Kansas

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State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,913,314
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
195,738
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.52%
Change from
2018 to 2019
91,009
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.50%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
82.67%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 2,913,123 2,911,510 2,913,314
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 191,769 194,225 195,738
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,069 87,802 91,009
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,234,266 1,241,955 1,237,960
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.45% 45.21% 46.50%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.96% 82.06% 82.67%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.60% 3.40% 3.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.60% 19.00% 19.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.90% 10.90% 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 181,015 195,158 190,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 192,687 195,193 193,874
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 319,711 333,319 326,746
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 25,286 27,206 24,372
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 25,056 31,507 31,290
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,525 5,768 5,437
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,514 6,023 4,764
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,263 11,935 14,742
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 6,239 5,654 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,017 3,963 3,973
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.70% 8.70% 8.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 73,174 72,185 70,426

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,406 8,725 8,631
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 25,872 24,584 14,680
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 28,174 26,640 24,901
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 33.40% 32.80% 34.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 15.00% 14.50% 14.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 25.70% 26.00% 25.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,265 1,235 1,180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,171 2,207 2,100
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,001 3,726 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 100 67 77
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 58 40 46
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 60.00% 6.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.00 1.37 1.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 25.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,968 3,105 3,121
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,747 106,448 104,953
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 73 106 95
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 107 147 164

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A $252,611 $459,539
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A $106,151,990 $108,687,513
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,600 3,923 4,839
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,842 2,789 2,670
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,056 4,538 4,040
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 29.10 30.68 32.05

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.91% 68.93% 68.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.97% 7.41% 7.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.20% 2.25% 2.32%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.74% 99.33% 99.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 28.25% 42.67% 32.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.25% 62.21% 56.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.75% 72.96% 75.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 26.00% 19.54% 23.78%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30 33 5
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 31 33 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,889 2,156 171
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 114 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,003 2,156 171

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title II

Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system. The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 186) Title II      

• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.

• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.

• The Developmental Disabilities Council.

• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.

• The Employment First Commission.

• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

KRS has agreements with Comprehensive Schools for the Blind in Colorado (Colorado Center for the Blind), Missouri (Alphapointe) and Minnesota (BLIND, Inc.) to provide access to the intensive level of training needed by some consumers. An agreement with the Helen Keller National Center was established in 2017 and continues in place. On an ongoing basis, KRS will seek additional agreements as needed to meet the needs of our consumers. The Governor’s Disability Sub-Cabinet, which includes DCF/KRS, KDADS, KDHE and Commerce, also addresses strategies to infuse an employment first focus into state services and programs. (Page 198) Title II    

• The Assistive Technology Advisory Committee.

• The Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

• Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

• Employment First Oversight Commission

This involvement facilitates the provision of information about VR services to other disability service organizations, and often results in additional outreach activities or specific referrals.

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~To help Kansas citizens with disabilities meet their employment goals, a comprehensive array of VR services are available. Services are customized according to each person’s unique needs, skills, interests, abilities, and vocational goal. Services to be provided for each individual customer are specified on an Individual Plan for Employment, and may include:
• Vocational assessment to help a customer identify his or her skills, abilities, interests and job goals.
• Vocational counseling and guidance.
• Physical and mental restoration services, including artificial limbs, psychotherapy, and physical therapy.
• Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 54) Title I

It is expected that End-Dependence Kansas will lead to 2,000 Kansans with disabilities throughout the State achieving competitive, integrated employment after receiving newly established evidence-based employment services, e.g., discovery, individual placement supports (IPS) or Progressive Employment.
A significant goal of End-Dependence Kansas is to promote sustainable systems change to improve the quality and quantity of employment outcomes. End-Dependence Kansas will emphasize and support community partners to prioritize competitive, integrated jobs in the community rather than sub-minimum wage employment, sheltered employment, non-work day activities or other more segregated services.
To implement this initiative, KRS issued 14 performance-based contracts with community partners to provide direct consumer services. These contracts were issued after a competitive Request for Proposals process and were effective July 1, 2016. The contracts are projected for five years, with annual renewals. The community partners and VR staff have undergone intensive training on specific evidence-based practices. To evaluate fidelity to the service models and success of the initiative and to assist in establishing a sustainable cost structure, participating community partners are also reporting specific progress measures and cost information using a software designed for this initiative called Efforts to Outcomes. (Page 187) Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan. (Page 193) Title II

Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 193) Title II

A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. Experience working with people with disabilities and/or experience in competitive integrated business environments and/or human resources, supervision or training preferred. (Page 204) Title II

The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 233) Title II

KRS will implement the End-Dependence Kansas initiative, a significant capacity building and systems change effort to expand supported employment opportunities, especially through the Individual Placements and Supports model for persons with behavioral health disabilities and through the Individualized Discovery/SE model for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Led by KRS, this initiative also includes the Kansas Departments of Commerce, Corrections, Health and Environment, and Aging and Disability Services. End-Dependence Kansas will leverage the resources and expertise of these departments to identify the most effective collaborative funding approaches and to increase supported employment outcomes for Kansans with disabilities. For example, the Departments on Aging and Disability Services and Commerce contributed non-federal resources to use as matching funds for the VR program and its End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be issued following a competitive bid process to community service providers statewide to assist them to build and maintain capacity for evidence-based employment models of service delivery. (Page 249) Title II

When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Pages 250-251) Title II

The performance of these providers in helping consumers secure meaningful employment and wages consistent with their goals and priorities significantly impacts the overall KRS performance on standards and indicators. Therefore, accountability benchmarks have been established with the target of 80% of persons referred to service providers obtaining jobs within an average of 120 days, and 60% of persons referred achieving successful closures. The goal is a network of effective supported employment providers whose focus is on the vocational objectives, goals, rehabilitation needs and priorities of the consumers to be served. Improved Information Technology support solutions are needed to better track and assess service provider outcomes and to produce “report cards” of performance. The End-Dependence Kansas Initiative will provide direct service contracts to disability services providers to build and maintain their capacity to provide two evidence-based models: Individual Placements and Supports and Individualized Discovery/Supported employment. (Page 266) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of jobseekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 17) Title I

Development of this collaborative CIP will be completed by July 1, 2016. While the State’s initial focus will be on a collaborative CIP among the Core Partners, further phases of this CIP may engage other partners such as community and technical colleges. In addition, this CIP may address options for data tracking related to use of other comparable or required services and the related leveraging of resources for jobseekers. (Page 34) Title I

Opening the dialogue between the Partners and creating a streamlined approach to business outreach will provide the opportunity for key stakeholders to discuss options for creating inclusion and targeted training programs that will enhance employers hiring capabilities, as well as providing people with multiple barriers to employment opportunities to become employed. This improved engagement will also provide additional paid job opportunities for youth while in school or immediately after, up to age 24. This can include, but is not limited to internships, apprenticeships, job shadowing and/or training courses.

In addition, the strategy will increase the collaboration and leveraging of services for employers among the Partners. Employers previously served by one partner will have access to a larger network of support and work-ready jobseekers. Employers will experience a more focused and collaborated effort between agencies. This collaborative effort will increase employer knowledge and maximize their usage of the various incentive programs the state has available for businesses to hire people with disabilities and those with significant barriers to employment. (Page 69) Title I

$121,250 to United Cerebral Palsy of Kansas (UCPK), Wichita to provide individual assistive technology equipment, devices and services to enhance the independent living of Kansas with disabilities. The state funds are matched with private funds provided through UCPK and other private donors, leveraging additional spending power from the state’s investment. (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
•  Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development. (Page 90) Title I
 

School to Work Transition

~~Improve the skills of jobseekers and workers through access to education and training leading to industry-recognized credentials through the use of career pathways, apprenticeships, and other strategies.

e) Encourage paid work-based learning experiences for youth so they may explore career options, develop the universal interpersonal and customer service skills needed in the workplace, and become self-reliant through employment as adults.

2) We value the contributions that all individuals, including those with significant barriers to employment, as defined by WIOA, can make to the Kansas economy. Our goals are to:

a) Vigorously represent the ability of qualified jobseekers with significant barriers to employment to meet the workforce needs of Kansas employers.

b) Ensure the local workforce development systems provide physical and programmatic access to and opportunities for the employment, education, training, and support services for individuals, particularly those with barriers to employment. (Page 28) Title I

Local plans will be required to discuss how core partners will coordinate to prevent duplication and/or conflicts about which program serves particular individuals, including coordinating to ensure that supportive services and work supports are provided. Because the nature of individual needs will vary from individual to individual, the team recognizes that many of these decisions will need to be made on a case-by-case basis, requiring regular communication among core partner staff. We anticipate that general tendencies will emerge (out-of-school youth will be more likely to receive Title I funded work-based learning, while Pre-Employment Transition Services, or PETS, under Title IV, may be more likely to serve in-school youth). These decisions will also be shaped by individual program requirements (PETS can only serve youth with disabilities, for example). (Page 42) Title I

KRS has built its capacity to provide Pre-ETS through the addition of 20 transition specialists to local VR offices. Each of the four regions also has a Pre-ETS Manager, and KRS employs a Statewide Manager as well. KRS has also established service provider agreements with all five of the Local Workforce Development Boards, numerous Centers for Independent Living and the Kansas Youth Empowerment Academy pertaining to specific components of Pre-ETS. A major emphasis is paid work-based learning experiences. Such experiences allow students to gain an early attachment to employment as the avenue to self-reliance, explore career options and develop the soft skills that are necessary for long-term employment success. Other services offered through services providers include self-advocacy training, post-secondary education, and workplace readiness training. (Page 189) Title I

Offer training and technical assistance to districts and local VR offices on coordinating the transition planning process. Topics in this area may include but are not limited to: inviting KRS counselors to IEP meetings; providing information about VR in the IEP development process; and educating VR counselors about district procedures related to transition planning and services for employment and postsecondary education goals for students with IEPs.

• Collaborate on the State Performance Plan and/or strategic plans developed by each party to facilitate the goals of this agreement and give priority to effective transition services for youth with disabilities resulting in improved post-secondary education and competitive, integrated employment outcomes.
• Use available inter-agency forums, conferences and expertise to develop a coordinated approach to facilitate achievement of the goals of this agreement.
• Share student/consumer data and state-level data, to the extent allowed by law, to evaluate the effectiveness of the education and VR services provided.
• Share federal and state monitoring practices and findings for effective program and policy evaluation.
• Participate in technical assistance and advisory opportunities to support the goals of this agreement. (Page 190) Title II

The Individual Plan for Employment is used as the basis for referral to one of the providers. It also describes the criteria, specific to each consumer, for determining that job performance is stable, determining how and when progress will be evaluated, and describing how extended ongoing support services will be provided. After the consumer reaches stability on the job, the consumer, service provider and VR counselor work together to finalize the plan for extended ongoing supports. This allows the plan to be specific and customized according to the consumer’s current work situation and support needs. As a result, the ongoing support section of the IPE may be amended, with the consumer’s agreement, in order to reflect the most current information available. (Page 194) Title II

KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance. (Page 208) Title II

In November 2009 (Program Year 2009), KRS implemented a comprehensive Performance Management System. This system established consistent counselor performance standards related to quality and policy compliance reflected through case reviews; timeliness for eligibility and IPE development; the number of new IPEs developed; the number of consumers rehabilitated; and the rehabilitation rate. Competencies related to professional conduct, timely responses to consumer and other inquiries, and effective caseload management are also included in this performance management process. Consistent standards were also established for supervisors and administrators. (Page 208) Title II

Multiple services means more than one service as listed on the IPE. Support services (maintenance, transportation, personal assistance, and services to family members) may not be counted toward multiple services. Routine counseling and guidance to facilitate participation in the VR process may not be counted toward multiple services. Core services which are not provided by KRS but which are necessary for achievement of the employment outcome may be counted toward multiple services.

Extended period of time means at least four months between Status 12 and closure. (Page 244) Title IV

An order of selection gives priority to persons with the most significant disabilities when there are insufficient resources to provide vocational rehabilitation services to all eligible individuals who apply. After eligibility has been determined, each consumer is assigned to a category group. The consumer will be assigned to the highest priority category for which he or she is qualified, and a rationale will be documented in the case file. If the consumer’s circumstances change or new information is acquired, the category designation can be changed. Depending on available resources, all categories may be served. However, if there is a need to close one or more categories for services:
• Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will set aside sufficient funds to purchase services necessary to determine eligibility. Applications for services will be accepted without restriction.
• The closure will not affect individuals who already have final Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs). IPE services will continue.
• Persons who need post-employment services will not be affected. (Page 247) Title IV

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV   
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
• Federal regulations require that eligibility for VR services be determined no later than 60 days from the data of application, unless the applicant agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas is only 28 days (as of 2-28-2018).
• Federal regulations require that an Individual Plan for Employment be developed no later than 90 days from the date of eligibility, unless the client agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas from application to IPE development is only 64 days (as of 2-28-2018). Page 258 title IV

Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). PY 2016: 10,149
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 260) Title IV

Given the limited number of VR staff, educators were asked at what age it would be when it would be most important for VR to participate in IEP meetings. The majority of educators indicated ages 17 (46.8%) and 16 (27.7%) would be the most important ages for VR to participate in IEP meetings.

The following question was posed: “To assist your students to be successful in post-secondary education or direct entry into the workforce, which of the following pre-employment transition services are most important?”

Rank of Most Important Pre-Employment Transition Services

567. Work-based learning experiences
568. Workplace readiness training
569. Instruction in self-advocacy
570. Job exploration counseling
571. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or post-secondary education programs at institutions of higher education (Page 229) Title IV

KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. KRS will also:

• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so That consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 250) Title IV

A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc.  (Page 249-250) Title IV

- Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
- Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs. Training will include short-term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One-Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
- Increase follow-up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
- Insure all most-in-need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
- Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor that outlines a four-year strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce development system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all job-seekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4) Title 1

Some skill gaps can be addressed through Career Technical Education. The Kansas Board of Regents’ Technical Education Authority has established twenty-five program Alignment Maps in ten federal instructional program classifications: Healthcare, Dental Care, Engineering Technology, Automotive Technology and Collision Repair, Construction/HVAC/Carpentry, Computer Sciences, Welding, Machine Technology, Diesel Technology, Electrical/Utility Technology and Police and Corrections Sciences. Most of these programs lead to careers in occupations which pay wages high enough to allow workers to earn wages which are self-supporting. Postsecondary institutions, or business and industry or WIOA Core and Required Partners in partnership with postsecondary institutions, can create career pathways which will be supported by WIOA funds. (Page 13) Title I

The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty—five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team—teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs.

When providing vocational counseling and guidance with VR customers, the VR program uses the Kansas Department of Labor’s Labor Information Center website for information on high—demand jobs and career pathways. At this website, information is provided about jobs across various industries. Career pathways and potential earnings are provided for entry—level, intermediate and advanced career options. Educational requirements for each level in the career pathway are provided. This information is useful in facilitating informed decision—making by VR customers regarding services and vocational objectives. It also helps assure that VR customers are prepared to meet the workforce needs of Kansas business and industry.

Department of Commerce Workforce Services Unit will require Local Workforce Development Areas to describe specifically how they will develop and expand strategies for meeting the needs of local employers, workers, and jobseekers, particularly through job—driven industry or sector partnerships. (Page 35) Title I

Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.

• Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in hiring older workers. They will contact those identified, provide education on the advantages of hiring older workers and establish on—going communication that will generate valuable employment opportunities for qualified project participants. (Page 302) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

For Titles IB and III the state workforce agency will fund outreach, employment assistance, case management, and staff supervision through state merit staff funded through Wagner-Peyser labor exchange and career services; Reemployment Assistance programs; Veteran’s Employment and Training programs, including those for Disabled Veterans; Registered Apprenticeship; Agricultural Outreach; Work Opportunity Tax Credit; Trade Act and Foreign Labor Wage Certification programs through formula and dedicated funds. SCSEP services are provided through a sub-grant agreement with the Wichita Area Workforce Development Board. Monitoring, information management, staff training, technical assistance and KWSB support will be provided with the state portion of WIOA funds and other employment and training formula funds. All of these activities will move Kansas toward the strategic goals described in the Section II of this plan. These activities will be aligned across the Core Programs and combined state plan partners as described in the Customer Flow section of the State plan, and through avenues defined during the first two years of the implementation of this State plan, such as cross-training, referrals, co-enrollment and coordinating resources as agreed in eventual Memoranda of Understanding. (Page 52) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local plans must discuss how the local areas will address the challenges of establishing and maintaining eligibility for public assistance, including SSI, TANF, SNAP, and other means-tested programs, especially in light of the possible effect on household income of a participant’s earnings through work-based learning.

• Local plans should address how case managers will become familiar with these issues.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State-level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis. Local area and partner staff should incorporate the information listed above into individual service strategies. Where practical and applicable, the goal of these strategies should be designed to exit public benefits successfully. (Page 44) Title I

This level of collaboration between the Partners will increase the number of jobseekers with multiple barriers to employment in successful employment. The Partners will regularly (annually) measure the degree of use and satisfaction of employers within the system, as well as the increased level of people with disabilities and significant barriers to employment who are working with those employers. (Page 71) Title I

Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:

• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs.
When considering the entire disability service delivery system, identifying the source of extended supports continues to be an issue warranting further review and capacity building efforts, especially for individuals who cannot access such services through the state’s network of community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations. (Page 224) Title IV

Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.

Strategies for Goal 2:

KRS will implement the following strategies:

A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).

B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage that career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 241) Title IV

Highlights and accomplishments Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) reports the following accomplishments in implementing the State Plan Goals and Priorities. These highlights are based on PY 2016 (July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017) indicators.

