IIDC) at Indiana University. The workgroup continues to meet monthly to evaluate the revisions, and to obtain feedback on emerging best practices as well as additional areas of improvement. Some additional modifications to the model have already been implemented in response to feedback from the workgroup and other stakeholders. (Page 162) Title IV

In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury

The survey included specific questions regarding transition services and training needs. Top responses included: • Developing quality work experiences and /or internships • Working with transition teams (e.g., schools, VR) • Understanding the transition process with schools • Working with transition-age youth (adolescents) (Page 163) Title IV

VR will purchase Supported Employment (SE) services for consumers with most significant disabilities (MSD), with Title I and Title VI-B funds (pending reauthorization). Consumers are able to access SE services through Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs), which include Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) across the state.

VR implemented major revisions to VR employment services in July 2015. Prior to these revisions, VR purchased employment services primarily through a Results Based Funding (RBF) approach. One significant revision that occurred is that SE services are no longer fully funded through employment milestones (or the previous RBF model). Because many individuals with MSD will require SE services that extend beyond the employment milestone payments, SE services are funded in addition to the current employment milestone payments. VR funding for SE services is outlined in the Table below. (Please note that the complete employment service model, implemented July 2015, can be viewed at www.vrs.in.gov). For more specific information, please see section (q). With the employment service changes, VR has collaborated with IIDC and Griffin and Hammis to provide additional training and technical assistance to Community Rehabilitation Providers and VR in the area of Discovery statewide. The training focused on Discovery, which is an individualized information gathering process that will guide employment services for the consumer. The training provided a framework to develop and implement a person-centered employment plan. While Discovery is important for many consumers, it is critical for consumers with the most significant disabilities and has an impact on their supported employment needs. VR continues to work collaboratively with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS), the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA), the Department of Education, IIDC, INARF, INAPSE, the Arc of Indiana, and other key stakeholders to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for consumers with the most significant disabilities through supported employment. Interagency collaboration will aim to increase the quality of SE services, including customized employment, and ensure appropriate extended services are appropriately utilized when necessary for long-term supports. (Page 187) Title IV

VR Counselors are required to assist in facilitating the seamless transition to extended services prior to VR case closure. The Transfer to Extended Services form is completed for VR consumers who require extended services. The form is completed following achievement of stabilization. VR and CRP personnel work jointly to complete this document. VR forwards completed form to entities providing supports at least 60 days prior to achievement of Milestone 3 (Retention). VR administration continues to focus on the need to ensure quality SE service; as such services are essential in securing quality employment outcomes for those consumers with MSD. VR will continue to work closely with the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services, the Division of Mental Health and Addiction, and CRPs to identify areas of concern, implement needed changes in practices, and provide training and/or technical assistance. (Page 201) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

All Indiana Unemployment Insurance (UI) Claimants: Are profiled as they file their initial claim to determine the level of assistance likely needed in order to return to meaningful work. Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment Program (RESEA) and the Jobs for Hoosiers (JFH) programs, (described further below), identify unemployed Hoosiers at the fourth week of their claim and include: UI eligibility review, claimant-centered labor market information, referral to a self-directed job search, and an orientation to the one-stop services. In addition, RESEA participants will be required to complete an Individual Reemployment Plan (IRP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance, employment counseling, and referrals to other employment services. (Page 106) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
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DDRS state funded services and program changes - 07/13/2020

“On May 21, 2020, Indiana’s State Budget Agency announced that each state agency was asked to immediately implement a 15% budget reduction. With this announcement, the Family and Social Services Administration has strived to meet the challenges of our state on many fronts and to continue to deliver critical services. In order to accomplish this, the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services had to make difficult decisions related to required budget reductions. DDRS administers services across the life span therefore this meant finding ways to meet budgetary requirements without impacting critical services to those who utilize programs such as First Steps, Medicaid home-and community-based services and Vocational Rehabilitation…

The state-funded programs that are being eliminated are caregiver supports, community based sheltered work and facility-based sheltered work… State-funded programs not currently impacted and will continue to be funded include: supported employment follow along services and OBRA services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana, Inc. (ASPIN) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, veteran families, small business owners, seasonal staff, immigrants, part-time workers, farmers, rural, and individuals with addictions or mental health diagnoses involved with the criminal justice system. In addition, navigators will assist consumers whose income fluctuates between income guidelines for insurance coverage and Medicaid. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Indiana Dept. of Insurance, State HUD office, Sheriff’s Association, Div. of Mental Health & Addictions, School Nurses Association, Pew Foundation, NAMI, IU Benefits Involvement Network, County corrections and jails, WIC offices, Local health departments, Bridges to Health, Exit Zero, Urban League, Mental Health America, Urban Ministries, Homeless shelters, Work One offices, Marion County Clerk’s office, Local Economic Development Corps, and the Small Business Administration  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.,Contact:Julia HollowayPhone: (317) 536-4683Email: jholloway@aspin.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Certificate of Completion - 07/16/2019

~~“The Course of Study for the Certificate of Completion is a framework for aligning curriculum to grade level standards while meeting the individual goals and transition needs stated in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Assistance - 07/01/2019

~~“With funding from the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provides services to Hoosier Veterans. Through the Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP), and the Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER) Program, Workforce Development Offices throughout the State are equipped to assist Hoosier Veterans with their transition from the service to civilian life. The DVOPs specialize in tailored training and job placement opportunities for veterans with service-connected disabilities. LVERs coordinate services provided veterans including counseling, testing, and identifying training and employment opportunities. Contact the nearest Indiana Workforce Development Office and ask for the location of the closest veteran's representative.”

Systems
  • Other

Indiana Disability Rights - 06/25/2019

~~“Provide Info & ResourcesWhy does Indiana Disability Rights provide information and referral first? Our Intake Advocates have over 30 years’ experience in the disability rights field. They will listen to you, and based on your individual situation, they will guide you to the best resources and organizations in Indiana. If we can't help, we have great partnerships with organizations that may be able to offer you the services you need.What kind of information can Indiana Disability Rights provide? We provide rights information for people with disabilities. We explain how to access social services (application process, complaint and appeal procedures). We make recommendations about how to access the help you need. We provide guidance on where to find digital resources. We may refer you to organizations that can address your issues.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center - 05/29/2019

~~“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs, and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

VR Vendor Information - 05/29/2019

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides individuals with disabilities, a wide range of services and supports necessary to help them prepare for, secure, retain, advance in or regain employment. VR services are available in all 92 Indiana counties and are individualized to meet the unique needs of each eligible individual. To carry out these services, VR partners with vendors across the state, who may be individuals, businesses or other organizations that provide services including, but not limited to the following:• Evaluation and treatment of an individual's disability;• Information and referral services;• Vocational counseling and training;• Job search and job placement assistance;• Rehabilitation Technology• Educational guidance or support (tuition resources and other support);• Physical and Mental Restoration• Transportation services;• Occupational tools and equipment;Personal attendant services (reader, interpreter, etc.).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Money Follows the Person - 04/24/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person program is funded through a grant from the federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home- and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007. Since then, Indiana has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FSSA Resource Guide - 04/24/2019

~~“This guide is designed to help providers and community- and faith-based organizations connect those who are in need with services we provide. It contains information about programs provided and administered by FSSA and a few other state agencies, and gives direction on how Hoosiers qualify to receive assistance from a variety of programs”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Portfolio Guidance 2019-2020 - 04/19/2019

~~“This document provides guidance for the development of a student portfolio which may serve as the  “Summary of Performance” under 511 IAC 7-43-7 of the Indiana Special Education Rule, Article 7. The Summary of Performance is defined  as a summary of the student with an IEP’s  academic achievement and functional performance, which must include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the students postsecondary goals, when a student graduates with a high school diploma, leaves school with a certification of completion, or exceeds the age eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

IC 22-9-11-7 Competitive integrated employment first and preferred state policy - 07/01/2017

~~“Sec. 7. (a) It is the policy of the state to advance competitive integrated employment, including self-employment, as the first and preferred option when providing services to an individual with disabilities who is of working age, regardless of the nature or the severity of the individual's disability. The policy applies to programs and agencies that provide services and support to help obtain employment for individuals with disabilities.     (b) State agencies shall follow the policy described in subsection (a) and ensure that the policy is implemented effectively in the state agencies' programs and services. State agencies shall implement the policy in a manner that is consistent with an individual's right to make an informed choice about employment options that meet an individual's needs and preferences.As added by P.L.68-2017, SEC.4.” 

Systems
  • Other

IC 22-9-11-8 Obtaining competitive integrated employment transition services - 07/01/2017

~~“Sec. 8. (a) This section applies to transition services provided as part of a special education program or related services to a child with a disability who is at least fourteen (14) years of age.     (b) The primary objective and preferred outcome of providing the services described in subsection (a) is to assist the child in obtaining competitive integrated employment.As added by P.L.68-2017, SEC.4.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

SENATE ENROLLED ACT No. 390, Concerning the Membership of the Commission on Rehabilitation Services.” - 04/13/2017

~~This act “ increases the number of members and changes the membership of the commission on rehabilitation services (commission). Makes changes in the terms of service of commission members and requires the governor to specify each member's term of service to ensure that terms expire on a staggered basis. Adds the following to the commission's duties: (1) Establish baseline data regarding the number of individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment and set annual goals for increasing the percentage of individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. (2) Identify and resolve barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities.  (3) Analyze federal, state, and local agency policies concerning the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including the impact of those policies on opportunities for competitive integrated employment, and recommend changes to state policies. (4) Assist state agencies in the implementation of the policy concerning employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. (5) Provide an annual report to the governor and the rehabilitation services administration commissioner concerning the employment of individuals with disabilities. Provides that the policy (policy) of the state is to promote competitive integrated employment, including self-employment, as the first and preferred option when providing services to individuals with disabilities who are of working age.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Indiana ABLE Legislation S.B. 11 - 07/01/2016

ABLE savings accounts for persons with a disability.  This bill creates the “achieving a better life experience” (ABLE) authority (authority).  Establishes the ABLE board (board) of the authority.  Provides that the authority may establish a qualified ABLE program under which a person may make contributions for a table year for the benefit of an eligible individual with a disability to an ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary in compliance with federal law.  Sets forth duties and powers of the authority and the board. Establishes a general operating fund, endowment fund, and trust fund.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Senate Resolution No. 39 – “Employment First” - 03/08/2016

~~“Be it resolved by the Senate of the 14General Assembly of the State of Indiana:SECTION 1. That the Indiana Senate urges the legislative council to assign the topic of an Employment First Program, which promotes and expands quality, community employment outcomes for all people with disabilities to an appropriate study committee.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

IN 2015 Senate Resolution 38 - 04/15/2015

“A SENATE RESOLUTION urging the legislative council to assign the topic of an Employment First Program, which promotes and expands quality, community employment outcomes for all people with disabilities to an appropriate study committee.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

DDRS state funded services and program changes - 07/13/2020

“On May 21, 2020, Indiana’s State Budget Agency announced that each state agency was asked to immediately implement a 15% budget reduction. With this announcement, the Family and Social Services Administration has strived to meet the challenges of our state on many fronts and to continue to deliver critical services. In order to accomplish this, the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services had to make difficult decisions related to required budget reductions. DDRS administers services across the life span therefore this meant finding ways to meet budgetary requirements without impacting critical services to those who utilize programs such as First Steps, Medicaid home-and community-based services and Vocational Rehabilitation…

The state-funded programs that are being eliminated are caregiver supports, community based sheltered work and facility-based sheltered work… State-funded programs not currently impacted and will continue to be funded include: supported employment follow along services and OBRA services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Indiana Certificate of Completion - 07/16/2019

~~“The Course of Study for the Certificate of Completion is a framework for aligning curriculum to grade level standards while meeting the individual goals and transition needs stated in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Assistance - 07/01/2019

~~“With funding from the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provides services to Hoosier Veterans. Through the Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP), and the Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER) Program, Workforce Development Offices throughout the State are equipped to assist Hoosier Veterans with their transition from the service to civilian life. The DVOPs specialize in tailored training and job placement opportunities for veterans with service-connected disabilities. LVERs coordinate services provided veterans including counseling, testing, and identifying training and employment opportunities. Contact the nearest Indiana Workforce Development Office and ask for the location of the closest veteran's representative.”

Systems
  • Other

Indiana Disability Rights - 06/25/2019

~~“Provide Info & ResourcesWhy does Indiana Disability Rights provide information and referral first? Our Intake Advocates have over 30 years’ experience in the disability rights field. They will listen to you, and based on your individual situation, they will guide you to the best resources and organizations in Indiana. If we can't help, we have great partnerships with organizations that may be able to offer you the services you need.What kind of information can Indiana Disability Rights provide? We provide rights information for people with disabilities. We explain how to access social services (application process, complaint and appeal procedures). We make recommendations about how to access the help you need. We provide guidance on where to find digital resources. We may refer you to organizations that can address your issues.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FSSA Resource Guide - 04/24/2019

~~“This guide is designed to help providers and community- and faith-based organizations connect those who are in need with services we provide. It contains information about programs provided and administered by FSSA and a few other state agencies, and gives direction on how Hoosiers qualify to receive assistance from a variety of programs”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Portfolio Guidance 2019-2020 - 04/19/2019

~~“This document provides guidance for the development of a student portfolio which may serve as the  “Summary of Performance” under 511 IAC 7-43-7 of the Indiana Special Education Rule, Article 7. The Summary of Performance is defined  as a summary of the student with an IEP’s  academic achievement and functional performance, which must include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the students postsecondary goals, when a student graduates with a high school diploma, leaves school with a certification of completion, or exceeds the age eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hire Vets First - 02/17/2019

~“Indiana is committed to providing quality employment services to veterans at our WorkOne Centers. Veterans go to the front of the line and each office has an onsite veteran's representative that assists with employment needs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Citations

How the Indiana Office of Special Education Makes Determinations Under the Results Driven Accountability and Differentiated Support System - 11/27/2018

~“IDEA 2004 requires states to make annual “Determinations” on the performance of each Local Education Agency in implementing the requirements and purposes of the IDEA 2004, with regard to the provision of special education and related services. Determinations are a way of designating the status of local districts into one of four categories, as outlined in 34 CFR§ 300.600.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veteran Health Indiana Homeless Veterans - 10/29/2018

~“Each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. More about the program may be found by accessing the web-link.”

Systems
  • Other

Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) - 10/29/2018

~“CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.” More about the program may be found by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Employment First Community Workshop Series for Employers - 08/21/2018

~~“LIFEDesigns, a service provider in south central Indiana, will host a series with three activities focusing on the ADA and employment. The activities will begin in October, National Disability Employment Awareness Month. The activities will include a presentation on Employment First and the ADA, a networking event for employers and VR customers, and a community conversation on employment for people with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center – University of Indiana Bloomington

“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities, as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Indiana Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities “State Plan”

“Every five years, the Indiana Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities is required by federal law to develop a 5-year strategic plan, outlining goals, objectives and specific activities that will be implemented each year of the plan. With public input and guidance from the Administration on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities, the state plan is developed in accordance with requirements of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (DD Act). The 2017-2021 State Plan covers the time period from October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2021. It addresses specific information required by the federal Administration on Developmental Disabilities, and includes the Council's determination of areas of emphasis and resulting goals and objectives for the five-year time period. The Council must spend a minimum of 70 percent of its federal funding to address the Plan objectives. All programs and projects of the Council are to be conducted in a manner that respects individual differences and cultural diversity.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Family & Social Services Administration. (2011). Guiding Employment First in Indiana: A statewide plan for systems change.

“The organizations primarily represented in the strategic planning process are leaders from state and federal agencies, consumer and advocacy agencies, provider organizations and MIG project partners. …This plan will be implemented beginning in 2011 through 2015…By providing avenues of communication and convening high-level leadership within state agency divisions, the plan provides the opportunity to align initiatives, reduce duplication of effort and address goals for employment of individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies

Project Search

"Project SEARCH is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Indiana Governor’s Council for People With Disabilities

“The Indiana Governor's Council is an independent state agency that facilitates change. Our mission is to advance the independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of society. This mission is accomplished through planning, evaluation, collaboration, education, research and advocacy.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Indiana 2005 Employment First Coalition: Employment First—Investing in Success

“On September 29, 2005, the Employment First Coalition brought together Leaders of Government, Business, Labor, Community and Education and the non-profit sectors to create a strategic plan ensuring employment is an outcome for all Hoosiers with disabilities.” This fact sheet provides a summary of the outcomes of the summit.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Indiana Government “Guidelines for Disclosure ” - 07/22/2016

“When an individual discloses, he or she is intentionally releasing personal information about him or herself for a specific purpose. Some personal information, such as one’s Social Security number, banking records, or medical records may be important to keep confidential. It is important to keep in mind that the decision to disclose is a personal one and should be helpful to the individual. Remember that it is not essential that a person with a disability divulge all personal information about his or her disability. What is most important and helpful is to provide information about how his or her disability affects his or her capacity to learn and perform effectively, and the environment, supports, and services he or she will need in order to access, participate in, and excel in his or her job, studies, and community. The person with a disability must decide what and how much of this sensitive information is necessary to reveal in order to obtain the needed accommodations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Indiana Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2012, Indiana was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant ended in 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Indiana Money Follows the Person Grant

“The MFP program is funded through a grant from the federal agency, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007 and since that time has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their community.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana, Inc. (ASPIN) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, veteran families, small business owners, seasonal staff, immigrants, part-time workers, farmers, rural, and individuals with addictions or mental health diagnoses involved with the criminal justice system. In addition, navigators will assist consumers whose income fluctuates between income guidelines for insurance coverage and Medicaid. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Indiana Dept. of Insurance, State HUD office, Sheriff’s Association, Div. of Mental Health & Addictions, School Nurses Association, Pew Foundation, NAMI, IU Benefits Involvement Network, County corrections and jails, WIC offices, Local health departments, Bridges to Health, Exit Zero, Urban League, Mental Health America, Urban Ministries, Homeless shelters, Work One offices, Marion County Clerk’s office, Local Economic Development Corps, and the Small Business Administration  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.,Contact:Julia HollowayPhone: (317) 536-4683Email: jholloway@aspin.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center - 05/29/2019

~~“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs, and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

VR Vendor Information - 05/29/2019

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides individuals with disabilities, a wide range of services and supports necessary to help them prepare for, secure, retain, advance in or regain employment. VR services are available in all 92 Indiana counties and are individualized to meet the unique needs of each eligible individual. To carry out these services, VR partners with vendors across the state, who may be individuals, businesses or other organizations that provide services including, but not limited to the following:• Evaluation and treatment of an individual's disability;• Information and referral services;• Vocational counseling and training;• Job search and job placement assistance;• Rehabilitation Technology• Educational guidance or support (tuition resources and other support);• Physical and Mental Restoration• Transportation services;• Occupational tools and equipment;Personal attendant services (reader, interpreter, etc.).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Indiana APSE 2018 Conference - 11/07/2018

~~The 28th Annual IN-APSE Conference will take place November 7th and 8th, 2018 in Indianapolis at the Indianapolis Marriott East. We invite you to share your knowledge and expertise with IN-APSE professionals from across the state. The submission deadline will be June 29, 2018.

Session FormatSessions may use a variety of formats, including lecture with questions and answers, panel or town hall discussion, and interactive sessions.  We encourage sessions that actively engage participants. Presentation guidelines and tips will be provided with session acceptance notification.

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Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

2019 Conference on Disabilities - 05/01/2018

~~The Indiana Conference on Disability has moved to a biennial format; the next conference will take place in 2019. Information will be posted as updates become available.

 

Systems
  • Other

Up to $20 Million in Grants Available Through Department of Workforce Development’s Skill UP Indiana! Program - 06/05/2017

~~“The Indiana Department of Workforce Development’s (DWD) employer-driven Skill UP Indiana! Program is about to enter round three. At stake over a two-year period is a pool of up to $20 million in grant funding that is being made available to financially support Innovation Networks to provide more and better avenues for skill-specific training and certification.

“’We often hear from employers who tell us they cannot find qualified candidates to fill open high-wage, high demand positions,’” said Steve Braun, DWD Commissioner. ‘“The goal of Skill UP Indiana! is to encourage regional networks and industry partnerships that meet these employer needs through training, education and certification.’””

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

A Guide to Community Employment and Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) - 06/15/2015

“If you are interested in employment, VRS is a good place to start. This guide will help you learn more about Vocational Rehabilitation Services [Vocational Rehabilitation Services], what to expect, and how to prepare so that you have the right supports to find the job that is best for you.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services In*Source Training

HCBS Final Rule Two important aspects to this Rule: -The Person-Centered Planning Process is key! - All HCBS settings need to provide for: –Opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings –Engagement in community life –Control of personal resources –Opportunity to receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Pathways to Employment

“Pathways to Employment, a series of short films, celebrates seven unique individuals who prove that hi]ring people with developmental disabilities is "Good for Business, Good for People & Good for the Economy." The films were produced for the The Arc of Indiana by filmmaker Ken Oguss, with support from the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Money Follows the Person - 04/24/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person program is funded through a grant from the federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home- and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007. Since then, Indiana has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 01/03/2019

~“As a division of the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA), the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS) has two overarching responsibilities for children and adults with physical and cognitive disabilities: •Facilitate partnerships that enhance the quality of life. •Provide continuous, life-long support. The Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS) and the Bureau of Quality Improvement Services (BQIS) are under the DDRS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration “FAQ CMS Final Rule Impact on Non-Residential Services in Indiana” - 08/31/2016

“Sometimes referred to as the HCBS settings rule, the rule impacts all HCBS waiver programs administered by the Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA). The context of this FAQ addresses impact of the rule only on the Family Supports (FSW) and the Community Integration and Habilitation (CIH) Waivers serving individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities. The FSW and CIH waivers are administered by the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS)’s Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana HCBS Statewide Transition Plan Amended - 07/01/2016

~~“In January 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations to better define the settings in which states can provide Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS). The HCBS final rule became effective March 17, 2014. The HCBS settings final rule, along with additional guidance and fact sheets, is available on the CMS Home and Community-Based Services site.The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that members receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to review current HCBS programs and to develop a transition plan providing an assessment, strategies and timelines for compliance with the new rules.The programs currently under review include 1915(c) HCBS Waivers and 1915(i) HCBS State Plan programs operated by the following divisions within the Family and Social Services Administration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Statewide HCBS Transition Plan - 12/10/2014

“Effective March 17, 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have issued regulations that define the settings in which it is permissible for states to pay for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS). The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated and that support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS. These changes will maximize the opportunities for participants in HCBS programs to have access to the benefits of community living and to receive services in the most integrated setting. The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) has created a Statewide Transition Plan to assess compliance with the HCBS Rule and identify strategies and timelines for coming into compliance with the new rule as it relates to all FSSA HCBS programs. States must be in full compliance with the federal requirements by the time frame approved in the Statewide Transition Plan but no later than March 17, 2019.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

IN Community Integration and Habilitation (0378.R03.00) - 10/01/2014

Provides adult day, prevocational, rent and food for unrelated live-in caregiver, residential hab and support, respite, supported employment follow along, OT, PT, psychological therapy, speech/language therapy, adult foster care, behavioral support, community based hab-group, community based hab-individual, community transition, electronic monitoring, environmental mods, facility based hab-group, facility based hab-individual, facility based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavior intervention, music therapy, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, workplace assistance for individuals w/autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Employment First Systems Change Statewide Plan (2011-2015) - 02/11/2011

“Through the use of MIG funds, Indiana has made a number of improvements to the state’s infrastructure supporting employment of IWD. While Indiana has been a leader in many aspects of employment supports and the use of innovative practices, the state realizes that ongoing efforts are necessary to improve employment outcomes, economic outlook and the overall well-being of IWD."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

IN Family Support Services (0387.R02.00) - 04/01/2010

Provides adult day, case management, prevocational, respite, supported employment follow along, OT, PT, psychological therapy, speech/language therapy, behavioral support services, community based hab-group, community based hab-individual, facility based hab-group, facility based hab-individual, facility based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavioral intervention, music therapy, participant assistance and care, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, workplace assistance for individuals w/autism, MR, DD ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Notice of Public Comment Period for Statewide Transition Plan

“Notice is hereby given that the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) will submit to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) a revision to Indiana's Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations of 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)-(2). Additional information on the Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the federal regulations of 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)-(2) can also be found at http://www.in.gov/fssa/4917.htm .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Money Follows the Person

“The MFP program is funded through a grant from the federal agency, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007 and since that time has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their community.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Start your engines for fast paced jobs in the Crossroads of America! The state of Indiana is ready for workers with disabilities to cross the finish line of career success! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Indiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
6,732,219
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
467,446
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
183,819
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
39.32%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.13%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.73%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 6,666,818 6,691,878 6,732,219
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 477,660 472,444 467,446
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 184,343 178,093 183,819
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,778,797 2,826,602 2,832,590
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.59% 37.70% 39.32%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.65% 79.83% 79.73%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.30% 3.40% 3.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.40% 20.50% 19.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.40% 12.00% 10.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 446,521 433,422 437,015
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 468,531 461,646 457,720
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 786,393 765,177 764,451
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 87,124 87,025 84,964
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,356 34,450 34,758
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,233 3,114 5,234
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,519 7,730 8,576
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 21,427 20,764 19,842
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,145 10,648 11,361

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,841 6,841 6,923
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.50% 5.50% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 205,562 201,734 198,695

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 18,747 19,079 18,554
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 32,810 35,500 30,628
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 71,357 69,656 68,802
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 26.30% 27.40% 27.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.30% 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.80% 5.50% 3.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 0.80% 0.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 26.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,203 1,038 1,108
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 4,800 4,475 2,752
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 879 647 678
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 21,355

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,186 11,335 10,590
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 982 1,197 521
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 539 640 292
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 53.00% 56.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 8.20 9.67 4.41

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 31.00% 34.00% 29.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 9,702 10,469 10,923
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 300,521 297,747 296,180
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 250 493 592
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 339 385 421

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,278,000 $2,659,000 $2,213,972
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,522,000 $15,625,000 $17,778,195
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,738,000 $26,254,000 $31,433,606
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $42,837,000 $45,873,000 $27,220,719
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 10.00% 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 11,428 12,741 9,461
Number of people served in facility based work. 4,748 4,712 4,552
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 6,877 7,346 7,605
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.00 25.80 22.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.40% 72.62% 73.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.42% 9.84% 9.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.02% 1.86% 1.82%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 86.36% 85.47% 86.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 30.00% 31.15% 36.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.71% 70.49% 63.78%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.14% 86.07% 88.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.71% 39.34% 27.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,825,018
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,360
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 238,730
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 283,720
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 522,451
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 515
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 258
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 773
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,426,931
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,636,380

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 34 40 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35 41 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,457 3,590 615
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,457 3,590 615

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Indiana Association of People Supporting Employment First (IN-APSE): BRS and IN-APSE share a common mission in that competitive, integrated employment should be the first and preferred option for all individuals with disabilities. BRS participates in IN-APSE events including the annual IN-APSE conference, and BRS staff regularly participate in planning as well as presenting at the conference. The IN-APSE statement on Employment First is based on several underlying principles including a presumption that all work age adults and youth with disabilities can work in jobs fully integrated with the general workforce, earning minimum wage or higher; and that employees with disabilities, as with all other individuals, require assistance and support to ensure job success and should have access to adequate, long term supports necessary to succeed in the workplace. These underlying principles are very much in line with BRS priorities, especially in light of WIOA and enhanced requirements to ensure that individuals receiving counseling, information and referral regarding alternatives to subminimum wage employment.

