Montana

States - Big Screen

When it comes to efforts to increase employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in Montana, the sky is the limit in the "Big Sky Country."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Montana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.61%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,068,778
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.89%
Change from
2018 to 2019
65,253
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
30,329
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.64%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.48%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.28%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,050,493 1,062,305 1,068,778
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 69,553 67,140 65,253
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 31,935 31,719 30,329
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 442,802 444,569 443,716
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 45.91% 47.24% 46.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.09% 79.99% 79.28%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.70% 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.30% 19.80% 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.70% 12.00% 11.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 77,995 75,690 75,831
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 64,267 65,000 66,377
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 128,081 125,382 127,174
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 387
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,560 4,582 4,317
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 7,371 8,245 9,569
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 648 867 929
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,392 5,391 3,675
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,191 590 474

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,848 1,753 1,728
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 10.70% 10.40% 10.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 27,274 26,628 26,058

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,188 1,691 1,180
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,381 2,900 1,903
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 6,841 6,495 4,141
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 17.40% 26.00% 28.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.50% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 2.60% 2.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 99 62
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 323 507 599
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,549 1,519 2,179
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 859 10 11
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 384 5 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 45.00% 50.00% 55.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 38.20 0.48 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 23.00% 98.00% 17.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,387 1,047 925
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 39,880 39,118 38,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 47 38 44
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 40 32 34

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 $2,216,146 $2,350,592
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $5,101,199 $4,657,057
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $17,794,322 $17,141,490
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $7,962 $2,314,472 $2,295,357
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,013 219 189
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 489 440
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 1,204 1,180
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.00 48.24 48.18

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 46.96% 47.72% 49.51%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.02% 12.28% 11.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.49% 1.07% 1.06%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.94% 98.70% 98.68%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.55% 22.14% 22.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.28% 73.86% 75.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.97% 86.86% 87.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 51.06% 51.72% 52.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 294,615
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,038
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 42,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 25,481
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 68,289
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 381
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 626
AbilityOne wages (products). $139,465
AbilityOne wages (services). $243,632

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 23 19 16
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 23 19 16
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 889 748 441
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 889 748 441

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Supported employment services are the primary emphasis of the VRBS and CRP relationship and were the focus of the needs assessment.
Issues identified to improve supported employment services include:

1) Expansion of services to rural and remote areas by the continued certification of private providers who meet VRBS’ qualification levels for job assistance and supported employment services
2) Expansion of mental health providers as CRP’s to serve those with severe and persistent mental illness
3) Planning for the needs of consumers requiring higher level of long-term supports was identified through participation with the Supported Employment Leadership Network (the employment first network of Montana. (Page 152) Title I

Customized Employment

~~2017 Qtr. 3: Guidance was given to all VRBS business team member to make contact with two businesses monthly to provide information and assist with issues such as the untapped pool of resources offered by persons with disabilities, customized employment and VRBS resources. (Page 172) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Montana, as a small state with limited workforce program funds and a significant small-business climate (97% of all private businesses have fewer than 50 employees), faces unique challenges and is committed to ensuring its workforce system meets the needs of the state’s businesses and workers, today and in the future. Such challenges demand that WIOA core and other partners effectively leverage partnerships and collaborate in service delivery efforts. These efforts allow the state to ensure that customer expectations and needs are understood; that service offerings and locations meet those needs without duplication; that data evaluation tools and processes are in place; and that the system continually evolves and improves on its own. To support these efforts, Montana continues to work together across provider and program lines to develop a seamless, demand-driven workforce service delivery system comprised of public and private organizations, businesses, local, state and federal employment and training programs, secondary, post-secondary and adult education programs, Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services, and other human capital support agencies. (Page 64) Title I

Montana’s State Workforce Innovation Board continues to prioritize service coordination with core partners throughout Montana. In addition to Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation representation on the board, programs continue to work on program integration and braiding services. Adult Education aligned its providers to coincide with the districts outlined in the state plan to further integrate services, in addition, the board weighed in on workforce portions of each provider application submitted through Adult Education’s RFP process. The Board also included provisions under its One-Stop Certification requiring the One-Stop Operator continue updating the WIOA Committee on its progress coordinating services with core partners and work on additional coordination efforts throughout the state. (Page 91) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. (Page 61) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~7. VRBS are provided pursuant to an individualized plan for employment (IPE) which is developed jointly by the rehabilitation counselor and the eligible individual. In those situations where referral has been made to campus disability support services, the appropriate disability services staff may also be involved in helping to develop the IPE.8. The VRBS’ rehabilitation counselor and the MUS campus disability support services staff will respect the individual’s right and responsibility to fully participate in all decisions regarding his or her vocational future. The IPE shall be developed and implemented in a manner that allows the individual an opportunity to exercise informed choice in selecting an employment outcome, the specific vocational rehabilitation services that are to be provided, the entity that will provide those services, and the methods that will be used to procure the vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 130) Title I