• A total of 1,021 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $10.33 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $37 an hour as an CAD drafter and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field. Other high-wage outcomes included physical therapist and occupational therapist, both at just more than $40 an hour.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.5%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 164. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In PY 2016, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $647,025. (Page 257) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Both state and federal resources are leveraged to improve access to workforce development programs provided by educational institutions. In addition to the projects already described, Kansas has been awarded the Disability Employment Initiative grant to, in part, fund postsecondary credential training for jobseekers with disabilities. Postsecondary partners have competed for and received funding to support tuition assistance for jobseekers including offenders and other individuals with barriers to employment. Kansas WIOA Core Partners, educational institutions and other partners will continue to aggressively seek additional resources to improve access to education, postsecondary credentials and college credit. (Page 73) Title I

The State Workforce Board’s Eligible Training Provider List policy describes the first step WIOA Titles I and III partners will utilize to engage Kansas education and training providers to create a job—driven education and training system. Historically, Workforce Development and VR have had a strong relationship with both Adult Education and postsecondary education institutions, as they are the very entities which provide the skill development opportunities required to meet the needs of Kansas employers. In addition to the projects described earlier, Workforce AID and Senate Bill 155, the state has also supported AO—K, a program providing jobseekers concurrent training in Adult Education and postsecondary credentials. This program relies on functional relationships between workforce services, adult education and postsecondary education to help jobseekers simultaneously gain the skills needed for successful employment and to meet the needs of employers seeking individuals with particular skill sets. (Page 71) Title I

Data Collection

(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.KANSASWORKS.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. The VR data system, the Kansas Management Information System or KMIS, will support implementation of the state’s strategies for an effective, efficient and outcome-oriented workforce system. KMIS is used to collect consumer demographic information, to track consumer milestones as they progress through their individual plans for employment, and to compile data necessary for state and federal reports. KMIS is also the fiscal management tool through which consumer services are authorized and paid. Data will be extracted for compilation of WIOA-required common accountability measures. The Portal for Adult Basic Literacy Outreach (PABLO) is the student information, program accountability, and reporting system for Kansas Adult Education. The Kansas Higher Education Data System (KHEDS) supports informed decision-making through the collection, analysis, and reporting of postsecondary data in Kansas. Both PABLO and KHEDS will support coordinated implementation of state strategies through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative (WDQI). Page 77 Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Identify competitive, integrated employment opportunities for vocational rehabilitation (VR) consumers, including such opportunities for youth and adults who are diverted from sub-minimum wage employment through Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.
• Increase opportunities for youth with disabilities to engage in paid work-based learning experiences as part of the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. Such work-based learning is intended to facilitate career exploration and development of the soft skills necessary for lifelong employment success.
• Collaborate with partners in the workforce development system on coordinated business outreach processes.
• Coordinate with Economic and Employment Services in the Department for Children and Families, which administers the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and its employer development activities. (Page 195)  Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will work with the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to establish an interagency agreement regarding roles and responsibilities pertaining to competitive, integrated employment for Kansans with disabilities. KDADS and KDHE share responsibilities for administration of the Medicaid program. KDADS oversees services for persons with intellectual disabilities and behavioral health disabilities.

The purpose of the agreement will be to create a common understanding of responsibilities, policies and procedures. It will address data sharing to better analyze how mutual consumers interact with the various services and supports available to them. Perhaps most importantly, the agreement will establish a collaborative framework for services that will improve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for people with disabilities. A priority will be to address procedures for referring youth with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation (VR) services so they may explore options for competitive, integrated employment rather than being placed directly in sub-minimum wage employment after exit from school, consistent with Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. In addition, the agreement will address referral procedures for adults who are already employed in sub-minimum wage jobs so that VR may provide periodic information and career counseling related to competitive, integrated employment options. (Page 196-197) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policy 5-33-00 assures compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability and can be found at (Pages 104-105) Title II

Veterans

Veterans receive priority access to computers and resources when there is a waiting line to utilize those resources. Veterans receive a special designation on interview sheets and sign in sheets for employer job fairs conducted at AJCs and get first opportunity to interview and/ or speak to employers. When program funds are limited, eligible veterans who qualify for funding assistance are granted priority over non-veterans for non-obligated funding assistance. Veterans’ resumes are searched first when new job orders are created by any workforce center staff. Qualified vets are then contacted by that staff and informed of the new position. (Page 104) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 277) Title IV

The DVOP specialist utilizes a case management process, in which they provide the following services: comprehensive assessments, individualized employment counseling, career guidance, and the development of an individual employment plan. This individualized employment plan will include appropriate apprenticeship, other on-job training, and additional education opportunities, as needed to help the veteran overcome their significant barrier to employment. After assessing the needs and a plan is developed, the DVOP will reassess and may identify additional non-intensive services needed, which will require the DVOP to refer veterans to services provided by local partners, agencies, and other employment/ training program providers. LVER Staff All Kansas LVER staff has received extensive training in how to engage employers through the National Veterans Training Institute (NVTI), within 18 months of their hire. Additionally, all new hire LVERs receive Ramp-UP training from the State Veteran Service Manager, which includes the history of the Wagner-Peyser, Employment Services, the Jobs for Veterans Act and JVSG staff roles and responsibilities. This training also includes local operations, as they relate to all active and current VPLs, chapters 41 and 42 of Title 38. Other training include the annual training conference, where we will address staff development and skills improvement, integrated service models and their unique roles, effective intensive service delivery models, and other program related information sharing/ strategic planning/ performance measuring/ and systems training. Lastly, local workforce center training is provided by local managers and the One-Stop partners, which highlights location specific practices and our partners’ operations. (Page 281) Title IV

For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 285) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) collaborates and coordinates services with federal, state and local employment and rehabilitation agencies that contribute to the vocational rehabilitation (VR) of Kansans with disabilities. At the local level such collaborations are individualized according to each person’s needs and interests. This individualized approach is one of the cornerstones of VR services. At the state level, KRS collaborates with other units within the Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) and with other state departments. For example:

• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title I

Service provider agreements are available for a variety of services, including vocational assessment, independent living assessment, community-based work assessment, community-based job tryout, job preparation, guided placement, customized placement, job coaching, rehabilitation engineering, assistive technology, rehabilitation teaching, comprehensive facility-based training for persons who are blind or visually impaired, and orientation/mobility. These agreements emphasize the development of action plans, strengthened approaches to ongoing communication among KRS counselors and service providers, and accountability measures for successful rehabilitation outcomes. KRS paid more than $4.5 million through these agreements in PY 2016.

Service providers participating in these agreements include community rehabilitation programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities, consumer-run organizations, independent living centers, mental health centers, substance abuse programs, assistive technology access sites, and independent contractors. Providers may offer more than one service and serve more than one region of the state. (Page 192) Title I

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:

1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.  (Page 193) Title II

Current activities include the following:

• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers address capacity to provide supported employment services.
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services continue to collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) who have disabilities.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who are aging out of foster care.
• In-service training will focus on best practices in service delivery for persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with traumatic brain injury, persons with disabilities who have a criminal background, and persons with mental illness. Contracted service providers will be included in these training opportunities whenever possible to enhance their expertise in service VR consumers. (Page 255) Title II

Individual job placements in competitive, integrated employment are the outcome of supported employment services funded by KRS. Such outcomes have higher earnings, consumer choice, community integration and more co-worker interaction. KRS supported employment outcomes do not include enclaves, work crews or other congregate work settings.

Service delivery system in implementing supported employment services, KRS emphasizes the importance of geographic distribution of services. KRS also places a priority on working with community agencies with the capacity to provide extended/ongoing support services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Provider agreements:

• Address responsibility of the providers to coordinate the community service system, which has responsibility for funding and providing the extended ongoing services necessary for the consumer to maintain employment once they exit the VR program. (Page 265) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

State Workforce Policy 4-2-04 Wagner-Peyser Reemployment Services for UI Claimants: Wagner-Peyser funding is utilized by the Department of Commerce to assure: (1) UI claimants receive a full range of labor exchange services necessary and appropriate to facilitate their earliest return to work, as determined by assessment services including WIOA Career Services; (2) claimants requiring assistance in seeking work receive the necessary guidance and counseling to ensure they can conduct a meaningful and realistic work search; and (3) UI program staff receive information about the claimants’ ability to work or their availability to accept suitable work offered them. UI claimants are selected using KDOL’s Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services (WPRS) system. Claimants most likely to exhaust (score of 50% or higher) are placed in the pool for WFC staff to schedule for services. The following are mandatory services: • Work Registration - Most claimants are automatically registered in KANSASWORKS.com when they file an Unemployment Insurance claim. However, if the claimant is not already registered, staff assistance is offered to help them register. • Assessment Orientation - Staff provide an introduction to the workforce center to include instruction on using self-help tools. • Initial Assessment - Staff provide an initial assessment of the claimant’s skill level, aptitude, ability, supportive service needs and eligibility for federally funded programs in general, and specifically USDOL funded programs. • Individual Employment Plan - In coordination with the claimant, and other WIOA Core Partners as appropriate, staff develop a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Assessment Interview. (Page 146- 147) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
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COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 31

COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Special Education Reimbursement Guide State Categorical Aid - 04/17/2019

~~“Categorical aid helps with the cost of implementing Individualized Education Program(IEP)services over and above the regular education that all students are entitled to receive. All expenditures claimed for reimbursement under categorical aid must have been paid from the Local Education Agency (LEA)’s special education funds All categorical aid money requested by the LEA must be deposited in its special education fund”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WIOA Guidance Letters - 04/15/2019

~~“The KANSASWORKS State Board serves as a review board and change agent empowered with the responsibility of making recommendations to the Governor and to state agencies to align workforce development with the needs of economic development in the state.”

This page has “WIOA Guidance Letters” that can be downloaded for use.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot - 01/20/2019

~~This page is an overview of the Kansas RETAIN details including amount of funding, target populations, locations of program and the point of contact.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

R2W Research & RETAIN Demonstration Projects - 01/20/2019

~~“Recognizing the importance of giving workers with disabilities economically sustainable alternatives to Federal disability benefits, the President's 2018 and 2019 proposed budgets support early intervention demonstrations. ODEP, the Employment and Training Administration, and the Social Security Administration developed the RETAIN initiative — Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network — to test the impact of early intervention projects on SAW/RTW outcomes. Visit the About RETAIN page for application information and the News & Events page for the latest information on all things RETAIN.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

MENTAL HEALTH TASK FORCE Report to the Kansas Legislature - 01/14/2019

~~“While the Task Force considers all recommendations in Figure 2 (page ES-vi) to be priorities, there were a number of action items that emerged as essential to the implementation of the entire plan, including:  •Expanding Medicaid would undergird many of the recommendations by improving access to behavioral health services at all levels of care and allowing investment in workforce and capacity (Recommendation 2.5, page 36); •Restoring and increasing community outpatient mental health and substance use disorder treatment, primary care, housing, employment and peer programs will improve outcomes for individuals and families (Recommendation 1.5, page 21; Recommendation 2.1,page 26; Recommendation 2.6, page 38; and Recommendation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2018-2019 - 01/01/2019

~~“The Kansas Assessment Program (KAP) Summative Assessment will have many tools available to help students navigate the online system. Some of the tools  will be available to all students, while others will only be available to students who have the need identified in their Individual Education Plans, Section 504 Plans, ELL Plan or statement of student needs. Many of these tools are available currently in the interactive demos and interim assessment, but all will be available for the summative assessments. All tools and accommodations work on laptops and desktops (Windows or Mac), tablets (Chromebooks or iPads).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” - 12/18/2018

~~“..the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid  Services (CMS) is approving Kansas’s request for an extension  of  its    section  1115(a)  demonstration   titled,  “KanCare” (Project  Number  11-W-00283/7),   along  with  modifications   to  the  demonstration  that  will  apply  during  the  extension  period.    With  this  approval,  the  KanCare demonstration extension w ill  be in  effect from January  1,  2019 through December 31,  2023. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Kansas School for the Deaf Secondary program - 08/23/2018

~~“Career:Career Exploration: Seventh and eighth grade students take classes to explore career interests and self-awareness skills for future job choices. Ninth and tenth grade students are required to take Career Training for soft skill and work skill development. Eleventh and twelve grade students experience on and off campus internships, job shadows, and supported employment.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2019

~~“Kansas now submits their amended Statewide Transition Plan. Changes include increasing stakeholder participation, integrating stakeholder recommendations, revised timelines, and proactive approaches for engaging stakeholders. The identified need for a new direction was derived from the collective views not only of service recipients, HCBS providers, and the state, but also significant and ongoing technical assistance provided to Kansas by officials from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Further, this amended plan includes summaries from previous and ongoing public comment sessions along with the KDADS responses.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” (Project Number 11-W-00283/7) - 12/18/2018

~~“Kansas will provide new employment supports to beneficiaries with behavioral health diagnoses and eligible for a 1915(c), either by being on the waitlist or already being enrolled in the 1915(c). This voluntary pilot will be capped at 500 beneficiaries. Services w ill inc lude pr e-vocational support services, supportive employment services, personal assistant services, independent living skills training, assistive technology, and transportation, and are s imila r to services that could be offered as state plan home and community-based services (HCBS) benefit under section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Included in the pilot is a targeted expansion of Medicaid for individua ls on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) who would normally not be eligible for Medicaid without meeting spend-down requirements and.  these beneficiaries w ill be eligible f or both the pilot services and Medicaid state plan services. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Institutional Transition Policy - 11/05/2018

~~“PurposeThis policy establishes the process and procedures for transitioning eligible individuals from institutional care settings onto the Frail and Elderly (FE), Intellectual and Developmental Disability (I/DD), Physical Disability (PD), and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) waiver programs. "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Person-Centered Service Plan Policy - 07/09/2018

~~“The purpose of this policy is to explain the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) requirements found in 42 CFR § 441.301, K.A.R. 30-63-1 through 32, and the 1915 (c) HCBS waivers and detail the process for creation of the Person-Centered Service Plan.

This policy provides requirements for the implementation of a person-centered planning process, and aims to describe for 1915 (c) waiver participants, what to expect though the development and implementation of a person-centered plan.  This policy also provides information regarding applicable Person-Centered Service Plan forms and documents, elements for the 1915(c) HCBS waiver’s plan of care quality assurance compliance, and the procedures, timelines and responsible parties governing the Person-Centered Service Plan  and implementation activities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Medicaid 1915 (c) Waiver Public Forums - 06/15/2018

~~“Home and Community Bases Services (HCBS) provides oversight for a system of community based supports and  services for persons in Kansas with disabilities. Information about HCBS waiver programs can be found at the corresponding links for each program listed below. Providers include a variety of not-for-profit and for-profit organizations as well as governmental entities. These services are provided through 10 HCBS waiver programs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,913,314
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
195,738
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.52%
Change from
2018 to 2019
91,009
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.50%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
82.67%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 2,913,123 2,911,510 2,913,314
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 191,769 194,225 195,738
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,069 87,802 91,009
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,234,266 1,241,955 1,237,960
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.45% 45.21% 46.50%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.96% 82.06% 82.67%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.60% 3.40% 3.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.60% 19.00% 19.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.90% 10.90% 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 181,015 195,158 190,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 192,687 195,193 193,874
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 319,711 333,319 326,746
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 25,286 27,206 24,372
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 25,056 31,507 31,290
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,525 5,768 5,437
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,514 6,023 4,764
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,263 11,935 14,742
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 6,239 5,654 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,017 3,963 3,973
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.70% 8.70% 8.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 73,174 72,185 70,426

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,406 8,725 8,631
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 25,872 24,584 14,680
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 28,174 26,640 24,901
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 33.40% 32.80% 34.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 15.00% 14.50% 14.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 25.70% 26.00% 25.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,265 1,235 1,180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,171 2,207 2,100
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,001 3,726 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 100 67 77
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 58 40 46
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 60.00% 6.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.00 1.37 1.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 25.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,968 3,105 3,121
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,747 106,448 104,953
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 73 106 95
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 107 147 164

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A $252,611 $459,539
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A $106,151,990 $108,687,513
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,600 3,923 4,839
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,842 2,789 2,670
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,056 4,538 4,040
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 29.10 30.68 32.05

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.91% 68.93% 68.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.97% 7.41% 7.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.20% 2.25% 2.32%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.74% 99.33% 99.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 28.25% 42.67% 32.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.25% 62.21% 56.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.75% 72.96% 75.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 26.00% 19.54% 23.78%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30 33 5
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 31 33 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,889 2,156 171
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 114 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,003 2,156 171

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title II

Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system. The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 186) Title II      

• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.

• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.

• The Developmental Disabilities Council.

• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.

• The Employment First Commission.

• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

KRS has agreements with Comprehensive Schools for the Blind in Colorado (Colorado Center for the Blind), Missouri (Alphapointe) and Minnesota (BLIND, Inc.) to provide access to the intensive level of training needed by some consumers. An agreement with the Helen Keller National Center was established in 2017 and continues in place. On an ongoing basis, KRS will seek additional agreements as needed to meet the needs of our consumers. The Governor’s Disability Sub-Cabinet, which includes DCF/KRS, KDADS, KDHE and Commerce, also addresses strategies to infuse an employment first focus into state services and programs. (Page 198) Title II    

• The Assistive Technology Advisory Committee.

• The Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

• Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

• Employment First Oversight Commission

This involvement facilitates the provision of information about VR services to other disability service organizations, and often results in additional outreach activities or specific referrals.

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~To help Kansas citizens with disabilities meet their employment goals, a comprehensive array of VR services are available. Services are customized according to each person’s unique needs, skills, interests, abilities, and vocational goal. Services to be provided for each individual customer are specified on an Individual Plan for Employment, and may include:
• Vocational assessment to help a customer identify his or her skills, abilities, interests and job goals.
• Vocational counseling and guidance.
• Physical and mental restoration services, including artificial limbs, psychotherapy, and physical therapy.
• Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 54) Title I

It is expected that End-Dependence Kansas will lead to 2,000 Kansans with disabilities throughout the State achieving competitive, integrated employment after receiving newly established evidence-based employment services, e.g., discovery, individual placement supports (IPS) or Progressive Employment.
A significant goal of End-Dependence Kansas is to promote sustainable systems change to improve the quality and quantity of employment outcomes. End-Dependence Kansas will emphasize and support community partners to prioritize competitive, integrated jobs in the community rather than sub-minimum wage employment, sheltered employment, non-work day activities or other more segregated services.
To implement this initiative, KRS issued 14 performance-based contracts with community partners to provide direct consumer services. These contracts were issued after a competitive Request for Proposals process and were effective July 1, 2016. The contracts are projected for five years, with annual renewals. The community partners and VR staff have undergone intensive training on specific evidence-based practices. To evaluate fidelity to the service models and success of the initiative and to assist in establishing a sustainable cost structure, participating community partners are also reporting specific progress measures and cost information using a software designed for this initiative called Efforts to Outcomes. (Page 187) Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan. (Page 193) Title II

Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 193) Title II

A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. Experience working with people with disabilities and/or experience in competitive integrated business environments and/or human resources, supervision or training preferred. (Page 204) Title II

The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 233) Title II

KRS will implement the End-Dependence Kansas initiative, a significant capacity building and systems change effort to expand supported employment opportunities, especially through the Individual Placements and Supports model for persons with behavioral health disabilities and through the Individualized Discovery/SE model for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Led by KRS, this initiative also includes the Kansas Departments of Commerce, Corrections, Health and Environment, and Aging and Disability Services. End-Dependence Kansas will leverage the resources and expertise of these departments to identify the most effective collaborative funding approaches and to increase supported employment outcomes for Kansans with disabilities. For example, the Departments on Aging and Disability Services and Commerce contributed non-federal resources to use as matching funds for the VR program and its End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be issued following a competitive bid process to community service providers statewide to assist them to build and maintain capacity for evidence-based employment models of service delivery. (Page 249) Title II

When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Pages 250-251) Title II

The performance of these providers in helping consumers secure meaningful employment and wages consistent with their goals and priorities significantly impacts the overall KRS performance on standards and indicators. Therefore, accountability benchmarks have been established with the target of 80% of persons referred to service providers obtaining jobs within an average of 120 days, and 60% of persons referred achieving successful closures. The goal is a network of effective supported employment providers whose focus is on the vocational objectives, goals, rehabilitation needs and priorities of the consumers to be served. Improved Information Technology support solutions are needed to better track and assess service provider outcomes and to produce “report cards” of performance. The End-Dependence Kansas Initiative will provide direct service contracts to disability services providers to build and maintain their capacity to provide two evidence-based models: Individual Placements and Supports and Individualized Discovery/Supported employment. (Page 266) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of jobseekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 17) Title I

Development of this collaborative CIP will be completed by July 1, 2016. While the State’s initial focus will be on a collaborative CIP among the Core Partners, further phases of this CIP may engage other partners such as community and technical colleges. In addition, this CIP may address options for data tracking related to use of other comparable or required services and the related leveraging of resources for jobseekers. (Page 34) Title I

Opening the dialogue between the Partners and creating a streamlined approach to business outreach will provide the opportunity for key stakeholders to discuss options for creating inclusion and targeted training programs that will enhance employers hiring capabilities, as well as providing people with multiple barriers to employment opportunities to become employed. This improved engagement will also provide additional paid job opportunities for youth while in school or immediately after, up to age 24. This can include, but is not limited to internships, apprenticeships, job shadowing and/or training courses.