Other: VR maintains a collaborative working relationship with several advocacy and consumer support groups and organizations with a presence in Indiana. These include: the National Employment Team (The NET) which includes a national network of the 80 public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs supports a united or “one company” approach to working with business customers. The NET vision is to create a coordinated approach to serving business customers through a national VR team that specialized in employer development, business consulting and corporate relations; the Indiana Resource Center for Families with Special Needs (INSOURCE); the Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities in Indiana (INARF); the Indiana Council of Community Mental Health Centers, Employment Committee; and the Arc of Indiana. Input from many of these groups is obtained through various workgroups such as the transition advisory council and the VR employment advisory group. (Page 139) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title IV

VR purchases an array of services from a variety of vendors and community rehabilitation providers. Community Rehabilitation Providers specifically provide discovery, employment services, vocational evaluation, job shadow, placement, and supported employment services. VR promotes consumer choice in the provision of services. There are a total of 90 agencies with Provider Agreements for providing employment services in Indiana. Purchased employment services follow a new Employment Service Model that is based on a consumer-centric, individualized, and flexible outcome-based payment model, blended with an hourly fee-for-service structure for Discovery activities and Supported Employment services. (Information regarding the VR Employment Services Model may be found at www.vrs.in.gov.) The 90 providers include Community Rehabilitation Programs and Community Mental Health Centers. (Page 144) Title IV

In 2015, Indiana made major changes to its Employment Services Model. While retaining many of the components of the Results Based Funding (RBF) system, the rate structure now also includes hourly fees for services such as Discovery and for additional work place supports that are needed by consumers. Extensive trainings were held statewide, over the course of several months, to explain the new model and to address questions and concerns on the changes. Those who attended the trainings were primarily from VR and community rehabilitation programs, but individuals from the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services, DWD, advocates, and school personnel were also in attendance. (Page 162) Title IV

Employment services include discovery services, job readiness training, outcome-based employment services, supported employment services, on-the-job supports short-term, and job search/job placement assistance. Specific allowable costs are limited to costs of staffing to increase capacity to carry out employment services to VR applicable or eligible individuals, and costs to improve and expand training for employment services staff. Training methods consist of new and/or enhanced classroom-based and hands-on training, ensuring staff appropriately apply supports and techniques with ongoing coaching and mentoring. Quarterly reporting of measureable objectives provides BRS with progress updates on improved timeliness of initiation of services; increased provisions of SE services or on-the-job supports short-term; and increased quality and quantity of competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

Introductory one-day training on Discovery was attended by 285 individuals. A more detailed, two-day training on the Discovery process was held statewide, with 268 individuals attending from over 74 community rehabilitation programs. Indiana currently has VR employment service agreements with 89 community rehabilitation programs across the state. (Page 163) Title IV

Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury (Page 163) Title IV

What are the main needs of students and you with disabilities? The WIOA legislation continues to be a main focus for Vocational Rehabilitation and other state agencies. A major focus area is the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to studentswith disabilities, which includes: 1) job exploration counseling 2) work based learning opportunities 3) counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education 4) workplace readiness training and 5) self-advocacy. The recent revisions to the VR Employment Service Model increase emphasis on Discovery activities through an enhanced menu of services and a modified funding structure that funds discovery services individually instead of through a milestone payment. These revisions are especially timely in light of the new requirement for VR to utilize 15% of Title I funds for Pre-ETS. Discovery activities include services such as job shadowing, situational assessments, work experiences, informational interviews, vocational counseling and guidance, vocational testing and other services needed to evaluate consumer strengths, interests, abilities and ideal work conditions. (Page 168) Title IV

What are your perceived needs to improve Community Employment Programs?
Are there service gaps? If so, what? 147 80% Is there a need for expanded services? If so, in what area? 93 51% Is there a need for additional staff development? If so in what area? 115 63% Are there needed Improvements in service delivery? If so what? 96 52%
Gaps were identified, specifically, coordination of services between agencies and staff turnover at all agencies. The need for expanded services, including transition services and services to rural areas was also mentioned. Staff development needs were identified in the areas of job coaching and development. Improvements were noted again in the area of communication between agencies.
Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury. (Page 163) Title IV

Goal 2: VR Supported Employment providers will increase knowledge and skills on the provision of supported employment services, including greater understanding and focus on development of natural supports, job readiness training techniques, customized employment, and strategies for achieving stabilization on the job.
Measure: BRS will invest in training for supported employment providers including classroom-based, web-based, and hands-on workshops that focus on job coaching and job readiness training techniques. BRS will examine strategies for improvement of community rehabilitation providers to ensure capacity to carry out increased expectations under the new model, such as provision of funding for Establishment projects. At least 500 individuals will attend training annually, beginning in FFY16. (Page 186) Title IV

With the employment service changes, VR has collaborated with IIDC and Griffin and Hammis to provide additional training and technical assistance to Community Rehabilitation Providers and VR in the area of Discovery statewide. The training focused on Discovery, which is an individualized information gathering process that will guide employment services for the consumer. The training provided a framework to develop and implement a person-centered employment plan. While Discovery is important for many consumers, it is critical for consumers with the most significant disabilities and has an impact on their supported employment needs. VR continues to work collaboratively with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS), the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA), the Department of Education, IIDC, INARF, INAPSE, the Arc of Indiana, and other key stakeholders to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for consumers with the most significant disabilities through supported employment. Interagency collaboration will aim to increase the quality of SE services, including customized employment, and ensure appropriate extended services are appropriately utilized when necessary for long-term supports.  (Page 187) Title IV

Key revisions included: • Increased focus and re-emphasis on Discovery and Supports needed to achieve true stabilization; • Discovery activities are provided prior to milestone payments, funded per activity, and are no longer paid under a milestone. The menu of VR-funded Discovery activities is greatly enhanced. • SE services (including ongoing support services) funding is available in addition to milestone payments. • Increased flexibility to allow for more individualization based on consumer needs; • Elimination of 2 separate tiered milestone payments • Development of 3 new Milestones: o Milestone 1 = Job Development and Placement (1 week on the job) o Milestone 2 = Support and Short-term Retention (4 weeks on the job) o Milestone 3 = Retention (90 days AFTER stabilization) • Reduced financial incentive to quickly reach ‘stabilization’ and closure by ensuring adequate supports are available, including up to 24 months of VR-funded SE services to ensure true stabilization. • Changes to rates and expectations • Increased VR Counselor engagement in the employment services process This year, VR also continued its presence on social media, including Twitter and Facebook. Social media followers has nearly doubled from 2016 to 2017, and this platform helps communicate a consistent message about the program. (Page 188) Title IV

One of the key VR employment service revisions is an increase in VR-funded Discovery activities. The menu of services and activities that is available through the Discovery process has been enhanced, and may include work experience, situational assessments, job shadows, informational interviews, vocational testing, and other related activities. BRS recognizes the importance of Discovery for job seekers with disabilities, and particularly for youth or other individuals with disabilities who have little or no work history, or a history of jobs that were not quite the right ‘fit.’ Through an evaluation of the revised employment services model, implemented July, 2015, individuals receiving services through a CRP received, on average, 22.3 hours of discovery at the end of FFY 2017. VR has also increased outreach and education to transition aged youth, including development of a brief video that has been widely disbursed including posted through social media. BRS has a dedicated youth services director, as well as a youth services coordinator, who have worked to expand and improve relationships with key transition stakeholders, largely through facilitation of the VR Transition Advisory Council, engaging in one-on-one conversations, and presenting and educating various stakeholder groups about VR and pre-employment transition services. The Transition Advisory Council has been instrumental in increasing outreach and education related to transition aged youth. Specifically, collaboration with representatives from IIDC, DOE, and DWD on the council has aided in outreach to school systems, training of educators on transition, VR, and pre-ETS, and services available to transition-aged youth through DWD and other sources. In late 2017, student mentoring days were held at two separate business sites (an automotive manufacturing plant and a plastics manufacturer) in partnership with local schools, self-advocates of Indiana, and the local Work One. (Pages 189-190) Title IV

As mentioned above, the VR employment service revisions implemented July 2015 increased access to discovery activities and supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who require supported employment services. The previous RBF model did not always allow for appropriate service provision or provide a funding structure necessary for those VR consumers with the most significant disabilities who have very high support needs. (Pages 191-192) Title IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 3.3: Both the number of training opportunities and training topics increased in 2016. As an example, a ‘check and connect’ webinar training series was implemented in 2016 in partnership with Indiana University’s Center on Community Living and Careers, Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (CCLC/IIDC), which has featured topics on supported employment, discovery, customized employment, and a variety of other topics. Additionally, CCLC/IIDC under contract with BRS, provided one-on-one training and technical assistance to more than 20 CRPs in 2016 and 2017. Additionally, BRS entered into Establishment project contracts with 47 CRPs in 2017 for the purpose of enhancing training and building sufficient staffing capacity to provide high-quality, responsive services to VR applicants and eligible individuals. Through this funding, CRP’s have been able to increase the provision of training, including hands-on foundational skills training, to their direct services staff. (Page 197) Title IV

Outcome: Achieved: BRS, in partnership with Indiana University, offered ample training opportunities to VR providers throughout 2016 and 2017, including a refresher on employment services, employment specialist training, supported employment, discovery, customized employment, and additional training topics. Hundreds of individuals participate in webinars throughout 2016 including a web-based training series called ‘check and connect’ that is focused on employment services. In March/April 2016, approximately 350 Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) staff attended a half-day refresher training on the revised VR employment service model, including training regarding supported employment services. Well over half of CRPs participated in at least one training event in 2016.
Goal 3: VR will increase the quantity and quality of job outcomes for students and youth with the most significant disabilities through Project SEARCH. (Page 198) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~DWD or agency partners will conduct training for One-stop office staff, (including youth staff), to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. VR, Mental Health Centers, and the Department of Correction will also be invited to attend these events and asked to present on relevant topics. Disability Resource Coordinators sustained through Indiana’s Disability Employment Initiative (IN-DEI) grant will be utilized as subject matter experts in the field and also assist with training staff on serving individuals with disabilities. Best practices will be identified by these coordinators and shared with the WDBs for implementation when appropriate.

Within the One-stop offices, staff have been and will be further trained to follow established procedures to ensure inclusion and compliance. Starting with intake, staff is trained to ask every customer if they require accommodations during the intake process. Customer and One-stop office staff orientations should include a discussion of Equal Opportunity (EO) and the right to file a complaint. Following orientation, services should be reviewed with the client by determining the client’s eligibility and need for services in an integrated setting. Ongoing training will need to occur to educate staff on the services, funding, and the resources available to determine when it is appropriate to refer to partner agencies and possibly blend funding. Agency partners will seek to coordinate efforts and leverage funding between partner agencies to meet the employment and training needs of the customer. Memorandums of Understanding may be developed or reviewed, as necessary, to outline the responsibilities of each partner. (Page 72) Title I

BENEFITS COUNSELING VR should continue to support benefits counseling as this is a key concern for families. It was recommended that benefits counseling resources and knowledge be shared across WIOA core partners. This could be achieved through collaboration with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Grants, through education and training of WIOA partners, and be exploring the availability of benefits counseling in the local Work One centers.

VR Response: VR plans to continue to support benefits counseling through the funding of the Benefits Information Network (BIN), and agrees that counseling on the impact of working on benefits and available federal and state work incentives is critical in helping consumers to make informed choices about working and in working toward self-sufficiency. VR will include discussion on the importance of benefits counseling in conversations with WIOA partners. (Page 133) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Commission also suggested that further exploration is necessary on the provision of work experience services to students, including those working toward a High School diploma. Financial literacy and self-disclosure are also important issues for individuals with disabilities and VR is encouraged to ensure resources are in place to meet these needs. Additional suggestions regarding services to youth with disabilities included looking at best practices from a School-to-work pilot project utilizing career coaches in schools and providing work experiences prior to a student’s exit from school.

VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program (http://www.in.gov/fssa/ddrs/4901.htm) provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. (Page 14) Title I

Host work-and-learn events: Indiana, through the Indiana Career Council, the Indiana Works Councils and other partners, is hosting an event on 11/10/15 that will focus on successful programs across the state that are creating learning opportunities for students and educators, through a variety of methods, programs, and experiences. The inaugural Indiana Sectors Summit was held in October 2016 to grow and expand sector partnerships across Indiana, as well as continue to explore how we utilize sector partnerships as the vehicle to develop industry-driven career pathways in Indiana. To continue the momentum and progress generated from the summit, DWD contracted with Jobs for the Future (JFF) to provide strategic guidance, training, technical assistance and support including facilitation and planning of the 2016 Indiana Sectors Summit, mapping where sector partnerships exist and the assets that support sector partnership development, convening stakeholders for working groups and regional workshops, and organization and planning of the 2017 Indiana Sectors Summit. The second annual summit was held in November 2017 with the goal to deepen understanding and relationships between launching, advancing, and/or sustaining sector partnerships in collaboration with the Skill UP 3 grant opportunity incorporating tailored technical assistance requested from local partners. More information can be found at http://www.in.gov/dwd/sectorpartnerships.htm.

o Collaborate with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 504 overview materials for Indiana based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) and resources for employers. (Page 35) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. (Pages 44-45) Title I

Staff will also be trained to use multiple resources and tools to ensure accessibility to services. One such resource that staff will be encouraged to use is the Guidepost for Success, which is a set of key educational and intervention strategies for youth, including those with disabilities. Additionally, One-stop assessments, Individual Education Program (IEPs), and Academic and Career Planning (ACPs) tools will continue to be utilized to identify career paths, barriers to employment, training or service needs, and employability skills. These assessments will also assist with identifying hidden disabilities and the potential need for accommodations. DWD and agency partners will implement policies to support accessibility to services throughout the state. Development of a Reasonable Accommodation Policy will be explored that requires the WDBs to formally track when a reasonable accommodation is requested and whether it is approved or denied. This policy may include, but will not be limited to: the process for handling and tracking reasonable accommodation requests; examples of reasonable accommodations (i.e., frequent breaks, ensuring a quiet testing environment, reading the test aloud); providing training and information regarding One-stop procedures; and a process for notifying the state regarding the approval/denial of the request(s). The state will track both informal and formal complaints received in the One-stop offices through the State’s Quarterly Customer Service Record Log, located at http://www.in.gov/dwd/files/complaint log.xls . This will help the state identify any patterns for alleged discrimination of individuals with disabilities. Along these same lines, when DWD or a One-stop office removes a job order that prohibits individuals with disabilities from applying, the employer’s contact information will be logged on the Quarterly Customer Service Record Log for tracking purposes. (Pages 72-73) Title I

The Commission also suggested that further exploration is necessary on the provision of work experience services to students, including those working toward a High School diploma. Financial literacy and self-disclosure are also important issues for individuals with disabilities and VR is encouraged to ensure resources are in place to meet these needs. Additional suggestions regarding services to youth with disabilities included looking at best practices from a School-to-work pilot project utilizing career coaches in schools and providing work experiences prior to a student’s exit from school.

VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title IV

As of December, 2017, progress from the work plan touched on all 5 of the goals identified by the group: early work experience, postsecondary education, family expectations, system integration, seamless transition, and professional supports and incentives. These accomplishments included over 61,000 early work experiences being provided to students with disabilities statewide, over 3,000 sessions related to education on postsecondary options provided to students with disabilities, outreach to families and educators related to transition expectations through webinars and in-person trainings sponsored by IN*Source, About Special Kids, and local transition cadres, training to pre-ETS providers on supplementing rather than supplanting training available through local education agencies to ensure seamless transition and system integration, as well as discussion of appropriate qualifications for transition providers. VR works closely with IIDC at IU on several transition-related priorities. IIDC promotes partnerships between Indiana schools and various state agencies and other support organizations. IIDC’s focus is on career development, secondary education, and transition to adult life. As part of the need to establish an infrastructure and ensure sustainability of transition services, including pre-ETS, VR works with the existing Transition Cadres in Indiana. Established in 2011 and dedicated to improving secondary transition outcomes for students, a network of Transition Cadres throughout Indiana (funded by DOE) is working collaborative, both regionally and statewide. The efforts are focused on implementing promising practices and creating innovative strategies, tools, and resources for teachers and other transition professionals. VR has provided training on VR and its services to the Cadres and is attending the regularly scheduled cadre meetings to continue the joint collaboration. For more information please see: http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/cadre-leaders. In coordination with IIDC, VR developed written informational materials for educators and students. Three VR fact sheets, entitled “Working with Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation” are in the process of being updated to include information on pre-ETS, order of selection, and other programmatic updates. The fact sheets provide resources for students, teachers, and families about VR at students’ Transition IEP meetings. Another important informational and educational tool that was created to improve outreach and education about VR is the “Working with Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation” Video. This video provides a quick 5 minute overview of VR in an entertaining manner in hopes to provide a unique mode of educating transition-aged students and families. (Video may be viewed at www.vrs.in.gov.) VR has counselors assigned to each school for outreach and education to teachers, students, and parents. These VR counselors collaborate with the school staff to enable a seamless transition to life after high school. The goal for each student is for a VR application to be completed, and, for eligible consumers who are being served, to have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place, before exiting high school. LEA’s and VR confer at least one time per year to identify students who may require VR services. VR Counselors are invited to IEP meetings and make it a priority to attend when schedules permit. VR counselors and/or area supervisors are also involved in local transition councils if they exist in the community. Councils are made up of local stakeholders who are involved in the transition from school to work and adult life. Councils could include students/family, school personnel, service providers, etc. In addition, VR is responsible for providing written information to students and their families regarding adult services. (Page 142) Title IV

VR and DOE maintain an interagency agreement, which was updated in recent years to capture expanded federal requirements under WIOA. The interagency agreement states that: the roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities and methods for determining which partner agency and qualified personnel is responsible for transition services are: 1. The student’s Transition IEP will define the services and responsible payer for each of the services. If VR is responsible for payment of a service, this responsibility will be described in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). 2. Each agency will maximize coordination in the use of federal funds. 3. Decisions related to which entity will be financially responsible for providing transition or pre-ETS that can be considered both a special education and a VR service must be made at the local level as part of the collaboration between the VR agency, state educational agency, and the local educational agency. The Partner Agencies will collaborate to develop the required procedures and processes that VR area offices and local educational agencies will use when considering and assigning the financial responsibility of each agency for the provision of transition and pre-ETS to students with disabilities. The required procedures and processes will be based, at least in part, on the following criteria: a. Is the purpose of the service related to an employment outcome or education? b. Is the service one that the school customarily provides under IDEA, Part B? c. Is the student receiving special education services 14 years or older or entered grade 9? 4. The partner agencies will develop procedures and processes for outreach efforts and identification of eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities. These efforts will occur as early as possible during the transition process and will include: a description of pre-ETS available to students who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services; the purpose of the VR program; eligibility requirements; application process; and the scope of services that may be provided to eligible individuals. Any formal training on the topic of transition from school to adult life will include appropriate stakeholders, e.g., VR area office staff, school personnel, and students/families. The interagency agreement between VR and DOE is in the process of being reviewed and will be updated by June, 2018. The review of the interagency agreement between VR and DOE will include an assessment of current strategies and identification of new strategies to maximize transition opportunities for students. This will include the types of consultation and technical assistance VR will provide to educational agencies, methods that VR can use to provide consultation and technical assistance, including through alternative means, such as conference calls and webinars, how DOE and VR will work together in the development and facilitation of the IEP and IPE, cross-training opportunities between the VR and DOE, and coordination with non-educational agencies for out-of-school youth.  (As appropriate, describe the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

VR has a Statewide Transition Coordinator on staff to train and notify VR field staff of all changes and initiatives related to working with transition-aged students. In addition, VR will be adding a Statewide Transition Director. IIDC continues to serve as a transition resource to VR and DOE. Training and technical assistance is offered statewide and the targeted audience is parents, students, school officials, VR professionals, and CRP staff. Initiatives are currently ongoing to develop and update transition guides that will be available to all appropriate stakeholders. The Transition Alliance workgroup will be expanded in the coming year to serve as an advisory group pertaining to statewide VR Transition initiatives. Partners who sit on this group include parent advocates, DOE, schools, DWD, VR, IIDC, etc. VR is investigating opportunities for cross-training with VR and appropriate school personnel. Targeted training and technical assistance is ongoing for the VR field staff; specifically, VR has held webinars and face-to-face trainings on transition-related topics, such as special education overview, Transition IEPs, 504 Plans, special education eligibility, transition services, etc. All of these strategies will support VRs’ priority to increase outreach efforts and access to VR services for transition aged youth (Pages 144- 145) Title IV

Gap in services from school to work (student leaves school without connections to services) • Lack of information on available services • Concerns related to loss of Social Security benefits or health benefits • Lack of timeliness of services, that is, time from referral to job placement • Lack of high expectations from families • Lack of high expectations from school and agency personnel What strategies do you recommend to improve/expand VR services for students and youth with disabilities? The 250 respondents to this question gave a variety of responses. The most frequently noted was to have VR involved with students at a much earlier age, which would include having more frequent presence of VR counselors in the school and dedicated transition counselors. It was noted that better coordination is needed with the schools and VR. Another strategy that was frequently mentioned was that of more involvement with families to address expectations and impact of work on benefits. (Page 162) Title IV

Priority 1.4: Ensure VR staff is trained, highly knowledgeable, and are providing information on services across WIOA core programs, and other appropriate programs that may assist individuals with disabilities achieve their employment outcome. New staff will participate in both web-based and classroom-based training throughout, at minimum, the first year of employment.
Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A plan for joint data collection will be developed by the end of FFY17.