While not part of the MOU with the OPI, VRBS commits to the development and approval of an IPE before each eligible student able to be served under the order of selection leaves the school setting. Should Montana come out of order of selection, VRBS is committed to development and approval of an IPE before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 131) Title I

The OPI shall assist school districts to inform VRBS of students with disabilities who are on an IEP and may be in need of assistance through VRBS. The notice to VRBS shall occur no later than the first IEP at which transition services are considered in order for VRBS to participate in the future development of the student’s IEP. For students enrolling closer to graduation or age 21, school districts are urged to inform VRBS as soon as those students are identified.
For all IEP meetings subsequent to the first meeting, the OPI shall encourage school districts to schedule IEP meetings for eligible students with disabilities in a timely manner, and to include notice to VRBS and the invitation for the VRBS counselor to participate subject to parental approval. Development of vocational goals and objectives shall occur in collaboration with the IEP team.
For the first IEP meeting following the initial notice to VRBS, the OPI shall encourage school districts to inform VRBS of the meeting in advance to allow sufficient time for VRBS to acquire the necessary diagnostic data to determine the student’s eligibility. The notice to VRBS should include an invitation to the VRBS counselor to participate, from then on, in transition planning within the IEP process. VRBS participation in IEP meetings is subject to parental approval. (Page 131) Title I

The following are sections of the MOU with the Office of Public Instruction that deal with financial responsibilities of each agencies and related matters.
The OPI shall assist local school districts with coordination of vocationally related services with VRBS for eligible students. Coordination should commence in the early stages of transition. Vocationally-related service coordination
and corresponding agency responsibilities should be identified in the IEP and included on the student’s IPE when appropriate.
VRBS will provide assistive technology services relevant to functions outside those assistive technology services required to access the educational program. (Page 132) Title I

The primary method of improving and expanding VR services to students with disabilities have been described elsewhere in this document. The main method has been contracting for Pre-ETS services with school districts. There also have been additional contracts with programs like Montana Youth Transitions, Montana Youth Leadership Forum, Moving On, Project Search, Easter Seals volunteer experience program, Montana Center for Inclusive Education’s Virtual college peer mentoring program, and exploring specialized Pre-ETS collaboration with the tribal VR programs located in Montana.
In addition, VRBS counselors have been encouraged to take applications with students with disabilities at a younger age and provide IPE services that are focused on vocational and career exploration rather than a specific vocational goal. (Page 164) Title I
 

Career Pathways

~~Braiding funds with other core partners for conferences and trainings focused on supporting career pathways will be the manner in which leadership dollars will align with the work of our core partners. This collaboration across core partner agencies will evolve to meet the needs of WIOA implementation and sustainability. Secondly, the state will support the eligible providers’ ability to integrate and sustain career pathways in their instructional practice. Funds will be available to support regional meetings with workforce and one-stop partners to help AE programs identify the components of job-driven training that needs to be incorporated into their curriculum. Regional professional development will make use of leadership dollars to assist programs in learning how to become responsive to local labor market demands. Thirdly, the state will use funds to develop templates and identify resources that support a systemic approach to career pathways; technical assistance will be made available for providers on the use of state developed resources that will inform their pathway implementation. (Page 41) Title I