In addition, the strategy will increase the collaboration and leveraging of services for employers among the Partners. Employers previously served by one partner will have access to a larger network of support and work-ready jobseekers. Employers will experience a more focused and collaborated effort between agencies. This collaborative effort will increase employer knowledge and maximize their usage of the various incentive programs the state has available for businesses to hire people with disabilities and those with significant barriers to employment. (Page 69) Title I

$121,250 to United Cerebral Palsy of Kansas (UCPK), Wichita to provide individual assistive technology equipment, devices and services to enhance the independent living of Kansas with disabilities. The state funds are matched with private funds provided through UCPK and other private donors, leveraging additional spending power from the state’s investment. (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
•  Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development. (Page 90) Title I
 

School to Work Transition

~~Improve the skills of jobseekers and workers through access to education and training leading to industry-recognized credentials through the use of career pathways, apprenticeships, and other strategies.

e) Encourage paid work-based learning experiences for youth so they may explore career options, develop the universal interpersonal and customer service skills needed in the workplace, and become self-reliant through employment as adults.

2) We value the contributions that all individuals, including those with significant barriers to employment, as defined by WIOA, can make to the Kansas economy. Our goals are to:

a) Vigorously represent the ability of qualified jobseekers with significant barriers to employment to meet the workforce needs of Kansas employers.

b) Ensure the local workforce development systems provide physical and programmatic access to and opportunities for the employment, education, training, and support services for individuals, particularly those with barriers to employment. (Page 28) Title I

Local plans will be required to discuss how core partners will coordinate to prevent duplication and/or conflicts about which program serves particular individuals, including coordinating to ensure that supportive services and work supports are provided. Because the nature of individual needs will vary from individual to individual, the team recognizes that many of these decisions will need to be made on a case-by-case basis, requiring regular communication among core partner staff. We anticipate that general tendencies will emerge (out-of-school youth will be more likely to receive Title I funded work-based learning, while Pre-Employment Transition Services, or PETS, under Title IV, may be more likely to serve in-school youth). These decisions will also be shaped by individual program requirements (PETS can only serve youth with disabilities, for example). (Page 42) Title I

KRS has built its capacity to provide Pre-ETS through the addition of 20 transition specialists to local VR offices. Each of the four regions also has a Pre-ETS Manager, and KRS employs a Statewide Manager as well. KRS has also established service provider agreements with all five of the Local Workforce Development Boards, numerous Centers for Independent Living and the Kansas Youth Empowerment Academy pertaining to specific components of Pre-ETS. A major emphasis is paid work-based learning experiences. Such experiences allow students to gain an early attachment to employment as the avenue to self-reliance, explore career options and develop the soft skills that are necessary for long-term employment success. Other services offered through services providers include self-advocacy training, post-secondary education, and workplace readiness training. (Page 189) Title I

Offer training and technical assistance to districts and local VR offices on coordinating the transition planning process. Topics in this area may include but are not limited to: inviting KRS counselors to IEP meetings; providing information about VR in the IEP development process; and educating VR counselors about district procedures related to transition planning and services for employment and postsecondary education goals for students with IEPs.

• Collaborate on the State Performance Plan and/or strategic plans developed by each party to facilitate the goals of this agreement and give priority to effective transition services for youth with disabilities resulting in improved post-secondary education and competitive, integrated employment outcomes.
• Use available inter-agency forums, conferences and expertise to develop a coordinated approach to facilitate achievement of the goals of this agreement.
• Share student/consumer data and state-level data, to the extent allowed by law, to evaluate the effectiveness of the education and VR services provided.
• Share federal and state monitoring practices and findings for effective program and policy evaluation.
• Participate in technical assistance and advisory opportunities to support the goals of this agreement. (Page 190) Title II

The Individual Plan for Employment is used as the basis for referral to one of the providers. It also describes the criteria, specific to each consumer, for determining that job performance is stable, determining how and when progress will be evaluated, and describing how extended ongoing support services will be provided. After the consumer reaches stability on the job, the consumer, service provider and VR counselor work together to finalize the plan for extended ongoing supports. This allows the plan to be specific and customized according to the consumer’s current work situation and support needs. As a result, the ongoing support section of the IPE may be amended, with the consumer’s agreement, in order to reflect the most current information available. (Page 194) Title II

KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance. (Page 208) Title II

In November 2009 (Program Year 2009), KRS implemented a comprehensive Performance Management System. This system established consistent counselor performance standards related to quality and policy compliance reflected through case reviews; timeliness for eligibility and IPE development; the number of new IPEs developed; the number of consumers rehabilitated; and the rehabilitation rate. Competencies related to professional conduct, timely responses to consumer and other inquiries, and effective caseload management are also included in this performance management process. Consistent standards were also established for supervisors and administrators. (Page 208) Title II

Multiple services means more than one service as listed on the IPE. Support services (maintenance, transportation, personal assistance, and services to family members) may not be counted toward multiple services. Routine counseling and guidance to facilitate participation in the VR process may not be counted toward multiple services. Core services which are not provided by KRS but which are necessary for achievement of the employment outcome may be counted toward multiple services.

Extended period of time means at least four months between Status 12 and closure. (Page 244) Title IV

An order of selection gives priority to persons with the most significant disabilities when there are insufficient resources to provide vocational rehabilitation services to all eligible individuals who apply. After eligibility has been determined, each consumer is assigned to a category group. The consumer will be assigned to the highest priority category for which he or she is qualified, and a rationale will be documented in the case file. If the consumer’s circumstances change or new information is acquired, the category designation can be changed. Depending on available resources, all categories may be served. However, if there is a need to close one or more categories for services:
• Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will set aside sufficient funds to purchase services necessary to determine eligibility. Applications for services will be accepted without restriction.
• The closure will not affect individuals who already have final Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs). IPE services will continue.
• Persons who need post-employment services will not be affected. (Page 247) Title IV

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV   
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
• Federal regulations require that eligibility for VR services be determined no later than 60 days from the data of application, unless the applicant agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas is only 28 days (as of 2-28-2018).
• Federal regulations require that an Individual Plan for Employment be developed no later than 90 days from the date of eligibility, unless the client agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas from application to IPE development is only 64 days (as of 2-28-2018). Page 258 title IV

Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). PY 2016: 10,149
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 260) Title IV

Given the limited number of VR staff, educators were asked at what age it would be when it would be most important for VR to participate in IEP meetings. The majority of educators indicated ages 17 (46.8%) and 16 (27.7%) would be the most important ages for VR to participate in IEP meetings.

The following question was posed: “To assist your students to be successful in post-secondary education or direct entry into the workforce, which of the following pre-employment transition services are most important?”

Rank of Most Important Pre-Employment Transition Services

567. Work-based learning experiences
568. Workplace readiness training
569. Instruction in self-advocacy
570. Job exploration counseling
571. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or post-secondary education programs at institutions of higher education (Page 229) Title IV

KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. KRS will also:

• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so That consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 250) Title IV

A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc.  (Page 249-250) Title IV

- Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
- Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs. Training will include short-term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One-Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
- Increase follow-up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
- Insure all most-in-need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
- Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor that outlines a four-year strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce development system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all job-seekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4) Title 1

Some skill gaps can be addressed through Career Technical Education. The Kansas Board of Regents’ Technical Education Authority has established twenty-five program Alignment Maps in ten federal instructional program classifications: Healthcare, Dental Care, Engineering Technology, Automotive Technology and Collision Repair, Construction/HVAC/Carpentry, Computer Sciences, Welding, Machine Technology, Diesel Technology, Electrical/Utility Technology and Police and Corrections Sciences. Most of these programs lead to careers in occupations which pay wages high enough to allow workers to earn wages which are self-supporting. Postsecondary institutions, or business and industry or WIOA Core and Required Partners in partnership with postsecondary institutions, can create career pathways which will be supported by WIOA funds. (Page 13) Title I

The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty—five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team—teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs.

When providing vocational counseling and guidance with VR customers, the VR program uses the Kansas Department of Labor’s Labor Information Center website for information on high—demand jobs and career pathways. At this website, information is provided about jobs across various industries. Career pathways and potential earnings are provided for entry—level, intermediate and advanced career options. Educational requirements for each level in the career pathway are provided. This information is useful in facilitating informed decision—making by VR customers regarding services and vocational objectives. It also helps assure that VR customers are prepared to meet the workforce needs of Kansas business and industry.

Department of Commerce Workforce Services Unit will require Local Workforce Development Areas to describe specifically how they will develop and expand strategies for meeting the needs of local employers, workers, and jobseekers, particularly through job—driven industry or sector partnerships. (Page 35) Title I

Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.

• Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in hiring older workers. They will contact those identified, provide education on the advantages of hiring older workers and establish on—going communication that will generate valuable employment opportunities for qualified project participants. (Page 302) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

For Titles IB and III the state workforce agency will fund outreach, employment assistance, case management, and staff supervision through state merit staff funded through Wagner-Peyser labor exchange and career services; Reemployment Assistance programs; Veteran’s Employment and Training programs, including those for Disabled Veterans; Registered Apprenticeship; Agricultural Outreach; Work Opportunity Tax Credit; Trade Act and Foreign Labor Wage Certification programs through formula and dedicated funds. SCSEP services are provided through a sub-grant agreement with the Wichita Area Workforce Development Board. Monitoring, information management, staff training, technical assistance and KWSB support will be provided with the state portion of WIOA funds and other employment and training formula funds. All of these activities will move Kansas toward the strategic goals described in the Section II of this plan. These activities will be aligned across the Core Programs and combined state plan partners as described in the Customer Flow section of the State plan, and through avenues defined during the first two years of the implementation of this State plan, such as cross-training, referrals, co-enrollment and coordinating resources as agreed in eventual Memoranda of Understanding. (Page 52) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local plans must discuss how the local areas will address the challenges of establishing and maintaining eligibility for public assistance, including SSI, TANF, SNAP, and other means-tested programs, especially in light of the possible effect on household income of a participant’s earnings through work-based learning.

• Local plans should address how case managers will become familiar with these issues.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State-level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis. Local area and partner staff should incorporate the information listed above into individual service strategies. Where practical and applicable, the goal of these strategies should be designed to exit public benefits successfully. (Page 44) Title I

This level of collaboration between the Partners will increase the number of jobseekers with multiple barriers to employment in successful employment. The Partners will regularly (annually) measure the degree of use and satisfaction of employers within the system, as well as the increased level of people with disabilities and significant barriers to employment who are working with those employers. (Page 71) Title I

Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:

• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs.
When considering the entire disability service delivery system, identifying the source of extended supports continues to be an issue warranting further review and capacity building efforts, especially for individuals who cannot access such services through the state’s network of community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations. (Page 224) Title IV

Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.

Strategies for Goal 2:

KRS will implement the following strategies:

A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).

B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage that career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 241) Title IV

Highlights and accomplishments Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) reports the following accomplishments in implementing the State Plan Goals and Priorities. These highlights are based on PY 2016 (July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017) indicators.

• A total of 1,021 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $10.33 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $37 an hour as an CAD drafter and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field. Other high-wage outcomes included physical therapist and occupational therapist, both at just more than $40 an hour.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.5%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 164. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In PY 2016, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $647,025. (Page 257) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Both state and federal resources are leveraged to improve access to workforce development programs provided by educational institutions. In addition to the projects already described, Kansas has been awarded the Disability Employment Initiative grant to, in part, fund postsecondary credential training for jobseekers with disabilities. Postsecondary partners have competed for and received funding to support tuition assistance for jobseekers including offenders and other individuals with barriers to employment. Kansas WIOA Core Partners, educational institutions and other partners will continue to aggressively seek additional resources to improve access to education, postsecondary credentials and college credit. (Page 73) Title I

The State Workforce Board’s Eligible Training Provider List policy describes the first step WIOA Titles I and III partners will utilize to engage Kansas education and training providers to create a job—driven education and training system. Historically, Workforce Development and VR have had a strong relationship with both Adult Education and postsecondary education institutions, as they are the very entities which provide the skill development opportunities required to meet the needs of Kansas employers. In addition to the projects described earlier, Workforce AID and Senate Bill 155, the state has also supported AO—K, a program providing jobseekers concurrent training in Adult Education and postsecondary credentials. This program relies on functional relationships between workforce services, adult education and postsecondary education to help jobseekers simultaneously gain the skills needed for successful employment and to meet the needs of employers seeking individuals with particular skill sets. (Page 71) Title I

Data Collection

(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.KANSASWORKS.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. The VR data system, the Kansas Management Information System or KMIS, will support implementation of the state’s strategies for an effective, efficient and outcome-oriented workforce system. KMIS is used to collect consumer demographic information, to track consumer milestones as they progress through their individual plans for employment, and to compile data necessary for state and federal reports. KMIS is also the fiscal management tool through which consumer services are authorized and paid. Data will be extracted for compilation of WIOA-required common accountability measures. The Portal for Adult Basic Literacy Outreach (PABLO) is the student information, program accountability, and reporting system for Kansas Adult Education. The Kansas Higher Education Data System (KHEDS) supports informed decision-making through the collection, analysis, and reporting of postsecondary data in Kansas. Both PABLO and KHEDS will support coordinated implementation of state strategies through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative (WDQI). Page 77 Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Identify competitive, integrated employment opportunities for vocational rehabilitation (VR) consumers, including such opportunities for youth and adults who are diverted from sub-minimum wage employment through Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.
• Increase opportunities for youth with disabilities to engage in paid work-based learning experiences as part of the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. Such work-based learning is intended to facilitate career exploration and development of the soft skills necessary for lifelong employment success.
• Collaborate with partners in the workforce development system on coordinated business outreach processes.
• Coordinate with Economic and Employment Services in the Department for Children and Families, which administers the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and its employer development activities. (Page 195)  Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will work with the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to establish an interagency agreement regarding roles and responsibilities pertaining to competitive, integrated employment for Kansans with disabilities. KDADS and KDHE share responsibilities for administration of the Medicaid program. KDADS oversees services for persons with intellectual disabilities and behavioral health disabilities.

The purpose of the agreement will be to create a common understanding of responsibilities, policies and procedures. It will address data sharing to better analyze how mutual consumers interact with the various services and supports available to them. Perhaps most importantly, the agreement will establish a collaborative framework for services that will improve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for people with disabilities. A priority will be to address procedures for referring youth with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation (VR) services so they may explore options for competitive, integrated employment rather than being placed directly in sub-minimum wage employment after exit from school, consistent with Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. In addition, the agreement will address referral procedures for adults who are already employed in sub-minimum wage jobs so that VR may provide periodic information and career counseling related to competitive, integrated employment options. (Page 196-197) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policy 5-33-00 assures compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability and can be found at (Pages 104-105) Title II

Veterans

Veterans receive priority access to computers and resources when there is a waiting line to utilize those resources. Veterans receive a special designation on interview sheets and sign in sheets for employer job fairs conducted at AJCs and get first opportunity to interview and/ or speak to employers. When program funds are limited, eligible veterans who qualify for funding assistance are granted priority over non-veterans for non-obligated funding assistance. Veterans’ resumes are searched first when new job orders are created by any workforce center staff. Qualified vets are then contacted by that staff and informed of the new position. (Page 104) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 277) Title IV

The DVOP specialist utilizes a case management process, in which they provide the following services: comprehensive assessments, individualized employment counseling, career guidance, and the development of an individual employment plan. This individualized employment plan will include appropriate apprenticeship, other on-job training, and additional education opportunities, as needed to help the veteran overcome their significant barrier to employment. After assessing the needs and a plan is developed, the DVOP will reassess and may identify additional non-intensive services needed, which will require the DVOP to refer veterans to services provided by local partners, agencies, and other employment/ training program providers. LVER Staff All Kansas LVER staff has received extensive training in how to engage employers through the National Veterans Training Institute (NVTI), within 18 months of their hire. Additionally, all new hire LVERs receive Ramp-UP training from the State Veteran Service Manager, which includes the history of the Wagner-Peyser, Employment Services, the Jobs for Veterans Act and JVSG staff roles and responsibilities. This training also includes local operations, as they relate to all active and current VPLs, chapters 41 and 42 of Title 38. Other training include the annual training conference, where we will address staff development and skills improvement, integrated service models and their unique roles, effective intensive service delivery models, and other program related information sharing/ strategic planning/ performance measuring/ and systems training. Lastly, local workforce center training is provided by local managers and the One-Stop partners, which highlights location specific practices and our partners’ operations. (Page 281) Title IV

For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 285) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) collaborates and coordinates services with federal, state and local employment and rehabilitation agencies that contribute to the vocational rehabilitation (VR) of Kansans with disabilities. At the local level such collaborations are individualized according to each person’s needs and interests. This individualized approach is one of the cornerstones of VR services. At the state level, KRS collaborates with other units within the Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) and with other state departments. For example:

• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title I

Service provider agreements are available for a variety of services, including vocational assessment, independent living assessment, community-based work assessment, community-based job tryout, job preparation, guided placement, customized placement, job coaching, rehabilitation engineering, assistive technology, rehabilitation teaching, comprehensive facility-based training for persons who are blind or visually impaired, and orientation/mobility. These agreements emphasize the development of action plans, strengthened approaches to ongoing communication among KRS counselors and service providers, and accountability measures for successful rehabilitation outcomes. KRS paid more than $4.5 million through these agreements in PY 2016.

Service providers participating in these agreements include community rehabilitation programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities, consumer-run organizations, independent living centers, mental health centers, substance abuse programs, assistive technology access sites, and independent contractors. Providers may offer more than one service and serve more than one region of the state. (Page 192) Title I

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:

1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.  (Page 193) Title II

Current activities include the following:

• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers address capacity to provide supported employment services.
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services continue to collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) who have disabilities.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who are aging out of foster care.
• In-service training will focus on best practices in service delivery for persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with traumatic brain injury, persons with disabilities who have a criminal background, and persons with mental illness. Contracted service providers will be included in these training opportunities whenever possible to enhance their expertise in service VR consumers. (Page 255) Title II

Individual job placements in competitive, integrated employment are the outcome of supported employment services funded by KRS. Such outcomes have higher earnings, consumer choice, community integration and more co-worker interaction. KRS supported employment outcomes do not include enclaves, work crews or other congregate work settings.