GOAL 2: Increase the number of people with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment. (Pages176-177) Title IV

Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 503 overview materials for Indiana-based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A strategy for required collection and report of business engagement efforts will be identified by late 2017. (Page 193) Title I

Indiana’s Supported Employment (SE) services are highly individualized and involve ongoing support services and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain an individual with the most significant disability (MSD), including youth with the most significant disabilities in SE for a period of time that generally does not exceed 24 months. Such services, such as job coaching, are for individuals who have SE and long-term supports identified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Often, because of the nature and severity of the individuals’ disability, there is a need for extended services that are provided by a State agency, private nonprofit organization, natural supports, or any other appropriate resources that are funded outside of VR. VR funding is available for the provision of extended services to Youth with a MSD, for a period not to exceed four years, if the youth has exhausted 24 months of SE services, and is not eligible for extended services through other agencies. Eligible VR participants with the most significant disabilities obtain SE services through Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) across the state. The service delivery requirements are to provide appropriate ongoing support services to individuals with MSD for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of the significance of the disability, and who requires SE services. SE services are provided from the time of job placement through achievement of stabilization and retention (90 days after stabilization). The expected outcome of SE services is to ensure that stabilization on the job has appropriately occurred after a period of gradually decreasing needed supports and a correlated demonstration of increased independence. The intensive level of support needs should be well-documented by the CRPs in the Employment Support and Retention Plan, and the expectation of fading (i.e., decreasing the amount of support as a consumer becomes more proficient in completing job duties) is important to reach optimal independence. VR acknowledges that fading of supports may not always occur in a completely linear process, and levels of SE support may ebb and flow depending on the needs of the individual. However, a pattern of increased independence and reduced need for support (fading) should be evident prior to the identification that stabilization has occurred for an individual needing SE services. More specifics regarding Supported Employment may be found in the Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services — Manual of Employment Services at www.vrs.in.gov. (Pages 199- 200) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~VR Response: VR plans to continue to support benefits counseling through the funding of the Benefits Information Network (BIN), and agrees that counseling on the impact of working on benefits and available federal and state work incentives is critical in helping consumers to make informed choices about working and in working toward self-sufficiency. VR will include discussion on the importance of benefits counseling in conversations with WIOA partners. (Page 133) Title IV

The Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS) and Office of Medicaid Policy and Procedure (OMPP) maintain a written agreement to outline responsibilities in serving consumers. This MOU states that OMPP has financial responsibility for necessary medical services covered by Indiana’s Medicaid Program for consumers who are eligible for both VR and Medicaid. VR has provided education and outreach regarding Indiana’s Medicaid buy-in program (called M.E.D. Works) to increase access to competitive, integrated employment for individuals with disabilities receiving Medicaid. Through the VR-funded Benefits Information Network (BIN), VR consumers also receive information about M.E.D. Works and how this program can enable them to both work and maintain their needed Medicaid benefits. The BIN process also educates VR consumers to make overall informed choices about working, providing education not only about the impact on Medicaid, but also the impact on other federal and state benefits, and the use of federal and state work incentives to assist in achieving gainful employment. (Page 147) Title IV

FFY17 ACTUAL (Applicants: 10,942; Eligible: 8,777) FFY18 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,050; Eligible: 8,860) FFY19 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,160; Eligible: 8,950) FFY20 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,270; Eligible: 9,040) FFY21 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,380; Eligible: 9,130) It is anticipated that VR will see a similar trend in the number of applicants, or an increase in applicants and eligible consumers in the coming years, due to increased outreach and education at schools statewide through the provision of pre-employment transition services, and through outreach to individuals employed at sub-minimum wage through provision of career counseling and information and referral services. VR is planning outreach efforts aimed at increasing VR applicants and expects the application trend to gradually increase over the next several years. A counselor-consumer ratio of not more than 1:100 is best practice to maintain efficient caseload management and quality service. As the number of applicants and people who are eligible are anticipated to increase, the number of staff needed to meet consumer needs may increase as well. As of this submission, 35 VR Counselors, 11 VR Case Coordinators, 5 secretaries, 5 area supervisors, and 2 regional managers are eligible for retirement.

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years 1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 175 11 35 2 VR Area Supervisors 22 0 5 3 VR Region Managers 4 0 2 4 BRS Management/Leadership Staff 7 0 1 5 VR Case Coordinators 60 0 11 6 VR Area Secretaries 19 8 5 7 Blind/VI/Deaf programs 7 1 2 8 BRS Central Office Staff 16 2 5
ii. the number of personnel currently needed by the State agency to provide VR services, broken down by personnel category; and
Please see response to A(i) above
iii. projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the State agency to provide VR services in 5 years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors. (Pages 148-149) Title IV

Identified training needs for Job Site Training and Supports were: • Developing employment support and retention plans • Teaching social and self-management skills • Developing and building natural supports • Developing accommodations • Onsite systematic instruction and support strategies
Off-site support training needs included: • Developing employment support and retention plans • Teaching social and self-management skills • Strategies for anger management and anxiety reduction • Benefits planning and management (social security and work incentives) • Other (time management, marking VR to partner agencies, training for job coaches and VR vendors, peer communication on job, fiscal/billing, soft skills)
Survey participants identified that they wanted training to be a hybrid of face-to-face and webinars. From the information generated, Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services is working with the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (IIDC) at Indiana University to provide the needed training. (Page 164) Title IV

BRS is working to implement an electronic claims payment system to streamline billing processes and anticipates this system to ‘go-live’ in 2018. While much improvement has been realized through efforts to improve staff capacity, including decreased retention and improved retention seen over the past several months, overall challenges with staff capacity remain. With the addition of new federal requirements under WIOA, BRS is forecasting an annual budget deficit starting with federal fiscal year 2018. While the VR Federal grant provides sufficient resources to Indiana, BRS is unable to draw all federal funds due to insufficient non-federal match dollars. BRS does not have sufficient funds to serve all eligible individuals, increase staffing and comply with all requirements under WIOA, including earmarking 15% of federal funds for pre-employment transition services, provision of career counseling and information and referral services to over 4,000 individuals employed at sub-minimum wage, and participating in infrastructure funding agreements to support the operation of One Stop locations throughout the state. BRS has identified and implemented several cost savings initiatives over the past few years, however even with the initiatives outlined below, a budget gap of approximately $5 million is anticipated, starting in FFY18. (Page 182) Title IV

BRS does not have sufficient resources to serve eligible individuals who are SD or NSD who require specific services or equipment to maintain employment, with the exception of providing specific services or equipment for individuals in post-employment services. Post-employment services are limited to individuals who had previously achieved a successful employment outcome and require additional services to maintain, re-enter, or advance in employment and are of limited scope and duration. BRS will be sharing relevant resources with individuals unable to be served by VR who are in need of assistance to obtain or maintain employment, such as facilitating a referral to the local Work One. Other resources may include Ticket to Work Employment Networks, Centers for Independent Living, College and Universities, the IN Data Assistive Technology program, and other state and local resources. (Page 185) Title IV

With the VR employment service changes mentioned above, VR and BDDS worked collaboratively to update an extended service definition for Indiana’s Family Supports Waiver and Community Integration and Habilitation Waiver in order to clarify extended services activities and compliment the supported employment changes made in VR. Both changes became effective on July 1, 2015.
Extended services are ongoing support and other appropriate services that are needed to support and maintain a youth with a most significant disability in supported employment and that are provided by a State agency, a private nonprofit organization, employer, or any other appropriate resource. There are times when extended services are required for the youth to maintain employment but may not be available through traditional sources (e.g., the youth does not qualify for BDDS funding or a Medicaid Waiver, or natural supports are not available). In these instances, VR may provide funding to assist youth with the most significant disabilities in maintaining an employment outcome in supported employment. (Page 186) Title IV

BRS has partnered with the Arc of Indiana and Self-Advocates of Indiana to provide career counseling and information and referral services (CCIR) to individuals employed at subminimum wage. CCIR services are provided in a one-on-one or group setting. Group settings include a presentation which incorporated videos and success stories; and typically occurs at the sub-minimum wage employee’s worksite during the lunch hour. Guardians are welcome and encouraged to attend. During the presentation, attendees receive information about local resources regarding employment services and other-related information; discuss potential competitive, integrated employment opportunities and ways to learn more about a new career field (i.e. informational interviewing or job-shadowing); and discuss the importance of seeking assistance and guidance from a support network, such as family members or friends. Following the Q&A portion of the presentation, attendees receive a certificate of participation documenting completion of the CCIR activities, and the Arc submits a copy of each certificate to BRS for record-keeping purposes. (Page 192) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~DWD is in the process of implementing a customer relationship management tool for employer engagement activities tracking. DWD and VR will utilize this tool to track employer engagement activities, share data across agencies, and report federally from a single data source.
o Evaluate the employment and training services being provided to recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), identifying options for consolidating programs and services that would increase coordination, efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability. In 2017 the FSSA awarded the contract for TANF and SNAP services to a new vendor. DWD was part of the scoring committee. This vendor change will allow more collaboration and coordination at the local level for clients who are recipients of TANF/SNAP and DWD services. (Page 31) Title I

Collaborate with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 504 overview materials for Indiana based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) and resources for employers. (Page 34) Title I

Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (individuals who have functional limitations to employment in three or more areas) and Supported Employment (providing job coaching and additional supports to individuals as needed) needs:
What barriers exist in serving individuals through supported employment?
Employer Engagement (how to involve employers):
What strategies would enhance the engagement of employers in assisting individuals with disabilities, including students, in obtaining integrated employment (employment in the community with at least minimum wage)?
What services or resources would be beneficial to support employers in hiring individuals with disabilities (e.g., disability awareness training, ADA workplace accommodations, etc.)?
What do you see as barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities?
Partnerships with the statewide workforce development system (i.e. WorkOnes):
What suggestions do you have in developing a partnership with WorkOne to assist individuals with disabilities?
Please rate the current relationships between Vocational Rehabilitation Services and WorkOne offices. (Page 171) Title IV

Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A plan for joint data collection will be developed by the end of FFY17. (Pages 176-177) Title IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 1.4: In late 2017 and early 2018, all VR staff received face-to-face training regarding DWD and Work One programs and services. VR Intake Counselors provide information about Work One during intake meetings with VR applicants and make referrals as applicable. Further training strategies will be explored in 2018.
Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 503 overview materials for Indiana-based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A strategy for required collection and report of business engagement efforts will be identified by late 2017. (Pages 193) Title IV

Data Collection

By establishing KPIs and program performance measures/themes and more purposefully using data, the core programs can lay the foundation needed to most effectively support operational and organizational improvement. , In addition to establishing agency wide KPIs, DWD has worked in collaboration with Regional Partners to develop regional dashboards to visualize data at the regional level for regions to use as a management tool. VR & DWD will continue to reassess state employee performance appraisal goals with the core indicators in mind. Currently staff are measured on select prior indicators and these will be updated to be in better alignment with the new common performance measures. Both agencies will also be modifying the outcome data elements that are captured for their respective providers to ensure appropriate alignment with the common performance measures. (Page 24) Title I

PREVALENCE RATE The percentage of men and women, aged 16-64, who reported a sensory, physical, mental, or self-care disability in 2013 was 9.9% in Indiana and 9.7% in the U.S. The 2013 data indicated that the percentage of non-institutionalized males or females in Indiana, ages 16-64, regardless of ethnicity, with all education levels who reported a disability is 10.2% compared to a national rate of 12%. The current population in Indiana, based on 2011 U.S. Census Bureau estimates, is more than 6.5 million, with approximately 62% of the population that are working age (18 through 64). Of the working-age population, 8.9% adults have self-reported as having been diagnosed with a disability. EMPLOYMENT Indiana’s employment rate in 2013 for 487,266 individuals with disabilities, ages 18-64 living in the community was 33.8% (164,556). The employment rate for individuals without disabilities is 76%. This is an employment gap of 42.3%. Indiana’s Department of Workforce Development reported that in June 2015, Indiana’s unemployment rate of the general population was reported at 4.9%, closely mirroring the national average of 5.4%. EMPLOYMENT DEMAND IN INDIANA Indiana’s Department of Workforce Development has a list of Hoosier Hot 50 Jobs. The list's ranking is based on expected demand and wages in 2022 for the state of Indiana. It is anticipated that there will continue to be need for employees over the next decade for each of the following (from most to least): registered nurses, K-12 teachers, truck drivers (heavy and tractor-trailer), sales representatives (wholesale and manufacturing), general operations managers, licensed practical nurses, postsecondary educators, accountants/auditors, office managers, and electricians. Even though this list reflects needs through 2022, all ten of these positions are listed as currently in demand. POVERTY The percentage of non-institutionalized persons, aged 21 to 64 years, with a disability in the United States who were living below the poverty line in 2013 was 28.2%. In Indiana that same group living in poverty was 29.3 %. In 2013, the poverty rate of individuals without disabilities, ages 18 to 64 years, living in the community was 13.3%—a poverty gap of 15.6 percentage points. In 2013, an estimated 31.9% of civilian, non-institutionalized men and women with a work limitation, aged 18-64, in the United States lived in families with incomes below the poverty line. This rate was 35.4% for individuals with work limitations residing in Indiana. In Indiana, an estimated 15.4% of the general population lived in poverty according to Census data, and the median household income was $47,508 in 2013. SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME The percentage of non-institutionalized persons, aged 21 to 64 years with a disability, who were receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits in 2013 was 17.7% in Indiana and 18.9% for the U.S. Nationally, in December 2012, of the 8,262,877 individuals who received federally administered payments from the SSI program, 1,156,188 were eligible, 67,725 were eligible based on blindness, and 7,038,964 were eligible based on disability. (Pages 155-156) Title IV

INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES The Institute for Community Inclusion data for 2013 shows that Indiana reported 31% of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities were served in integrated employment services. Indiana VR showed a 59.96%employment rate for individuals with a cognitive disability in 2013. The 2015 Day and Employment Services Outcome System reports on 12,972 individuals from 57 Indiana employment providers. Twenty six percent were served in integrated employment, 27% in sheltered/facility-based work, 27% in alternative to work (seeking employment, volunteer work) and 18% in non-employment day services. Commission on Rehabilitation Services Input VR staff received the following comments from the members of the Commission on Rehabilitation Services: • An emphasis on the importance on benefits counseling services to families as impact of employment on benefits remains a key concern for families. • A need for increased education and collaboration with WIOA partners on serving individuals with disabilities. • A need for financial literacy for individuals with disabilities as a strategy for working toward self-sufficiency. • A need to educate individuals with disabilities about self-disclosure. • Educating school personnel including special education teachers, guidance counselors and transition coordinators about services offered through WIOA partners, including WorkOne services. • Continued emphasis on service youth with disabilities through outreach, use of career coaches, work experience opportunities, and increasing expectations for employment. • Increased collaboration with other partners such as Department of Correction regarding services to shared consumers. • Improved marketing including sharing of success stories and improving website information. • Revision to hiring criteria for VR Counselors to address staff shortage and staff retention issues, including implementation of revised CSPD criteria to allow for hiring of qualified candidates with a Bachelor’s degree. Consumer Input Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services surveyed 697 consumers who had their VR cases closed due to successful job placements, and 168 individuals whose cases were closed unsuccessfully. This survey was for the first six months of 2015. The table below compares the outcomes of this survey to the past two years. (Page 157) Title IV

The projected average cost per individual and total projected costs for client services in FFY2018: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served % of Total Projected Number of Rehabilitations Average Cost per individual Projected Costs 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 8510 63.5% 4255 $3,000 $25.5M 2) Significant Disability (SD) *4557 34% 2278 $3,000 $13.7M 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) *335 2.5% 251 $1800 $603K Total 13400 6784(average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE) $39.8M *Individuals in all priority categories who had an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place prior to the implementation of the order of selection will continue to be served once the order is implemented. The projected average cost per individual and total projected costs for client services in FFY2019: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Number of Rehabilitations Average Cost per individual Projected Costs 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 9782 73% 4891 $3,000 $29.3M 2) Significant Disability (SD) *3484 26% 1742 $3,000 $10.5M 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) *134 1% 101 $1800 $240K Total 13400 6734 (average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE) $40M *Individuals in all priority categories who had an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place prior to the implementation of the order of selection will continue to be served once the order is implemented. (Page 175) Title IV

Total annual funding available in FFY18 and FFY19 for serving individuals in Title I ($38.5 million) and VI-B ($500,000), program income ($1 million), administrative costs including personnel ($32 million), and the required pre-employment transition services set aside ($9.5 million) is $81.5 million. Additional staffing would be necessary to provide the full range of services to all eligible individuals in an equitable and expeditious manner. A fiscal deficit is projected due to a need to shift funding to meet federal requirements under WIOA, including earmarking 15% of Title I federal funds on pre-employment transition services and contributing to the operation costs of the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) Work One centers through infrastructure funding agreements, as well as the need to modify data collection systems to meet enhanced federal reporting requirements. The anticipated projected annual deficit for FFY18 and FFY19 is $5 million. Therefore, an annual budget of approximately $86.5 million would be needed in FFY18 and FFY19 to serve all eligible individuals, which is at minimum 15,000. The current ratio of VR Counselors to eligible consumers receiving services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is 1:126. BRS believes that a counselor-consumer ratio of no more than 1:100 is optimal to maintain efficient caseload management and high quality services. At this time, additional VR Counselors are needed to work toward this optimal ratio, however there are challenges with expanding the number of VR Counselor positions, including lack of availability of qualified candidates, and challenges with fiscal resources. This is further discussed below. Staff retention of VR Counselors has been a major concern for VR over the past few years. In recent years, the turnover rate for all VR field positions has been 41%, with turnover of 56% for VR Counselor positions. This turnover has been a major contributing factor to BRS’ diminished capacity to serve all individuals seeking VR services, and the inability to serve consumers already in the system in a timely manner. BRS has experienced improvements in the retention rate over the past 9 months, and as of March, 2018 the turnover rate of VR Counselors has decreased to 31%. (Page 180) IV

VR has continued to serve all consumers who were receiving services under an approved IPE prior to implementation of the order of selection on August 1, 2017. Based on review of data on the number of individuals served in each category during the first six months under the order of selection, the number of individuals projected to be served in each priority category in FFY18, as well as the number of individuals projected to achieve their vocational outcomes are as follows: • Priority category 1: 8,560 Individuals with a Most Significant Disability (MSD) are projected to be served. o 4,280 individuals with a MSD will achieve their employment goals • Priority category 2: 4,583 individuals with a Significant Disability (SD) are projected to be served. This number represents individuals who had an IPE in place prior to implementation of the Order of Selection. o 2,292 individuals with a SD will achieve their employment goals • Priority category 3: 337 individuals with a Non-Significant Disability (NSD) are projected to be served. This number represents individuals who had an IPE in place prior to implementation of the Order of Selection. o 253 individuals with a NSD will achieve their employment goals The table in section D further illustrates this data. Both FFY18 and FFY19 projections are included under Section D. (Page 183) IV

4,280 individuals with a MSD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 593 days • 2,292 individuals with a SD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 649 days • 253 individuals with a NSD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 227 days. Projections for FY 2018: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Percentage of total rehabilitations Projected Number of Rehabilitations 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 8510 50% 4255 2) Significant Disability (SD) 4557 50% 2278 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) 335 75% 251 Total 13400 *6784 * The number of rehabilitation figures above do not reflect the number of placements in one FFY, as the average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE. Projections for FY 2019: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Percentage of total rehabilitations Projected Number of Rehabilitations 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 9782 50% 4891 2) Significant Disability (SD) 3484 50% 1742 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) 134 75% 101 Total 13400 *6734 * The number of rehabilitation figures above do not reflect the number of placements in one FFY, as the average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE. (Page 184) IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 3.1: An evaluation of services and outcomes under the revised employment service model, compared to services and outcomes under the previous Results Based Funding (RBF) employment service model has been ongoing since August, 2016. Baseline data was obtained in August, 2016, and an initial summary report was completed and posted on the VR website in November, 2016. Data has continued to be updated and shared in subsequent VR employment service evaluation reports, with the most recent report completed November, 2017. Within the first two years following implementation of the new model, VR participants who received employment services through a CRP, had increased access to discovery and supported employment services, and the quality of employment outcomes began to improve, with an average hourly wage of $9.26 in 2017 for those placed through a CRP, compared to an average hourly wage of $8.67 in 2015, which was a 7% increase over the two-year time period. This indicates good progress, however more improvement is needed. The overall average wage obtained by all VR participants achieving employment outcomes increased by 16% during this same time period, with average wages of $12.06 in FFY15 and $13.97 in FFY17. Additionally, VR has achieved an increase in the number of individuals obtaining competitive, integrated employment during the first quarter of FFY18 (970), compared to the first quarter of FFY17 (846). Also, VR has seen a decrease in the number of individuals exiting the program without employment after development of an IPE in the first quarter of FFY18 (600), compared to the first quarter of FFY17 (694). This is a positive trend that BRS will be closely monitoring throughout FFY18. Priority 3.2: Continue development of VR staff through professional development and training, including the creation of a web-based training curriculum (VR Leadership Academy) that can be shared across WIOA core programs to ensure consistency in information and increased knowledge about VR service delivery. VR will introduce new training by March 2016 that will aim to increase focus on counseling and guidance. (Page 196) IV

BRS has begun to report data through the revised and expanded RSA-911 report. Baseline data collected between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018 will assist the joint efforts of VR and RSA to set specific measures for each performance expectation. The existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between BRS and DWD was updated to ensure that BRS can obtain employment and wage data through DWD. Additionally, other resources are being investigated to aid VR in meeting data collection and reporting requirements either through other State agencies and public or private sources, including post-exit data. (Page 199) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~GOAL 2: Increase the number of people with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment.
Priority 2.1: Develop a coordinated process with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services and State and local educational agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities who are considering subminimum wage employment or who are already employed, at a subminimum wage, to maximize opportunities to achieve competitive integrated employment. Provide initial career counseling and information and referral (CCIR) services, and appropriate documentation, to youth seeking sub-minimum wage employment as well as ensure that all individuals employed at sub-minimum wage receive CCIR services by July, 2017, an annually thereafter. (Page 177) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. DWD will develop marketing materials made available through a broad range of media, (i.e., online, print, and social media), to promote universal access and equal opportunity for adults and youth with disabilities. The marketing materials will include positive images of people with disabilities and the types of available services, assistance, and accommodations provided in the WorkOne offices. (Page 71) Title I

DWD will explore development of a non-English translated marketing materials made available through a broad range of media, (i.e., online, print, and social media), to promote equal opportunity for limited English proficiency individuals. The marketing materials will include positive images of people of different origins and the types of available services, assistance, and accommodations provided in the WorkOne offices. Additionally, DWD and partners will continue to enhance the engagement of LEP individuals through online sources and websites. Finally, in order to help non-speaking English clients better understand how to receive benefits and interact with the one-stop system, One-stop partners will identify “vital” documents containing important information about client rights, responsibilities and/or benefits. Section 188 of the regulations require that a Babel notice be given when a client encounters a vital document, whether hard copy or electronically. A Babel notice is a short notice included in a document or electronic medium in multiple languages informing the reader that the communication contains vital information, and explains how to access language services to have the contents of the communication provided in other languages. Sample language for the Babel notice is below: English IMPORTANT! This document or application contains important information about your rights, responsibilities and/or benefits. It is critical that you understand the information in this document and/or application, and we will provide the information in your preferred language at no cost to you. Please contact your local Indiana WorkOne Office near you for assistance in the translation and understanding of the information in this document and/or application. (Pages 74-75) Title I

Veterans

* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 11) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program (http://www.in.gov/fssa/ddrs/4901.htm) provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. The workforce development programs of the mandatory and optional partners, including Career and Technical Education (CTE), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation (UC) programs, and YouthBuild, are listed below: (Page 14) Title I

Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program: This program operates in Indiana’s WorkOne centers. Under normal operating circumstances, all WorkOne customers are greeted by the welcome team and moved on to the appropriate staff for assistance. The majority of veterans should be served by Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff rather than the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Veterans’ staff. This allows JVSG Veterans’ staff efforts to focus on veteran customers with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE). Welcome team staff should identify those veterans with SBE’s and direct those veterans to the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialist for assistance, intensive services and case management. In the event that a DVOP is not available, the veteran or spouse should be referred to the appropriate Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff and not held up until a DVOP is available. (Page 16) Title I

The strengths of the workforce development activities identified in (A) above are: • Three of the four core programs (Titles I, II and III) and five of the required one-stop partners (post-secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, and Unemployment Compensation programs) are located within one state agency (DWD), increasing the ease of coordination. (Page 19) Title I

DWD also has responsibility for the following mandatory one-stop partners: post-secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, and Unemployment Compensation programs. FSSA also has responsibility for the TANF program. Additionally the following state agencies administer programs falling within the mandatory one-stop partners: • the Office of Community and Rural Affairs administers the Workforce Development Program grant, a HUD Employment and Training Program; and • the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) is the designated state agency for purposes of carrying out state activities for the federal Community Services Block Grant. (Page 20) Title I

The Core partners and the following state representatives of the mandatory partners meet regularly throughout 2016 to assess alignment and coordination of activities described (A) above: Career and Technical Education (Perkins) post-secondary, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs. Indiana also includes child welfare and corrections in the meetings. (Page 39) Title I

As indicated above, the core partners and the following state representatives of the mandatory partners meet regularly to assess alignment and coordination of activities described (A) above: Career and Technical Education (Perkins) post-secondary, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs. Indiana also includes child welfare and corrections in the meetings. (Page 40) Title I

Many of the one stop partner programs are under the responsibility of DWD (i.e., Post-Secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs). Currently, DWD is providing monitoring and technical assistance to these programs, but DWD will work on a process to ensure quality and consistency of assessment, including a process for consistent review of partner goals outlined within each region’s local plan and the progress made by the partners. (Page 60) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. (Page 68) Title I

Welcome team staff identify those veterans with SBE’s and direct those veterans to the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialist for assistance, intensive services and case management. In the event that a DVOP is not available, the veteran or spouse should be referred to the appropriate Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff and not held up until a DVOP is available. In accordance with Veteran Program Letter (VPL) 07-09, for a service such as classroom training, priority of service applies to the selection procedure, as follows: • First, if there is a waiting list for the formation of a training class, priority of service is intended to require a veteran or eligible spouse to go to the top of that list. • Second, priority of service applies up to the point at which an individual is both: (a) approved for funding; and, (b) accepted or enrolled in a training class. Therefore, once a non-covered person has been both approved for funding an accepted/ enrolled in a training class, priority of service is not intended to allow a veteran or eligible spouse who is identified subsequently to “bump” the non-covered person from that training class. (Page 69) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Additionally, DWD will continue to enhance the Job Seekers with Disabilities website, http://www.in.gov/dwd/2416.htm, to include resources for both job seekers and employers. DWD will also strengthen existing partnerships with groups such as the Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (including Blind and Deaf Services, Developmental Disability Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, Independent Living Centers, and Project SEARCH), Division of Family Resources, and the Office of Medicaid Policy and Planning by defining the process for referred or shared customers and improving the delivery of available services. Collaboration with these partners will also help to support October’s National Disability Awareness Month and March’s Disability Awareness Month through joint marketing materials and awareness efforts.. (Pages 71-72) Title I

DWD or agency partners will conduct training for One-stop office staff, (including youth staff), to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. VR, Mental Health Centers, and the Department of Correction will also be invited to attend these events and asked to present on relevant topics. Disability Resource Coordinators sustained through Indiana’s Disability Employment Initiative (IN-DEI) grant will be utilized as subject matter experts in the field and also assist with training staff on serving individuals with disabilities. Best practices will be identified by these coordinators and shared with the WDBs for implementation when appropriate. (Pages 72) Title I

Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA): DMHA is a division within Family Social Services Agency, which enables VR to partner with DMHA on employment initiatives. VR staff work closely at a local level with the DMHA funded Community Mental Health Centers (CMHC). Through a contract, the Indiana Institute of Disability and Community provides training and consultation to all employment services providers, including mental health centers and VR staff regarding employment for people with disabilities, including a focus on mental health. There are approximately 25 CMHCs across the State that are community rehabilitation providers. DMHA continues to promote employment for persons with mental illness by including employment and career planning as measures in consumer services reviews. VR Leadership meets quarterly with the Mental Health Employment Council to discuss new initiatives and identify how initiatives, such as the recent Employment Service Model Revisions, impact CMHC’s and consumers with mental illness. CMHC employment staff also serve on the Employment Service workgroup. Additionally, a representative from DMHA is an appointed member of the VR Commission. (Page 137) Title IV

Other: VR maintains a collaborative working relationship with several advocacy and consumer support groups and organizations with a presence in Indiana. These include: the National Employment Team (The NET) which includes a national network of the 80 public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs supports a united or “one company” approach to working with business customers. The NET vision is to create a coordinated approach to serving business customers through a national VR team that specialized in employer development, business consulting and corporate relations; the Indiana Resource Center for Families with Special Needs (INSOURCE); the Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities in Indiana (INARF); the Indiana Council of Community Mental Health Centers, Employment Committee; and the Arc of Indiana. Input from many of these groups is obtained through various workgroups such as the transition advisory council and the VR employment advisory group.