WIOA youth providers coordinate services with Vocational Rehabilitation whenever the opportunity is presented. Youth with disabilities have benefited from services provided through both programs. Now with the emphasis on career pathways and ultimately employment there is need for more collaboration and coordination between the WIOA youth program and Vocational-Rehabilitation to ensure youth are competitively seek and obtain jobs with real pay with livable wages. (Page 83) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~VRBS coordinates with businesses through several avenues, including new initiatives that are in the planning stage, all of which are designed to enhance efforts to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including pre-employment transition services.
These initiatives include:
o A standalone VRBS Business Services website for businesses to use to learn about the services we have to offer
o Coordination with Montana Workforce Centers to input and collect data on Business Services. This allows VRBS to collaborate with the Workforce Centers and document ongoing relationships with business and ensure deliverables and services are provided.
o Improved knowledge of Labor Market Information and how to incorporate this information into Business Services practices
o Business Services Team members are Windmills curriculum trainers. This training is used as an employer-employee awareness program specifically addressing attitudinal barriers. (Page 135) Title I

VRBS believes that WIOA provides significant guidance on what constitutes 21st century VR practice. There are three new pillars to VR practice that counselors need to develop skills in:
• skills to address the evolving needs of employers and labor force to meet the demands of a changing society and work place.
• skills to assist the persons with the most significant disabilities find jobs in competitive integrated settings.
• skills to work youth and high school students with disabilities to be prepared to competitively enter the world of work and post-secondary education. (Page 145) Title I
 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2017 Qtr. 2: Individuals working for a 14(c) employer who choose to pursue competitive integrated employment by signing the CCIR validation form are referred to VRBS. VRBS then makes contact with those individuals and initiates the process to provide VR services. (Page 174) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The State of Montana offers services to individuals with disabilities through the Job Service offices across the state. The workforce system is continually developing new and fostering ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive and integrated access to services and expanding the system’s capacity to serve customers and businesses with disabilities. Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. DRCs also attend training annually to receive new information and collaborate on the best ways to support their targeted populations. This training has been done in conjunction with Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services and the Developmental Disabilities Bureau. Montana is a single-area planning state; therefore the state of Montana designed its one-stop system to best meet the workforce needs of the state. As part of the one-stop certification, the SWIB certified the comprehensive one-stop and the affiliate centers. Part of the criteria for system certification was that the comprehensive one-stop and all its affiliate centers delivered services in an integrated and accessible way to ensure that all sites can serve all customers, regardless of ability. (Page 61) Title I

Montana’s one-stop service delivery system will comply with provisions of the American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. As part of Montana’s one-stop operator application process, it will request that all applicants submit information on its facility’s ADA accessibility to better assess barriers to services and better serve persons with disabilities. (Page 62) Title I

All professional development will be located in accessible facilities and necessary adaptive accommodations will be made to make the content of workshop accessible to all participants (e.g., large print, Braille, speech to text software, adaptive technology). (Page 122) Title I

Veterans

Veterans and eligible persons will receive employment, training and job placement services at the Montana Job Service Centers like other Montana Job Service Center customers. However, veterans and eligible persons will receive priority of service over non-veterans when it comes to receiving employment, training, and job placement services. All veterans, spouses, and caregivers who enter a Job Service Centers that house a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialist will be screened for eligibility to determine if the veteran and other eligible persons qualify for DVOP services. DVOPs will work one on one with eligible veterans and eligible persons to provide training in job placement and employment skills to include, but not limited to, resume writing and review, interview concepts and skills, and searching for employment. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

Montana currently does not employ LVER staff. DVOPs are charged with providing case management and individualized careers services to young veterans aged 18-24, eligible spouses, and veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBEs) as outlined in Veterans Program Letter most current guidance, which include: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those who: 1) are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or, 2) were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability; (Page 206) Title IV

DVOPs provide a range of services including career planning and counseling, comprehensive assessments, individual employment plan development, short-term pre-vocational services, and other career services within the Montana Job Service Centers. These services include but are not limited to: •Outreach to locate veterans in need of intensive services; •Comprehensive Assessment, including a documented plan of service (IEP); •Counseling and career/vocational guidance; •Referral of veterans to supportive or remedial services; •Promoting Vocational Rehab and WIOA services; •Referral of veterans to job focused and outcome-driven training or certification; •Job development; •Development of VA funded Special Incentive and OJT; •Review all open case files of current participants with an SBE in a priority category and perform case management duties; and •Referral of veterans to employment opportunities. (Page 206) Title IV Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) programs are administered by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (MTDLI) and are co-located and fully integrated within the Montana Job Service Centers. JVSG funds six FTE including Disabled Veterans Outreach Specialists (DVOP) and a Veteran Intensive Service Coordinator. Customers entering the Job Service Centers are screened for eligibility and referred to JVSG staff as appropriate. In most cases, JVSG clients are co-enrolled in Title I-B programs. (Page 207) Title IV