Service delivery system in implementing supported employment services, KRS emphasizes the importance of geographic distribution of services. KRS also places a priority on working with community agencies with the capacity to provide extended/ongoing support services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Provider agreements:

• Address responsibility of the providers to coordinate the community service system, which has responsibility for funding and providing the extended ongoing services necessary for the consumer to maintain employment once they exit the VR program. (Page 265) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

State Workforce Policy 4-2-04 Wagner-Peyser Reemployment Services for UI Claimants: Wagner-Peyser funding is utilized by the Department of Commerce to assure: (1) UI claimants receive a full range of labor exchange services necessary and appropriate to facilitate their earliest return to work, as determined by assessment services including WIOA Career Services; (2) claimants requiring assistance in seeking work receive the necessary guidance and counseling to ensure they can conduct a meaningful and realistic work search; and (3) UI program staff receive information about the claimants’ ability to work or their availability to accept suitable work offered them. UI claimants are selected using KDOL’s Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services (WPRS) system. Claimants most likely to exhaust (score of 50% or higher) are placed in the pool for WFC staff to schedule for services. The following are mandatory services: • Work Registration - Most claimants are automatically registered in KANSASWORKS.com when they file an Unemployment Insurance claim. However, if the claimant is not already registered, staff assistance is offered to help them register. • Assessment Orientation - Staff provide an introduction to the workforce center to include instruction on using self-help tools. • Initial Assessment - Staff provide an initial assessment of the claimant’s skill level, aptitude, ability, supportive service needs and eligibility for federally funded programs in general, and specifically USDOL funded programs. • Individual Employment Plan - In coordination with the claimant, and other WIOA Core Partners as appropriate, staff develop a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Assessment Interview. (Page 146- 147) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

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COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 31

COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Special Education Reimbursement Guide State Categorical Aid - 04/17/2019

~~“Categorical aid helps with the cost of implementing Individualized Education Program(IEP)services over and above the regular education that all students are entitled to receive. All expenditures claimed for reimbursement under categorical aid must have been paid from the Local Education Agency (LEA)’s special education funds All categorical aid money requested by the LEA must be deposited in its special education fund”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WIOA Guidance Letters - 04/15/2019

~~“The KANSASWORKS State Board serves as a review board and change agent empowered with the responsibility of making recommendations to the Governor and to state agencies to align workforce development with the needs of economic development in the state.”

This page has “WIOA Guidance Letters” that can be downloaded for use.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot - 01/20/2019

~~This page is an overview of the Kansas RETAIN details including amount of funding, target populations, locations of program and the point of contact.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

R2W Research & RETAIN Demonstration Projects - 01/20/2019

~~“Recognizing the importance of giving workers with disabilities economically sustainable alternatives to Federal disability benefits, the President's 2018 and 2019 proposed budgets support early intervention demonstrations. ODEP, the Employment and Training Administration, and the Social Security Administration developed the RETAIN initiative — Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network — to test the impact of early intervention projects on SAW/RTW outcomes. Visit the About RETAIN page for application information and the News & Events page for the latest information on all things RETAIN.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

MENTAL HEALTH TASK FORCE Report to the Kansas Legislature - 01/14/2019

~~“While the Task Force considers all recommendations in Figure 2 (page ES-vi) to be priorities, there were a number of action items that emerged as essential to the implementation of the entire plan, including:  •Expanding Medicaid would undergird many of the recommendations by improving access to behavioral health services at all levels of care and allowing investment in workforce and capacity (Recommendation 2.5, page 36); •Restoring and increasing community outpatient mental health and substance use disorder treatment, primary care, housing, employment and peer programs will improve outcomes for individuals and families (Recommendation 1.5, page 21; Recommendation 2.1,page 26; Recommendation 2.6, page 38; and Recommendation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2018-2019 - 01/01/2019

~~“The Kansas Assessment Program (KAP) Summative Assessment will have many tools available to help students navigate the online system. Some of the tools  will be available to all students, while others will only be available to students who have the need identified in their Individual Education Plans, Section 504 Plans, ELL Plan or statement of student needs. Many of these tools are available currently in the interactive demos and interim assessment, but all will be available for the summative assessments. All tools and accommodations work on laptops and desktops (Windows or Mac), tablets (Chromebooks or iPads).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” - 12/18/2018

~~“..the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid  Services (CMS) is approving Kansas’s request for an extension  of  its    section  1115(a)  demonstration   titled,  “KanCare” (Project  Number  11-W-00283/7),   along  with  modifications   to  the  demonstration  that  will  apply  during  the  extension  period.    With  this  approval,  the  KanCare demonstration extension w ill  be in  effect from January  1,  2019 through December 31,  2023. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Kansas School for the Deaf Secondary program - 08/23/2018

~~“Career:Career Exploration: Seventh and eighth grade students take classes to explore career interests and self-awareness skills for future job choices. Ninth and tenth grade students are required to take Career Training for soft skill and work skill development. Eleventh and twelve grade students experience on and off campus internships, job shadows, and supported employment.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2019

~~“Kansas now submits their amended Statewide Transition Plan. Changes include increasing stakeholder participation, integrating stakeholder recommendations, revised timelines, and proactive approaches for engaging stakeholders. The identified need for a new direction was derived from the collective views not only of service recipients, HCBS providers, and the state, but also significant and ongoing technical assistance provided to Kansas by officials from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Further, this amended plan includes summaries from previous and ongoing public comment sessions along with the KDADS responses.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” (Project Number 11-W-00283/7) - 12/18/2018

~~“Kansas will provide new employment supports to beneficiaries with behavioral health diagnoses and eligible for a 1915(c), either by being on the waitlist or already being enrolled in the 1915(c). This voluntary pilot will be capped at 500 beneficiaries. Services w ill inc lude pr e-vocational support services, supportive employment services, personal assistant services, independent living skills training, assistive technology, and transportation, and are s imila r to services that could be offered as state plan home and community-based services (HCBS) benefit under section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Included in the pilot is a targeted expansion of Medicaid for individua ls on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) who would normally not be eligible for Medicaid without meeting spend-down requirements and.  these beneficiaries w ill be eligible f or both the pilot services and Medicaid state plan services. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Institutional Transition Policy - 11/05/2018

~~“PurposeThis policy establishes the process and procedures for transitioning eligible individuals from institutional care settings onto the Frail and Elderly (FE), Intellectual and Developmental Disability (I/DD), Physical Disability (PD), and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) waiver programs. "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Person-Centered Service Plan Policy - 07/09/2018

~~“The purpose of this policy is to explain the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) requirements found in 42 CFR § 441.301, K.A.R. 30-63-1 through 32, and the 1915 (c) HCBS waivers and detail the process for creation of the Person-Centered Service Plan.

This policy provides requirements for the implementation of a person-centered planning process, and aims to describe for 1915 (c) waiver participants, what to expect though the development and implementation of a person-centered plan.  This policy also provides information regarding applicable Person-Centered Service Plan forms and documents, elements for the 1915(c) HCBS waiver’s plan of care quality assurance compliance, and the procedures, timelines and responsible parties governing the Person-Centered Service Plan  and implementation activities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Medicaid 1915 (c) Waiver Public Forums - 06/15/2018

~~“Home and Community Bases Services (HCBS) provides oversight for a system of community based supports and  services for persons in Kansas with disabilities. Information about HCBS waiver programs can be found at the corresponding links for each program listed below. Providers include a variety of not-for-profit and for-profit organizations as well as governmental entities. These services are provided through 10 HCBS waiver programs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,913,314
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
195,738
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.52%
Change from
2018 to 2019
91,009
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.50%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
82.67%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 2,913,123 2,911,510 2,913,314
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 191,769 194,225 195,738
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 89,069 87,802 91,009
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,234,266 1,241,955 1,237,960
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.45% 45.21% 46.50%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.96% 82.06% 82.67%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.60% 3.40% 3.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.60% 19.00% 19.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.90% 10.90% 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 181,015 195,158 190,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 192,687 195,193 193,874
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 319,711 333,319 326,746
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 25,286 27,206 24,372
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 25,056 31,507 31,290
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,525 5,768 5,437
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,514 6,023 4,764
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 12,263 11,935 14,742
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 6,239 5,654 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,017 3,963 3,973
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.70% 8.70% 8.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 73,174 72,185 70,426

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,406 8,725 8,631
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 25,872 24,584 14,680
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 28,174 26,640 24,901
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 33.40% 32.80% 34.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 15.00% 14.50% 14.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 25.70% 26.00% 25.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,265 1,235 1,180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,171 2,207 2,100
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,001 3,726 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 100 67 77
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 58 40 46
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 60.00% 6.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.00 1.37 1.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 25.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,968 3,105 3,121
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 106,747 106,448 104,953
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 73 106 95
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 107 147 164

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A $252,611 $459,539
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A $106,151,990 $108,687,513
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00% 12.00% 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,600 3,923 4,839
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,842 2,789 2,670
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,056 4,538 4,040
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 29.10 30.68 32.05

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.91% 68.93% 68.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.97% 7.41% 7.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.20% 2.25% 2.32%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.74% 99.33% 99.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 28.25% 42.67% 32.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.25% 62.21% 56.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.75% 72.96% 75.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 26.00% 19.54% 23.78%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30 33 5
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 31 33 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,889 2,156 171
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 114 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,003 2,156 171

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title II

Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system. The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 186) Title II      

• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.

• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.

• The Developmental Disabilities Council.

• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.

• The Employment First Commission.

• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

KRS has agreements with Comprehensive Schools for the Blind in Colorado (Colorado Center for the Blind), Missouri (Alphapointe) and Minnesota (BLIND, Inc.) to provide access to the intensive level of training needed by some consumers. An agreement with the Helen Keller National Center was established in 2017 and continues in place. On an ongoing basis, KRS will seek additional agreements as needed to meet the needs of our consumers. The Governor’s Disability Sub-Cabinet, which includes DCF/KRS, KDADS, KDHE and Commerce, also addresses strategies to infuse an employment first focus into state services and programs. (Page 198) Title II    

• The Assistive Technology Advisory Committee.

• The Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

• Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

• Employment First Oversight Commission

This involvement facilitates the provision of information about VR services to other disability service organizations, and often results in additional outreach activities or specific referrals.

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~To help Kansas citizens with disabilities meet their employment goals, a comprehensive array of VR services are available. Services are customized according to each person’s unique needs, skills, interests, abilities, and vocational goal. Services to be provided for each individual customer are specified on an Individual Plan for Employment, and may include:
• Vocational assessment to help a customer identify his or her skills, abilities, interests and job goals.
• Vocational counseling and guidance.
• Physical and mental restoration services, including artificial limbs, psychotherapy, and physical therapy.
• Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 54) Title I

It is expected that End-Dependence Kansas will lead to 2,000 Kansans with disabilities throughout the State achieving competitive, integrated employment after receiving newly established evidence-based employment services, e.g., discovery, individual placement supports (IPS) or Progressive Employment.
A significant goal of End-Dependence Kansas is to promote sustainable systems change to improve the quality and quantity of employment outcomes. End-Dependence Kansas will emphasize and support community partners to prioritize competitive, integrated jobs in the community rather than sub-minimum wage employment, sheltered employment, non-work day activities or other more segregated services.
To implement this initiative, KRS issued 14 performance-based contracts with community partners to provide direct consumer services. These contracts were issued after a competitive Request for Proposals process and were effective July 1, 2016. The contracts are projected for five years, with annual renewals. The community partners and VR staff have undergone intensive training on specific evidence-based practices. To evaluate fidelity to the service models and success of the initiative and to assist in establishing a sustainable cost structure, participating community partners are also reporting specific progress measures and cost information using a software designed for this initiative called Efforts to Outcomes. (Page 187) Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan. (Page 193) Title II

Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 193) Title II

A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. Experience working with people with disabilities and/or experience in competitive integrated business environments and/or human resources, supervision or training preferred. (Page 204) Title II

The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 233) Title II

KRS will implement the End-Dependence Kansas initiative, a significant capacity building and systems change effort to expand supported employment opportunities, especially through the Individual Placements and Supports model for persons with behavioral health disabilities and through the Individualized Discovery/SE model for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Led by KRS, this initiative also includes the Kansas Departments of Commerce, Corrections, Health and Environment, and Aging and Disability Services. End-Dependence Kansas will leverage the resources and expertise of these departments to identify the most effective collaborative funding approaches and to increase supported employment outcomes for Kansans with disabilities. For example, the Departments on Aging and Disability Services and Commerce contributed non-federal resources to use as matching funds for the VR program and its End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be issued following a competitive bid process to community service providers statewide to assist them to build and maintain capacity for evidence-based employment models of service delivery. (Page 249) Title II

When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Pages 250-251) Title II

The performance of these providers in helping consumers secure meaningful employment and wages consistent with their goals and priorities significantly impacts the overall KRS performance on standards and indicators. Therefore, accountability benchmarks have been established with the target of 80% of persons referred to service providers obtaining jobs within an average of 120 days, and 60% of persons referred achieving successful closures. The goal is a network of effective supported employment providers whose focus is on the vocational objectives, goals, rehabilitation needs and priorities of the consumers to be served. Improved Information Technology support solutions are needed to better track and assess service provider outcomes and to produce “report cards” of performance. The End-Dependence Kansas Initiative will provide direct service contracts to disability services providers to build and maintain their capacity to provide two evidence-based models: Individual Placements and Supports and Individualized Discovery/Supported employment. (Page 266) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of jobseekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 17) Title I

Development of this collaborative CIP will be completed by July 1, 2016. While the State’s initial focus will be on a collaborative CIP among the Core Partners, further phases of this CIP may engage other partners such as community and technical colleges. In addition, this CIP may address options for data tracking related to use of other comparable or required services and the related leveraging of resources for jobseekers. (Page 34) Title I

Opening the dialogue between the Partners and creating a streamlined approach to business outreach will provide the opportunity for key stakeholders to discuss options for creating inclusion and targeted training programs that will enhance employers hiring capabilities, as well as providing people with multiple barriers to employment opportunities to become employed. This improved engagement will also provide additional paid job opportunities for youth while in school or immediately after, up to age 24. This can include, but is not limited to internships, apprenticeships, job shadowing and/or training courses.

In addition, the strategy will increase the collaboration and leveraging of services for employers among the Partners. Employers previously served by one partner will have access to a larger network of support and work-ready jobseekers. Employers will experience a more focused and collaborated effort between agencies. This collaborative effort will increase employer knowledge and maximize their usage of the various incentive programs the state has available for businesses to hire people with disabilities and those with significant barriers to employment. (Page 69) Title I

$121,250 to United Cerebral Palsy of Kansas (UCPK), Wichita to provide individual assistive technology equipment, devices and services to enhance the independent living of Kansas with disabilities. The state funds are matched with private funds provided through UCPK and other private donors, leveraging additional spending power from the state’s investment. (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
•  Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development. (Page 90) Title I
 

School to Work Transition

~~Improve the skills of jobseekers and workers through access to education and training leading to industry-recognized credentials through the use of career pathways, apprenticeships, and other strategies.

e) Encourage paid work-based learning experiences for youth so they may explore career options, develop the universal interpersonal and customer service skills needed in the workplace, and become self-reliant through employment as adults.

2) We value the contributions that all individuals, including those with significant barriers to employment, as defined by WIOA, can make to the Kansas economy. Our goals are to:

a) Vigorously represent the ability of qualified jobseekers with significant barriers to employment to meet the workforce needs of Kansas employers.

b) Ensure the local workforce development systems provide physical and programmatic access to and opportunities for the employment, education, training, and support services for individuals, particularly those with barriers to employment. (Page 28) Title I

Local plans will be required to discuss how core partners will coordinate to prevent duplication and/or conflicts about which program serves particular individuals, including coordinating to ensure that supportive services and work supports are provided. Because the nature of individual needs will vary from individual to individual, the team recognizes that many of these decisions will need to be made on a case-by-case basis, requiring regular communication among core partner staff. We anticipate that general tendencies will emerge (out-of-school youth will be more likely to receive Title I funded work-based learning, while Pre-Employment Transition Services, or PETS, under Title IV, may be more likely to serve in-school youth). These decisions will also be shaped by individual program requirements (PETS can only serve youth with disabilities, for example). (Page 42) Title I

KRS has built its capacity to provide Pre-ETS through the addition of 20 transition specialists to local VR offices. Each of the four regions also has a Pre-ETS Manager, and KRS employs a Statewide Manager as well. KRS has also established service provider agreements with all five of the Local Workforce Development Boards, numerous Centers for Independent Living and the Kansas Youth Empowerment Academy pertaining to specific components of Pre-ETS. A major emphasis is paid work-based learning experiences. Such experiences allow students to gain an early attachment to employment as the avenue to self-reliance, explore career options and develop the soft skills that are necessary for long-term employment success. Other services offered through services providers include self-advocacy training, post-secondary education, and workplace readiness training. (Page 189) Title I

Offer training and technical assistance to districts and local VR offices on coordinating the transition planning process. Topics in this area may include but are not limited to: inviting KRS counselors to IEP meetings; providing information about VR in the IEP development process; and educating VR counselors about district procedures related to transition planning and services for employment and postsecondary education goals for students with IEPs.

• Collaborate on the State Performance Plan and/or strategic plans developed by each party to facilitate the goals of this agreement and give priority to effective transition services for youth with disabilities resulting in improved post-secondary education and competitive, integrated employment outcomes.
• Use available inter-agency forums, conferences and expertise to develop a coordinated approach to facilitate achievement of the goals of this agreement.
• Share student/consumer data and state-level data, to the extent allowed by law, to evaluate the effectiveness of the education and VR services provided.
• Share federal and state monitoring practices and findings for effective program and policy evaluation.
• Participate in technical assistance and advisory opportunities to support the goals of this agreement. (Page 190) Title II

The Individual Plan for Employment is used as the basis for referral to one of the providers. It also describes the criteria, specific to each consumer, for determining that job performance is stable, determining how and when progress will be evaluated, and describing how extended ongoing support services will be provided. After the consumer reaches stability on the job, the consumer, service provider and VR counselor work together to finalize the plan for extended ongoing supports. This allows the plan to be specific and customized according to the consumer’s current work situation and support needs. As a result, the ongoing support section of the IPE may be amended, with the consumer’s agreement, in order to reflect the most current information available. (Page 194) Title II

KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance. (Page 208) Title II

In November 2009 (Program Year 2009), KRS implemented a comprehensive Performance Management System. This system established consistent counselor performance standards related to quality and policy compliance reflected through case reviews; timeliness for eligibility and IPE development; the number of new IPEs developed; the number of consumers rehabilitated; and the rehabilitation rate. Competencies related to professional conduct, timely responses to consumer and other inquiries, and effective caseload management are also included in this performance management process. Consistent standards were also established for supervisors and administrators. (Page 208) Title II

Multiple services means more than one service as listed on the IPE. Support services (maintenance, transportation, personal assistance, and services to family members) may not be counted toward multiple services. Routine counseling and guidance to facilitate participation in the VR process may not be counted toward multiple services. Core services which are not provided by KRS but which are necessary for achievement of the employment outcome may be counted toward multiple services.