In order to address underserved and unserved populations, VR has initiated interagency cooperation with the following programs: Indiana Civil Rights Commission, Commission on the Social Status of Black Males, and the Burmese American Association. (Page 139) Title IV

VR developed training briefs for VR staff to help them understand the impact of Order of Selection on pre-ETS. Additional written materials are in development for educators and parents, which will be distributed to school systems courtesy of the Department of Education (DOE). VR, in collaboration with DOE, established a Statewide Transition Advisory Council to identify and address the barriers that continue to impact students, and develop and implement strategies and services to make the transition successful for students and youth with disabilities. The Transition Advisory Council established a work plan based upon the Transition to Careers Subcommittee Chapter recommendations (one of the four created by the full Transition Advisory Committee on Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities (ACICIEID)). The Statewide Transition Advisory Council includes representation from a wide range of key partners and stakeholders, including the following: VR, DOE, local educational agencies’ school personnel and administrators, Indiana Council of Administrators of Special Education (ICASE), the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services (BDDS), the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), Department of Corrections, Center for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Education (CDHHE), Community Mental Health Centers, First Steps, Indiana Association of People Supporting Employment First (INAPSE), Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (INARF), Indiana Institute of Disability and Community (IIDC), parent representation, the Arc of Indiana, INSOURCE, and other family advocacy groups. As of December, 2017, progress from the work plan touched on all 5 of the goals identified by the group: early work experience, postsecondary education, family expectations, system integration, seamless transition, and professional supports and incentives. These accomplishments included over 61,000 early work experiences being provided to students with disabilities statewide, over 3,000 sessions related to education on postsecondary options provided to students with disabilities, outreach to families and educators related to transition expectations through webinars and in-person trainings sponsored by IN*Source, About Special Kids, and local transition cadres, training to pre-ETS providers on supplementing rather than supplanting training available through local education agencies to ensure seamless transition and system integration, as well as discussion of appropriate qualifications for transition providers. VR works closely with IIDC at IU on several transition-related priorities. IIDC promotes partnerships between Indiana schools and various state agencies and other support organizations. IIDC’s focus is on career development, secondary education, and transition to adult life (Pages 141-142) Title IV

VR purchases an array of services from a variety of vendors and community rehabilitation providers. Community Rehabilitation Providers specifically provide discovery, employment services, vocational evaluation, job shadow, placement, and supported employment services. VR promotes consumer choice in the provision of services. There are a total of 90 agencies with Provider Agreements for providing employment services in Indiana. Purchased employment services follow a new Employment Service Model that is based on a consumer-centric, individualized, and flexible outcome-based payment model, blended with an hourly fee-for-service structure for Discovery activities and Supported Employment services. (Information regarding the VR Employment Services Model may be found at www.vrs.in.gov.) The 90 providers include Community Rehabilitation Programs and Community Mental Health Centers. (Page 144) Title IV

VR staff also works closely at a local level with the Division of Mental Health and Addiction’s (DMHA) funded Centers for Mental Health. VR has a training contract which provides training and consultation to all employment services providers, including mental health centers and VR staff regarding employment for people with disabilities. The majority of mental health centers across the state have employment service agreements with VR for the provision of placement services including supported employment. Additionally, stakeholder members from these centers, along with stakeholders from Community Rehabilitation Providers, participated in the VR employment services workgroup which resulted in the roll-out of substantial modifications to the VR employment service model. These revisions were designed to better serve all consumers, including those with the most significant disabilities and the highest support needs. Several revisions were made to the new draft model based on feedback from these workgroup members to ensure the new model is effective in serving all individuals.
A representative from both BDDS and DMHA were appointed to the VR Commission in FFY18 and are active participants on the commission. (Page 147) Title IV

A workgroup was established to guide the development of the revised Employment Service model. The workgroup is composed of BRS Leadership Staff, VR field staff, Community Rehabilitation Program, Community Mental Health Centers, INARF, and the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (IIDC) at Indiana University. The workgroup continues to meet monthly to evaluate the revisions, and to obtain feedback on emerging best practices as well as additional areas of improvement. Some additional modifications to the model have already been implemented in response to feedback from the workgroup and other stakeholders. (Page 162) Title IV

In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury

The survey included specific questions regarding transition services and training needs. Top responses included: • Developing quality work experiences and /or internships • Working with transition teams (e.g., schools, VR) • Understanding the transition process with schools • Working with transition-age youth (adolescents) (Page 163) Title IV

VR will purchase Supported Employment (SE) services for consumers with most significant disabilities (MSD), with Title I and Title VI-B funds (pending reauthorization). Consumers are able to access SE services through Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs), which include Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) across the state.

VR implemented major revisions to VR employment services in July 2015. Prior to these revisions, VR purchased employment services primarily through a Results Based Funding (RBF) approach. One significant revision that occurred is that SE services are no longer fully funded through employment milestones (or the previous RBF model). Because many individuals with MSD will require SE services that extend beyond the employment milestone payments, SE services are funded in addition to the current employment milestone payments. VR funding for SE services is outlined in the Table below. (Please note that the complete employment service model, implemented July 2015, can be viewed at www.vrs.in.gov). For more specific information, please see section (q). With the employment service changes, VR has collaborated with IIDC and Griffin and Hammis to provide additional training and technical assistance to Community Rehabilitation Providers and VR in the area of Discovery statewide. The training focused on Discovery, which is an individualized information gathering process that will guide employment services for the consumer. The training provided a framework to develop and implement a person-centered employment plan. While Discovery is important for many consumers, it is critical for consumers with the most significant disabilities and has an impact on their supported employment needs. VR continues to work collaboratively with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS), the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA), the Department of Education, IIDC, INARF, INAPSE, the Arc of Indiana, and other key stakeholders to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for consumers with the most significant disabilities through supported employment. Interagency collaboration will aim to increase the quality of SE services, including customized employment, and ensure appropriate extended services are appropriately utilized when necessary for long-term supports. (Page 187) Title IV

VR Counselors are required to assist in facilitating the seamless transition to extended services prior to VR case closure. The Transfer to Extended Services form is completed for VR consumers who require extended services. The form is completed following achievement of stabilization. VR and CRP personnel work jointly to complete this document. VR forwards completed form to entities providing supports at least 60 days prior to achievement of Milestone 3 (Retention). VR administration continues to focus on the need to ensure quality SE service; as such services are essential in securing quality employment outcomes for those consumers with MSD. VR will continue to work closely with the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services, the Division of Mental Health and Addiction, and CRPs to identify areas of concern, implement needed changes in practices, and provide training and/or technical assistance. (Page 201) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

All Indiana Unemployment Insurance (UI) Claimants: Are profiled as they file their initial claim to determine the level of assistance likely needed in order to return to meaningful work. Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment Program (RESEA) and the Jobs for Hoosiers (JFH) programs, (described further below), identify unemployed Hoosiers at the fourth week of their claim and include: UI eligibility review, claimant-centered labor market information, referral to a self-directed job search, and an orientation to the one-stop services. In addition, RESEA participants will be required to complete an Individual Reemployment Plan (IRP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance, employment counseling, and referrals to other employment services. (Page 106) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 60

DDRS state funded services and program changes - 07/13/2020

“On May 21, 2020, Indiana’s State Budget Agency announced that each state agency was asked to immediately implement a 15% budget reduction. With this announcement, the Family and Social Services Administration has strived to meet the challenges of our state on many fronts and to continue to deliver critical services. In order to accomplish this, the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services had to make difficult decisions related to required budget reductions. DDRS administers services across the life span therefore this meant finding ways to meet budgetary requirements without impacting critical services to those who utilize programs such as First Steps, Medicaid home-and community-based services and Vocational Rehabilitation…

The state-funded programs that are being eliminated are caregiver supports, community based sheltered work and facility-based sheltered work… State-funded programs not currently impacted and will continue to be funded include: supported employment follow along services and OBRA services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana, Inc. (ASPIN) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, veteran families, small business owners, seasonal staff, immigrants, part-time workers, farmers, rural, and individuals with addictions or mental health diagnoses involved with the criminal justice system. In addition, navigators will assist consumers whose income fluctuates between income guidelines for insurance coverage and Medicaid. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Indiana Dept. of Insurance, State HUD office, Sheriff’s Association, Div. of Mental Health & Addictions, School Nurses Association, Pew Foundation, NAMI, IU Benefits Involvement Network, County corrections and jails, WIC offices, Local health departments, Bridges to Health, Exit Zero, Urban League, Mental Health America, Urban Ministries, Homeless shelters, Work One offices, Marion County Clerk’s office, Local Economic Development Corps, and the Small Business Administration  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.,Contact:Julia HollowayPhone: (317) 536-4683Email: jholloway@aspin.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Certificate of Completion - 07/16/2019

~~“The Course of Study for the Certificate of Completion is a framework for aligning curriculum to grade level standards while meeting the individual goals and transition needs stated in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Assistance - 07/01/2019

~~“With funding from the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provides services to Hoosier Veterans. Through the Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP), and the Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER) Program, Workforce Development Offices throughout the State are equipped to assist Hoosier Veterans with their transition from the service to civilian life. The DVOPs specialize in tailored training and job placement opportunities for veterans with service-connected disabilities. LVERs coordinate services provided veterans including counseling, testing, and identifying training and employment opportunities. Contact the nearest Indiana Workforce Development Office and ask for the location of the closest veteran's representative.”

Systems
  • Other

Indiana Disability Rights - 06/25/2019

~~“Provide Info & ResourcesWhy does Indiana Disability Rights provide information and referral first? Our Intake Advocates have over 30 years’ experience in the disability rights field. They will listen to you, and based on your individual situation, they will guide you to the best resources and organizations in Indiana. If we can't help, we have great partnerships with organizations that may be able to offer you the services you need.What kind of information can Indiana Disability Rights provide? We provide rights information for people with disabilities. We explain how to access social services (application process, complaint and appeal procedures). We make recommendations about how to access the help you need. We provide guidance on where to find digital resources. We may refer you to organizations that can address your issues.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center - 05/29/2019

~~“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs, and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

VR Vendor Information - 05/29/2019

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides individuals with disabilities, a wide range of services and supports necessary to help them prepare for, secure, retain, advance in or regain employment. VR services are available in all 92 Indiana counties and are individualized to meet the unique needs of each eligible individual. To carry out these services, VR partners with vendors across the state, who may be individuals, businesses or other organizations that provide services including, but not limited to the following:• Evaluation and treatment of an individual's disability;• Information and referral services;• Vocational counseling and training;• Job search and job placement assistance;• Rehabilitation Technology• Educational guidance or support (tuition resources and other support);• Physical and Mental Restoration• Transportation services;• Occupational tools and equipment;Personal attendant services (reader, interpreter, etc.).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Money Follows the Person - 04/24/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person program is funded through a grant from the federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home- and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007. Since then, Indiana has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FSSA Resource Guide - 04/24/2019

~~“This guide is designed to help providers and community- and faith-based organizations connect those who are in need with services we provide. It contains information about programs provided and administered by FSSA and a few other state agencies, and gives direction on how Hoosiers qualify to receive assistance from a variety of programs”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Portfolio Guidance 2019-2020 - 04/19/2019

~~“This document provides guidance for the development of a student portfolio which may serve as the  “Summary of Performance” under 511 IAC 7-43-7 of the Indiana Special Education Rule, Article 7. The Summary of Performance is defined  as a summary of the student with an IEP’s  academic achievement and functional performance, which must include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the students postsecondary goals, when a student graduates with a high school diploma, leaves school with a certification of completion, or exceeds the age eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

IC 22-9-11-7 Competitive integrated employment first and preferred state policy - 07/01/2017

~~“Sec. 7. (a) It is the policy of the state to advance competitive integrated employment, including self-employment, as the first and preferred option when providing services to an individual with disabilities who is of working age, regardless of the nature or the severity of the individual's disability. The policy applies to programs and agencies that provide services and support to help obtain employment for individuals with disabilities.     (b) State agencies shall follow the policy described in subsection (a) and ensure that the policy is implemented effectively in the state agencies' programs and services. State agencies shall implement the policy in a manner that is consistent with an individual's right to make an informed choice about employment options that meet an individual's needs and preferences.As added by P.L.68-2017, SEC.4.” 

Systems
  • Other

IC 22-9-11-8 Obtaining competitive integrated employment transition services - 07/01/2017

~~“Sec. 8. (a) This section applies to transition services provided as part of a special education program or related services to a child with a disability who is at least fourteen (14) years of age.     (b) The primary objective and preferred outcome of providing the services described in subsection (a) is to assist the child in obtaining competitive integrated employment.As added by P.L.68-2017, SEC.4.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

SENATE ENROLLED ACT No. 390, Concerning the Membership of the Commission on Rehabilitation Services.” - 04/13/2017

~~This act “ increases the number of members and changes the membership of the commission on rehabilitation services (commission). Makes changes in the terms of service of commission members and requires the governor to specify each member's term of service to ensure that terms expire on a staggered basis. Adds the following to the commission's duties: (1) Establish baseline data regarding the number of individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment and set annual goals for increasing the percentage of individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. (2) Identify and resolve barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities.  (3) Analyze federal, state, and local agency policies concerning the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including the impact of those policies on opportunities for competitive integrated employment, and recommend changes to state policies. (4) Assist state agencies in the implementation of the policy concerning employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. (5) Provide an annual report to the governor and the rehabilitation services administration commissioner concerning the employment of individuals with disabilities. Provides that the policy (policy) of the state is to promote competitive integrated employment, including self-employment, as the first and preferred option when providing services to individuals with disabilities who are of working age.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Indiana ABLE Legislation S.B. 11 - 07/01/2016

ABLE savings accounts for persons with a disability.  This bill creates the “achieving a better life experience” (ABLE) authority (authority).  Establishes the ABLE board (board) of the authority.  Provides that the authority may establish a qualified ABLE program under which a person may make contributions for a table year for the benefit of an eligible individual with a disability to an ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary in compliance with federal law.  Sets forth duties and powers of the authority and the board. Establishes a general operating fund, endowment fund, and trust fund.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Senate Resolution No. 39 – “Employment First” - 03/08/2016

~~“Be it resolved by the Senate of the 14General Assembly of the State of Indiana:SECTION 1. That the Indiana Senate urges the legislative council to assign the topic of an Employment First Program, which promotes and expands quality, community employment outcomes for all people with disabilities to an appropriate study committee.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

IN 2015 Senate Resolution 38 - 04/15/2015

“A SENATE RESOLUTION urging the legislative council to assign the topic of an Employment First Program, which promotes and expands quality, community employment outcomes for all people with disabilities to an appropriate study committee.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

DDRS state funded services and program changes - 07/13/2020

“On May 21, 2020, Indiana’s State Budget Agency announced that each state agency was asked to immediately implement a 15% budget reduction. With this announcement, the Family and Social Services Administration has strived to meet the challenges of our state on many fronts and to continue to deliver critical services. In order to accomplish this, the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services had to make difficult decisions related to required budget reductions. DDRS administers services across the life span therefore this meant finding ways to meet budgetary requirements without impacting critical services to those who utilize programs such as First Steps, Medicaid home-and community-based services and Vocational Rehabilitation…

The state-funded programs that are being eliminated are caregiver supports, community based sheltered work and facility-based sheltered work… State-funded programs not currently impacted and will continue to be funded include: supported employment follow along services and OBRA services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Indiana Certificate of Completion - 07/16/2019

~~“The Course of Study for the Certificate of Completion is a framework for aligning curriculum to grade level standards while meeting the individual goals and transition needs stated in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Assistance - 07/01/2019

~~“With funding from the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provides services to Hoosier Veterans. Through the Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP), and the Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER) Program, Workforce Development Offices throughout the State are equipped to assist Hoosier Veterans with their transition from the service to civilian life. The DVOPs specialize in tailored training and job placement opportunities for veterans with service-connected disabilities. LVERs coordinate services provided veterans including counseling, testing, and identifying training and employment opportunities. Contact the nearest Indiana Workforce Development Office and ask for the location of the closest veteran's representative.”

Systems
  • Other

Indiana Disability Rights - 06/25/2019

~~“Provide Info & ResourcesWhy does Indiana Disability Rights provide information and referral first? Our Intake Advocates have over 30 years’ experience in the disability rights field. They will listen to you, and based on your individual situation, they will guide you to the best resources and organizations in Indiana. If we can't help, we have great partnerships with organizations that may be able to offer you the services you need.What kind of information can Indiana Disability Rights provide? We provide rights information for people with disabilities. We explain how to access social services (application process, complaint and appeal procedures). We make recommendations about how to access the help you need. We provide guidance on where to find digital resources. We may refer you to organizations that can address your issues.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FSSA Resource Guide - 04/24/2019

~~“This guide is designed to help providers and community- and faith-based organizations connect those who are in need with services we provide. It contains information about programs provided and administered by FSSA and a few other state agencies, and gives direction on how Hoosiers qualify to receive assistance from a variety of programs”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Portfolio Guidance 2019-2020 - 04/19/2019

~~“This document provides guidance for the development of a student portfolio which may serve as the  “Summary of Performance” under 511 IAC 7-43-7 of the Indiana Special Education Rule, Article 7. The Summary of Performance is defined  as a summary of the student with an IEP’s  academic achievement and functional performance, which must include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the students postsecondary goals, when a student graduates with a high school diploma, leaves school with a certification of completion, or exceeds the age eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hire Vets First - 02/17/2019

~“Indiana is committed to providing quality employment services to veterans at our WorkOne Centers. Veterans go to the front of the line and each office has an onsite veteran's representative that assists with employment needs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Citations

How the Indiana Office of Special Education Makes Determinations Under the Results Driven Accountability and Differentiated Support System - 11/27/2018

~“IDEA 2004 requires states to make annual “Determinations” on the performance of each Local Education Agency in implementing the requirements and purposes of the IDEA 2004, with regard to the provision of special education and related services. Determinations are a way of designating the status of local districts into one of four categories, as outlined in 34 CFR§ 300.600.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veteran Health Indiana Homeless Veterans - 10/29/2018

~“Each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. More about the program may be found by accessing the web-link.”

Systems
  • Other

Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) - 10/29/2018

~“CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.” More about the program may be found by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Employment First Community Workshop Series for Employers - 08/21/2018

~~“LIFEDesigns, a service provider in south central Indiana, will host a series with three activities focusing on the ADA and employment. The activities will begin in October, National Disability Employment Awareness Month. The activities will include a presentation on Employment First and the ADA, a networking event for employers and VR customers, and a community conversation on employment for people with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center – University of Indiana Bloomington

“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities, as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Indiana Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities “State Plan”

“Every five years, the Indiana Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities is required by federal law to develop a 5-year strategic plan, outlining goals, objectives and specific activities that will be implemented each year of the plan. With public input and guidance from the Administration on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities, the state plan is developed in accordance with requirements of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (DD Act). The 2017-2021 State Plan covers the time period from October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2021. It addresses specific information required by the federal Administration on Developmental Disabilities, and includes the Council's determination of areas of emphasis and resulting goals and objectives for the five-year time period. The Council must spend a minimum of 70 percent of its federal funding to address the Plan objectives. All programs and projects of the Council are to be conducted in a manner that respects individual differences and cultural diversity.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Family & Social Services Administration. (2011). Guiding Employment First in Indiana: A statewide plan for systems change.

“The organizations primarily represented in the strategic planning process are leaders from state and federal agencies, consumer and advocacy agencies, provider organizations and MIG project partners. …This plan will be implemented beginning in 2011 through 2015…By providing avenues of communication and convening high-level leadership within state agency divisions, the plan provides the opportunity to align initiatives, reduce duplication of effort and address goals for employment of individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies

Project Search

"Project SEARCH is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Indiana Governor’s Council for People With Disabilities

“The Indiana Governor's Council is an independent state agency that facilitates change. Our mission is to advance the independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of society. This mission is accomplished through planning, evaluation, collaboration, education, research and advocacy.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Indiana 2005 Employment First Coalition: Employment First—Investing in Success

“On September 29, 2005, the Employment First Coalition brought together Leaders of Government, Business, Labor, Community and Education and the non-profit sectors to create a strategic plan ensuring employment is an outcome for all Hoosiers with disabilities.” This fact sheet provides a summary of the outcomes of the summit.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Indiana Government “Guidelines for Disclosure ” - 07/22/2016

“When an individual discloses, he or she is intentionally releasing personal information about him or herself for a specific purpose. Some personal information, such as one’s Social Security number, banking records, or medical records may be important to keep confidential. It is important to keep in mind that the decision to disclose is a personal one and should be helpful to the individual. Remember that it is not essential that a person with a disability divulge all personal information about his or her disability. What is most important and helpful is to provide information about how his or her disability affects his or her capacity to learn and perform effectively, and the environment, supports, and services he or she will need in order to access, participate in, and excel in his or her job, studies, and community. The person with a disability must decide what and how much of this sensitive information is necessary to reveal in order to obtain the needed accommodations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Indiana Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2012, Indiana was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant ended in 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Indiana Money Follows the Person Grant

“The MFP program is funded through a grant from the federal agency, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007 and since that time has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their community.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana, Inc. (ASPIN) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, veteran families, small business owners, seasonal staff, immigrants, part-time workers, farmers, rural, and individuals with addictions or mental health diagnoses involved with the criminal justice system. In addition, navigators will assist consumers whose income fluctuates between income guidelines for insurance coverage and Medicaid. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Indiana Dept. of Insurance, State HUD office, Sheriff’s Association, Div. of Mental Health & Addictions, School Nurses Association, Pew Foundation, NAMI, IU Benefits Involvement Network, County corrections and jails, WIC offices, Local health departments, Bridges to Health, Exit Zero, Urban League, Mental Health America, Urban Ministries, Homeless shelters, Work One offices, Marion County Clerk’s office, Local Economic Development Corps, and the Small Business Administration  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.,Contact:Julia HollowayPhone: (317) 536-4683Email: jholloway@aspin.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center - 05/29/2019

~~“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs, and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

VR Vendor Information - 05/29/2019

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides individuals with disabilities, a wide range of services and supports necessary to help them prepare for, secure, retain, advance in or regain employment. VR services are available in all 92 Indiana counties and are individualized to meet the unique needs of each eligible individual. To carry out these services, VR partners with vendors across the state, who may be individuals, businesses or other organizations that provide services including, but not limited to the following:• Evaluation and treatment of an individual's disability;• Information and referral services;• Vocational counseling and training;• Job search and job placement assistance;• Rehabilitation Technology• Educational guidance or support (tuition resources and other support);• Physical and Mental Restoration• Transportation services;• Occupational tools and equipment;Personal attendant services (reader, interpreter, etc.).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Indiana APSE 2018 Conference - 11/07/2018

~~The 28th Annual IN-APSE Conference will take place November 7th and 8th, 2018 in Indianapolis at the Indianapolis Marriott East. We invite you to share your knowledge and expertise with IN-APSE professionals from across the state. The submission deadline will be June 29, 2018.