The JVSG and workforce center staff participates in state and local area training sessions and initiatives centered around sectors and career pathways. JVSG and workforce center staff utilize local labor market information as a tool when eligible veterans and persons are making job-driven training decisions. Through the complete training process, the DVOP specialists, WIOA and Wagner-Peyser staff will work in conjunction with the business service team to assist eligible veterans and persons to identify employment opportunities through the state labor exchange. The tools in which we measure the services provided include but not limited to: •Interviewing of Job Service Center staff •Monitoring MWorks (Montana case management system) •Review of program files and documentation •Customer surveys •Site visits •Accompanying DVET during federal audits •Quarterly Managers Report •Regional Director meetings (Page 210) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~VRBS presently has cooperative agreements with all of the six Section 121 projects (Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation, Fort Peck Reservation, Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Northern Cheyenne Reservation and the Blackfeet Reservation) located in Montana. The purpose of these agreements is to establish procedures to assure continued coordination between the 121 projects and VRBS. These agreements are implemented for the sole purpose of enhancing, to the greatest extent possible, the delivery of rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities living in the state of Montana and residing on or near the six reservations that currently have a tribal vocational rehabilitation project.
This cooperative agreement has provisions that include:
1. To make available the required supported employment/follow-along services from community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that are certified mental health providers. Follow- along services may be provided through community based psychiatric rehabilitation and support, and through case management services.
2. To serve persons identified as eligible for mental health service under Medicaid or the Mental Health Service Plan.
3. To strengthen supported employment services to Montana citizens eligible for vocational rehabilitation’s supported employment services and for community mental health services funded by the Addictive and Mental Disorders Division.
      131.To provide cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies.
      132.To establish and evaluate annual goals for our interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services. (Page 126-127) Title I

Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities are important stakeholders in providing supported employment services. Their contributions are described later as they have their own sections below.
Enrolled CRPs: VRBS works with a number of community based organizations across the state. Many are enrolled as extended support service providers to assure quality in service delivery for consumers. VRBS has enrolled programs in mental health services, developmental disabilities, as well as other disability organizations to provide these services at the local level. (Pages 134-135)
VRBS has a negotiated cooperative agreement with the Addictive & Mental Disorders Division. The cooperative agreement provides guidance for: cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies, establishment and evaluation of annual goals for interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services, and makes available the required supported employment/extended support/follow-along services from enrolled community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and certified mental health providers. (Pages 137-138) Title I

Quality of Supported Employment Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services (VRBS) enrolls providers who will be making supported employment time limited services available. The enrollment process requires that providers have met a set of standards described in administrative rules. This enrollment process ensures that the providers maintain the necessary education, skills, and degree of professional expertise to provide a level of service commensurate with VRBS work service standard. VRBS values its priority partners who have met the required standards. Supported employment providers evaluated by the developmental disability system or mental health system represent the majority of our providers. The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS) are also utilized by providers. Other providers are individuals who have been selected to provide services for a limited number of consumers in a rural area where there are no established providers. (Pages 176-177) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
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2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HB 294 Montana Accessible Playgrounds Grant Program - 07/01/2017

“HB 294 creates a grant program that encourages municipalities and school districts to develop

accessible playgrounds. Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Parks Division, administers this grant program.

This program provides grants only to supplement local and private funds in order to secure other

grant funding that require a match for developing accessible playgrounds.

The legislature appropriated $100,000 for the biennium beginning July 1, 2017 and ending June

30, 2019. Any state funds distributed must be matched at a rate of 1 to 1 minimum, with $1 in

state funds to $1 or more in other grant funds. A grant may not exceed $10,000.