Extended period of time means at least four months between Status 12 and closure. (Page 244) Title IV

An order of selection gives priority to persons with the most significant disabilities when there are insufficient resources to provide vocational rehabilitation services to all eligible individuals who apply. After eligibility has been determined, each consumer is assigned to a category group. The consumer will be assigned to the highest priority category for which he or she is qualified, and a rationale will be documented in the case file. If the consumer’s circumstances change or new information is acquired, the category designation can be changed. Depending on available resources, all categories may be served. However, if there is a need to close one or more categories for services:
• Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will set aside sufficient funds to purchase services necessary to determine eligibility. Applications for services will be accepted without restriction.
• The closure will not affect individuals who already have final Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs). IPE services will continue.
• Persons who need post-employment services will not be affected. (Page 247) Title IV

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV   
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
• Federal regulations require that eligibility for VR services be determined no later than 60 days from the data of application, unless the applicant agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas is only 28 days (as of 2-28-2018).
• Federal regulations require that an Individual Plan for Employment be developed no later than 90 days from the date of eligibility, unless the client agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas from application to IPE development is only 64 days (as of 2-28-2018). Page 258 title IV

Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). PY 2016: 10,149
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 260) Title IV

Given the limited number of VR staff, educators were asked at what age it would be when it would be most important for VR to participate in IEP meetings. The majority of educators indicated ages 17 (46.8%) and 16 (27.7%) would be the most important ages for VR to participate in IEP meetings.

The following question was posed: “To assist your students to be successful in post-secondary education or direct entry into the workforce, which of the following pre-employment transition services are most important?”

Rank of Most Important Pre-Employment Transition Services

567. Work-based learning experiences
568. Workplace readiness training
569. Instruction in self-advocacy
570. Job exploration counseling
571. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or post-secondary education programs at institutions of higher education (Page 229) Title IV

KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. KRS will also:

• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so That consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 250) Title IV

A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc.  (Page 249-250) Title IV

- Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
- Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs. Training will include short-term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One-Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
- Increase follow-up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
- Insure all most-in-need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
- Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor that outlines a four-year strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce development system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all job-seekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4) Title 1

Some skill gaps can be addressed through Career Technical Education. The Kansas Board of Regents’ Technical Education Authority has established twenty-five program Alignment Maps in ten federal instructional program classifications: Healthcare, Dental Care, Engineering Technology, Automotive Technology and Collision Repair, Construction/HVAC/Carpentry, Computer Sciences, Welding, Machine Technology, Diesel Technology, Electrical/Utility Technology and Police and Corrections Sciences. Most of these programs lead to careers in occupations which pay wages high enough to allow workers to earn wages which are self-supporting. Postsecondary institutions, or business and industry or WIOA Core and Required Partners in partnership with postsecondary institutions, can create career pathways which will be supported by WIOA funds. (Page 13) Title I

The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty—five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team—teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs.

When providing vocational counseling and guidance with VR customers, the VR program uses the Kansas Department of Labor’s Labor Information Center website for information on high—demand jobs and career pathways. At this website, information is provided about jobs across various industries. Career pathways and potential earnings are provided for entry—level, intermediate and advanced career options. Educational requirements for each level in the career pathway are provided. This information is useful in facilitating informed decision—making by VR customers regarding services and vocational objectives. It also helps assure that VR customers are prepared to meet the workforce needs of Kansas business and industry.

Department of Commerce Workforce Services Unit will require Local Workforce Development Areas to describe specifically how they will develop and expand strategies for meeting the needs of local employers, workers, and jobseekers, particularly through job—driven industry or sector partnerships. (Page 35) Title I

Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.

• Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in hiring older workers. They will contact those identified, provide education on the advantages of hiring older workers and establish on—going communication that will generate valuable employment opportunities for qualified project participants. (Page 302) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

For Titles IB and III the state workforce agency will fund outreach, employment assistance, case management, and staff supervision through state merit staff funded through Wagner-Peyser labor exchange and career services; Reemployment Assistance programs; Veteran’s Employment and Training programs, including those for Disabled Veterans; Registered Apprenticeship; Agricultural Outreach; Work Opportunity Tax Credit; Trade Act and Foreign Labor Wage Certification programs through formula and dedicated funds. SCSEP services are provided through a sub-grant agreement with the Wichita Area Workforce Development Board. Monitoring, information management, staff training, technical assistance and KWSB support will be provided with the state portion of WIOA funds and other employment and training formula funds. All of these activities will move Kansas toward the strategic goals described in the Section II of this plan. These activities will be aligned across the Core Programs and combined state plan partners as described in the Customer Flow section of the State plan, and through avenues defined during the first two years of the implementation of this State plan, such as cross-training, referrals, co-enrollment and coordinating resources as agreed in eventual Memoranda of Understanding. (Page 52) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local plans must discuss how the local areas will address the challenges of establishing and maintaining eligibility for public assistance, including SSI, TANF, SNAP, and other means-tested programs, especially in light of the possible effect on household income of a participant’s earnings through work-based learning.

• Local plans should address how case managers will become familiar with these issues.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State-level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis. Local area and partner staff should incorporate the information listed above into individual service strategies. Where practical and applicable, the goal of these strategies should be designed to exit public benefits successfully. (Page 44) Title I

This level of collaboration between the Partners will increase the number of jobseekers with multiple barriers to employment in successful employment. The Partners will regularly (annually) measure the degree of use and satisfaction of employers within the system, as well as the increased level of people with disabilities and significant barriers to employment who are working with those employers. (Page 71) Title I

Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:

• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs.
When considering the entire disability service delivery system, identifying the source of extended supports continues to be an issue warranting further review and capacity building efforts, especially for individuals who cannot access such services through the state’s network of community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations. (Page 224) Title IV

Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.

Strategies for Goal 2:

KRS will implement the following strategies:

A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).

B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage that career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 241) Title IV

Highlights and accomplishments Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) reports the following accomplishments in implementing the State Plan Goals and Priorities. These highlights are based on PY 2016 (July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017) indicators.

• A total of 1,021 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $10.33 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $37 an hour as an CAD drafter and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field. Other high-wage outcomes included physical therapist and occupational therapist, both at just more than $40 an hour.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.5%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 164. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In PY 2016, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $647,025. (Page 257) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Both state and federal resources are leveraged to improve access to workforce development programs provided by educational institutions. In addition to the projects already described, Kansas has been awarded the Disability Employment Initiative grant to, in part, fund postsecondary credential training for jobseekers with disabilities. Postsecondary partners have competed for and received funding to support tuition assistance for jobseekers including offenders and other individuals with barriers to employment. Kansas WIOA Core Partners, educational institutions and other partners will continue to aggressively seek additional resources to improve access to education, postsecondary credentials and college credit. (Page 73) Title I

The State Workforce Board’s Eligible Training Provider List policy describes the first step WIOA Titles I and III partners will utilize to engage Kansas education and training providers to create a job—driven education and training system. Historically, Workforce Development and VR have had a strong relationship with both Adult Education and postsecondary education institutions, as they are the very entities which provide the skill development opportunities required to meet the needs of Kansas employers. In addition to the projects described earlier, Workforce AID and Senate Bill 155, the state has also supported AO—K, a program providing jobseekers concurrent training in Adult Education and postsecondary credentials. This program relies on functional relationships between workforce services, adult education and postsecondary education to help jobseekers simultaneously gain the skills needed for successful employment and to meet the needs of employers seeking individuals with particular skill sets. (Page 71) Title I

Data Collection

(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.KANSASWORKS.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. The VR data system, the Kansas Management Information System or KMIS, will support implementation of the state’s strategies for an effective, efficient and outcome-oriented workforce system. KMIS is used to collect consumer demographic information, to track consumer milestones as they progress through their individual plans for employment, and to compile data necessary for state and federal reports. KMIS is also the fiscal management tool through which consumer services are authorized and paid. Data will be extracted for compilation of WIOA-required common accountability measures. The Portal for Adult Basic Literacy Outreach (PABLO) is the student information, program accountability, and reporting system for Kansas Adult Education. The Kansas Higher Education Data System (KHEDS) supports informed decision-making through the collection, analysis, and reporting of postsecondary data in Kansas. Both PABLO and KHEDS will support coordinated implementation of state strategies through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative (WDQI). Page 77 Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Identify competitive, integrated employment opportunities for vocational rehabilitation (VR) consumers, including such opportunities for youth and adults who are diverted from sub-minimum wage employment through Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.
• Increase opportunities for youth with disabilities to engage in paid work-based learning experiences as part of the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. Such work-based learning is intended to facilitate career exploration and development of the soft skills necessary for lifelong employment success.
• Collaborate with partners in the workforce development system on coordinated business outreach processes.
• Coordinate with Economic and Employment Services in the Department for Children and Families, which administers the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and its employer development activities. (Page 195)  Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will work with the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to establish an interagency agreement regarding roles and responsibilities pertaining to competitive, integrated employment for Kansans with disabilities. KDADS and KDHE share responsibilities for administration of the Medicaid program. KDADS oversees services for persons with intellectual disabilities and behavioral health disabilities.

The purpose of the agreement will be to create a common understanding of responsibilities, policies and procedures. It will address data sharing to better analyze how mutual consumers interact with the various services and supports available to them. Perhaps most importantly, the agreement will establish a collaborative framework for services that will improve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for people with disabilities. A priority will be to address procedures for referring youth with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation (VR) services so they may explore options for competitive, integrated employment rather than being placed directly in sub-minimum wage employment after exit from school, consistent with Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. In addition, the agreement will address referral procedures for adults who are already employed in sub-minimum wage jobs so that VR may provide periodic information and career counseling related to competitive, integrated employment options. (Page 196-197) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policy 5-33-00 assures compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability and can be found at (Pages 104-105) Title II

Veterans

Veterans receive priority access to computers and resources when there is a waiting line to utilize those resources. Veterans receive a special designation on interview sheets and sign in sheets for employer job fairs conducted at AJCs and get first opportunity to interview and/ or speak to employers. When program funds are limited, eligible veterans who qualify for funding assistance are granted priority over non-veterans for non-obligated funding assistance. Veterans’ resumes are searched first when new job orders are created by any workforce center staff. Qualified vets are then contacted by that staff and informed of the new position. (Page 104) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 277) Title IV

The DVOP specialist utilizes a case management process, in which they provide the following services: comprehensive assessments, individualized employment counseling, career guidance, and the development of an individual employment plan. This individualized employment plan will include appropriate apprenticeship, other on-job training, and additional education opportunities, as needed to help the veteran overcome their significant barrier to employment. After assessing the needs and a plan is developed, the DVOP will reassess and may identify additional non-intensive services needed, which will require the DVOP to refer veterans to services provided by local partners, agencies, and other employment/ training program providers. LVER Staff All Kansas LVER staff has received extensive training in how to engage employers through the National Veterans Training Institute (NVTI), within 18 months of their hire. Additionally, all new hire LVERs receive Ramp-UP training from the State Veteran Service Manager, which includes the history of the Wagner-Peyser, Employment Services, the Jobs for Veterans Act and JVSG staff roles and responsibilities. This training also includes local operations, as they relate to all active and current VPLs, chapters 41 and 42 of Title 38. Other training include the annual training conference, where we will address staff development and skills improvement, integrated service models and their unique roles, effective intensive service delivery models, and other program related information sharing/ strategic planning/ performance measuring/ and systems training. Lastly, local workforce center training is provided by local managers and the One-Stop partners, which highlights location specific practices and our partners’ operations. (Page 281) Title IV

For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 285) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) collaborates and coordinates services with federal, state and local employment and rehabilitation agencies that contribute to the vocational rehabilitation (VR) of Kansans with disabilities. At the local level such collaborations are individualized according to each person’s needs and interests. This individualized approach is one of the cornerstones of VR services. At the state level, KRS collaborates with other units within the Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) and with other state departments. For example:

• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title I

Service provider agreements are available for a variety of services, including vocational assessment, independent living assessment, community-based work assessment, community-based job tryout, job preparation, guided placement, customized placement, job coaching, rehabilitation engineering, assistive technology, rehabilitation teaching, comprehensive facility-based training for persons who are blind or visually impaired, and orientation/mobility. These agreements emphasize the development of action plans, strengthened approaches to ongoing communication among KRS counselors and service providers, and accountability measures for successful rehabilitation outcomes. KRS paid more than $4.5 million through these agreements in PY 2016.

Service providers participating in these agreements include community rehabilitation programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities, consumer-run organizations, independent living centers, mental health centers, substance abuse programs, assistive technology access sites, and independent contractors. Providers may offer more than one service and serve more than one region of the state. (Page 192) Title I

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:

1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.  (Page 193) Title II

Current activities include the following:

• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers address capacity to provide supported employment services.
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services continue to collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) who have disabilities.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who are aging out of foster care.
• In-service training will focus on best practices in service delivery for persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with traumatic brain injury, persons with disabilities who have a criminal background, and persons with mental illness. Contracted service providers will be included in these training opportunities whenever possible to enhance their expertise in service VR consumers. (Page 255) Title II

Individual job placements in competitive, integrated employment are the outcome of supported employment services funded by KRS. Such outcomes have higher earnings, consumer choice, community integration and more co-worker interaction. KRS supported employment outcomes do not include enclaves, work crews or other congregate work settings.

Service delivery system in implementing supported employment services, KRS emphasizes the importance of geographic distribution of services. KRS also places a priority on working with community agencies with the capacity to provide extended/ongoing support services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Provider agreements:

• Address responsibility of the providers to coordinate the community service system, which has responsibility for funding and providing the extended ongoing services necessary for the consumer to maintain employment once they exit the VR program. (Page 265) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

State Workforce Policy 4-2-04 Wagner-Peyser Reemployment Services for UI Claimants: Wagner-Peyser funding is utilized by the Department of Commerce to assure: (1) UI claimants receive a full range of labor exchange services necessary and appropriate to facilitate their earliest return to work, as determined by assessment services including WIOA Career Services; (2) claimants requiring assistance in seeking work receive the necessary guidance and counseling to ensure they can conduct a meaningful and realistic work search; and (3) UI program staff receive information about the claimants’ ability to work or their availability to accept suitable work offered them. UI claimants are selected using KDOL’s Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services (WPRS) system. Claimants most likely to exhaust (score of 50% or higher) are placed in the pool for WFC staff to schedule for services. The following are mandatory services: • Work Registration - Most claimants are automatically registered in KANSASWORKS.com when they file an Unemployment Insurance claim. However, if the claimant is not already registered, staff assistance is offered to help them register. • Assessment Orientation - Staff provide an introduction to the workforce center to include instruction on using self-help tools. • Initial Assessment - Staff provide an initial assessment of the claimant’s skill level, aptitude, ability, supportive service needs and eligibility for federally funded programs in general, and specifically USDOL funded programs. • Individual Employment Plan - In coordination with the claimant, and other WIOA Core Partners as appropriate, staff develop a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Assessment Interview. (Page 146- 147) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

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COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 31

COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Special Education Reimbursement Guide State Categorical Aid - 04/17/2019

~~“Categorical aid helps with the cost of implementing Individualized Education Program(IEP)services over and above the regular education that all students are entitled to receive. All expenditures claimed for reimbursement under categorical aid must have been paid from the Local Education Agency (LEA)’s special education funds All categorical aid money requested by the LEA must be deposited in its special education fund”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WIOA Guidance Letters - 04/15/2019

~~“The KANSASWORKS State Board serves as a review board and change agent empowered with the responsibility of making recommendations to the Governor and to state agencies to align workforce development with the needs of economic development in the state.”

This page has “WIOA Guidance Letters” that can be downloaded for use.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot - 01/20/2019

~~This page is an overview of the Kansas RETAIN details including amount of funding, target populations, locations of program and the point of contact.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

R2W Research & RETAIN Demonstration Projects - 01/20/2019

~~“Recognizing the importance of giving workers with disabilities economically sustainable alternatives to Federal disability benefits, the President's 2018 and 2019 proposed budgets support early intervention demonstrations. ODEP, the Employment and Training Administration, and the Social Security Administration developed the RETAIN initiative — Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network — to test the impact of early intervention projects on SAW/RTW outcomes. Visit the About RETAIN page for application information and the News & Events page for the latest information on all things RETAIN.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

MENTAL HEALTH TASK FORCE Report to the Kansas Legislature - 01/14/2019

~~“While the Task Force considers all recommendations in Figure 2 (page ES-vi) to be priorities, there were a number of action items that emerged as essential to the implementation of the entire plan, including:  •Expanding Medicaid would undergird many of the recommendations by improving access to behavioral health services at all levels of care and allowing investment in workforce and capacity (Recommendation 2.5, page 36); •Restoring and increasing community outpatient mental health and substance use disorder treatment, primary care, housing, employment and peer programs will improve outcomes for individuals and families (Recommendation 1.5, page 21; Recommendation 2.1,page 26; Recommendation 2.6, page 38; and Recommendation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2018-2019 - 01/01/2019

~~“The Kansas Assessment Program (KAP) Summative Assessment will have many tools available to help students navigate the online system. Some of the tools  will be available to all students, while others will only be available to students who have the need identified in their Individual Education Plans, Section 504 Plans, ELL Plan or statement of student needs. Many of these tools are available currently in the interactive demos and interim assessment, but all will be available for the summative assessments. All tools and accommodations work on laptops and desktops (Windows or Mac), tablets (Chromebooks or iPads).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” - 12/18/2018

~~“..the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid  Services (CMS) is approving Kansas’s request for an extension  of  its    section  1115(a)  demonstration   titled,  “KanCare” (Project  Number  11-W-00283/7),   along  with  modifications   to  the  demonstration  that  will  apply  during  the  extension  period.    With  this  approval,  the  KanCare demonstration extension w ill  be in  effect from January  1,  2019 through December 31,  2023. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Kansas School for the Deaf Secondary program - 08/23/2018

~~“Career:Career Exploration: Seventh and eighth grade students take classes to explore career interests and self-awareness skills for future job choices. Ninth and tenth grade students are required to take Career Training for soft skill and work skill development. Eleventh and twelve grade students experience on and off campus internships, job shadows, and supported employment.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2019

~~“Kansas now submits their amended Statewide Transition Plan. Changes include increasing stakeholder participation, integrating stakeholder recommendations, revised timelines, and proactive approaches for engaging stakeholders. The identified need for a new direction was derived from the collective views not only of service recipients, HCBS providers, and the state, but also significant and ongoing technical assistance provided to Kansas by officials from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Further, this amended plan includes summaries from previous and ongoing public comment sessions along with the KDADS responses.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” (Project Number 11-W-00283/7) - 12/18/2018

~~“Kansas will provide new employment supports to beneficiaries with behavioral health diagnoses and eligible for a 1915(c), either by being on the waitlist or already being enrolled in the 1915(c). This voluntary pilot will be capped at 500 beneficiaries. Services w ill inc lude pr e-vocational support services, supportive employment services, personal assistant services, independent living skills training, assistive technology, and transportation, and are s imila r to services that could be offered as state plan home and community-based services (HCBS) benefit under section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Included in the pilot is a targeted expansion of Medicaid for individua ls on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) who would normally not be eligible for Medicaid without meeting spend-down requirements and.  these beneficiaries w ill be eligible f or both the pilot services and Medicaid state plan services. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Institutional Transition Policy - 11/05/2018

~~“PurposeThis policy establishes the process and procedures for transitioning eligible individuals from institutional care settings onto the Frail and Elderly (FE), Intellectual and Developmental Disability (I/DD), Physical Disability (PD), and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) waiver programs. "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Person-Centered Service Plan Policy - 07/09/2018

~~“The purpose of this policy is to explain the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) requirements found in 42 CFR § 441.301, K.A.R. 30-63-1 through 32, and the 1915 (c) HCBS waivers and detail the process for creation of the Person-Centered Service Plan.