Session FormatSessions may use a variety of formats, including lecture with questions and answers, panel or town hall discussion, and interactive sessions.  We encourage sessions that actively engage participants. Presentation guidelines and tips will be provided with session acceptance notification.

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Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

2019 Conference on Disabilities - 05/01/2018

~~The Indiana Conference on Disability has moved to a biennial format; the next conference will take place in 2019. Information will be posted as updates become available.

 

Systems
  • Other

Up to $20 Million in Grants Available Through Department of Workforce Development’s Skill UP Indiana! Program - 06/05/2017

~~“The Indiana Department of Workforce Development’s (DWD) employer-driven Skill UP Indiana! Program is about to enter round three. At stake over a two-year period is a pool of up to $20 million in grant funding that is being made available to financially support Innovation Networks to provide more and better avenues for skill-specific training and certification.

“’We often hear from employers who tell us they cannot find qualified candidates to fill open high-wage, high demand positions,’” said Steve Braun, DWD Commissioner. ‘“The goal of Skill UP Indiana! is to encourage regional networks and industry partnerships that meet these employer needs through training, education and certification.’””

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

A Guide to Community Employment and Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) - 06/15/2015

“If you are interested in employment, VRS is a good place to start. This guide will help you learn more about Vocational Rehabilitation Services [Vocational Rehabilitation Services], what to expect, and how to prepare so that you have the right supports to find the job that is best for you.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services In*Source Training

HCBS Final Rule Two important aspects to this Rule: -The Person-Centered Planning Process is key! - All HCBS settings need to provide for: –Opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings –Engagement in community life –Control of personal resources –Opportunity to receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Pathways to Employment

“Pathways to Employment, a series of short films, celebrates seven unique individuals who prove that hi]ring people with developmental disabilities is "Good for Business, Good for People & Good for the Economy." The films were produced for the The Arc of Indiana by filmmaker Ken Oguss, with support from the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Money Follows the Person - 04/24/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person program is funded through a grant from the federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home- and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007. Since then, Indiana has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 01/03/2019

~“As a division of the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA), the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS) has two overarching responsibilities for children and adults with physical and cognitive disabilities: •Facilitate partnerships that enhance the quality of life. •Provide continuous, life-long support. The Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS) and the Bureau of Quality Improvement Services (BQIS) are under the DDRS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration “FAQ CMS Final Rule Impact on Non-Residential Services in Indiana” - 08/31/2016

“Sometimes referred to as the HCBS settings rule, the rule impacts all HCBS waiver programs administered by the Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA). The context of this FAQ addresses impact of the rule only on the Family Supports (FSW) and the Community Integration and Habilitation (CIH) Waivers serving individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities. The FSW and CIH waivers are administered by the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS)’s Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana HCBS Statewide Transition Plan Amended - 07/01/2016

~~“In January 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations to better define the settings in which states can provide Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS). The HCBS final rule became effective March 17, 2014. The HCBS settings final rule, along with additional guidance and fact sheets, is available on the CMS Home and Community-Based Services site.The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that members receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to review current HCBS programs and to develop a transition plan providing an assessment, strategies and timelines for compliance with the new rules.The programs currently under review include 1915(c) HCBS Waivers and 1915(i) HCBS State Plan programs operated by the following divisions within the Family and Social Services Administration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Statewide HCBS Transition Plan - 12/10/2014

“Effective March 17, 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have issued regulations that define the settings in which it is permissible for states to pay for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS). The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated and that support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS. These changes will maximize the opportunities for participants in HCBS programs to have access to the benefits of community living and to receive services in the most integrated setting. The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) has created a Statewide Transition Plan to assess compliance with the HCBS Rule and identify strategies and timelines for coming into compliance with the new rule as it relates to all FSSA HCBS programs. States must be in full compliance with the federal requirements by the time frame approved in the Statewide Transition Plan but no later than March 17, 2019.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

IN Community Integration and Habilitation (0378.R03.00) - 10/01/2014

Provides adult day, prevocational, rent and food for unrelated live-in caregiver, residential hab and support, respite, supported employment follow along, OT, PT, psychological therapy, speech/language therapy, adult foster care, behavioral support, community based hab-group, community based hab-individual, community transition, electronic monitoring, environmental mods, facility based hab-group, facility based hab-individual, facility based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavior intervention, music therapy, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, workplace assistance for individuals w/autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Employment First Systems Change Statewide Plan (2011-2015) - 02/11/2011

“Through the use of MIG funds, Indiana has made a number of improvements to the state’s infrastructure supporting employment of IWD. While Indiana has been a leader in many aspects of employment supports and the use of innovative practices, the state realizes that ongoing efforts are necessary to improve employment outcomes, economic outlook and the overall well-being of IWD."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

IN Family Support Services (0387.R02.00) - 04/01/2010

Provides adult day, case management, prevocational, respite, supported employment follow along, OT, PT, psychological therapy, speech/language therapy, behavioral support services, community based hab-group, community based hab-individual, facility based hab-group, facility based hab-individual, facility based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavioral intervention, music therapy, participant assistance and care, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, workplace assistance for individuals w/autism, MR, DD ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Notice of Public Comment Period for Statewide Transition Plan

“Notice is hereby given that the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) will submit to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) a revision to Indiana's Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations of 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)-(2). Additional information on the Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the federal regulations of 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)-(2) can also be found at http://www.in.gov/fssa/4917.htm .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Money Follows the Person

“The MFP program is funded through a grant from the federal agency, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007 and since that time has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their community.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Start your engines for fast paced jobs in the Crossroads of America! The state of Indiana is ready for workers with disabilities to cross the finish line of career success! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Indiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
6,732,219
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
467,446
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
183,819
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
39.32%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.13%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.73%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 6,666,818 6,691,878 6,732,219
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 477,660 472,444 467,446
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 184,343 178,093 183,819
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,778,797 2,826,602 2,832,590
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.59% 37.70% 39.32%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.65% 79.83% 79.73%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.30% 3.40% 3.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.40% 20.50% 19.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.40% 12.00% 10.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 446,521 433,422 437,015
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 468,531 461,646 457,720
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 786,393 765,177 764,451
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 87,124 87,025 84,964
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 38,356 34,450 34,758
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,233 3,114 5,234
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,519 7,730 8,576
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 21,427 20,764 19,842
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,145 10,648 11,361

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,841 6,841 6,923
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.50% 5.50% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 205,562 201,734 198,695

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 18,747 19,079 18,554
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 32,810 35,500 30,628
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 71,357 69,656 68,802
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 26.30% 27.40% 27.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.30% 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.80% 5.50% 3.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 0.80% 0.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 26.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,203 1,038 1,108
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 4,800 4,475 2,752
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 879 647 678
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A 21,355

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,186 11,335 10,590
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 982 1,197 521
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 539 640 292
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 53.00% 56.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 8.20 9.67 4.41

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 31.00% 34.00% 29.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 9,702 10,469 10,923
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 300,521 297,747 296,180
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 250 493 592
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 339 385 421

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,278,000 $2,659,000 $2,213,972
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,522,000 $15,625,000 $17,778,195
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,738,000 $26,254,000 $31,433,606
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $42,837,000 $45,873,000 $27,220,719
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 10.00% 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 11,428 12,741 9,461
Number of people served in facility based work. 4,748 4,712 4,552
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 6,877 7,346 7,605
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.00 25.80 22.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 71.40% 72.62% 73.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.42% 9.84% 9.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.02% 1.86% 1.82%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 86.36% 85.47% 86.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 30.00% 31.15% 36.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.71% 70.49% 63.78%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.14% 86.07% 88.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.71% 39.34% 27.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,825,018
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,360
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 238,730
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 283,720
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 522,451
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 515
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 258
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 773
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,426,931
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,636,380

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 34 40 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35 41 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,457 3,590 615
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,457 3,590 615

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Indiana Association of People Supporting Employment First (IN-APSE): BRS and IN-APSE share a common mission in that competitive, integrated employment should be the first and preferred option for all individuals with disabilities. BRS participates in IN-APSE events including the annual IN-APSE conference, and BRS staff regularly participate in planning as well as presenting at the conference. The IN-APSE statement on Employment First is based on several underlying principles including a presumption that all work age adults and youth with disabilities can work in jobs fully integrated with the general workforce, earning minimum wage or higher; and that employees with disabilities, as with all other individuals, require assistance and support to ensure job success and should have access to adequate, long term supports necessary to succeed in the workplace. These underlying principles are very much in line with BRS priorities, especially in light of WIOA and enhanced requirements to ensure that individuals receiving counseling, information and referral regarding alternatives to subminimum wage employment.

Other: VR maintains a collaborative working relationship with several advocacy and consumer support groups and organizations with a presence in Indiana. These include: the National Employment Team (The NET) which includes a national network of the 80 public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs supports a united or “one company” approach to working with business customers. The NET vision is to create a coordinated approach to serving business customers through a national VR team that specialized in employer development, business consulting and corporate relations; the Indiana Resource Center for Families with Special Needs (INSOURCE); the Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities in Indiana (INARF); the Indiana Council of Community Mental Health Centers, Employment Committee; and the Arc of Indiana. Input from many of these groups is obtained through various workgroups such as the transition advisory council and the VR employment advisory group. (Page 139) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title IV

VR purchases an array of services from a variety of vendors and community rehabilitation providers. Community Rehabilitation Providers specifically provide discovery, employment services, vocational evaluation, job shadow, placement, and supported employment services. VR promotes consumer choice in the provision of services. There are a total of 90 agencies with Provider Agreements for providing employment services in Indiana. Purchased employment services follow a new Employment Service Model that is based on a consumer-centric, individualized, and flexible outcome-based payment model, blended with an hourly fee-for-service structure for Discovery activities and Supported Employment services. (Information regarding the VR Employment Services Model may be found at www.vrs.in.gov.) The 90 providers include Community Rehabilitation Programs and Community Mental Health Centers. (Page 144) Title IV

In 2015, Indiana made major changes to its Employment Services Model. While retaining many of the components of the Results Based Funding (RBF) system, the rate structure now also includes hourly fees for services such as Discovery and for additional work place supports that are needed by consumers. Extensive trainings were held statewide, over the course of several months, to explain the new model and to address questions and concerns on the changes. Those who attended the trainings were primarily from VR and community rehabilitation programs, but individuals from the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services, DWD, advocates, and school personnel were also in attendance. (Page 162) Title IV

Employment services include discovery services, job readiness training, outcome-based employment services, supported employment services, on-the-job supports short-term, and job search/job placement assistance. Specific allowable costs are limited to costs of staffing to increase capacity to carry out employment services to VR applicable or eligible individuals, and costs to improve and expand training for employment services staff. Training methods consist of new and/or enhanced classroom-based and hands-on training, ensuring staff appropriately apply supports and techniques with ongoing coaching and mentoring. Quarterly reporting of measureable objectives provides BRS with progress updates on improved timeliness of initiation of services; increased provisions of SE services or on-the-job supports short-term; and increased quality and quantity of competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

Introductory one-day training on Discovery was attended by 285 individuals. A more detailed, two-day training on the Discovery process was held statewide, with 268 individuals attending from over 74 community rehabilitation programs. Indiana currently has VR employment service agreements with 89 community rehabilitation programs across the state. (Page 163) Title IV

Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury (Page 163) Title IV

What are the main needs of students and you with disabilities? The WIOA legislation continues to be a main focus for Vocational Rehabilitation and other state agencies. A major focus area is the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to studentswith disabilities, which includes: 1) job exploration counseling 2) work based learning opportunities 3) counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education 4) workplace readiness training and 5) self-advocacy. The recent revisions to the VR Employment Service Model increase emphasis on Discovery activities through an enhanced menu of services and a modified funding structure that funds discovery services individually instead of through a milestone payment. These revisions are especially timely in light of the new requirement for VR to utilize 15% of Title I funds for Pre-ETS. Discovery activities include services such as job shadowing, situational assessments, work experiences, informational interviews, vocational counseling and guidance, vocational testing and other services needed to evaluate consumer strengths, interests, abilities and ideal work conditions. (Page 168) Title IV

What are your perceived needs to improve Community Employment Programs?
Are there service gaps? If so, what? 147 80% Is there a need for expanded services? If so, in what area? 93 51% Is there a need for additional staff development? If so in what area? 115 63% Are there needed Improvements in service delivery? If so what? 96 52%
Gaps were identified, specifically, coordination of services between agencies and staff turnover at all agencies. The need for expanded services, including transition services and services to rural areas was also mentioned. Staff development needs were identified in the areas of job coaching and development. Improvements were noted again in the area of communication between agencies.
Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury. (Page 163) Title IV

Goal 2: VR Supported Employment providers will increase knowledge and skills on the provision of supported employment services, including greater understanding and focus on development of natural supports, job readiness training techniques, customized employment, and strategies for achieving stabilization on the job.
Measure: BRS will invest in training for supported employment providers including classroom-based, web-based, and hands-on workshops that focus on job coaching and job readiness training techniques. BRS will examine strategies for improvement of community rehabilitation providers to ensure capacity to carry out increased expectations under the new model, such as provision of funding for Establishment projects. At least 500 individuals will attend training annually, beginning in FFY16. (Page 186) Title IV

With the employment service changes, VR has collaborated with IIDC and Griffin and Hammis to provide additional training and technical assistance to Community Rehabilitation Providers and VR in the area of Discovery statewide. The training focused on Discovery, which is an individualized information gathering process that will guide employment services for the consumer. The training provided a framework to develop and implement a person-centered employment plan. While Discovery is important for many consumers, it is critical for consumers with the most significant disabilities and has an impact on their supported employment needs. VR continues to work collaboratively with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS), the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA), the Department of Education, IIDC, INARF, INAPSE, the Arc of Indiana, and other key stakeholders to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for consumers with the most significant disabilities through supported employment. Interagency collaboration will aim to increase the quality of SE services, including customized employment, and ensure appropriate extended services are appropriately utilized when necessary for long-term supports.  (Page 187) Title IV

Key revisions included: • Increased focus and re-emphasis on Discovery and Supports needed to achieve true stabilization; • Discovery activities are provided prior to milestone payments, funded per activity, and are no longer paid under a milestone. The menu of VR-funded Discovery activities is greatly enhanced. • SE services (including ongoing support services) funding is available in addition to milestone payments. • Increased flexibility to allow for more individualization based on consumer needs; • Elimination of 2 separate tiered milestone payments • Development of 3 new Milestones: o Milestone 1 = Job Development and Placement (1 week on the job) o Milestone 2 = Support and Short-term Retention (4 weeks on the job) o Milestone 3 = Retention (90 days AFTER stabilization) • Reduced financial incentive to quickly reach ‘stabilization’ and closure by ensuring adequate supports are available, including up to 24 months of VR-funded SE services to ensure true stabilization. • Changes to rates and expectations • Increased VR Counselor engagement in the employment services process This year, VR also continued its presence on social media, including Twitter and Facebook. Social media followers has nearly doubled from 2016 to 2017, and this platform helps communicate a consistent message about the program. (Page 188) Title IV

One of the key VR employment service revisions is an increase in VR-funded Discovery activities. The menu of services and activities that is available through the Discovery process has been enhanced, and may include work experience, situational assessments, job shadows, informational interviews, vocational testing, and other related activities. BRS recognizes the importance of Discovery for job seekers with disabilities, and particularly for youth or other individuals with disabilities who have little or no work history, or a history of jobs that were not quite the right ‘fit.’ Through an evaluation of the revised employment services model, implemented July, 2015, individuals receiving services through a CRP received, on average, 22.3 hours of discovery at the end of FFY 2017. VR has also increased outreach and education to transition aged youth, including development of a brief video that has been widely disbursed including posted through social media. BRS has a dedicated youth services director, as well as a youth services coordinator, who have worked to expand and improve relationships with key transition stakeholders, largely through facilitation of the VR Transition Advisory Council, engaging in one-on-one conversations, and presenting and educating various stakeholder groups about VR and pre-employment transition services. The Transition Advisory Council has been instrumental in increasing outreach and education related to transition aged youth. Specifically, collaboration with representatives from IIDC, DOE, and DWD on the council has aided in outreach to school systems, training of educators on transition, VR, and pre-ETS, and services available to transition-aged youth through DWD and other sources. In late 2017, student mentoring days were held at two separate business sites (an automotive manufacturing plant and a plastics manufacturer) in partnership with local schools, self-advocates of Indiana, and the local Work One. (Pages 189-190) Title IV

As mentioned above, the VR employment service revisions implemented July 2015 increased access to discovery activities and supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who require supported employment services. The previous RBF model did not always allow for appropriate service provision or provide a funding structure necessary for those VR consumers with the most significant disabilities who have very high support needs. (Pages 191-192) Title IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 3.3: Both the number of training opportunities and training topics increased in 2016. As an example, a ‘check and connect’ webinar training series was implemented in 2016 in partnership with Indiana University’s Center on Community Living and Careers, Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (CCLC/IIDC), which has featured topics on supported employment, discovery, customized employment, and a variety of other topics. Additionally, CCLC/IIDC under contract with BRS, provided one-on-one training and technical assistance to more than 20 CRPs in 2016 and 2017. Additionally, BRS entered into Establishment project contracts with 47 CRPs in 2017 for the purpose of enhancing training and building sufficient staffing capacity to provide high-quality, responsive services to VR applicants and eligible individuals. Through this funding, CRP’s have been able to increase the provision of training, including hands-on foundational skills training, to their direct services staff. (Page 197) Title IV

Outcome: Achieved: BRS, in partnership with Indiana University, offered ample training opportunities to VR providers throughout 2016 and 2017, including a refresher on employment services, employment specialist training, supported employment, discovery, customized employment, and additional training topics. Hundreds of individuals participate in webinars throughout 2016 including a web-based training series called ‘check and connect’ that is focused on employment services. In March/April 2016, approximately 350 Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) staff attended a half-day refresher training on the revised VR employment service model, including training regarding supported employment services. Well over half of CRPs participated in at least one training event in 2016.
Goal 3: VR will increase the quantity and quality of job outcomes for students and youth with the most significant disabilities through Project SEARCH. (Page 198) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~DWD or agency partners will conduct training for One-stop office staff, (including youth staff), to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. VR, Mental Health Centers, and the Department of Correction will also be invited to attend these events and asked to present on relevant topics. Disability Resource Coordinators sustained through Indiana’s Disability Employment Initiative (IN-DEI) grant will be utilized as subject matter experts in the field and also assist with training staff on serving individuals with disabilities. Best practices will be identified by these coordinators and shared with the WDBs for implementation when appropriate.

Within the One-stop offices, staff have been and will be further trained to follow established procedures to ensure inclusion and compliance. Starting with intake, staff is trained to ask every customer if they require accommodations during the intake process. Customer and One-stop office staff orientations should include a discussion of Equal Opportunity (EO) and the right to file a complaint. Following orientation, services should be reviewed with the client by determining the client’s eligibility and need for services in an integrated setting. Ongoing training will need to occur to educate staff on the services, funding, and the resources available to determine when it is appropriate to refer to partner agencies and possibly blend funding. Agency partners will seek to coordinate efforts and leverage funding between partner agencies to meet the employment and training needs of the customer. Memorandums of Understanding may be developed or reviewed, as necessary, to outline the responsibilities of each partner. (Page 72) Title I

BENEFITS COUNSELING VR should continue to support benefits counseling as this is a key concern for families. It was recommended that benefits counseling resources and knowledge be shared across WIOA core partners. This could be achieved through collaboration with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Grants, through education and training of WIOA partners, and be exploring the availability of benefits counseling in the local Work One centers.

VR Response: VR plans to continue to support benefits counseling through the funding of the Benefits Information Network (BIN), and agrees that counseling on the impact of working on benefits and available federal and state work incentives is critical in helping consumers to make informed choices about working and in working toward self-sufficiency. VR will include discussion on the importance of benefits counseling in conversations with WIOA partners. (Page 133) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Commission also suggested that further exploration is necessary on the provision of work experience services to students, including those working toward a High School diploma. Financial literacy and self-disclosure are also important issues for individuals with disabilities and VR is encouraged to ensure resources are in place to meet these needs. Additional suggestions regarding services to youth with disabilities included looking at best practices from a School-to-work pilot project utilizing career coaches in schools and providing work experiences prior to a student’s exit from school.

VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title I

School to Work Transition

~~Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program (http://www.in.gov/fssa/ddrs/4901.htm) provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. (Page 14) Title I

Host work-and-learn events: Indiana, through the Indiana Career Council, the Indiana Works Councils and other partners, is hosting an event on 11/10/15 that will focus on successful programs across the state that are creating learning opportunities for students and educators, through a variety of methods, programs, and experiences. The inaugural Indiana Sectors Summit was held in October 2016 to grow and expand sector partnerships across Indiana, as well as continue to explore how we utilize sector partnerships as the vehicle to develop industry-driven career pathways in Indiana. To continue the momentum and progress generated from the summit, DWD contracted with Jobs for the Future (JFF) to provide strategic guidance, training, technical assistance and support including facilitation and planning of the 2016 Indiana Sectors Summit, mapping where sector partnerships exist and the assets that support sector partnership development, convening stakeholders for working groups and regional workshops, and organization and planning of the 2017 Indiana Sectors Summit. The second annual summit was held in November 2017 with the goal to deepen understanding and relationships between launching, advancing, and/or sustaining sector partnerships in collaboration with the Skill UP 3 grant opportunity incorporating tailored technical assistance requested from local partners. More information can be found at http://www.in.gov/dwd/sectorpartnerships.htm.

o Collaborate with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 504 overview materials for Indiana based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) and resources for employers. (Page 35) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. (Pages 44-45) Title I

Staff will also be trained to use multiple resources and tools to ensure accessibility to services. One such resource that staff will be encouraged to use is the Guidepost for Success, which is a set of key educational and intervention strategies for youth, including those with disabilities. Additionally, One-stop assessments, Individual Education Program (IEPs), and Academic and Career Planning (ACPs) tools will continue to be utilized to identify career paths, barriers to employment, training or service needs, and employability skills. These assessments will also assist with identifying hidden disabilities and the potential need for accommodations. DWD and agency partners will implement policies to support accessibility to services throughout the state. Development of a Reasonable Accommodation Policy will be explored that requires the WDBs to formally track when a reasonable accommodation is requested and whether it is approved or denied. This policy may include, but will not be limited to: the process for handling and tracking reasonable accommodation requests; examples of reasonable accommodations (i.e., frequent breaks, ensuring a quiet testing environment, reading the test aloud); providing training and information regarding One-stop procedures; and a process for notifying the state regarding the approval/denial of the request(s). The state will track both informal and formal complaints received in the One-stop offices through the State’s Quarterly Customer Service Record Log, located at http://www.in.gov/dwd/files/complaint log.xls . This will help the state identify any patterns for alleged discrimination of individuals with disabilities. Along these same lines, when DWD or a One-stop office removes a job order that prohibits individuals with disabilities from applying, the employer’s contact information will be logged on the Quarterly Customer Service Record Log for tracking purposes. (Pages 72-73) Title I

The Commission also suggested that further exploration is necessary on the provision of work experience services to students, including those working toward a High School diploma. Financial literacy and self-disclosure are also important issues for individuals with disabilities and VR is encouraged to ensure resources are in place to meet these needs. Additional suggestions regarding services to youth with disabilities included looking at best practices from a School-to-work pilot project utilizing career coaches in schools and providing work experiences prior to a student’s exit from school.

VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title IV

As of December, 2017, progress from the work plan touched on all 5 of the goals identified by the group: early work experience, postsecondary education, family expectations, system integration, seamless transition, and professional supports and incentives. These accomplishments included over 61,000 early work experiences being provided to students with disabilities statewide, over 3,000 sessions related to education on postsecondary options provided to students with disabilities, outreach to families and educators related to transition expectations through webinars and in-person trainings sponsored by IN*Source, About Special Kids, and local transition cadres, training to pre-ETS providers on supplementing rather than supplanting training available through local education agencies to ensure seamless transition and system integration, as well as discussion of appropriate qualifications for transition providers. VR works closely with IIDC at IU on several transition-related priorities. IIDC promotes partnerships between Indiana schools and various state agencies and other support organizations. IIDC’s focus is on career development, secondary education, and transition to adult life. As part of the need to establish an infrastructure and ensure sustainability of transition services, including pre-ETS, VR works with the existing Transition Cadres in Indiana. Established in 2011 and dedicated to improving secondary transition outcomes for students, a network of Transition Cadres throughout Indiana (funded by DOE) is working collaborative, both regionally and statewide. The efforts are focused on implementing promising practices and creating innovative strategies, tools, and resources for teachers and other transition professionals. VR has provided training on VR and its services to the Cadres and is attending the regularly scheduled cadre meetings to continue the joint collaboration. For more information please see: http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/cadre-leaders. In coordination with IIDC, VR developed written informational materials for educators and students. Three VR fact sheets, entitled “Working with Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation” are in the process of being updated to include information on pre-ETS, order of selection, and other programmatic updates. The fact sheets provide resources for students, teachers, and families about VR at students’ Transition IEP meetings. Another important informational and educational tool that was created to improve outreach and education about VR is the “Working with Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation” Video. This video provides a quick 5 minute overview of VR in an entertaining manner in hopes to provide a unique mode of educating transition-aged students and families. (Video may be viewed at www.vrs.in.gov.) VR has counselors assigned to each school for outreach and education to teachers, students, and parents. These VR counselors collaborate with the school staff to enable a seamless transition to life after high school. The goal for each student is for a VR application to be completed, and, for eligible consumers who are being served, to have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place, before exiting high school. LEA’s and VR confer at least one time per year to identify students who may require VR services. VR Counselors are invited to IEP meetings and make it a priority to attend when schedules permit. VR counselors and/or area supervisors are also involved in local transition councils if they exist in the community. Councils are made up of local stakeholders who are involved in the transition from school to work and adult life. Councils could include students/family, school personnel, service providers, etc. In addition, VR is responsible for providing written information to students and their families regarding adult services. (Page 142) Title IV

VR and DOE maintain an interagency agreement, which was updated in recent years to capture expanded federal requirements under WIOA. The interagency agreement states that: the roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities and methods for determining which partner agency and qualified personnel is responsible for transition services are: 1. The student’s Transition IEP will define the services and responsible payer for each of the services. If VR is responsible for payment of a service, this responsibility will be described in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). 2. Each agency will maximize coordination in the use of federal funds. 3. Decisions related to which entity will be financially responsible for providing transition or pre-ETS that can be considered both a special education and a VR service must be made at the local level as part of the collaboration between the VR agency, state educational agency, and the local educational agency. The Partner Agencies will collaborate to develop the required procedures and processes that VR area offices and local educational agencies will use when considering and assigning the financial responsibility of each agency for the provision of transition and pre-ETS to students with disabilities. The required procedures and processes will be based, at least in part, on the following criteria: a. Is the purpose of the service related to an employment outcome or education? b. Is the service one that the school customarily provides under IDEA, Part B? c. Is the student receiving special education services 14 years or older or entered grade 9? 4. The partner agencies will develop procedures and processes for outreach efforts and identification of eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities. These efforts will occur as early as possible during the transition process and will include: a description of pre-ETS available to students who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services; the purpose of the VR program; eligibility requirements; application process; and the scope of services that may be provided to eligible individuals. Any formal training on the topic of transition from school to adult life will include appropriate stakeholders, e.g., VR area office staff, school personnel, and students/families. The interagency agreement between VR and DOE is in the process of being reviewed and will be updated by June, 2018. The review of the interagency agreement between VR and DOE will include an assessment of current strategies and identification of new strategies to maximize transition opportunities for students. This will include the types of consultation and technical assistance VR will provide to educational agencies, methods that VR can use to provide consultation and technical assistance, including through alternative means, such as conference calls and webinars, how DOE and VR will work together in the development and facilitation of the IEP and IPE, cross-training opportunities between the VR and DOE, and coordination with non-educational agencies for out-of-school youth.  (As appropriate, describe the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

VR has a Statewide Transition Coordinator on staff to train and notify VR field staff of all changes and initiatives related to working with transition-aged students. In addition, VR will be adding a Statewide Transition Director. IIDC continues to serve as a transition resource to VR and DOE. Training and technical assistance is offered statewide and the targeted audience is parents, students, school officials, VR professionals, and CRP staff. Initiatives are currently ongoing to develop and update transition guides that will be available to all appropriate stakeholders. The Transition Alliance workgroup will be expanded in the coming year to serve as an advisory group pertaining to statewide VR Transition initiatives. Partners who sit on this group include parent advocates, DOE, schools, DWD, VR, IIDC, etc. VR is investigating opportunities for cross-training with VR and appropriate school personnel. Targeted training and technical assistance is ongoing for the VR field staff; specifically, VR has held webinars and face-to-face trainings on transition-related topics, such as special education overview, Transition IEPs, 504 Plans, special education eligibility, transition services, etc. All of these strategies will support VRs’ priority to increase outreach efforts and access to VR services for transition aged youth (Pages 144- 145) Title IV

Gap in services from school to work (student leaves school without connections to services) • Lack of information on available services • Concerns related to loss of Social Security benefits or health benefits • Lack of timeliness of services, that is, time from referral to job placement • Lack of high expectations from families • Lack of high expectations from school and agency personnel What strategies do you recommend to improve/expand VR services for students and youth with disabilities? The 250 respondents to this question gave a variety of responses. The most frequently noted was to have VR involved with students at a much earlier age, which would include having more frequent presence of VR counselors in the school and dedicated transition counselors. It was noted that better coordination is needed with the schools and VR. Another strategy that was frequently mentioned was that of more involvement with families to address expectations and impact of work on benefits. (Page 162) Title IV

Priority 1.4: Ensure VR staff is trained, highly knowledgeable, and are providing information on services across WIOA core programs, and other appropriate programs that may assist individuals with disabilities achieve their employment outcome. New staff will participate in both web-based and classroom-based training throughout, at minimum, the first year of employment.
Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A plan for joint data collection will be developed by the end of FFY17.

GOAL 2: Increase the number of people with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment. (Pages176-177) Title IV

Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 503 overview materials for Indiana-based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A strategy for required collection and report of business engagement efforts will be identified by late 2017. (Page 193) Title I

Indiana’s Supported Employment (SE) services are highly individualized and involve ongoing support services and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain an individual with the most significant disability (MSD), including youth with the most significant disabilities in SE for a period of time that generally does not exceed 24 months. Such services, such as job coaching, are for individuals who have SE and long-term supports identified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Often, because of the nature and severity of the individuals’ disability, there is a need for extended services that are provided by a State agency, private nonprofit organization, natural supports, or any other appropriate resources that are funded outside of VR. VR funding is available for the provision of extended services to Youth with a MSD, for a period not to exceed four years, if the youth has exhausted 24 months of SE services, and is not eligible for extended services through other agencies. Eligible VR participants with the most significant disabilities obtain SE services through Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) across the state. The service delivery requirements are to provide appropriate ongoing support services to individuals with MSD for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred, or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of the significance of the disability, and who requires SE services. SE services are provided from the time of job placement through achievement of stabilization and retention (90 days after stabilization). The expected outcome of SE services is to ensure that stabilization on the job has appropriately occurred after a period of gradually decreasing needed supports and a correlated demonstration of increased independence. The intensive level of support needs should be well-documented by the CRPs in the Employment Support and Retention Plan, and the expectation of fading (i.e., decreasing the amount of support as a consumer becomes more proficient in completing job duties) is important to reach optimal independence. VR acknowledges that fading of supports may not always occur in a completely linear process, and levels of SE support may ebb and flow depending on the needs of the individual. However, a pattern of increased independence and reduced need for support (fading) should be evident prior to the identification that stabilization has occurred for an individual needing SE services. More specifics regarding Supported Employment may be found in the Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services — Manual of Employment Services at www.vrs.in.gov. (Pages 199- 200) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~VR Response: VR plans to continue to support benefits counseling through the funding of the Benefits Information Network (BIN), and agrees that counseling on the impact of working on benefits and available federal and state work incentives is critical in helping consumers to make informed choices about working and in working toward self-sufficiency. VR will include discussion on the importance of benefits counseling in conversations with WIOA partners. (Page 133) Title IV

The Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS) and Office of Medicaid Policy and Procedure (OMPP) maintain a written agreement to outline responsibilities in serving consumers. This MOU states that OMPP has financial responsibility for necessary medical services covered by Indiana’s Medicaid Program for consumers who are eligible for both VR and Medicaid. VR has provided education and outreach regarding Indiana’s Medicaid buy-in program (called M.E.D. Works) to increase access to competitive, integrated employment for individuals with disabilities receiving Medicaid. Through the VR-funded Benefits Information Network (BIN), VR consumers also receive information about M.E.D. Works and how this program can enable them to both work and maintain their needed Medicaid benefits. The BIN process also educates VR consumers to make overall informed choices about working, providing education not only about the impact on Medicaid, but also the impact on other federal and state benefits, and the use of federal and state work incentives to assist in achieving gainful employment. (Page 147) Title IV

FFY17 ACTUAL (Applicants: 10,942; Eligible: 8,777) FFY18 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,050; Eligible: 8,860) FFY19 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,160; Eligible: 8,950) FFY20 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,270; Eligible: 9,040) FFY21 ESTIMATE (Applicants: 11,380; Eligible: 9,130) It is anticipated that VR will see a similar trend in the number of applicants, or an increase in applicants and eligible consumers in the coming years, due to increased outreach and education at schools statewide through the provision of pre-employment transition services, and through outreach to individuals employed at sub-minimum wage through provision of career counseling and information and referral services. VR is planning outreach efforts aimed at increasing VR applicants and expects the application trend to gradually increase over the next several years. A counselor-consumer ratio of not more than 1:100 is best practice to maintain efficient caseload management and quality service. As the number of applicants and people who are eligible are anticipated to increase, the number of staff needed to meet consumer needs may increase as well. As of this submission, 35 VR Counselors, 11 VR Case Coordinators, 5 secretaries, 5 area supervisors, and 2 regional managers are eligible for retirement.

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years 1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 175 11 35 2 VR Area Supervisors 22 0 5 3 VR Region Managers 4 0 2 4 BRS Management/Leadership Staff 7 0 1 5 VR Case Coordinators 60 0 11 6 VR Area Secretaries 19 8 5 7 Blind/VI/Deaf programs 7 1 2 8 BRS Central Office Staff 16 2 5
ii. the number of personnel currently needed by the State agency to provide VR services, broken down by personnel category; and
Please see response to A(i) above
iii. projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the State agency to provide VR services in 5 years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors. (Pages 148-149) Title IV

Identified training needs for Job Site Training and Supports were: • Developing employment support and retention plans • Teaching social and self-management skills • Developing and building natural supports • Developing accommodations • Onsite systematic instruction and support strategies
Off-site support training needs included: • Developing employment support and retention plans • Teaching social and self-management skills • Strategies for anger management and anxiety reduction • Benefits planning and management (social security and work incentives) • Other (time management, marking VR to partner agencies, training for job coaches and VR vendors, peer communication on job, fiscal/billing, soft skills)
Survey participants identified that they wanted training to be a hybrid of face-to-face and webinars. From the information generated, Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services is working with the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (IIDC) at Indiana University to provide the needed training. (Page 164) Title IV

BRS is working to implement an electronic claims payment system to streamline billing processes and anticipates this system to ‘go-live’ in 2018. While much improvement has been realized through efforts to improve staff capacity, including decreased retention and improved retention seen over the past several months, overall challenges with staff capacity remain. With the addition of new federal requirements under WIOA, BRS is forecasting an annual budget deficit starting with federal fiscal year 2018. While the VR Federal grant provides sufficient resources to Indiana, BRS is unable to draw all federal funds due to insufficient non-federal match dollars. BRS does not have sufficient funds to serve all eligible individuals, increase staffing and comply with all requirements under WIOA, including earmarking 15% of federal funds for pre-employment transition services, provision of career counseling and information and referral services to over 4,000 individuals employed at sub-minimum wage, and participating in infrastructure funding agreements to support the operation of One Stop locations throughout the state. BRS has identified and implemented several cost savings initiatives over the past few years, however even with the initiatives outlined below, a budget gap of approximately $5 million is anticipated, starting in FFY18. (Page 182) Title IV

BRS does not have sufficient resources to serve eligible individuals who are SD or NSD who require specific services or equipment to maintain employment, with the exception of providing specific services or equipment for individuals in post-employment services. Post-employment services are limited to individuals who had previously achieved a successful employment outcome and require additional services to maintain, re-enter, or advance in employment and are of limited scope and duration. BRS will be sharing relevant resources with individuals unable to be served by VR who are in need of assistance to obtain or maintain employment, such as facilitating a referral to the local Work One. Other resources may include Ticket to Work Employment Networks, Centers for Independent Living, College and Universities, the IN Data Assistive Technology program, and other state and local resources. (Page 185) Title IV

With the VR employment service changes mentioned above, VR and BDDS worked collaboratively to update an extended service definition for Indiana’s Family Supports Waiver and Community Integration and Habilitation Waiver in order to clarify extended services activities and compliment the supported employment changes made in VR. Both changes became effective on July 1, 2015.
Extended services are ongoing support and other appropriate services that are needed to support and maintain a youth with a most significant disability in supported employment and that are provided by a State agency, a private nonprofit organization, employer, or any other appropriate resource. There are times when extended services are required for the youth to maintain employment but may not be available through traditional sources (e.g., the youth does not qualify for BDDS funding or a Medicaid Waiver, or natural supports are not available). In these instances, VR may provide funding to assist youth with the most significant disabilities in maintaining an employment outcome in supported employment. (Page 186) Title IV

BRS has partnered with the Arc of Indiana and Self-Advocates of Indiana to provide career counseling and information and referral services (CCIR) to individuals employed at subminimum wage. CCIR services are provided in a one-on-one or group setting. Group settings include a presentation which incorporated videos and success stories; and typically occurs at the sub-minimum wage employee’s worksite during the lunch hour. Guardians are welcome and encouraged to attend. During the presentation, attendees receive information about local resources regarding employment services and other-related information; discuss potential competitive, integrated employment opportunities and ways to learn more about a new career field (i.e. informational interviewing or job-shadowing); and discuss the importance of seeking assistance and guidance from a support network, such as family members or friends. Following the Q&A portion of the presentation, attendees receive a certificate of participation documenting completion of the CCIR activities, and the Arc submits a copy of each certificate to BRS for record-keeping purposes. (Page 192) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~DWD is in the process of implementing a customer relationship management tool for employer engagement activities tracking. DWD and VR will utilize this tool to track employer engagement activities, share data across agencies, and report federally from a single data source.
o Evaluate the employment and training services being provided to recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), identifying options for consolidating programs and services that would increase coordination, efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability. In 2017 the FSSA awarded the contract for TANF and SNAP services to a new vendor. DWD was part of the scoring committee. This vendor change will allow more collaboration and coordination at the local level for clients who are recipients of TANF/SNAP and DWD services. (Page 31) Title I

Collaborate with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 504 overview materials for Indiana based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) and resources for employers. (Page 34) Title I

Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (individuals who have functional limitations to employment in three or more areas) and Supported Employment (providing job coaching and additional supports to individuals as needed) needs:
What barriers exist in serving individuals through supported employment?
Employer Engagement (how to involve employers):
What strategies would enhance the engagement of employers in assisting individuals with disabilities, including students, in obtaining integrated employment (employment in the community with at least minimum wage)?
What services or resources would be beneficial to support employers in hiring individuals with disabilities (e.g., disability awareness training, ADA workplace accommodations, etc.)?
What do you see as barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities?
Partnerships with the statewide workforce development system (i.e. WorkOnes):
What suggestions do you have in developing a partnership with WorkOne to assist individuals with disabilities?
Please rate the current relationships between Vocational Rehabilitation Services and WorkOne offices. (Page 171) Title IV

Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A plan for joint data collection will be developed by the end of FFY17. (Pages 176-177) Title IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 1.4: In late 2017 and early 2018, all VR staff received face-to-face training regarding DWD and Work One programs and services. VR Intake Counselors provide information about Work One during intake meetings with VR applicants and make referrals as applicable. Further training strategies will be explored in 2018.
Priority 1.5: Work in partnership with WIOA core programs to strategically enhance employer engagement and work-based learning opportunities for individuals with disabilities. This includes expanding VR employer engagement to develop appropriate disability-related information and resources (e.g., disability awareness training, Section 503 overview materials for Indiana-based federal contractors, business-to-business resources for beginning disability hiring initiatives, etc.) for employers. A strategy for required collection and report of business engagement efforts will be identified by late 2017. (Pages 193) Title IV

Data Collection

By establishing KPIs and program performance measures/themes and more purposefully using data, the core programs can lay the foundation needed to most effectively support operational and organizational improvement. , In addition to establishing agency wide KPIs, DWD has worked in collaboration with Regional Partners to develop regional dashboards to visualize data at the regional level for regions to use as a management tool. VR & DWD will continue to reassess state employee performance appraisal goals with the core indicators in mind. Currently staff are measured on select prior indicators and these will be updated to be in better alignment with the new common performance measures. Both agencies will also be modifying the outcome data elements that are captured for their respective providers to ensure appropriate alignment with the common performance measures. (Page 24) Title I

PREVALENCE RATE The percentage of men and women, aged 16-64, who reported a sensory, physical, mental, or self-care disability in 2013 was 9.9% in Indiana and 9.7% in the U.S. The 2013 data indicated that the percentage of non-institutionalized males or females in Indiana, ages 16-64, regardless of ethnicity, with all education levels who reported a disability is 10.2% compared to a national rate of 12%. The current population in Indiana, based on 2011 U.S. Census Bureau estimates, is more than 6.5 million, with approximately 62% of the population that are working age (18 through 64). Of the working-age population, 8.9% adults have self-reported as having been diagnosed with a disability. EMPLOYMENT Indiana’s employment rate in 2013 for 487,266 individuals with disabilities, ages 18-64 living in the community was 33.8% (164,556). The employment rate for individuals without disabilities is 76%. This is an employment gap of 42.3%. Indiana’s Department of Workforce Development reported that in June 2015, Indiana’s unemployment rate of the general population was reported at 4.9%, closely mirroring the national average of 5.4%. EMPLOYMENT DEMAND IN INDIANA Indiana’s Department of Workforce Development has a list of Hoosier Hot 50 Jobs. The list's ranking is based on expected demand and wages in 2022 for the state of Indiana. It is anticipated that there will continue to be need for employees over the next decade for each of the following (from most to least): registered nurses, K-12 teachers, truck drivers (heavy and tractor-trailer), sales representatives (wholesale and manufacturing), general operations managers, licensed practical nurses, postsecondary educators, accountants/auditors, office managers, and electricians. Even though this list reflects needs through 2022, all ten of these positions are listed as currently in demand. POVERTY The percentage of non-institutionalized persons, aged 21 to 64 years, with a disability in the United States who were living below the poverty line in 2013 was 28.2%. In Indiana that same group living in poverty was 29.3 %. In 2013, the poverty rate of individuals without disabilities, ages 18 to 64 years, living in the community was 13.3%—a poverty gap of 15.6 percentage points. In 2013, an estimated 31.9% of civilian, non-institutionalized men and women with a work limitation, aged 18-64, in the United States lived in families with incomes below the poverty line. This rate was 35.4% for individuals with work limitations residing in Indiana. In Indiana, an estimated 15.4% of the general population lived in poverty according to Census data, and the median household income was $47,508 in 2013. SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME The percentage of non-institutionalized persons, aged 21 to 64 years with a disability, who were receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits in 2013 was 17.7% in Indiana and 18.9% for the U.S. Nationally, in December 2012, of the 8,262,877 individuals who received federally administered payments from the SSI program, 1,156,188 were eligible, 67,725 were eligible based on blindness, and 7,038,964 were eligible based on disability. (Pages 155-156) Title IV

INDIVIDUALS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES The Institute for Community Inclusion data for 2013 shows that Indiana reported 31% of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities were served in integrated employment services. Indiana VR showed a 59.96%employment rate for individuals with a cognitive disability in 2013. The 2015 Day and Employment Services Outcome System reports on 12,972 individuals from 57 Indiana employment providers. Twenty six percent were served in integrated employment, 27% in sheltered/facility-based work, 27% in alternative to work (seeking employment, volunteer work) and 18% in non-employment day services. Commission on Rehabilitation Services Input VR staff received the following comments from the members of the Commission on Rehabilitation Services: • An emphasis on the importance on benefits counseling services to families as impact of employment on benefits remains a key concern for families. • A need for increased education and collaboration with WIOA partners on serving individuals with disabilities. • A need for financial literacy for individuals with disabilities as a strategy for working toward self-sufficiency. • A need to educate individuals with disabilities about self-disclosure. • Educating school personnel including special education teachers, guidance counselors and transition coordinators about services offered through WIOA partners, including WorkOne services. • Continued emphasis on service youth with disabilities through outreach, use of career coaches, work experience opportunities, and increasing expectations for employment. • Increased collaboration with other partners such as Department of Correction regarding services to shared consumers. • Improved marketing including sharing of success stories and improving website information. • Revision to hiring criteria for VR Counselors to address staff shortage and staff retention issues, including implementation of revised CSPD criteria to allow for hiring of qualified candidates with a Bachelor’s degree. Consumer Input Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services surveyed 697 consumers who had their VR cases closed due to successful job placements, and 168 individuals whose cases were closed unsuccessfully. This survey was for the first six months of 2015. The table below compares the outcomes of this survey to the past two years. (Page 157) Title IV

The projected average cost per individual and total projected costs for client services in FFY2018: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served % of Total Projected Number of Rehabilitations Average Cost per individual Projected Costs 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 8510 63.5% 4255 $3,000 $25.5M 2) Significant Disability (SD) *4557 34% 2278 $3,000 $13.7M 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) *335 2.5% 251 $1800 $603K Total 13400 6784(average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE) $39.8M *Individuals in all priority categories who had an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place prior to the implementation of the order of selection will continue to be served once the order is implemented. The projected average cost per individual and total projected costs for client services in FFY2019: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Number of Rehabilitations Average Cost per individual Projected Costs 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 9782 73% 4891 $3,000 $29.3M 2) Significant Disability (SD) *3484 26% 1742 $3,000 $10.5M 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) *134 1% 101 $1800 $240K Total 13400 6734 (average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE) $40M *Individuals in all priority categories who had an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in place prior to the implementation of the order of selection will continue to be served once the order is implemented. (Page 175) Title IV

Total annual funding available in FFY18 and FFY19 for serving individuals in Title I ($38.5 million) and VI-B ($500,000), program income ($1 million), administrative costs including personnel ($32 million), and the required pre-employment transition services set aside ($9.5 million) is $81.5 million. Additional staffing would be necessary to provide the full range of services to all eligible individuals in an equitable and expeditious manner. A fiscal deficit is projected due to a need to shift funding to meet federal requirements under WIOA, including earmarking 15% of Title I federal funds on pre-employment transition services and contributing to the operation costs of the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) Work One centers through infrastructure funding agreements, as well as the need to modify data collection systems to meet enhanced federal reporting requirements. The anticipated projected annual deficit for FFY18 and FFY19 is $5 million. Therefore, an annual budget of approximately $86.5 million would be needed in FFY18 and FFY19 to serve all eligible individuals, which is at minimum 15,000. The current ratio of VR Counselors to eligible consumers receiving services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is 1:126. BRS believes that a counselor-consumer ratio of no more than 1:100 is optimal to maintain efficient caseload management and high quality services. At this time, additional VR Counselors are needed to work toward this optimal ratio, however there are challenges with expanding the number of VR Counselor positions, including lack of availability of qualified candidates, and challenges with fiscal resources. This is further discussed below. Staff retention of VR Counselors has been a major concern for VR over the past few years. In recent years, the turnover rate for all VR field positions has been 41%, with turnover of 56% for VR Counselor positions. This turnover has been a major contributing factor to BRS’ diminished capacity to serve all individuals seeking VR services, and the inability to serve consumers already in the system in a timely manner. BRS has experienced improvements in the retention rate over the past 9 months, and as of March, 2018 the turnover rate of VR Counselors has decreased to 31%. (Page 180) IV

VR has continued to serve all consumers who were receiving services under an approved IPE prior to implementation of the order of selection on August 1, 2017. Based on review of data on the number of individuals served in each category during the first six months under the order of selection, the number of individuals projected to be served in each priority category in FFY18, as well as the number of individuals projected to achieve their vocational outcomes are as follows: • Priority category 1: 8,560 Individuals with a Most Significant Disability (MSD) are projected to be served. o 4,280 individuals with a MSD will achieve their employment goals • Priority category 2: 4,583 individuals with a Significant Disability (SD) are projected to be served. This number represents individuals who had an IPE in place prior to implementation of the Order of Selection. o 2,292 individuals with a SD will achieve their employment goals • Priority category 3: 337 individuals with a Non-Significant Disability (NSD) are projected to be served. This number represents individuals who had an IPE in place prior to implementation of the Order of Selection. o 253 individuals with a NSD will achieve their employment goals The table in section D further illustrates this data. Both FFY18 and FFY19 projections are included under Section D. (Page 183) IV

4,280 individuals with a MSD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 593 days • 2,292 individuals with a SD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 649 days • 253 individuals with a NSD will achieve their employment goals, with the average time between IPE development (status 12) and successful closure (status 26) = 227 days. Projections for FY 2018: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Percentage of total rehabilitations Projected Number of Rehabilitations 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 8510 50% 4255 2) Significant Disability (SD) 4557 50% 2278 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) 335 75% 251 Total 13400 *6784 * The number of rehabilitation figures above do not reflect the number of placements in one FFY, as the average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE. Projections for FY 2019: Order of Selection Category Projected Number to be Served Projected Percentage of total rehabilitations Projected Number of Rehabilitations 1) Most Significant Disability (MSD) 9782 50% 4891 2) Significant Disability (SD) 3484 50% 1742 3) Non-Significant Disability (NSD) 134 75% 101 Total 13400 *6734 * The number of rehabilitation figures above do not reflect the number of placements in one FFY, as the average time to achieve successful rehabilitation is 18 months from IPE. (Page 184) IV