The department (Fish, Wildlife & Parks) shall ensure that funds are distributed only as necessary

to secure other grant funding that will increase accessibility in existing playgrounds or for the

costs of accessibility features in new playgrounds. The money may not be used during initial

construction for accessibility features required by The Americans With Disabilities Act for

newly constructed playgrounds or to upgrade existing restroom or parking facilities that are not

compliant with applicable accessibility standards.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

House Bill 638 Provider Rate Increases for Direct Care Staff - 05/09/2017

“An Act appropriating money to the Department of Public Health and Human Services for a developmental disability and aging services provider rate increase for direct care worker wages; authorizing a fund transfer from the older Montanans trust fund to direct care wages account.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Montana ABLE Legislation Senate Bill 399 - 05/05/2015

It is the intent of the legislature to give Montana residents access to a program authorized section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. 529A, to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, federal and state medical and disability insurance, a beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Veteran Services - 04/01/2019

~~“Locate a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) SpecialistThe Employment Specialists at Montana's Job Service offices can assist all Veterans in securing employment and training, as well as refer Veterans to other service providers in both public and private agencies and organizations. Below is a list of contact information for all of Montana's Job Service offices, with specific listings for the DVOP Specialist. Visit a Montana Job Service near you.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan - 02/01/2019

~~“The 2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan is a Department-wide plan, outlining a shared vision and mission, as well as goals, objectives, and strategies.  The plan defines common priorities and focuses resources and actions on achieving collective goals.  The plan draws on the strengths of the Department and addresses health and human services needs throughout the state.   The plan provides the framework for more detailed strategic and implementation plans for divisions, bureaus, and programs. 

DPHHS will update this strategic plan annually and use it ongoing to support continuous improvement efforts.  “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

Disability Resources - 01/28/2019

~~“Whether you are an Employer or a Job Seeker, if you have questions related to employment and disabilities, contact us for assistance. We can connect you to resources to answer those questions….The Montana Department of Labor and Industry Disability Consultant can assist you with information in the following topics• Job Listings and Referrals• Resume Assistance• Community Resource Information• Americans with Disabilities Act• Resource Library and Computers• Child Care Information• Labor Market Information• Career Exploration• Job Search Assistance• Career Planning”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Presentation to the 2019 Health and Human Services Joint Appropriation Subcommittee Disability Employment and Transitions Division - 01/28/2019

~~“The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services presented a Report on the services it provides to more than 21,000 Montanans with disabilities. These include access to services to strengthen their economic and social well-being across their life span. Details about these services and supports are available by accessing the web link to the document.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities opens at MSU - 11/27/2018

~~“The MSU LIFE Scholars Program is an inclusive post-secondary experience that opened this fall to its first seven students, according to Christy Sofianek, program director. The program consists of three main components: academics, career development and campus engagement. Students who are enrolled in the program may choose to either audit classes or take them for credit. Students this fall selected courses in meteorology, creative writing, public speaking, horse handling, aviation and tae kwon do, among other subjects, Sofianek said. LIFE Scholars also engage in extra-curricular campus activities and complete an internship in order to develop job skills and explore careers."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Cuts Contracts With Developmental Disability Caregivers - 12/28/2017

“The state health department is cutting ties at the end of March with private contractors who help people with developmental disabilities.

That’s a result of cuts to Medicaid due to the state’s budget cuts, enacted by Governor Steve Bullock because of the state bringing in lower than expected revenue.

The cuts mean that in the coming months, 2,700 people with developmental disabilities who get help from case managers will move from private organizations overseeing their care to the state health department.

The department says it was forced to make this change because of budget cuts in the 2017 legislative session and the recent special legislative session.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Partnerships for Transitions - 01/01/2018

“Partnerships in Transition is a project to address the challenges and barriers to youth transitioning from school to the adult employment and service delivery system. The project increased transition outcomes for youth with developmental disabilities statewide through a systematic approach that included skill development, capacity building, information dissemination and the creation of community and web-based information resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Center for Inclusive Education - 06/01/2014

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.   Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project   The Montana State University Billings Montana Center for Inclusive Education WIPA project has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA project is to help Social Security Disability beneficiaries understand and utilize employment supports and work incentives so they can achieve their employment and vocational goals. The Community Work Incentive Coordinator (CWIC)    • Provides effective work incentives planning and assistance services to Social Security beneficiaries.    • Promotes and supports employment outcomes for Social Security beneficiaries with disabilities.    • Partners with community agencies and conducts community outreach.    • Understands Social Security Disability benefits programs as well as other federal/state/local programs for which beneficiaries might be eligible.    • Provides healthcare planning and counseling.    • The project utilizes community networks such as Vocational Rehabilitation, and Montana Offices of Public Assistance to help in the identification of individuals with disabilities that could benefit from receiving this information. The CWIC provides statewide coverage in local areas either electronically or in person.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DPHHS Developmental Services Division - 01/01/2010

In July 2009, the Disability Services Division (DSD) of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) was restructured under the Medicaid and Health Services Branch of DPHHS. In January 2010, the name was changed to Developmental Services Division.