This policy provides requirements for the implementation of a person-centered planning process, and aims to describe for 1915 (c) waiver participants, what to expect though the development and implementation of a person-centered plan.  This policy also provides information regarding applicable Person-Centered Service Plan forms and documents, elements for the 1915(c) HCBS waiver’s plan of care quality assurance compliance, and the procedures, timelines and responsible parties governing the Person-Centered Service Plan  and implementation activities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Medicaid 1915 (c) Waiver Public Forums - 06/15/2018

~~“Home and Community Bases Services (HCBS) provides oversight for a system of community based supports and  services for persons in Kansas with disabilities. Information about HCBS waiver programs can be found at the corresponding links for each program listed below. Providers include a variety of not-for-profit and for-profit organizations as well as governmental entities. These services are provided through 10 HCBS waiver programs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,913,314
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
195,738
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.52%
Change from
2018 to 2019
91,009
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.50%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
82.67%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 2,913,314
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 195,738
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 91,009
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,237,960
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.50%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.67%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 190,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 193,874
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 326,746
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 24,372
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 31,290
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 5,437
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,764
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,742
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,375

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,973
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 8.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 70,426

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,631
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,680
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 24,901
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 34.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 14.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 25.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,100
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,008
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 77
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 46
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 6.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,121
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 104,953
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 95
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 164

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $459,539
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $108,687,513
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,839
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,670
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 4,040
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 32.05

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 7.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.32%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.52%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 75.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.78%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 454,126
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 810
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 174,942
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 33,751
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 208,693
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 165
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 184
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,536,706
AbilityOne wages (services). $320,864

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 5
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 5
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 171
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 171

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title II

Through the Governor’s Sub-Cabinet on Disability, leadership among the Kansas Departments for Children and Families (DCF), Health and Environment, Commerce, Corrections and Aging and Disability Services focuses attention on implementing employment first strategies in state agencies and tracking baseline and performance data to effectively measure outcomes. Sub-Cabinet meetings are also an opportunity for open communications among these departments and advocacy and provider organizations working in the disability system. The DCF Secretary is participating on a Governor-directed strategic planning effort with a focus on workforce development. DCF is the designated state agency. (Page 186) Title II      

• Governor’s Behavioral Health Planning Council and its vocational sub-committee.

• The KDADS strategic planning team to integrate mental health and substance use disorder services into a recovery oriented system of care.

• The Developmental Disabilities Council.

• The Kansas Commission on Disability Concerns.

• The Employment First Commission.

• Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

KRS has agreements with Comprehensive Schools for the Blind in Colorado (Colorado Center for the Blind), Missouri (Alphapointe) and Minnesota (BLIND, Inc.) to provide access to the intensive level of training needed by some consumers. An agreement with the Helen Keller National Center was established in 2017 and continues in place. On an ongoing basis, KRS will seek additional agreements as needed to meet the needs of our consumers. The Governor’s Disability Sub-Cabinet, which includes DCF/KRS, KDADS, KDHE and Commerce, also addresses strategies to infuse an employment first focus into state services and programs. (Page 198) Title II    

• The Assistive Technology Advisory Committee.

• The Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

• Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

• Employment First Oversight Commission

This involvement facilitates the provision of information about VR services to other disability service organizations, and often results in additional outreach activities or specific referrals.

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~To help Kansas citizens with disabilities meet their employment goals, a comprehensive array of VR services are available. Services are customized according to each person’s unique needs, skills, interests, abilities, and vocational goal. Services to be provided for each individual customer are specified on an Individual Plan for Employment, and may include:
• Vocational assessment to help a customer identify his or her skills, abilities, interests and job goals.
• Vocational counseling and guidance.
• Physical and mental restoration services, including artificial limbs, psychotherapy, and physical therapy.
• Training and education to learn new vocational skills.
• Rehabilitation technology, telecommunication aids and other adaptive devices.
• Job preparation and placement services.
• Job coaching.
• On-the-job training.
• Services to help students with disabilities get a job after finishing high school.
• Supported and customized employment for individuals who need intensive on-the-job training and ongoing support.
• Referral to other services.
The assessment services needed to determine if an individual is eligible, vocational counseling, guidance, referral, job placement, supported employment/customized employment and job coaching will be provided at no cost. VR payment for most other services will depend on whether the customer meets financial need guidelines. If comparable services or benefits are provided or paid for, in whole or part, by other federal, state or local public agencies, by health insurance, or by employee benefits, and if they are available at the time the VR customer needs them to ensure progress toward employment, then those comparable services must be used first before the expenditure of VR funds. (Page 54) Title I

It is expected that End-Dependence Kansas will lead to 2,000 Kansans with disabilities throughout the State achieving competitive, integrated employment after receiving newly established evidence-based employment services, e.g., discovery, individual placement supports (IPS) or Progressive Employment.
A significant goal of End-Dependence Kansas is to promote sustainable systems change to improve the quality and quantity of employment outcomes. End-Dependence Kansas will emphasize and support community partners to prioritize competitive, integrated jobs in the community rather than sub-minimum wage employment, sheltered employment, non-work day activities or other more segregated services.
To implement this initiative, KRS issued 14 performance-based contracts with community partners to provide direct consumer services. These contracts were issued after a competitive Request for Proposals process and were effective July 1, 2016. The contracts are projected for five years, with annual renewals. The community partners and VR staff have undergone intensive training on specific evidence-based practices. To evaluate fidelity to the service models and success of the initiative and to assist in establishing a sustainable cost structure, participating community partners are also reporting specific progress measures and cost information using a software designed for this initiative called Efforts to Outcomes. (Page 187) Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:
1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan. (Page 193) Title II

Direct hourly Job Coaching services are provided for VR consumers in conjunction with the Customized Employment milestones services descried above. Short and long-term individualized job coaching is also provided through service provider agreements. (Page 193) Title II

A bachelor’s degree in a field of study reasonably related to vocational rehabilitation, indicating a level of competency and skill demonstrating basic preparation in a field of study such as vocational rehabilitation counseling, social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. Experience working with people with disabilities and/or experience in competitive integrated business environments and/or human resources, supervision or training preferred. (Page 204) Title II

The needs assessment revealed the need for job placement and other provider services with specialized expertise in competitive, integrated employment of people with disabilities. As a result, KRS will emphasize the development and maintenance of evidence-based and promising practices through the End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be used to promote the development and expansion of Individual Placement and Supports, Individualized Discovery/Customized Employment, and Progressive Employment. (Page 233) Title II

KRS will implement the End-Dependence Kansas initiative, a significant capacity building and systems change effort to expand supported employment opportunities, especially through the Individual Placements and Supports model for persons with behavioral health disabilities and through the Individualized Discovery/SE model for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Led by KRS, this initiative also includes the Kansas Departments of Commerce, Corrections, Health and Environment, and Aging and Disability Services. End-Dependence Kansas will leverage the resources and expertise of these departments to identify the most effective collaborative funding approaches and to increase supported employment outcomes for Kansans with disabilities. For example, the Departments on Aging and Disability Services and Commerce contributed non-federal resources to use as matching funds for the VR program and its End-Dependence Kansas initiative. Direct service contracts will be issued following a competitive bid process to community service providers statewide to assist them to build and maintain capacity for evidence-based employment models of service delivery. (Page 249) Title II

When considering opportunities to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, KRS emphasizes strategies that will address the needs of people with the most significant disabilities and people who have been unserved or under-served. Collaborative efforts with consumers, advisory councils, parent groups, advocacy organizations, community rehabilitation programs and other state agencies are undertaken to expand access to VR services and to promote supported employment, customized employment, Pre-Employment Transition Services and assistive technology services. Innovation and expansion activities are consistent with the findings of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Pages 250-251) Title II

The performance of these providers in helping consumers secure meaningful employment and wages consistent with their goals and priorities significantly impacts the overall KRS performance on standards and indicators. Therefore, accountability benchmarks have been established with the target of 80% of persons referred to service providers obtaining jobs within an average of 120 days, and 60% of persons referred achieving successful closures. The goal is a network of effective supported employment providers whose focus is on the vocational objectives, goals, rehabilitation needs and priorities of the consumers to be served. Improved Information Technology support solutions are needed to better track and assess service provider outcomes and to produce “report cards” of performance. The End-Dependence Kansas Initiative will provide direct service contracts to disability services providers to build and maintain their capacity to provide two evidence-based models: Individual Placements and Supports and Individualized Discovery/Supported employment. (Page 266) Title II
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• Not significantly increased the number of individuals with barriers to employment who receive training and other more intensive services
• Limited success with blending and braiding resources across multiple systems to meet the needs of jobseekers and workers
• Varied success at meeting the workforce needs of all industry sectors, as well as in some geographic areas of the state (Page 17) Title I

Development of this collaborative CIP will be completed by July 1, 2016. While the State’s initial focus will be on a collaborative CIP among the Core Partners, further phases of this CIP may engage other partners such as community and technical colleges. In addition, this CIP may address options for data tracking related to use of other comparable or required services and the related leveraging of resources for jobseekers. (Page 34) Title I

Opening the dialogue between the Partners and creating a streamlined approach to business outreach will provide the opportunity for key stakeholders to discuss options for creating inclusion and targeted training programs that will enhance employers hiring capabilities, as well as providing people with multiple barriers to employment opportunities to become employed. This improved engagement will also provide additional paid job opportunities for youth while in school or immediately after, up to age 24. This can include, but is not limited to internships, apprenticeships, job shadowing and/or training courses.

In addition, the strategy will increase the collaboration and leveraging of services for employers among the Partners. Employers previously served by one partner will have access to a larger network of support and work-ready jobseekers. Employers will experience a more focused and collaborated effort between agencies. This collaborative effort will increase employer knowledge and maximize their usage of the various incentive programs the state has available for businesses to hire people with disabilities and those with significant barriers to employment. (Page 69) Title I

$121,250 to United Cerebral Palsy of Kansas (UCPK), Wichita to provide individual assistive technology equipment, devices and services to enhance the independent living of Kansas with disabilities. The state funds are matched with private funds provided through UCPK and other private donors, leveraging additional spending power from the state’s investment. (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Other evaluation and research functions implemented through core programs include:
•  Implementing evidence-based employment practices for people with disabilities and ongoing fidelity research into the effectiveness of these practices.
• Using federal and state technical assistance resources, to the extent they are available, for evaluation and research functions.
• Using a research-to-practice approach by leveraging knowledge transfer from national resources including technical assistance centers funded by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the National Center on Leadership for the Employment and Economic Advancement of People with Disabilities (LEAD Center) with funding from the US Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the National Skills Coalition, and other similar organizations that disseminate research-based information on improving service delivery.
• Dissemination of information concerning research-based best practices for service delivery, alignment, and policy development. (Page 90) Title I
 

School to Work Transition

~~Improve the skills of jobseekers and workers through access to education and training leading to industry-recognized credentials through the use of career pathways, apprenticeships, and other strategies.

e) Encourage paid work-based learning experiences for youth so they may explore career options, develop the universal interpersonal and customer service skills needed in the workplace, and become self-reliant through employment as adults.

2) We value the contributions that all individuals, including those with significant barriers to employment, as defined by WIOA, can make to the Kansas economy. Our goals are to:

a) Vigorously represent the ability of qualified jobseekers with significant barriers to employment to meet the workforce needs of Kansas employers.

b) Ensure the local workforce development systems provide physical and programmatic access to and opportunities for the employment, education, training, and support services for individuals, particularly those with barriers to employment. (Page 28) Title I

Local plans will be required to discuss how core partners will coordinate to prevent duplication and/or conflicts about which program serves particular individuals, including coordinating to ensure that supportive services and work supports are provided. Because the nature of individual needs will vary from individual to individual, the team recognizes that many of these decisions will need to be made on a case-by-case basis, requiring regular communication among core partner staff. We anticipate that general tendencies will emerge (out-of-school youth will be more likely to receive Title I funded work-based learning, while Pre-Employment Transition Services, or PETS, under Title IV, may be more likely to serve in-school youth). These decisions will also be shaped by individual program requirements (PETS can only serve youth with disabilities, for example). (Page 42) Title I

KRS has built its capacity to provide Pre-ETS through the addition of 20 transition specialists to local VR offices. Each of the four regions also has a Pre-ETS Manager, and KRS employs a Statewide Manager as well. KRS has also established service provider agreements with all five of the Local Workforce Development Boards, numerous Centers for Independent Living and the Kansas Youth Empowerment Academy pertaining to specific components of Pre-ETS. A major emphasis is paid work-based learning experiences. Such experiences allow students to gain an early attachment to employment as the avenue to self-reliance, explore career options and develop the soft skills that are necessary for long-term employment success. Other services offered through services providers include self-advocacy training, post-secondary education, and workplace readiness training. (Page 189) Title I

Offer training and technical assistance to districts and local VR offices on coordinating the transition planning process. Topics in this area may include but are not limited to: inviting KRS counselors to IEP meetings; providing information about VR in the IEP development process; and educating VR counselors about district procedures related to transition planning and services for employment and postsecondary education goals for students with IEPs.

• Collaborate on the State Performance Plan and/or strategic plans developed by each party to facilitate the goals of this agreement and give priority to effective transition services for youth with disabilities resulting in improved post-secondary education and competitive, integrated employment outcomes.
• Use available inter-agency forums, conferences and expertise to develop a coordinated approach to facilitate achievement of the goals of this agreement.
• Share student/consumer data and state-level data, to the extent allowed by law, to evaluate the effectiveness of the education and VR services provided.
• Share federal and state monitoring practices and findings for effective program and policy evaluation.
• Participate in technical assistance and advisory opportunities to support the goals of this agreement. (Page 190) Title II

The Individual Plan for Employment is used as the basis for referral to one of the providers. It also describes the criteria, specific to each consumer, for determining that job performance is stable, determining how and when progress will be evaluated, and describing how extended ongoing support services will be provided. After the consumer reaches stability on the job, the consumer, service provider and VR counselor work together to finalize the plan for extended ongoing supports. This allows the plan to be specific and customized according to the consumer’s current work situation and support needs. As a result, the ongoing support section of the IPE may be amended, with the consumer’s agreement, in order to reflect the most current information available. (Page 194) Title II

KRS will continue to develop, implement and maintain a professional development system for new and experienced staff. A priority focus area will be to address effective communication strategies to assure consumer engagement and progress toward employment, and development and implementation of effective Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs). Other areas of focus continue to be informed choice; understanding the purpose and intent of the VR program; linkages between eligibility, rehabilitation needs, consumer goals and priorities, and services provided; development of effective progress measures; time and caseload management techniques; financial accountability cultural competence; accountable decision-making; expertise related to disability populations served (specifically persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with mental illness, and persons with head injury); leadership development; use of comparable benefits; basic benefits counseling issues surrounding employment; use of Kansas specific labor market trends and demands; and, effective career counseling and guidance related to employment as the avenue to self-reliance. (Page 208) Title II

In November 2009 (Program Year 2009), KRS implemented a comprehensive Performance Management System. This system established consistent counselor performance standards related to quality and policy compliance reflected through case reviews; timeliness for eligibility and IPE development; the number of new IPEs developed; the number of consumers rehabilitated; and the rehabilitation rate. Competencies related to professional conduct, timely responses to consumer and other inquiries, and effective caseload management are also included in this performance management process. Consistent standards were also established for supervisors and administrators. (Page 208) Title II

Multiple services means more than one service as listed on the IPE. Support services (maintenance, transportation, personal assistance, and services to family members) may not be counted toward multiple services. Routine counseling and guidance to facilitate participation in the VR process may not be counted toward multiple services. Core services which are not provided by KRS but which are necessary for achievement of the employment outcome may be counted toward multiple services.

Extended period of time means at least four months between Status 12 and closure. (Page 244) Title IV

An order of selection gives priority to persons with the most significant disabilities when there are insufficient resources to provide vocational rehabilitation services to all eligible individuals who apply. After eligibility has been determined, each consumer is assigned to a category group. The consumer will be assigned to the highest priority category for which he or she is qualified, and a rationale will be documented in the case file. If the consumer’s circumstances change or new information is acquired, the category designation can be changed. Depending on available resources, all categories may be served. However, if there is a need to close one or more categories for services:
• Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will set aside sufficient funds to purchase services necessary to determine eligibility. Applications for services will be accepted without restriction.
• The closure will not affect individuals who already have final Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs). IPE services will continue.
• Persons who need post-employment services will not be affected. (Page 247) Title IV

VR counselors participate, within available resources, in Individual Education Plan meetings for transition-aged youth with disabilities to assure that they have information about VR services and how to apply. (Page 252) Title IV   
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
• Federal regulations require that eligibility for VR services be determined no later than 60 days from the data of application, unless the applicant agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas is only 28 days (as of 2-28-2018).
• Federal regulations require that an Individual Plan for Employment be developed no later than 90 days from the date of eligibility, unless the client agrees to a time extension. The statewide average in Kansas from application to IPE development is only 64 days (as of 2-28-2018). Page 258 title IV

Indicator 2.8: Annual number of persons served (status 02-24 +32). PY 2016: 10,149
Indicator 2.9: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.10: Annual contribution to IPE costs through comparable benefits and services provided through one-stop workforce centers. A data source has not been established for this indicator.
Indicator 2.11: Rehabilitation rate of persons referred to placement or supported employment providers. (Page 260) Title IV

Given the limited number of VR staff, educators were asked at what age it would be when it would be most important for VR to participate in IEP meetings. The majority of educators indicated ages 17 (46.8%) and 16 (27.7%) would be the most important ages for VR to participate in IEP meetings.

The following question was posed: “To assist your students to be successful in post-secondary education or direct entry into the workforce, which of the following pre-employment transition services are most important?”