Progress toward achieving Priority 3.1: An evaluation of services and outcomes under the revised employment service model, compared to services and outcomes under the previous Results Based Funding (RBF) employment service model has been ongoing since August, 2016. Baseline data was obtained in August, 2016, and an initial summary report was completed and posted on the VR website in November, 2016. Data has continued to be updated and shared in subsequent VR employment service evaluation reports, with the most recent report completed November, 2017. Within the first two years following implementation of the new model, VR participants who received employment services through a CRP, had increased access to discovery and supported employment services, and the quality of employment outcomes began to improve, with an average hourly wage of $9.26 in 2017 for those placed through a CRP, compared to an average hourly wage of $8.67 in 2015, which was a 7% increase over the two-year time period. This indicates good progress, however more improvement is needed. The overall average wage obtained by all VR participants achieving employment outcomes increased by 16% during this same time period, with average wages of $12.06 in FFY15 and $13.97 in FFY17. Additionally, VR has achieved an increase in the number of individuals obtaining competitive, integrated employment during the first quarter of FFY18 (970), compared to the first quarter of FFY17 (846). Also, VR has seen a decrease in the number of individuals exiting the program without employment after development of an IPE in the first quarter of FFY18 (600), compared to the first quarter of FFY17 (694). This is a positive trend that BRS will be closely monitoring throughout FFY18. Priority 3.2: Continue development of VR staff through professional development and training, including the creation of a web-based training curriculum (VR Leadership Academy) that can be shared across WIOA core programs to ensure consistency in information and increased knowledge about VR service delivery. VR will introduce new training by March 2016 that will aim to increase focus on counseling and guidance. (Page 196) IV

BRS has begun to report data through the revised and expanded RSA-911 report. Baseline data collected between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018 will assist the joint efforts of VR and RSA to set specific measures for each performance expectation. The existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between BRS and DWD was updated to ensure that BRS can obtain employment and wage data through DWD. Additionally, other resources are being investigated to aid VR in meeting data collection and reporting requirements either through other State agencies and public or private sources, including post-exit data. (Page 199) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~GOAL 2: Increase the number of people with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment.
Priority 2.1: Develop a coordinated process with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services and State and local educational agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities who are considering subminimum wage employment or who are already employed, at a subminimum wage, to maximize opportunities to achieve competitive integrated employment. Provide initial career counseling and information and referral (CCIR) services, and appropriate documentation, to youth seeking sub-minimum wage employment as well as ensure that all individuals employed at sub-minimum wage receive CCIR services by July, 2017, an annually thereafter. (Page 177) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. DWD will develop marketing materials made available through a broad range of media, (i.e., online, print, and social media), to promote universal access and equal opportunity for adults and youth with disabilities. The marketing materials will include positive images of people with disabilities and the types of available services, assistance, and accommodations provided in the WorkOne offices. (Page 71) Title I

DWD will explore development of a non-English translated marketing materials made available through a broad range of media, (i.e., online, print, and social media), to promote equal opportunity for limited English proficiency individuals. The marketing materials will include positive images of people of different origins and the types of available services, assistance, and accommodations provided in the WorkOne offices. Additionally, DWD and partners will continue to enhance the engagement of LEP individuals through online sources and websites. Finally, in order to help non-speaking English clients better understand how to receive benefits and interact with the one-stop system, One-stop partners will identify “vital” documents containing important information about client rights, responsibilities and/or benefits. Section 188 of the regulations require that a Babel notice be given when a client encounters a vital document, whether hard copy or electronically. A Babel notice is a short notice included in a document or electronic medium in multiple languages informing the reader that the communication contains vital information, and explains how to access language services to have the contents of the communication provided in other languages. Sample language for the Babel notice is below: English IMPORTANT! This document or application contains important information about your rights, responsibilities and/or benefits. It is critical that you understand the information in this document and/or application, and we will provide the information in your preferred language at no cost to you. Please contact your local Indiana WorkOne Office near you for assistance in the translation and understanding of the information in this document and/or application. (Pages 74-75) Title I

Veterans

* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 11) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation is an engaged partner to increase educational access to job-seekers that may need VR services and supports to be successful in other state and federal programs. VR is able to provide services to assist with barriers stemming from an individual’s disability that assists in access to existing programs or aids in successfully completing a program. VR is working with State programs, like JAG and local educational agencies, to identify ways to collaborate to serve student and youth populations through pre-employment transition services. Project SEARCH is a VR program that is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction. Additionally, the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprise Program (http://www.in.gov/fssa/ddrs/4901.htm) provides entrepreneurial opportunities for legally blind clients of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS). These blind entrepreneurs manage a wide variety of food-service operations, including cafeterias, coffee shops, vending locations, and highway area vending sites. Through this program, blind individuals receive training and opportunities to become productive, tax-paying citizens and independent business owners. The workforce development programs of the mandatory and optional partners, including Career and Technical Education (CTE), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation (UC) programs, and YouthBuild, are listed below: (Page 14) Title I

Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program: This program operates in Indiana’s WorkOne centers. Under normal operating circumstances, all WorkOne customers are greeted by the welcome team and moved on to the appropriate staff for assistance. The majority of veterans should be served by Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff rather than the Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) Veterans’ staff. This allows JVSG Veterans’ staff efforts to focus on veteran customers with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE). Welcome team staff should identify those veterans with SBE’s and direct those veterans to the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialist for assistance, intensive services and case management. In the event that a DVOP is not available, the veteran or spouse should be referred to the appropriate Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff and not held up until a DVOP is available. (Page 16) Title I

The strengths of the workforce development activities identified in (A) above are: • Three of the four core programs (Titles I, II and III) and five of the required one-stop partners (post-secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, and Unemployment Compensation programs) are located within one state agency (DWD), increasing the ease of coordination. (Page 19) Title I

DWD also has responsibility for the following mandatory one-stop partners: post-secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, and Unemployment Compensation programs. FSSA also has responsibility for the TANF program. Additionally the following state agencies administer programs falling within the mandatory one-stop partners: • the Office of Community and Rural Affairs administers the Workforce Development Program grant, a HUD Employment and Training Program; and • the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) is the designated state agency for purposes of carrying out state activities for the federal Community Services Block Grant. (Page 20) Title I

The Core partners and the following state representatives of the mandatory partners meet regularly throughout 2016 to assess alignment and coordination of activities described (A) above: Career and Technical Education (Perkins) post-secondary, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs. Indiana also includes child welfare and corrections in the meetings. (Page 39) Title I

As indicated above, the core partners and the following state representatives of the mandatory partners meet regularly to assess alignment and coordination of activities described (A) above: Career and Technical Education (Perkins) post-secondary, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs. Indiana also includes child welfare and corrections in the meetings. (Page 40) Title I

Many of the one stop partner programs are under the responsibility of DWD (i.e., Post-Secondary Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs Program, Senior Community Service Employment Program, Trade Adjustment Assistance Programs, and Unemployment Compensation Programs). Currently, DWD is providing monitoring and technical assistance to these programs, but DWD will work on a process to ensure quality and consistency of assessment, including a process for consistent review of partner goals outlined within each region’s local plan and the progress made by the partners. (Page 60) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. (Page 68) Title I

Welcome team staff identify those veterans with SBE’s and direct those veterans to the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program specialist for assistance, intensive services and case management. In the event that a DVOP is not available, the veteran or spouse should be referred to the appropriate Wagner-Peyser or WIOA staff and not held up until a DVOP is available. In accordance with Veteran Program Letter (VPL) 07-09, for a service such as classroom training, priority of service applies to the selection procedure, as follows: • First, if there is a waiting list for the formation of a training class, priority of service is intended to require a veteran or eligible spouse to go to the top of that list. • Second, priority of service applies up to the point at which an individual is both: (a) approved for funding; and, (b) accepted or enrolled in a training class. Therefore, once a non-covered person has been both approved for funding an accepted/ enrolled in a training class, priority of service is not intended to allow a veteran or eligible spouse who is identified subsequently to “bump” the non-covered person from that training class. (Page 69) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Additionally, DWD will continue to enhance the Job Seekers with Disabilities website, http://www.in.gov/dwd/2416.htm, to include resources for both job seekers and employers. DWD will also strengthen existing partnerships with groups such as the Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (including Blind and Deaf Services, Developmental Disability Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, Independent Living Centers, and Project SEARCH), Division of Family Resources, and the Office of Medicaid Policy and Planning by defining the process for referred or shared customers and improving the delivery of available services. Collaboration with these partners will also help to support October’s National Disability Awareness Month and March’s Disability Awareness Month through joint marketing materials and awareness efforts.. (Pages 71-72) Title I

DWD or agency partners will conduct training for One-stop office staff, (including youth staff), to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. VR, Mental Health Centers, and the Department of Correction will also be invited to attend these events and asked to present on relevant topics. Disability Resource Coordinators sustained through Indiana’s Disability Employment Initiative (IN-DEI) grant will be utilized as subject matter experts in the field and also assist with training staff on serving individuals with disabilities. Best practices will be identified by these coordinators and shared with the WDBs for implementation when appropriate. (Pages 72) Title I

Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA): DMHA is a division within Family Social Services Agency, which enables VR to partner with DMHA on employment initiatives. VR staff work closely at a local level with the DMHA funded Community Mental Health Centers (CMHC). Through a contract, the Indiana Institute of Disability and Community provides training and consultation to all employment services providers, including mental health centers and VR staff regarding employment for people with disabilities, including a focus on mental health. There are approximately 25 CMHCs across the State that are community rehabilitation providers. DMHA continues to promote employment for persons with mental illness by including employment and career planning as measures in consumer services reviews. VR Leadership meets quarterly with the Mental Health Employment Council to discuss new initiatives and identify how initiatives, such as the recent Employment Service Model Revisions, impact CMHC’s and consumers with mental illness. CMHC employment staff also serve on the Employment Service workgroup. Additionally, a representative from DMHA is an appointed member of the VR Commission. (Page 137) Title IV

Other: VR maintains a collaborative working relationship with several advocacy and consumer support groups and organizations with a presence in Indiana. These include: the National Employment Team (The NET) which includes a national network of the 80 public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs supports a united or “one company” approach to working with business customers. The NET vision is to create a coordinated approach to serving business customers through a national VR team that specialized in employer development, business consulting and corporate relations; the Indiana Resource Center for Families with Special Needs (INSOURCE); the Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities in Indiana (INARF); the Indiana Council of Community Mental Health Centers, Employment Committee; and the Arc of Indiana. Input from many of these groups is obtained through various workgroups such as the transition advisory council and the VR employment advisory group.

In order to address underserved and unserved populations, VR has initiated interagency cooperation with the following programs: Indiana Civil Rights Commission, Commission on the Social Status of Black Males, and the Burmese American Association. (Page 139) Title IV

VR developed training briefs for VR staff to help them understand the impact of Order of Selection on pre-ETS. Additional written materials are in development for educators and parents, which will be distributed to school systems courtesy of the Department of Education (DOE). VR, in collaboration with DOE, established a Statewide Transition Advisory Council to identify and address the barriers that continue to impact students, and develop and implement strategies and services to make the transition successful for students and youth with disabilities. The Transition Advisory Council established a work plan based upon the Transition to Careers Subcommittee Chapter recommendations (one of the four created by the full Transition Advisory Committee on Increasing Competitive Integrated Employment for Individuals with Disabilities (ACICIEID)). The Statewide Transition Advisory Council includes representation from a wide range of key partners and stakeholders, including the following: VR, DOE, local educational agencies’ school personnel and administrators, Indiana Council of Administrators of Special Education (ICASE), the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services (BDDS), the Department of Workforce Development (DWD), Department of Corrections, Center for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Education (CDHHE), Community Mental Health Centers, First Steps, Indiana Association of People Supporting Employment First (INAPSE), Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (INARF), Indiana Institute of Disability and Community (IIDC), parent representation, the Arc of Indiana, INSOURCE, and other family advocacy groups. As of December, 2017, progress from the work plan touched on all 5 of the goals identified by the group: early work experience, postsecondary education, family expectations, system integration, seamless transition, and professional supports and incentives. These accomplishments included over 61,000 early work experiences being provided to students with disabilities statewide, over 3,000 sessions related to education on postsecondary options provided to students with disabilities, outreach to families and educators related to transition expectations through webinars and in-person trainings sponsored by IN*Source, About Special Kids, and local transition cadres, training to pre-ETS providers on supplementing rather than supplanting training available through local education agencies to ensure seamless transition and system integration, as well as discussion of appropriate qualifications for transition providers. VR works closely with IIDC at IU on several transition-related priorities. IIDC promotes partnerships between Indiana schools and various state agencies and other support organizations. IIDC’s focus is on career development, secondary education, and transition to adult life (Pages 141-142) Title IV

VR purchases an array of services from a variety of vendors and community rehabilitation providers. Community Rehabilitation Providers specifically provide discovery, employment services, vocational evaluation, job shadow, placement, and supported employment services. VR promotes consumer choice in the provision of services. There are a total of 90 agencies with Provider Agreements for providing employment services in Indiana. Purchased employment services follow a new Employment Service Model that is based on a consumer-centric, individualized, and flexible outcome-based payment model, blended with an hourly fee-for-service structure for Discovery activities and Supported Employment services. (Information regarding the VR Employment Services Model may be found at www.vrs.in.gov.) The 90 providers include Community Rehabilitation Programs and Community Mental Health Centers. (Page 144) Title IV

VR staff also works closely at a local level with the Division of Mental Health and Addiction’s (DMHA) funded Centers for Mental Health. VR has a training contract which provides training and consultation to all employment services providers, including mental health centers and VR staff regarding employment for people with disabilities. The majority of mental health centers across the state have employment service agreements with VR for the provision of placement services including supported employment. Additionally, stakeholder members from these centers, along with stakeholders from Community Rehabilitation Providers, participated in the VR employment services workgroup which resulted in the roll-out of substantial modifications to the VR employment service model. These revisions were designed to better serve all consumers, including those with the most significant disabilities and the highest support needs. Several revisions were made to the new draft model based on feedback from these workgroup members to ensure the new model is effective in serving all individuals.
A representative from both BDDS and DMHA were appointed to the VR Commission in FFY18 and are active participants on the commission. (Page 147) Title IV

A workgroup was established to guide the development of the revised Employment Service model. The workgroup is composed of BRS Leadership Staff, VR field staff, Community Rehabilitation Program, Community Mental Health Centers, INARF, and the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (IIDC) at Indiana University. The workgroup continues to meet monthly to evaluate the revisions, and to obtain feedback on emerging best practices as well as additional areas of improvement. Some additional modifications to the model have already been implemented in response to feedback from the workgroup and other stakeholders. (Page 162) Title IV

In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury

The survey included specific questions regarding transition services and training needs. Top responses included: • Developing quality work experiences and /or internships • Working with transition teams (e.g., schools, VR) • Understanding the transition process with schools • Working with transition-age youth (adolescents) (Page 163) Title IV

VR will purchase Supported Employment (SE) services for consumers with most significant disabilities (MSD), with Title I and Title VI-B funds (pending reauthorization). Consumers are able to access SE services through Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs), which include Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) across the state.

VR implemented major revisions to VR employment services in July 2015. Prior to these revisions, VR purchased employment services primarily through a Results Based Funding (RBF) approach. One significant revision that occurred is that SE services are no longer fully funded through employment milestones (or the previous RBF model). Because many individuals with MSD will require SE services that extend beyond the employment milestone payments, SE services are funded in addition to the current employment milestone payments. VR funding for SE services is outlined in the Table below. (Please note that the complete employment service model, implemented July 2015, can be viewed at www.vrs.in.gov). For more specific information, please see section (q). With the employment service changes, VR has collaborated with IIDC and Griffin and Hammis to provide additional training and technical assistance to Community Rehabilitation Providers and VR in the area of Discovery statewide. The training focused on Discovery, which is an individualized information gathering process that will guide employment services for the consumer. The training provided a framework to develop and implement a person-centered employment plan. While Discovery is important for many consumers, it is critical for consumers with the most significant disabilities and has an impact on their supported employment needs. VR continues to work collaboratively with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS), the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA), the Department of Education, IIDC, INARF, INAPSE, the Arc of Indiana, and other key stakeholders to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for consumers with the most significant disabilities through supported employment. Interagency collaboration will aim to increase the quality of SE services, including customized employment, and ensure appropriate extended services are appropriately utilized when necessary for long-term supports. (Page 187) Title IV

VR Counselors are required to assist in facilitating the seamless transition to extended services prior to VR case closure. The Transfer to Extended Services form is completed for VR consumers who require extended services. The form is completed following achievement of stabilization. VR and CRP personnel work jointly to complete this document. VR forwards completed form to entities providing supports at least 60 days prior to achievement of Milestone 3 (Retention). VR administration continues to focus on the need to ensure quality SE service; as such services are essential in securing quality employment outcomes for those consumers with MSD. VR will continue to work closely with the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services, the Division of Mental Health and Addiction, and CRPs to identify areas of concern, implement needed changes in practices, and provide training and/or technical assistance. (Page 201) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

All Indiana Unemployment Insurance (UI) Claimants: Are profiled as they file their initial claim to determine the level of assistance likely needed in order to return to meaningful work. Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment Program (RESEA) and the Jobs for Hoosiers (JFH) programs, (described further below), identify unemployed Hoosiers at the fourth week of their claim and include: UI eligibility review, claimant-centered labor market information, referral to a self-directed job search, and an orientation to the one-stop services. In addition, RESEA participants will be required to complete an Individual Reemployment Plan (IRP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance, employment counseling, and referrals to other employment services. (Page 106) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 60

DDRS state funded services and program changes - 07/13/2020

“On May 21, 2020, Indiana’s State Budget Agency announced that each state agency was asked to immediately implement a 15% budget reduction. With this announcement, the Family and Social Services Administration has strived to meet the challenges of our state on many fronts and to continue to deliver critical services. In order to accomplish this, the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services had to make difficult decisions related to required budget reductions. DDRS administers services across the life span therefore this meant finding ways to meet budgetary requirements without impacting critical services to those who utilize programs such as First Steps, Medicaid home-and community-based services and Vocational Rehabilitation…

The state-funded programs that are being eliminated are caregiver supports, community based sheltered work and facility-based sheltered work… State-funded programs not currently impacted and will continue to be funded include: supported employment follow along services and OBRA services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana, Inc. (ASPIN) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, veteran families, small business owners, seasonal staff, immigrants, part-time workers, farmers, rural, and individuals with addictions or mental health diagnoses involved with the criminal justice system. In addition, navigators will assist consumers whose income fluctuates between income guidelines for insurance coverage and Medicaid. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Indiana Dept. of Insurance, State HUD office, Sheriff’s Association, Div. of Mental Health & Addictions, School Nurses Association, Pew Foundation, NAMI, IU Benefits Involvement Network, County corrections and jails, WIC offices, Local health departments, Bridges to Health, Exit Zero, Urban League, Mental Health America, Urban Ministries, Homeless shelters, Work One offices, Marion County Clerk’s office, Local Economic Development Corps, and the Small Business Administration  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.,Contact:Julia HollowayPhone: (317) 536-4683Email: jholloway@aspin.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Certificate of Completion - 07/16/2019

~~“The Course of Study for the Certificate of Completion is a framework for aligning curriculum to grade level standards while meeting the individual goals and transition needs stated in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Assistance - 07/01/2019

~~“With funding from the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provides services to Hoosier Veterans. Through the Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP), and the Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER) Program, Workforce Development Offices throughout the State are equipped to assist Hoosier Veterans with their transition from the service to civilian life. The DVOPs specialize in tailored training and job placement opportunities for veterans with service-connected disabilities. LVERs coordinate services provided veterans including counseling, testing, and identifying training and employment opportunities. Contact the nearest Indiana Workforce Development Office and ask for the location of the closest veteran's representative.”

Systems
  • Other

Indiana Disability Rights - 06/25/2019

~~“Provide Info & ResourcesWhy does Indiana Disability Rights provide information and referral first? Our Intake Advocates have over 30 years’ experience in the disability rights field. They will listen to you, and based on your individual situation, they will guide you to the best resources and organizations in Indiana. If we can't help, we have great partnerships with organizations that may be able to offer you the services you need.What kind of information can Indiana Disability Rights provide? We provide rights information for people with disabilities. We explain how to access social services (application process, complaint and appeal procedures). We make recommendations about how to access the help you need. We provide guidance on where to find digital resources. We may refer you to organizations that can address your issues.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center - 05/29/2019

~~“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs, and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

VR Vendor Information - 05/29/2019

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides individuals with disabilities, a wide range of services and supports necessary to help them prepare for, secure, retain, advance in or regain employment. VR services are available in all 92 Indiana counties and are individualized to meet the unique needs of each eligible individual. To carry out these services, VR partners with vendors across the state, who may be individuals, businesses or other organizations that provide services including, but not limited to the following:• Evaluation and treatment of an individual's disability;• Information and referral services;• Vocational counseling and training;• Job search and job placement assistance;• Rehabilitation Technology• Educational guidance or support (tuition resources and other support);• Physical and Mental Restoration• Transportation services;• Occupational tools and equipment;Personal attendant services (reader, interpreter, etc.).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Money Follows the Person - 04/24/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person program is funded through a grant from the federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home- and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007. Since then, Indiana has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FSSA Resource Guide - 04/24/2019

~~“This guide is designed to help providers and community- and faith-based organizations connect those who are in need with services we provide. It contains information about programs provided and administered by FSSA and a few other state agencies, and gives direction on how Hoosiers qualify to receive assistance from a variety of programs”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Portfolio Guidance 2019-2020 - 04/19/2019

~~“This document provides guidance for the development of a student portfolio which may serve as the  “Summary of Performance” under 511 IAC 7-43-7 of the Indiana Special Education Rule, Article 7. The Summary of Performance is defined  as a summary of the student with an IEP’s  academic achievement and functional performance, which must include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the students postsecondary goals, when a student graduates with a high school diploma, leaves school with a certification of completion, or exceeds the age eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

IC 22-9-11-7 Competitive integrated employment first and preferred state policy - 07/01/2017

~~“Sec. 7. (a) It is the policy of the state to advance competitive integrated employment, including self-employment, as the first and preferred option when providing services to an individual with disabilities who is of working age, regardless of the nature or the severity of the individual's disability. The policy applies to programs and agencies that provide services and support to help obtain employment for individuals with disabilities.     (b) State agencies shall follow the policy described in subsection (a) and ensure that the policy is implemented effectively in the state agencies' programs and services. State agencies shall implement the policy in a manner that is consistent with an individual's right to make an informed choice about employment options that meet an individual's needs and preferences.As added by P.L.68-2017, SEC.4.” 

Systems
  • Other

IC 22-9-11-8 Obtaining competitive integrated employment transition services - 07/01/2017

~~“Sec. 8. (a) This section applies to transition services provided as part of a special education program or related services to a child with a disability who is at least fourteen (14) years of age.     (b) The primary objective and preferred outcome of providing the services described in subsection (a) is to assist the child in obtaining competitive integrated employment.As added by P.L.68-2017, SEC.4.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

SENATE ENROLLED ACT No. 390, Concerning the Membership of the Commission on Rehabilitation Services.” - 04/13/2017

~~This act “ increases the number of members and changes the membership of the commission on rehabilitation services (commission). Makes changes in the terms of service of commission members and requires the governor to specify each member's term of service to ensure that terms expire on a staggered basis. Adds the following to the commission's duties: (1) Establish baseline data regarding the number of individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment and set annual goals for increasing the percentage of individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. (2) Identify and resolve barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities.  (3) Analyze federal, state, and local agency policies concerning the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, including the impact of those policies on opportunities for competitive integrated employment, and recommend changes to state policies. (4) Assist state agencies in the implementation of the policy concerning employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. (5) Provide an annual report to the governor and the rehabilitation services administration commissioner concerning the employment of individuals with disabilities. Provides that the policy (policy) of the state is to promote competitive integrated employment, including self-employment, as the first and preferred option when providing services to individuals with disabilities who are of working age.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Data Sharing

Indiana ABLE Legislation S.B. 11 - 07/01/2016

ABLE savings accounts for persons with a disability.  This bill creates the “achieving a better life experience” (ABLE) authority (authority).  Establishes the ABLE board (board) of the authority.  Provides that the authority may establish a qualified ABLE program under which a person may make contributions for a table year for the benefit of an eligible individual with a disability to an ABLE account to meet the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary in compliance with federal law.  Sets forth duties and powers of the authority and the board. Establishes a general operating fund, endowment fund, and trust fund.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Senate Resolution No. 39 – “Employment First” - 03/08/2016

~~“Be it resolved by the Senate of the 14General Assembly of the State of Indiana:SECTION 1. That the Indiana Senate urges the legislative council to assign the topic of an Employment First Program, which promotes and expands quality, community employment outcomes for all people with disabilities to an appropriate study committee.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

IN 2015 Senate Resolution 38 - 04/15/2015

“A SENATE RESOLUTION urging the legislative council to assign the topic of an Employment First Program, which promotes and expands quality, community employment outcomes for all people with disabilities to an appropriate study committee.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

DDRS state funded services and program changes - 07/13/2020

“On May 21, 2020, Indiana’s State Budget Agency announced that each state agency was asked to immediately implement a 15% budget reduction. With this announcement, the Family and Social Services Administration has strived to meet the challenges of our state on many fronts and to continue to deliver critical services. In order to accomplish this, the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services had to make difficult decisions related to required budget reductions. DDRS administers services across the life span therefore this meant finding ways to meet budgetary requirements without impacting critical services to those who utilize programs such as First Steps, Medicaid home-and community-based services and Vocational Rehabilitation…

The state-funded programs that are being eliminated are caregiver supports, community based sheltered work and facility-based sheltered work… State-funded programs not currently impacted and will continue to be funded include: supported employment follow along services and OBRA services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Indiana Certificate of Completion - 07/16/2019

~~“The Course of Study for the Certificate of Completion is a framework for aligning curriculum to grade level standards while meeting the individual goals and transition needs stated in the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Assistance - 07/01/2019

~~“With funding from the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provides services to Hoosier Veterans. Through the Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP), and the Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER) Program, Workforce Development Offices throughout the State are equipped to assist Hoosier Veterans with their transition from the service to civilian life. The DVOPs specialize in tailored training and job placement opportunities for veterans with service-connected disabilities. LVERs coordinate services provided veterans including counseling, testing, and identifying training and employment opportunities. Contact the nearest Indiana Workforce Development Office and ask for the location of the closest veteran's representative.”