The Montana Disability Services Division joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) in 2011, since then it has worked to address concerns reflected in the State Strategic Employment Assessment. Building a focused state workplan through key stakeholder input is reflective of the Division’s strong interest in improving employment statewide, across both urban and rural settings.   The Division continues to engage self-advocates and families in planning efforts. This is helping to create strong external pressures and demands for increasing integrated employment opportunities and the expectation of work, regardless of disability.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project

~~“The Montana State University Billings WIPA program has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement  Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA program is to assist Social Security Disability beneficiaries to make informed choices about work and to support working beneficiaries to make a successful transition to self-sufficiency.  More information about WIPA services and eligibility criteria can be found by accessing the web link.. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

~~By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The University of Montana Rural Institute Transition Projects

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:-Providing education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;-Developing creative strategies and transition models;-Offering training and assistance on-site and long distance;-Promoting systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and 

Systems
  • Other

University of Montana Rural Institute Center for Excellence in Disability Education, Research, And Service

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has strived to collaborate with partners across Montana and across the nation to further its mission. Partners include Department of Public Health and Human Services, Montana Child Care Resource and Referral Network,  Missoula City/County Public Health Department, Montana Department of Commerce,  Montana’s Office of Public Instruction,  State Deaf-Blind Coordinator, and  Vocational Rehabilitation agencies throughout the state.

Systems
  • Other

The University of Montana Rural Transition & Employment

"What We Do

Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.

Our transition activities are unique in that they promote:

Customized Employment strategies for youth with disabilities;The use of Social Security work incentives for students;Transition planning for middle school students;Collaborative funding across agencies to create individually-driven employment supports;Self-employment as vocational experience or as a post-school outcome; andSelf-determination for youth as we empower them to identify strengths, skills, and needs for transition planning.

Visit our link to “Articles and Products” for information and tools you can use in your own programs."

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) - 02/18/2019

~~“Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) is a Medicaid program designed for elderly or disabled residents that require in-home care service. Individuals can receive care services from the state (agency based) or they can elect to hire and train their own care providers who are then paid by the Provider Agency. This type of self-directed care program is also referred to as cash and counseling, consumer direction, or participant direction.

One element of CFC / PAS that is attractive to many families is that certain family members can be hired to provide personal care; they can be paid caregivers. Although spouses, parents, and legal guardians are not eligible, the adult children of aging parents and ex-wives or ex-husbands can be paid to provide personal care services.  More information on CFC/PAS can be obtained by accessing the web link.""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“MFP is a demonstration program [that] helps Montana shift its long term care system by reducing the use of institutionally based services and increasing the use of home and community based services (HCBS). MFP is focused on helping individuals transition from in-patient facilities to the community. [The Program’s vision is to] create a sustainable system that supports community options as a first choice for individuals needing long term care services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DHHS "Employing People with Disabilities" Self-Assessment Tool - 04/14/2016

Using this self-assessment tool, Governor Brian Schweitzer of Montana encourages the employers in his state to self-assess how “friendly” their business is to people with disabilities and encourages them to explore the potential of workers with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

MT INVEST Employment Specialist Training

Many of us know somebody that has a disability. Individuals with disabilities can face additional challenges to obtaining and retaining good jobs. To create an opportunity for that person to be most successful, there are several activities and/or steps to identify employment options that are a good match to the person’s skills, interests, and workplace preference (likes quiet or likes noise and activity for example). The curriculum and testing will help learners develop the skill of facilitating Employment Supports, as well as inspire and motivate employment staff to new levels of performance and professionalism. Whether you are helping a family member or friend, or whether you are or plan to be, an employment specialist professional: this information can help you bring successful results to those you are assisting.

The course consists of five sections, including resources and sample forms:

1. Introduction to Community Employment

2. Assessment for the Job Seeker

3. Job Development

4. Job Analysis, Training & Job Coaching

5. Long-Term Supports, Customer Service & Review

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.

As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana Center for Inclusive Education

The Montana Center on Disabilities (MCD) is part of Montana State University-Billings. MCD works to make sure that all people are part of the community.  The Center supports the idea that people with disabilities can make their own choices about how they live and work.  MCD does this by offering education and information to many people.  One focus is on giving young people with disabilities the tools to become leaders.