Rank of Most Important Pre-Employment Transition Services

567. Work-based learning experiences
568. Workplace readiness training
569. Instruction in self-advocacy
570. Job exploration counseling
571. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or post-secondary education programs at institutions of higher education (Page 229) Title IV

KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc. KRS will also:

• Recruit additional service providers to expand access to supported employment services statewide.
• Continue ongoing collaborative meetings with sources of long-term support, including HCBS waiver services and managed care organizations.
• Enhance data collection related to referral sources, consumers served by multiple agencies and programs, extended services and outcomes.
• Create a service provider agreement to expand the availability of highly qualified benefits counselors so That consumers have accurate information about employment incentives. (Page 250) Title IV

A priority target population for End-Dependence Kansas is youth transitioning from school to work. End-Dependence Kansas, coupled with outreach for Pre-Employment Transition Services and Section 511 services to divert youth from direct entry into sub-minimum wage work, will expand supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Significant training and technical assistance will be focused on improved communication with students and youth with disabilities encouraging competitive integrated employment. Also, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Education, KRS will offer opportunities for training and technical assistance for school personnel to learn and understand the needs of students and youth pursuing employment rather than services only, to establish and implement the soft skills and employment preparedness skills needed by employers and how and when to complete a referral to the VR program. In addition to these strategies, KRS will work collaboratively to assure Title I youth services are readily available to students and youth with disabilities to enjoy work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, career exploration and coaching, etc.  (Page 249-250) Title IV

- Increase recruitment and enrollment to increase the number of active participants. This focus will include reaching out to community organizations and other senior service providers to provide information on the SCSEP program and its’ benefits.
- Focus participant training towards employment skills acquisition as guided by IEP, TAD and assessment results based on labor market needs. Training will include short-term training classes, education and WORKReady! Certification. SCSEP will also insure that participants are receiving the job notification list that is generated by the One-Stop so that participants are better informed about area job openings.
- Increase follow-up contact with participants exited for unsubsidized employment to address employment and life issues to help maintain employment.
- Insure all most-in-need measures are accurately and timely entered into SPARQ.
- Create host agency skill development training and tracking to be reviewed with participant and agency quarterly based on each individuals IEP. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor that outlines a four-year strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce development system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all job-seekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4) Title 1

Some skill gaps can be addressed through Career Technical Education. The Kansas Board of Regents’ Technical Education Authority has established twenty-five program Alignment Maps in ten federal instructional program classifications: Healthcare, Dental Care, Engineering Technology, Automotive Technology and Collision Repair, Construction/HVAC/Carpentry, Computer Sciences, Welding, Machine Technology, Diesel Technology, Electrical/Utility Technology and Police and Corrections Sciences. Most of these programs lead to careers in occupations which pay wages high enough to allow workers to earn wages which are self-supporting. Postsecondary institutions, or business and industry or WIOA Core and Required Partners in partnership with postsecondary institutions, can create career pathways which will be supported by WIOA funds. (Page 13) Title I

The State will implement sector strategies, as described, regarding identified economic regions found in Title IB, Section VI and career pathways already utilized in multiple workforce programs, including formula and competitive grant programs. Career pathways will prepare individuals to be successful in a full range of secondary or postsecondary options including registered apprenticeships. Career pathways will enable individuals to attain a high school equivalency certificate, where necessary, as well as at least one recognized postsecondary credential. Where practicable, career pathways will integrate education, training, and other services including counseling and workforce preparation activities in order to accelerate the educational and career advancement of individuals. Since 2011, Regents, employers and individual postsecondary institutions have worked together to develop career pathways in twenty—five aligned programs. Local Workforce Boards may also develop additional career pathways as required by local employers. Adult Education will collaborate with workforce partners in offering basic skills to registered apprenticeship participants and with colleges in offering concurrent enrollment and team—teaching in Adult Education and CTE programs.

When providing vocational counseling and guidance with VR customers, the VR program uses the Kansas Department of Labor’s Labor Information Center website for information on high—demand jobs and career pathways. At this website, information is provided about jobs across various industries. Career pathways and potential earnings are provided for entry—level, intermediate and advanced career options. Educational requirements for each level in the career pathway are provided. This information is useful in facilitating informed decision—making by VR customers regarding services and vocational objectives. It also helps assure that VR customers are prepared to meet the workforce needs of Kansas business and industry.

Department of Commerce Workforce Services Unit will require Local Workforce Development Areas to describe specifically how they will develop and expand strategies for meeting the needs of local employers, workers, and jobseekers, particularly through job—driven industry or sector partnerships. (Page 35) Title I

Job Developers, utilizing current labor market information will seek out and develop relationships with businesses in growing industries and occupations. Potential employment and career opportunities for project participants in the industries projected to have the most growth will include but not be limited to a variety of options within schools, hospitals, home health care, temporary help services, food preparation and serving, cashiers and retail sales. Key steps to career pathways in all of these fields include: related community service assignment; job search skills workshops, relevant computer/technology training and certifications for food handlers, basic first aid, CPR, computer proficiency and any other training identified as increasing participant marketability for job attainment.

• Job Developers will develop lists of employers in the targeted industries focusing on creating and establishing innovative working relationships, particularly with those that have a special interest in hiring older workers. They will contact those identified, provide education on the advantages of hiring older workers and establish on—going communication that will generate valuable employment opportunities for qualified project participants. (Page 302) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

For Titles IB and III the state workforce agency will fund outreach, employment assistance, case management, and staff supervision through state merit staff funded through Wagner-Peyser labor exchange and career services; Reemployment Assistance programs; Veteran’s Employment and Training programs, including those for Disabled Veterans; Registered Apprenticeship; Agricultural Outreach; Work Opportunity Tax Credit; Trade Act and Foreign Labor Wage Certification programs through formula and dedicated funds. SCSEP services are provided through a sub-grant agreement with the Wichita Area Workforce Development Board. Monitoring, information management, staff training, technical assistance and KWSB support will be provided with the state portion of WIOA funds and other employment and training formula funds. All of these activities will move Kansas toward the strategic goals described in the Section II of this plan. These activities will be aligned across the Core Programs and combined state plan partners as described in the Customer Flow section of the State plan, and through avenues defined during the first two years of the implementation of this State plan, such as cross-training, referrals, co-enrollment and coordinating resources as agreed in eventual Memoranda of Understanding. (Page 52) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Local plans must discuss how the local areas will address the challenges of establishing and maintaining eligibility for public assistance, including SSI, TANF, SNAP, and other means-tested programs, especially in light of the possible effect on household income of a participant’s earnings through work-based learning.

• Local plans should address how case managers will become familiar with these issues.
• Local areas should incorporate mitigating strategies, such as Earned Income Tax Credit program awareness, into their service strategies.
• State-level core partners should ensure that local partners are familiar with resources such as Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) benefits counselors, Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA), and other resources, and should develop strategies to share this information and/or train local area staff on an ongoing basis. Local area and partner staff should incorporate the information listed above into individual service strategies. Where practical and applicable, the goal of these strategies should be designed to exit public benefits successfully. (Page 44) Title I

This level of collaboration between the Partners will increase the number of jobseekers with multiple barriers to employment in successful employment. The Partners will regularly (annually) measure the degree of use and satisfaction of employers within the system, as well as the increased level of people with disabilities and significant barriers to employment who are working with those employers. (Page 71) Title I

Annually about 10% of the total persons served (Status 02-24 +32) receive supported employment services. Individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, significant intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injury are among the primary populations receiving supported employment services. Their services are characterized by:

• The need for community-based work assessments or job tryouts in competitive, integrated employment so that individuals who have not previously worked can explore jobs that are a good match for their skills and interests.
• The importance of an individualized approach in connecting these individuals with: available social service and disability-related services; transportation; benefits counseling; and natural support networks in their home communities.
• The need for employability or soft skill training on issues such as self-advocacy, communications, taking direction from employers, getting along with co-workers and customer service.
• The need for specific job skill training matched with current and projected labor market needs.
When considering the entire disability service delivery system, identifying the source of extended supports continues to be an issue warranting further review and capacity building efforts, especially for individuals who cannot access such services through the state’s network of community mental health centers and community developmental disability organizations. (Page 224) Title IV

Goal 2: KRS will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve the outreach and outcomes for transition-aged students.

Strategies for Goal 2:

KRS will implement the following strategies:

A. Build and maintain VR capacity to deliver Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS).

B. Build partnerships with school transition personnel to encourage that career-focused and work-based experiences are incorporated into transition Individual Education Plans and to increase referrals of PETS-eligible students to the VR program. (Page 241) Title IV

Highlights and accomplishments Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) reports the following accomplishments in implementing the State Plan Goals and Priorities. These highlights are based on PY 2016 (July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2017) indicators.

• A total of 1,021 Kansans with disabilities achieved stable employment as a result of VR services, earning an average of $10.33 an hour. VR consumers achieved employment in high-wage, high-demand jobs, for example: more than $37 an hour as an CAD drafter and numerous placements of more than $30 an hour in the nursing field. Other high-wage outcomes included physical therapist and occupational therapist, both at just more than $40 an hour.
• The percent of individuals who reported their own earnings as the largest source of support at the time of vocational rehabilitation (VR) case closure was 72.5%, 57% higher than at application. This represents a significant milestone toward increased self-reliance.
• The number of successful employment outcomes after participating in post-secondary education was 164. This indicator represents a significant quality measure as increased education and technical training often lead to higher-wage, career track positions and therefore increased self-reliance.
• KRS receives reimbursement funds from the Social Security Administration for consumers who are recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or beneficiaries of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) when those individuals work at the Substantial Gainful Activity earnings level for at least nine months. In PY 2016, reimbursement funds received by the agency totaled $647,025. (Page 257) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Both state and federal resources are leveraged to improve access to workforce development programs provided by educational institutions. In addition to the projects already described, Kansas has been awarded the Disability Employment Initiative grant to, in part, fund postsecondary credential training for jobseekers with disabilities. Postsecondary partners have competed for and received funding to support tuition assistance for jobseekers including offenders and other individuals with barriers to employment. Kansas WIOA Core Partners, educational institutions and other partners will continue to aggressively seek additional resources to improve access to education, postsecondary credentials and college credit. (Page 73) Title I

The State Workforce Board’s Eligible Training Provider List policy describes the first step WIOA Titles I and III partners will utilize to engage Kansas education and training providers to create a job—driven education and training system. Historically, Workforce Development and VR have had a strong relationship with both Adult Education and postsecondary education institutions, as they are the very entities which provide the skill development opportunities required to meet the needs of Kansas employers. In addition to the projects described earlier, Workforce AID and Senate Bill 155, the state has also supported AO—K, a program providing jobseekers concurrent training in Adult Education and postsecondary credentials. This program relies on functional relationships between workforce services, adult education and postsecondary education to help jobseekers simultaneously gain the skills needed for successful employment and to meet the needs of employers seeking individuals with particular skill sets. (Page 71) Title I

Data Collection

(1) (A) The Commerce workforce system uses the America’s Job Link Alliance Management Information System to meet all of the requirements of US Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration for data collection and reporting. The AJLA system in Kansas, www.KANSASWORKS.com also provides the public with access to labor market information, connects to postsecondary training programs and performance outcomes by training program. The AJLA system provides case management tools and creates participant records and can be used for payment for services and cost allocation of services. Employers may enter job postings in KANSASWORKS.com in addition to finding qualified applicants for jobs. Today, there are 35,524 job postings and 9021 resumes in KANSASWORKS.com. The VR data system, the Kansas Management Information System or KMIS, will support implementation of the state’s strategies for an effective, efficient and outcome-oriented workforce system. KMIS is used to collect consumer demographic information, to track consumer milestones as they progress through their individual plans for employment, and to compile data necessary for state and federal reports. KMIS is also the fiscal management tool through which consumer services are authorized and paid. Data will be extracted for compilation of WIOA-required common accountability measures. The Portal for Adult Basic Literacy Outreach (PABLO) is the student information, program accountability, and reporting system for Kansas Adult Education. The Kansas Higher Education Data System (KHEDS) supports informed decision-making through the collection, analysis, and reporting of postsecondary data in Kansas. Both PABLO and KHEDS will support coordinated implementation of state strategies through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative (WDQI). Page 77 Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Identify competitive, integrated employment opportunities for vocational rehabilitation (VR) consumers, including such opportunities for youth and adults who are diverted from sub-minimum wage employment through Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.
• Increase opportunities for youth with disabilities to engage in paid work-based learning experiences as part of the Pre-Employment Transition Services program. Such work-based learning is intended to facilitate career exploration and development of the soft skills necessary for lifelong employment success.
• Collaborate with partners in the workforce development system on coordinated business outreach processes.
• Coordinate with Economic and Employment Services in the Department for Children and Families, which administers the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and its employer development activities. (Page 195)  Title II

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) will work with the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS) and the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to establish an interagency agreement regarding roles and responsibilities pertaining to competitive, integrated employment for Kansans with disabilities. KDADS and KDHE share responsibilities for administration of the Medicaid program. KDADS oversees services for persons with intellectual disabilities and behavioral health disabilities.

The purpose of the agreement will be to create a common understanding of responsibilities, policies and procedures. It will address data sharing to better analyze how mutual consumers interact with the various services and supports available to them. Perhaps most importantly, the agreement will establish a collaborative framework for services that will improve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for people with disabilities. A priority will be to address procedures for referring youth with disabilities to vocational rehabilitation (VR) services so they may explore options for competitive, integrated employment rather than being placed directly in sub-minimum wage employment after exit from school, consistent with Section 511 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. In addition, the agreement will address referral procedures for adults who are already employed in sub-minimum wage jobs so that VR may provide periodic information and career counseling related to competitive, integrated employment options. (Page 196-197) Title II
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Each workforce partner and local area must comply with both program and physical accessibility requirements consistent with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, WIOA Section 188 and related federal guidance, and the Kansas Act against Discrimination. Policy 5-33-00 assures compliance and equal access and usability for all Kansans, regardless of disability and can be found at (Pages 104-105) Title II

Veterans

Veterans receive priority access to computers and resources when there is a waiting line to utilize those resources. Veterans receive a special designation on interview sheets and sign in sheets for employer job fairs conducted at AJCs and get first opportunity to interview and/ or speak to employers. When program funds are limited, eligible veterans who qualify for funding assistance are granted priority over non-veterans for non-obligated funding assistance. Veterans’ resumes are searched first when new job orders are created by any workforce center staff. Qualified vets are then contacted by that staff and informed of the new position. (Page 104) Title I

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. (Page 277) Title IV

The DVOP specialist utilizes a case management process, in which they provide the following services: comprehensive assessments, individualized employment counseling, career guidance, and the development of an individual employment plan. This individualized employment plan will include appropriate apprenticeship, other on-job training, and additional education opportunities, as needed to help the veteran overcome their significant barrier to employment. After assessing the needs and a plan is developed, the DVOP will reassess and may identify additional non-intensive services needed, which will require the DVOP to refer veterans to services provided by local partners, agencies, and other employment/ training program providers. LVER Staff All Kansas LVER staff has received extensive training in how to engage employers through the National Veterans Training Institute (NVTI), within 18 months of their hire. Additionally, all new hire LVERs receive Ramp-UP training from the State Veteran Service Manager, which includes the history of the Wagner-Peyser, Employment Services, the Jobs for Veterans Act and JVSG staff roles and responsibilities. This training also includes local operations, as they relate to all active and current VPLs, chapters 41 and 42 of Title 38. Other training include the annual training conference, where we will address staff development and skills improvement, integrated service models and their unique roles, effective intensive service delivery models, and other program related information sharing/ strategic planning/ performance measuring/ and systems training. Lastly, local workforce center training is provided by local managers and the One-Stop partners, which highlights location specific practices and our partners’ operations. (Page 281) Title IV

For the purpose of promoting the hiring and retention of veterans, Workforce Center staff will provide and facilitate a full range of employment and training services. LVER staff will advocate for veterans to employers and seek other opportunities with business and industry, community based organizations, and contractors of all kinds, to include federal contractors. All Workforce Center staff, as well as LVER staff, will work together to plan and participate in job fairs to promote the hiring of veterans and eligible persons. LVER staff will communicate job fair participation opportunities and the benefits of attending job fairs, to employers and federal contractors. LVERs will also make contact with unions, apprenticeship programs and the business community to promote employment and training opportunities for veterans and eligible persons, and furthermore promote credentialing and training opportunities with training providers and credentialing bodies. (Page 285) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) collaborates and coordinates services with federal, state and local employment and rehabilitation agencies that contribute to the vocational rehabilitation (VR) of Kansans with disabilities. At the local level such collaborations are individualized according to each person’s needs and interests. This individualized approach is one of the cornerstones of VR services. At the state level, KRS collaborates with other units within the Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) and with other state departments. For example:

• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have disabilities. Consumers benefit by being able to receive the coordinated and specialized services they need to achieve employment before their time-limited TANF benefits cease.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services independent living staff will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who age out of foster care.
• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers facilitate discussions about the importance of competitive, integrated employment, an employment-first strategy, evidence-based practices, and supported employment services. Managed Care Organizations coordinate services for HCBS participants with employment goals on plans of care. (Page 185) Title I

Service provider agreements are available for a variety of services, including vocational assessment, independent living assessment, community-based work assessment, community-based job tryout, job preparation, guided placement, customized placement, job coaching, rehabilitation engineering, assistive technology, rehabilitation teaching, comprehensive facility-based training for persons who are blind or visually impaired, and orientation/mobility. These agreements emphasize the development of action plans, strengthened approaches to ongoing communication among KRS counselors and service providers, and accountability measures for successful rehabilitation outcomes. KRS paid more than $4.5 million through these agreements in PY 2016.

Service providers participating in these agreements include community rehabilitation programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities, consumer-run organizations, independent living centers, mental health centers, substance abuse programs, assistive technology access sites, and independent contractors. Providers may offer more than one service and serve more than one region of the state. (Page 192) Title I

Kansas Rehabilitation Services (KRS) enters into provider agreements with a variety of community agencies for the provision of supported employment services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Through customized employment provider agreements, six key components or milestones are specified for supported employment services:

1. Creation of a job development action plan.
2. Placement.
3. Stabilization.
4. 45 days of continuous, successful employment.
5. Finalization of an extended ongoing service plan.  (Page 193) Title II

Current activities include the following:

• Cooperative working relationships between the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services oversight units for community developmental disability organizations and community mental health centers address capacity to provide supported employment services.
• KRS and DCF Economic and Employment Services continue to collaborate to serve recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) who have disabilities.
• KRS and DCF Prevention and Protection Services will coordinate to address the employment and/or post-secondary education needs of youth with disabilities who are aging out of foster care.
• In-service training will focus on best practices in service delivery for persons who are blind or visually impaired, persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders, persons with traumatic brain injury, persons with disabilities who have a criminal background, and persons with mental illness. Contracted service providers will be included in these training opportunities whenever possible to enhance their expertise in service VR consumers. (Page 255) Title II

Individual job placements in competitive, integrated employment are the outcome of supported employment services funded by KRS. Such outcomes have higher earnings, consumer choice, community integration and more co-worker interaction. KRS supported employment outcomes do not include enclaves, work crews or other congregate work settings.