Systems
  • Other

Indiana Disability Rights - 06/25/2019

~~“Provide Info & ResourcesWhy does Indiana Disability Rights provide information and referral first? Our Intake Advocates have over 30 years’ experience in the disability rights field. They will listen to you, and based on your individual situation, they will guide you to the best resources and organizations in Indiana. If we can't help, we have great partnerships with organizations that may be able to offer you the services you need.What kind of information can Indiana Disability Rights provide? We provide rights information for people with disabilities. We explain how to access social services (application process, complaint and appeal procedures). We make recommendations about how to access the help you need. We provide guidance on where to find digital resources. We may refer you to organizations that can address your issues.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FSSA Resource Guide - 04/24/2019

~~“This guide is designed to help providers and community- and faith-based organizations connect those who are in need with services we provide. It contains information about programs provided and administered by FSSA and a few other state agencies, and gives direction on how Hoosiers qualify to receive assistance from a variety of programs”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Portfolio Guidance 2019-2020 - 04/19/2019

~~“This document provides guidance for the development of a student portfolio which may serve as the  “Summary of Performance” under 511 IAC 7-43-7 of the Indiana Special Education Rule, Article 7. The Summary of Performance is defined  as a summary of the student with an IEP’s  academic achievement and functional performance, which must include recommendations on how to assist the student in meeting the students postsecondary goals, when a student graduates with a high school diploma, leaves school with a certification of completion, or exceeds the age eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hire Vets First - 02/17/2019

~“Indiana is committed to providing quality employment services to veterans at our WorkOne Centers. Veterans go to the front of the line and each office has an onsite veteran's representative that assists with employment needs.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Citations

How the Indiana Office of Special Education Makes Determinations Under the Results Driven Accountability and Differentiated Support System - 11/27/2018

~“IDEA 2004 requires states to make annual “Determinations” on the performance of each Local Education Agency in implementing the requirements and purposes of the IDEA 2004, with regard to the provision of special education and related services. Determinations are a way of designating the status of local districts into one of four categories, as outlined in 34 CFR§ 300.600.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veteran Health Indiana Homeless Veterans - 10/29/2018

~“Each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. More about the program may be found by accessing the web-link.”

Systems
  • Other

Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) - 10/29/2018

~“CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.” More about the program may be found by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Employment First Community Workshop Series for Employers - 08/21/2018

~~“LIFEDesigns, a service provider in south central Indiana, will host a series with three activities focusing on the ADA and employment. The activities will begin in October, National Disability Employment Awareness Month. The activities will include a presentation on Employment First and the ADA, a networking event for employers and VR customers, and a community conversation on employment for people with disabilities”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center – University of Indiana Bloomington

“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities, as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Indiana Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities “State Plan”

“Every five years, the Indiana Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities is required by federal law to develop a 5-year strategic plan, outlining goals, objectives and specific activities that will be implemented each year of the plan. With public input and guidance from the Administration on Intellectual Developmental Disabilities, the state plan is developed in accordance with requirements of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (DD Act). The 2017-2021 State Plan covers the time period from October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2021. It addresses specific information required by the federal Administration on Developmental Disabilities, and includes the Council's determination of areas of emphasis and resulting goals and objectives for the five-year time period. The Council must spend a minimum of 70 percent of its federal funding to address the Plan objectives. All programs and projects of the Council are to be conducted in a manner that respects individual differences and cultural diversity.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Family & Social Services Administration. (2011). Guiding Employment First in Indiana: A statewide plan for systems change.

“The organizations primarily represented in the strategic planning process are leaders from state and federal agencies, consumer and advocacy agencies, provider organizations and MIG project partners. …This plan will be implemented beginning in 2011 through 2015…By providing avenues of communication and convening high-level leadership within state agency divisions, the plan provides the opportunity to align initiatives, reduce duplication of effort and address goals for employment of individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies

Project Search

"Project SEARCH is a worksite-based school-to-work program that provides employment and education opportunities for students with disabilities transitioning from high school. The program benefits employers by increasing workforce diversity and reducing recruitment and training costs. Many employers experience improved job retention, enhanced community image and increased customer satisfaction."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Indiana Governor’s Council for People With Disabilities

“The Indiana Governor's Council is an independent state agency that facilitates change. Our mission is to advance the independence, productivity and inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of society. This mission is accomplished through planning, evaluation, collaboration, education, research and advocacy.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Indiana 2005 Employment First Coalition: Employment First—Investing in Success

“On September 29, 2005, the Employment First Coalition brought together Leaders of Government, Business, Labor, Community and Education and the non-profit sectors to create a strategic plan ensuring employment is an outcome for all Hoosiers with disabilities.” This fact sheet provides a summary of the outcomes of the summit.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Indiana Government “Guidelines for Disclosure ” - 07/22/2016

“When an individual discloses, he or she is intentionally releasing personal information about him or herself for a specific purpose. Some personal information, such as one’s Social Security number, banking records, or medical records may be important to keep confidential. It is important to keep in mind that the decision to disclose is a personal one and should be helpful to the individual. Remember that it is not essential that a person with a disability divulge all personal information about his or her disability. What is most important and helpful is to provide information about how his or her disability affects his or her capacity to learn and perform effectively, and the environment, supports, and services he or she will need in order to access, participate in, and excel in his or her job, studies, and community. The person with a disability must decide what and how much of this sensitive information is necessary to reveal in order to obtain the needed accommodations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Indiana Disability Employment Initiative - 10/01/2012

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2012, Indiana was awarded a Round 3 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The grant ended in 2015.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Indiana Money Follows the Person Grant

“The MFP program is funded through a grant from the federal agency, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007 and since that time has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their community.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana, Inc. (ASPIN) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, veteran families, small business owners, seasonal staff, immigrants, part-time workers, farmers, rural, and individuals with addictions or mental health diagnoses involved with the criminal justice system. In addition, navigators will assist consumers whose income fluctuates between income guidelines for insurance coverage and Medicaid. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Indiana Dept. of Insurance, State HUD office, Sheriff’s Association, Div. of Mental Health & Addictions, School Nurses Association, Pew Foundation, NAMI, IU Benefits Involvement Network, County corrections and jails, WIC offices, Local health departments, Bridges to Health, Exit Zero, Urban League, Mental Health America, Urban Ministries, Homeless shelters, Work One offices, Marion County Clerk’s office, Local Economic Development Corps, and the Small Business Administration  . For more information, please contact the designated project lead.,Contact:Julia HollowayPhone: (317) 536-4683Email: jholloway@aspin.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Secondary Transition Resource Center - 05/29/2019

~~“We create and enhance professional development activities and resources to support teachers and, ultimately, students with disabilities as they transition from school to their adult lives, working and participating in their communities, jobs, and/or postsecondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

VR Vendor Information - 05/29/2019

~~“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) provides individuals with disabilities, a wide range of services and supports necessary to help them prepare for, secure, retain, advance in or regain employment. VR services are available in all 92 Indiana counties and are individualized to meet the unique needs of each eligible individual. To carry out these services, VR partners with vendors across the state, who may be individuals, businesses or other organizations that provide services including, but not limited to the following:• Evaluation and treatment of an individual's disability;• Information and referral services;• Vocational counseling and training;• Job search and job placement assistance;• Rehabilitation Technology• Educational guidance or support (tuition resources and other support);• Physical and Mental Restoration• Transportation services;• Occupational tools and equipment;Personal attendant services (reader, interpreter, etc.).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Indiana APSE 2018 Conference - 11/07/2018

~~The 28th Annual IN-APSE Conference will take place November 7th and 8th, 2018 in Indianapolis at the Indianapolis Marriott East. We invite you to share your knowledge and expertise with IN-APSE professionals from across the state. The submission deadline will be June 29, 2018.

Session FormatSessions may use a variety of formats, including lecture with questions and answers, panel or town hall discussion, and interactive sessions.  We encourage sessions that actively engage participants. Presentation guidelines and tips will be provided with session acceptance notification.

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Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

2019 Conference on Disabilities - 05/01/2018

~~The Indiana Conference on Disability has moved to a biennial format; the next conference will take place in 2019. Information will be posted as updates become available.

 

Systems
  • Other

Up to $20 Million in Grants Available Through Department of Workforce Development’s Skill UP Indiana! Program - 06/05/2017

~~“The Indiana Department of Workforce Development’s (DWD) employer-driven Skill UP Indiana! Program is about to enter round three. At stake over a two-year period is a pool of up to $20 million in grant funding that is being made available to financially support Innovation Networks to provide more and better avenues for skill-specific training and certification.

“’We often hear from employers who tell us they cannot find qualified candidates to fill open high-wage, high demand positions,’” said Steve Braun, DWD Commissioner. ‘“The goal of Skill UP Indiana! is to encourage regional networks and industry partnerships that meet these employer needs through training, education and certification.’””

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

A Guide to Community Employment and Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) - 06/15/2015

“If you are interested in employment, VRS is a good place to start. This guide will help you learn more about Vocational Rehabilitation Services [Vocational Rehabilitation Services], what to expect, and how to prepare so that you have the right supports to find the job that is best for you.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services In*Source Training

HCBS Final Rule Two important aspects to this Rule: -The Person-Centered Planning Process is key! - All HCBS settings need to provide for: –Opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings –Engagement in community life –Control of personal resources –Opportunity to receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Pathways to Employment

“Pathways to Employment, a series of short films, celebrates seven unique individuals who prove that hi]ring people with developmental disabilities is "Good for Business, Good for People & Good for the Economy." The films were produced for the The Arc of Indiana by filmmaker Ken Oguss, with support from the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Money Follows the Person - 04/24/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person program is funded through a grant from the federal agency Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home- and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007. Since then, Indiana has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 01/03/2019

~“As a division of the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA), the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS) has two overarching responsibilities for children and adults with physical and cognitive disabilities: •Facilitate partnerships that enhance the quality of life. •Provide continuous, life-long support. The Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS) and the Bureau of Quality Improvement Services (BQIS) are under the DDRS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration “FAQ CMS Final Rule Impact on Non-Residential Services in Indiana” - 08/31/2016

“Sometimes referred to as the HCBS settings rule, the rule impacts all HCBS waiver programs administered by the Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA). The context of this FAQ addresses impact of the rule only on the Family Supports (FSW) and the Community Integration and Habilitation (CIH) Waivers serving individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities. The FSW and CIH waivers are administered by the Division of Disability and Rehabilitative Services (DDRS)’s Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana HCBS Statewide Transition Plan Amended - 07/01/2016

~~“In January 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published regulations to better define the settings in which states can provide Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS). The HCBS final rule became effective March 17, 2014. The HCBS settings final rule, along with additional guidance and fact sheets, is available on the CMS Home and Community-Based Services site.The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that members receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to review current HCBS programs and to develop a transition plan providing an assessment, strategies and timelines for compliance with the new rules.The programs currently under review include 1915(c) HCBS Waivers and 1915(i) HCBS State Plan programs operated by the following divisions within the Family and Social Services Administration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Statewide HCBS Transition Plan - 12/10/2014

“Effective March 17, 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have issued regulations that define the settings in which it is permissible for states to pay for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS). The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated and that support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS. These changes will maximize the opportunities for participants in HCBS programs to have access to the benefits of community living and to receive services in the most integrated setting. The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) has created a Statewide Transition Plan to assess compliance with the HCBS Rule and identify strategies and timelines for coming into compliance with the new rule as it relates to all FSSA HCBS programs. States must be in full compliance with the federal requirements by the time frame approved in the Statewide Transition Plan but no later than March 17, 2019.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

IN Community Integration and Habilitation (0378.R03.00) - 10/01/2014

Provides adult day, prevocational, rent and food for unrelated live-in caregiver, residential hab and support, respite, supported employment follow along, OT, PT, psychological therapy, speech/language therapy, adult foster care, behavioral support, community based hab-group, community based hab-individual, community transition, electronic monitoring, environmental mods, facility based hab-group, facility based hab-individual, facility based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavior intervention, music therapy, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, workplace assistance for individuals w/autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Employment First Systems Change Statewide Plan (2011-2015) - 02/11/2011

“Through the use of MIG funds, Indiana has made a number of improvements to the state’s infrastructure supporting employment of IWD. While Indiana has been a leader in many aspects of employment supports and the use of innovative practices, the state realizes that ongoing efforts are necessary to improve employment outcomes, economic outlook and the overall well-being of IWD."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

IN Family Support Services (0387.R02.00) - 04/01/2010

Provides adult day, case management, prevocational, respite, supported employment follow along, OT, PT, psychological therapy, speech/language therapy, behavioral support services, community based hab-group, community based hab-individual, facility based hab-group, facility based hab-individual, facility based support services, family and caregiver training, intensive behavioral intervention, music therapy, participant assistance and care, PERS, recreational therapy, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation, workplace assistance for individuals w/autism, MR, DD ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Notice of Public Comment Period for Statewide Transition Plan

“Notice is hereby given that the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) will submit to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) a revision to Indiana's Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) regulations of 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)-(2). Additional information on the Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the federal regulations of 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4)-(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)-(2) can also be found at http://www.in.gov/fssa/4917.htm .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Indiana Money Follows the Person

“The MFP program is funded through a grant from the federal agency, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The MFP program was developed to help states move individuals from institutional settings to home and community-based settings. Indiana was approved for the MFP program in 2007 and since that time has focused on assisting eligible persons to leave institutional care by providing services for individuals to live safely in their community.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Start your engines for fast paced jobs in the Crossroads of America! The state of Indiana is ready for workers with disabilities to cross the finish line of career success! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Indiana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
6,732,219
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
467,446
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
183,819
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.12%
Change from
2018 to 2019
39.32%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.13%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.73%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 6,732,219
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 467,446
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 183,819
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,832,590
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.32%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.73%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 437,015
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 457,720
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 764,451
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 84,964
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 34,758
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,234
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,576
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 19,842
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 11,361

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,923
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 198,695

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 18,554
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,628
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 68,802
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 27.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 26.30%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,108
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,752
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 678
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 21,355

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,590
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 521
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 292
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 56.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 4.41

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,923
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 296,180
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 592
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 421

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,213,972
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $17,778,195
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $31,433,606
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $27,220,719
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 9,461
Number of people served in facility based work. 4,552
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,605
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 22.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.34%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.82%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 86.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.78%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 88.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 27.56%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,825,018
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,360
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 238,730
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 283,720
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 522,451
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 515
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 258
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 773
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,426,931
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,636,380

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 615
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 615

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Indiana Association of People Supporting Employment First (IN-APSE): BRS and IN-APSE share a common mission in that competitive, integrated employment should be the first and preferred option for all individuals with disabilities. BRS participates in IN-APSE events including the annual IN-APSE conference, and BRS staff regularly participate in planning as well as presenting at the conference. The IN-APSE statement on Employment First is based on several underlying principles including a presumption that all work age adults and youth with disabilities can work in jobs fully integrated with the general workforce, earning minimum wage or higher; and that employees with disabilities, as with all other individuals, require assistance and support to ensure job success and should have access to adequate, long term supports necessary to succeed in the workplace. These underlying principles are very much in line with BRS priorities, especially in light of WIOA and enhanced requirements to ensure that individuals receiving counseling, information and referral regarding alternatives to subminimum wage employment.

Other: VR maintains a collaborative working relationship with several advocacy and consumer support groups and organizations with a presence in Indiana. These include: the National Employment Team (The NET) which includes a national network of the 80 public Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs supports a united or “one company” approach to working with business customers. The NET vision is to create a coordinated approach to serving business customers through a national VR team that specialized in employer development, business consulting and corporate relations; the Indiana Resource Center for Families with Special Needs (INSOURCE); the Indiana Association of Rehabilitation Facilities in Indiana (INARF); the Indiana Council of Community Mental Health Centers, Employment Committee; and the Arc of Indiana. Input from many of these groups is obtained through various workgroups such as the transition advisory council and the VR employment advisory group. (Page 139) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~VR Response: VR continues to facilitate a Statewide Transition Workgroup and will address these recommendations with the group. VR has implemented modifications to the VR employment service model and Discovery services. One of the changes is increased access to work experiences by all VR consumers, including youth. Discussions are already underway between the VR Director and the DWD Youth program directors. Both parties are very interested in better collaboration on programs such as Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG). (Page 133) Title IV

VR purchases an array of services from a variety of vendors and community rehabilitation providers. Community Rehabilitation Providers specifically provide discovery, employment services, vocational evaluation, job shadow, placement, and supported employment services. VR promotes consumer choice in the provision of services. There are a total of 90 agencies with Provider Agreements for providing employment services in Indiana. Purchased employment services follow a new Employment Service Model that is based on a consumer-centric, individualized, and flexible outcome-based payment model, blended with an hourly fee-for-service structure for Discovery activities and Supported Employment services. (Information regarding the VR Employment Services Model may be found at www.vrs.in.gov.) The 90 providers include Community Rehabilitation Programs and Community Mental Health Centers. (Page 144) Title IV

In 2015, Indiana made major changes to its Employment Services Model. While retaining many of the components of the Results Based Funding (RBF) system, the rate structure now also includes hourly fees for services such as Discovery and for additional work place supports that are needed by consumers. Extensive trainings were held statewide, over the course of several months, to explain the new model and to address questions and concerns on the changes. Those who attended the trainings were primarily from VR and community rehabilitation programs, but individuals from the Bureau of Developmental Disability Services, DWD, advocates, and school personnel were also in attendance. (Page 162) Title IV

Employment services include discovery services, job readiness training, outcome-based employment services, supported employment services, on-the-job supports short-term, and job search/job placement assistance. Specific allowable costs are limited to costs of staffing to increase capacity to carry out employment services to VR applicable or eligible individuals, and costs to improve and expand training for employment services staff. Training methods consist of new and/or enhanced classroom-based and hands-on training, ensuring staff appropriately apply supports and techniques with ongoing coaching and mentoring. Quarterly reporting of measureable objectives provides BRS with progress updates on improved timeliness of initiation of services; increased provisions of SE services or on-the-job supports short-term; and increased quality and quantity of competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

Introductory one-day training on Discovery was attended by 285 individuals. A more detailed, two-day training on the Discovery process was held statewide, with 268 individuals attending from over 74 community rehabilitation programs. Indiana currently has VR employment service agreements with 89 community rehabilitation programs across the state. (Page 163) Title IV

Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury (Page 163) Title IV

What are the main needs of students and you with disabilities? The WIOA legislation continues to be a main focus for Vocational Rehabilitation and other state agencies. A major focus area is the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to studentswith disabilities, which includes: 1) job exploration counseling 2) work based learning opportunities 3) counseling on opportunities for enrollment in post-secondary education 4) workplace readiness training and 5) self-advocacy. The recent revisions to the VR Employment Service Model increase emphasis on Discovery activities through an enhanced menu of services and a modified funding structure that funds discovery services individually instead of through a milestone payment. These revisions are especially timely in light of the new requirement for VR to utilize 15% of Title I funds for Pre-ETS. Discovery activities include services such as job shadowing, situational assessments, work experiences, informational interviews, vocational counseling and guidance, vocational testing and other services needed to evaluate consumer strengths, interests, abilities and ideal work conditions. (Page 168) Title IV

What are your perceived needs to improve Community Employment Programs?
Are there service gaps? If so, what? 147 80% Is there a need for expanded services? If so, in what area? 93 51% Is there a need for additional staff development? If so in what area? 115 63% Are there needed Improvements in service delivery? If so what? 96 52%
Gaps were identified, specifically, coordination of services between agencies and staff turnover at all agencies. The need for expanded services, including transition services and services to rural areas was also mentioned. Staff development needs were identified in the areas of job coaching and development. Improvements were noted again in the area of communication between agencies.
Community Rehabilitation Program Training Needs In the fall of 2015, VR staff and staff of community rehabilitation programs (CRP) were surveyed as to their training needs. Surveys were received from 622 individuals — 60% were from CRP personnel and 28% from VR staff. The top five General Employment needs were identified as: • Discovery process — in-depth training • Understanding supported employment • Job-readiness training • Understanding the difference between supported and customized employment • Understanding how to fund employment services
In Working with Employers, the following were identified as training needs: • Customizing jobs — job carving and restructuring • Developing business partnerships • Job development strategies • Marketing services • Developing small businesses/self-employment The top five other Unique Training Needs, were identified as: • Working with consumers who have mental health needs • Working with consumers who are ex-offenders • Working with consumers with intellectual and developmental disabilities • Working with consumers with autism • Working with consumers with traumatic brain injury. (Page 163) Title IV

Goal 2: VR Supported Employment providers will increase knowledge and skills on the provision of supported employment services, including greater understanding and focus on development of natural supports, job readiness training techniques, customized employment, and strategies for achieving stabilization on the job.
Measure: BRS will invest in training for supported employment providers including classroom-based, web-based, and hands-on workshops that focus on job coaching and job readiness training techniques. BRS will examine strategies for improvement of community rehabilitation providers to ensure capacity to carry out increased expectations under the new model, such as provision of funding for Establishment projects. At least 500 individuals will attend training annually, beginning in FFY16. (Page 186) Title IV

With the employment service changes, VR has collaborated with IIDC and Griffin and Hammis to provide additional training and technical assistance to Community Rehabilitation Providers and VR in the area of Discovery statewide. The training focused on Discovery, which is an individualized information gathering process that will guide employment services for the consumer. The training provided a framework to develop and implement a person-centered employment plan. While Discovery is important for many consumers, it is critical for consumers with the most significant disabilities and has an impact on their supported employment needs. VR continues to work collaboratively with the Bureau of Developmental Disabilities Services (BDDS), the Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA), the Department of Education, IIDC, INARF, INAPSE, the Arc of Indiana, and other key stakeholders to improve competitive integrated employment opportunities for consumers with the most significant disabilities through supported employment. Interagency collaboration will aim to increase the quality of SE services, including customized employment, and ensure appropriate extended services are appropriately utilized when necessary for long-term supports.  (Page 187) Title IV

Key revisions included: • Increased focus and re-emphasis on Discovery and Supports needed to achieve true stabilization; • Discovery activities are provided prior to milestone payments, funded per activity, and are no longer paid under a milestone. The menu of VR-funded Discovery activities is greatly enhanced. • SE services (including ongoing support services) funding is available in addition to milestone payments. • Increased flexibility to allow for more individualization based on consumer needs; • Elimination of 2 separate tiered milestone payments • Development of 3 new Milestones: o Milestone 1 = Job Development and Placement (1 week on the job) o Milestone 2 = Support and Short-term Retention (4 weeks on the job) o Milestone 3 = Retention (90 days AFTER stabilization) • Reduced financial incentive to quickly reach ‘stabilization’ and closure by ensuring adequate supports are available, including up to 24 months of VR-funded SE services to ensure true stabilization. • Changes to rates and expectations • Increased VR Counselor engagement in the employment services process This year, VR also continued its presence on social media, including Twitter and Facebook. Social media followers has nearly doubled from 2016 to 2017, and this platform helps communicate a consistent message about the program. (Page 188) Title IV

One of the key VR employment service revisions is an increase in VR-funded Discovery activities. The menu of services and activities that is available through the Discovery process has been enhanced, and may include work experience, situational assessments, job shadows, informational interviews, vocational testing, and other related activities. BRS recognizes the importance of Discovery for job seekers with disabilities, and particularly for youth or other individuals with disabilities who have little or no work history, or a history of jobs that were not quite the right ‘fit.’ Through an evaluation of the revised employment services model, implemented July, 2015, individuals receiving services through a CRP received, on average, 22.3 hours of discovery at the end of FFY 2017. VR has also increased outreach and education to transition aged youth, including development of a brief video that has been widely disbursed including posted through social media. BRS has a dedicated youth services director, as well as a youth services coordinator, who have worked to expand and improve relationships with key transition stakeholders, largely through facilitation of the VR Transition Advisory Council, engaging in one-on-one conversations, and presenting and educating various stakeholder groups about VR and pre-employment transition services. The Transition Advisory Council has been instrumental in increasing outreach and education related to transition aged youth. Specifically, collaboration with representatives from IIDC, DOE, and DWD on the council has aided in outreach to school systems, training of educators on transition, VR, and pre-ETS, and services available to transition-aged youth through DWD and other sources. In late 2017, student mentoring days were held at two separate business sites (an automotive manufacturing plant