Service delivery system in implementing supported employment services, KRS emphasizes the importance of geographic distribution of services. KRS also places a priority on working with community agencies with the capacity to provide extended/ongoing support services. Providers include community developmental disability organizations, mental health centers, independent living centers, and other public and private entities. Provider agreements:

• Address responsibility of the providers to coordinate the community service system, which has responsibility for funding and providing the extended ongoing services necessary for the consumer to maintain employment once they exit the VR program. (Page 265) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

State Workforce Policy 4-2-04 Wagner-Peyser Reemployment Services for UI Claimants: Wagner-Peyser funding is utilized by the Department of Commerce to assure: (1) UI claimants receive a full range of labor exchange services necessary and appropriate to facilitate their earliest return to work, as determined by assessment services including WIOA Career Services; (2) claimants requiring assistance in seeking work receive the necessary guidance and counseling to ensure they can conduct a meaningful and realistic work search; and (3) UI program staff receive information about the claimants’ ability to work or their availability to accept suitable work offered them. UI claimants are selected using KDOL’s Worker Profiling and Reemployment Services (WPRS) system. Claimants most likely to exhaust (score of 50% or higher) are placed in the pool for WFC staff to schedule for services. The following are mandatory services: • Work Registration - Most claimants are automatically registered in KANSASWORKS.com when they file an Unemployment Insurance claim. However, if the claimant is not already registered, staff assistance is offered to help them register. • Assessment Orientation - Staff provide an introduction to the workforce center to include instruction on using self-help tools. • Initial Assessment - Staff provide an initial assessment of the claimant’s skill level, aptitude, ability, supportive service needs and eligibility for federally funded programs in general, and specifically USDOL funded programs. • Individual Employment Plan - In coordination with the claimant, and other WIOA Core Partners as appropriate, staff develop a written Individual Employment Plan (IEP) matched to the claimant’s needs based on information gathered during the Assessment Interview. (Page 146- 147) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Kansas HB 2353, Concerning State Contracting and Purchasing from Not-for_profit Entities Serving People with Disabilties. - 07/01/2017

~~“AN ACT concerning state contracts and purchases; relating to purchases ofproducts and services from not-for-profit entities; employment of persons with disabilities; qualified vendors; amending K.S.A. 2016 Supp. 75-3317 and repealing the existing section…..{Employs} persons who are blind or disabled and who reside in Kansas. Persons who are employed by a third-party entity other than the vendor are not employed by the vendor for purposes of this section;(2)(B) (2) does business primarily in Kansas or substantially all of its production in Kansas;(C) (3) is operated in the interest of and for the benefit of the persons who are blind or persons with have other severe disabilities, or both;…” 

Systems
  • Other

Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and Oversight Commission (HB 2336) - 04/29/2015

“HB 2336 creates the Kansas Employment First Initiative Act and the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The bill requires state programs and services that support employment of persons with disabilities to consider, as their first option, competitive and integrated employment for persons with disabilities. The bill does not require an employer to give preference to hiring persons with a disability.   “The bill requires all state agencies to follow the policy for employment by coordinating and collaborating efforts among agencies. In addition, agencies may share data and information whenever possible across systems in order to track progress. State agencies may adopt rules and regulations to implement the Act.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Kansas ABLE Program (HB 2216) - 04/16/2015

"There is hereby established an enabling savings program and such program shall be known and may be cited as the Kansas ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] savings program. The purpose of the Kansas ABLE savings program is to authorize the establishment of savings accounts empowering individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability and to provide guidelines for the maintenance of such accounts."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission Senate substitute for HB 2150 - 07/01/2013

“Senate Sub. for HB 2150 revises the size and responsibilities for the Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission. The Commission increases from five members to seven members. The Governor appoints the two additional members, with one having disability employment experience and the other having business employment experience. The bill repeals the requirement that the one member currently appointed by the Governor not be a state employee.   “The bill repeals the responsibilities of the Commission to establish measurable goals and objectives for the State of Kansas and track the progress of state agencies implementing the Employment First Initiative. The Commission must work with state agencies and nongovernmental organizations to assist individuals with disabilities to obtain employment. The Commission may educate state agencies and stakeholders about the Initiative.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas HB 2453: Bidding Preferences for Businesses Employing Individuals with Disabilities - 07/01/2012

This legislation, signed into law by Governor Brownback in 2012, places responsibility for operating the “Kansas Bidders Preference Program” within Kansas Department of Administration In this program, which provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities, a certified business gets certain benefits and advantages when bidding on state contracts. To be certified, a business must meet several requirements, including having at least 20% of their workforce comprised of qualified people with disabilities. This provides an incentive for certain businesses to hire people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

44-1136. Kansas Employment First Initiative Act: Definitions & Policy Declaration

“It is hereby declared to be the policy of the state of Kansas that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered its first option when serving persons with disabilities who are of working age to obtain employment. This policy applies to programs and services that provide services and support to help obtain employment for persons with disabilities. All state agencies shall follow this policy and ensure that it is effectively implemented in their programs and services. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require any employer to give preference to hiring people with a disability.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 31

COVID-19 Resource Guide - 07/01/2020

“This page is a resource guide created by the Disability Rights Center of Kansas to provide updates and information to Kansans with disabilities about disability rights during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic…

Topics covered in this resource page

Credible websites with the latest information Kansans at a higher risk for serious illness Tips for planning and prevention Information in plain language Information in American Sign Language (ASL) More disability-related resources by topic: Benefits & Assistance Special Education Employment Healthcare Mental Health Survivors/Victims of Crime Jails & Prisons”
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging

Kansas Family Medical Assistance Manual (KFMAM) - 07/22/2019

~~“1101 Medicaid - The Medicaid program is a joint federal/state-funded program that covers a majority of low income persons in the State including children and pregnant women. Policies for family related medical coverage are in this manual while polices for other medical programs are located in the KEESM (Kansas Economic and Employment Support Manual).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

RETAIN Works - 06/03/2019

~~“The Workforce Alliance of South Central Kanas (WA) and Susan B Allen Hospital (SBA), in partnership with the Kansas Department of Commerce, are implementing a stay-at-work/return-to-work program, called RETAIN WORKS, Retaining Employment and Talent after Injury/Illness Network. The project will begin on June 3, 2019, with a nine-month pilot program for Butler County employers or residents through the Butler Workforce Center, in partnership with Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA) in El Dorado.The  goal is to assist individuals who become ill or injured remain in the labor force, which benefits the individual, their family, employers and the economy. The program also aims to reduce long-term work absences among project participants, and lessen the need for individuals to seek Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Special Education Reimbursement Guide State Categorical Aid - 04/17/2019

~~“Categorical aid helps with the cost of implementing Individualized Education Program(IEP)services over and above the regular education that all students are entitled to receive. All expenditures claimed for reimbursement under categorical aid must have been paid from the Local Education Agency (LEA)’s special education funds All categorical aid money requested by the LEA must be deposited in its special education fund”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WIOA Guidance Letters - 04/15/2019

~~“The KANSASWORKS State Board serves as a review board and change agent empowered with the responsibility of making recommendations to the Governor and to state agencies to align workforce development with the needs of economic development in the state.”

This page has “WIOA Guidance Letters” that can be downloaded for use.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

RETAIN Phase 1 Recipient Snapshot - 01/20/2019

~~This page is an overview of the Kansas RETAIN details including amount of funding, target populations, locations of program and the point of contact.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

R2W Research & RETAIN Demonstration Projects - 01/20/2019

~~“Recognizing the importance of giving workers with disabilities economically sustainable alternatives to Federal disability benefits, the President's 2018 and 2019 proposed budgets support early intervention demonstrations. ODEP, the Employment and Training Administration, and the Social Security Administration developed the RETAIN initiative — Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network — to test the impact of early intervention projects on SAW/RTW outcomes. Visit the About RETAIN page for application information and the News & Events page for the latest information on all things RETAIN.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

MENTAL HEALTH TASK FORCE Report to the Kansas Legislature - 01/14/2019

~~“While the Task Force considers all recommendations in Figure 2 (page ES-vi) to be priorities, there were a number of action items that emerged as essential to the implementation of the entire plan, including:  •Expanding Medicaid would undergird many of the recommendations by improving access to behavioral health services at all levels of care and allowing investment in workforce and capacity (Recommendation 2.5, page 36); •Restoring and increasing community outpatient mental health and substance use disorder treatment, primary care, housing, employment and peer programs will improve outcomes for individuals and families (Recommendation 1.5, page 21; Recommendation 2.1,page 26; Recommendation 2.6, page 38; and Recommendation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Accommodations Manual 2018-2019 - 01/01/2019

~~“The Kansas Assessment Program (KAP) Summative Assessment will have many tools available to help students navigate the online system. Some of the tools  will be available to all students, while others will only be available to students who have the need identified in their Individual Education Plans, Section 504 Plans, ELL Plan or statement of student needs. Many of these tools are available currently in the interactive demos and interim assessment, but all will be available for the summative assessments. All tools and accommodations work on laptops and desktops (Windows or Mac), tablets (Chromebooks or iPads).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” - 12/18/2018

~~“..the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid  Services (CMS) is approving Kansas’s request for an extension  of  its    section  1115(a)  demonstration   titled,  “KanCare” (Project  Number  11-W-00283/7),   along  with  modifications   to  the  demonstration  that  will  apply  during  the  extension  period.    With  this  approval,  the  KanCare demonstration extension w ill  be in  effect from January  1,  2019 through December 31,  2023. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Kansas School for the Deaf Secondary program - 08/23/2018

~~“Career:Career Exploration: Seventh and eighth grade students take classes to explore career interests and self-awareness skills for future job choices. Ninth and tenth grade students are required to take Career Training for soft skill and work skill development. Eleventh and twelve grade students experience on and off campus internships, job shadows, and supported employment.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Project Search - Kansas - 06/10/2017

~~“High School Transition Program:”Project SEARCH came to Kansas in 2010 with the first class of interns beginning in the fall of 2011. After the sixth year of implementation, over 350 Kansans have participated in Project SEARCH. 70 percent of those interns have secured competitive employment.90 interns have been selected for the 2017-2018 year.There are 13 host business sites in Kansas:• University of Kansas, Lawrence• Lawrence Memorial Hospital, Lawrence• Butler Community College, El Dorado• Susan B Allen Memorial Hospital, El Dorado• Newton Medical Center, Newton• Salina Regional Health Center, Salina• Via Christi Hospital, Wichita• Sedgwick County Government, Wichita• McConnell Air Force Base, Derby• Johnson County Government, Olathe• Embassy Suites, Olathe• Tabor College, Hillsboro• Cintas, Wichita” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities

The purpose of the Kansas Council on Developmental Disabilities (KCDD) is to support people of all ages with developmental disabilities so they have the opportunity to make choices regarding both their participation in society, and their quality of life.   In their current plan the KCDD has identified “4 areas of priority” of which one is employment  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Employment First Oversight Commission

“In order to ensure the Oversight Commission can effectively carry out its duties, the law places certain requirements on state agencies to help ensure that the law will be effectively and fully implemented. The law also places requirements on state agencies to provide the Commission information documenting measurable progress on the Goals and objectives established by the Commission and proving effective implementation of the law….Although the Employment First law requires all state agencies to implement its requirements, the Oversight Commission has identified a handful of state agencies that have programs and activities directly impacted by Employment First. These are referred to as “relevant state agencies” throughout this document. The relevant state agencies are:

•Kansas Department for Children and Families (KDCF –formerly Kansas Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services)

•Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS – formerly Kansas Dept. on Aging)

•Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE)

•Kansas Department of Commerce (Commerce)

•Kansas State Department of Education (KSDE)

•Kansas Department on Administration (KDOA) ”

.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kansas MIG-RATS - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, defined as: consumers with part-time employment, contract workers, bus drivers, re-entry, and individuals who have lost their healthcare insurance due to business closure. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Olathe Medical Center, Miami County Medical Center, and CoverKC Health Coalition. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Via Christi Hospitals Wichita, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, low wage working families; Individuals transitioning from parents’ insurance to individual insurance; Small business owners and their employees; Self-employed individuals of all ages; and Recently laid off individuals. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with Ascension Via Christi Cancer Institute, Ascension Health, Colleges and universities, Kansas Association of Medically Underserved (KAMU), Café con Leche, Asian Wellness, Community Operations Recovery Empowerment, Tax preparation services (HR Block and VITA sites), and Medical Mission at Home. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Shelly TrentPhone: (316) 268-5880Email: Shelly.Trent@ascension.org  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Kansas Department of Health and Environment CESP - 03/13/2013

“Certification of Employment Services Professionals - KDHE funded the provision of the Certified Employment Services Professional (CESP) in two locations during 2012. The CESP is a newly developed credential governed by the APSE Employment Services Professional Certification Council (ESPCC). Individuals who earn the CESP credential have demonstrated knowledge of the facilitation, and advocacy skills necessary to help establish and expand equitable employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. 64 people took the exam; 54 passed it. According to APSE, the number of candidates who sat for the exam in Kansas was double the number of candidates who sat for the initial administration of the exam by APSE during December 2011, and was the largest candidate sponsorship by any state since the inception of the exam in 2011 (See Appendix C, 2012 Employment Initiatives).” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Southeast Kansas Works Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Plan

Training must be industry or company specific and provide technical and skill upgrades. Training may be conducted at the applicant’s facility, at a public or private training provider site or at a combination of sites best meeting the needs of the organization. LA V allows the following types of training for employer projects meeting the above criteria:

 

Customized  occupational  training  designed  to  meet  the  special  requirements  of  an employer  (including  a  group  of  employers)  conducted  with  a  commitment  by  the employer to continue to employ an individual upon successful completion of the training.

 

Customized   on-the   job-training   relating   to   the   introduction   of   new   technologies,  introduction to new production or service procedures, or upgrading to new jobs requiring additional skills. LA V offers a variety of resources and information on services available to persons with disabilities including: information on training opportunities and links to online training; technology guides for using screen enlargement software, and screen reading software.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Supported Employment - 09/27/2019

~~Supported Employment is part of this waiver“The following supported employment activities by Supported Employment agency staff are designed to assist individuals in acquiring and maintaining employment:1. Individualized assessment.2.Individualized job development and placement services that create an appropriate job match for the individual and the employer. 3.Ongoing support services necessary to assure job retention as identified in the Person-Centered Support Plan and Person- Centered Service Plan.4.Training in related skills essential to secure and retain employment.

 Transportation between the participant's residence and the employment site is included in the rate paid to providers of Supported Employment services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas - HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS. 0224. R06.00 Transitions - 09/27/2019

~~“The Money Follows the Person (MFP) grant program ended on 6/30/17. As a result, the MFP structure for transitions from an institutionalized setting to a community setting via waiver supports was modified to become the HCBS Institutional Transitions process as indicated in policy. This process rolled qualified PRTF placements into its structure. As a result, the former reserved capacity numbers for the MFP grant program and the PRTF transitions were combined to form the basis for the new reserve capacity numbers for the HCBS Institutional Transitions. The HCBS Institutional Transition policy is available to CMS upon request.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Brain Injury Waiver Waiver Number: KS.4164.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The 2018 Kansas Legislature included a proviso in the budget bill directing KDADS to include acquired brain injuries (ABI) into the current TBI waiver. The proviso also directed that the amended waiver serve children under the age of 16. Policy and procedural changes surrounding this expansion will emerge through the stakeholder engagement process and will be phased in over the five-year life of the waiver. The former traumatic brain injury waiver will migrate away from a strictly rehabilitative waiver to one the is both habilitative and rehabilitative in nature.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS-I/DD Waiver Waiver Number: KS.0224.R06.00 - 07/01/2019

~~“The State of Kansas currently operates an approved Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability (IDD) waiver that provides services to eligible children and adults.  The purpose of this waiver is to provide the opportunity for innovation in providing Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS)to eligible participants who would otherwise require institutionalization in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ICF-IID). Consistent with the Developmental Disabilities Reform Act of 1995 (DDRA), the goals and objectives of the waiver continue to center around providing participants, who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, access to services and supports which allow opportunities for choices that increase the participant's independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in the community. Further, this range of supports and services will be appropriated to each participant and will be provided in a manner that affords the same dignity and respect to participants with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities that would be afforded to any person who does not have a disability.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“What is KanCare? - 04/22/2019

~~“KanCare is the program through which the State of Kansas administers Medicaid. Launched in January, 2013, KanCare is delivering whole-person, integrated care to more than 415,000 people across the state. Kansas has contracted with three health plans, or managed care organizations (MCOs), to coordinate health care for all people enrolled in Medicaid. More about KanCare can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Kansas Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2019

~~“Kansas now submits their amended Statewide Transition Plan. Changes include increasing stakeholder participation, integrating stakeholder recommendations, revised timelines, and proactive approaches for engaging stakeholders. The identified need for a new direction was derived from the collective views not only of service recipients, HCBS providers, and the state, but also significant and ongoing technical assistance provided to Kansas by officials from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Further, this amended plan includes summaries from previous and ongoing public comment sessions along with the KDADS responses.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Extension of its section 1115(a) demonstration titled, “KanCare” (Project Number 11-W-00283/7) - 12/18/2018

~~“Kansas will provide new employment supports to beneficiaries with behavioral health diagnoses and eligible for a 1915(c), either by being on the waitlist or already being enrolled in the 1915(c). This voluntary pilot will be capped at 500 beneficiaries. Services w ill inc lude pr e-vocational support services, supportive employment services, personal assistant services, independent living skills training, assistive technology, and transportation, and are s imila r to services that could be offered as state plan home and community-based services (HCBS) benefit under section 1915(i) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Included in the pilot is a targeted expansion of Medicaid for individua ls on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) who would normally not be eligible for Medicaid without meeting spend-down requirements and.  these beneficiaries w ill be eligible f or both the pilot services and Medicaid state plan services. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Institutional Transition Policy - 11/05/2018

~~“PurposeThis policy establishes the process and procedures for transitioning eligible individuals from institutional care settings onto the Frail and Elderly (FE), Intellectual and Developmental Disability (I/DD), Physical Disability (PD), and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) waiver programs. "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Person-Centered Service Plan Policy - 07/09/2018

~~“The purpose of this policy is to explain the Person-Centered Service Plan (PCSP) requirements found in 42 CFR § 441.301, K.A.R. 30-63-1 through 32, and the 1915 (c) HCBS waivers and detail the process for creation of the Person-Centered Service Plan.

This policy provides requirements for the implementation of a person-centered planning process, and aims to describe for 1915 (c) waiver participants, what to expect though the development and implementation of a person-centered plan.  This policy also provides information regarding applicable Person-Centered Service Plan forms and documents, elements for the 1915(c) HCBS waiver’s plan of care quality assurance compliance, and the procedures, timelines and responsible parties governing the Person-Centered Service Plan  and implementation activities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HCBS Medicaid 1915 (c) Waiver Public Forums - 06/15/2018

~~“Home and Community Bases Services (HCBS) provides oversight for a system of community based supports and  services for persons in Kansas with disabilities. Information about HCBS waiver programs can be found at the corresponding links for each program listed below. Providers include a variety of not-for-profit and for-profit organizations as well as governmental entities. These services are provided through 10 HCBS waiver programs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

There's no place like the workplace for great career opportunities for employees with disabilities in the Sunflower State of Kansas. See what Kansas is doing to make sure that workers with disabilities are bringing home the dough in America's Bread Basket.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Kansas VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,913,314
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
195,738
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.52%
Change from
2018 to 2019
91,009
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.77%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.50%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
82.67%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 2,913,314
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 195,738
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 91,009
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,237,960
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.50%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 82.67%