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The University of Montana Rural Institute: Transition & Employment Projects

“The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:    • Provision of education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;    • Development of innovative strategies and transition models;    • Demonstration, outreach and technical assistance, both on-site and long distance;    • Promotion of systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and    • Information dissemination.   Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/27/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals  with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work s   ervice options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/17/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work service options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services.“ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Administrative Register Issue No. 22 “ARM 37.40.705” - 11/16/2018

~~“The department has revised this rule to remove reference to a home- based requirement for receipt of home health services and to clarify coverage for medical supplies, equipment, and appliances. Fiscal Impact These rule amendments will increase the number of beneficiaries who are eligible for home health services due to the removal of the home bound status requirement and the expansion of service delivery locations.  This may lead to a cost shift for programs that currently provide services to medically needy populations.  The 1915(c) HCBS Big Sky Waiver and 1915(c) Waiver for Individuals with Severe Disabling Mental Illness programs provide private-duty nursing services to 257 Medicaid members who could be eligible for home health services depending on the care they need.  The expected shift in services could lead to an increase in home health services expenses.  The total estimated annual fiscal impact for the home health services amendment is $1.1 million.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT HCBW for Individuals w/DD (0208.R06.00) Comprehensive Waiver - 07/01/2018

~~"Provides day supports and activities, homemaker, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment - follow along support, nutritionist services, occupational therapy, physical therapy, private duty nursing, speech therapy, supports brokerage, adult foster support, assisted living, behavioral support services, caregiver training and support, community transition services, companion services, environmental modifications, individual goods and services, meals, personal care, personal emergency response system (PERS), personal supports, psychological evaluation, counseling and consultation services, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, retirement services, specialized medical equipment and supplies, supported employment - co-worker support, supported employment - individual employment support, supported employment - small group employment support, transportation for individuals w/IDD/DD ages 0 - no max age”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Home and Community Based Services Waiver (Big Sky Waiver) - 01/01/2017

“This Montana Medicaid program allows individuals that require nursing home level care to receive that care in their home or community in place of in a nursing home.  A wide variety care services and non-care support is provided both to the program participant and to their primary caregiver to allow them to live at home or in an assisted living residence.  Even minor home modifications which can decrease the beneficiary's reliance on other persons are considered an allowable expense.

 

This waiver is also referred to as the Elderly/Physically Disabled Waiver and Big Sky Home and Community Based Services.

 

Under this waiver, Montana residents have the option of self-direction or consumer direction. Meaning, participants have the right to choose their care providers. However, care providers are subjected to approval by the state. Interestingly, certain family members are eligible to be hired as personal care attendants. Typically, spouses are excluded from this option but under certain circumstances spouses can be paid providers.  More commonly, the adult children who are caring for aging parents are paid as caregivers. Care providers must be qualified to provide care therefore the types of care family members can be paid to provide is usually limited to personal care or homemaker services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HELP-Link - 01/01/2016

~~“HELP-Link is a free workforce program that connects Medicaid enrollees with high quality workforce training, employment services, and job openings in local communities. HELP-Link is a voluntary workforce program specifically designed to assist individuals participating in the Montana HELP Plan (also known as Medicaid Expansion) in order to improve their employment and wage outcomes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Montana HCBS Transition Plan - 06/01/2014

CMS has issued regulations that define the settings in which it is permissible for states to pay for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS).The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in, and support full access to, the greater community.  This includes opportunities to engage in community life, control personal resources, receive services in the community, and, when appropriate, seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS…   To assist states in making this transition, CMS has published guidance to provide further information about settings in which HCBS may or may not be allowed.  States will be allowed a maximum of five years to make the transition and must submit a transition plan to CMS within one year of the effective date of the rule   DPHHS submitted their transition plan late 2014  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT Medicaid HCBS Program: Supported Employment, Individual Employment Support - 01/31/2014

“Individual employment supports are habilitation services and staff supports needed by a person to acquire integrated employment or career advancement in the general workforce. Individual employment support is delivered in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting. The outcome of this service is paid employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting within the general workforce that meets the person's personal and career goals, as documented in the plan of care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

When it comes to efforts to increase employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in Montana, the sky is the limit in the "Big Sky Country."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Montana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.61%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,068,778
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.89%
Change from
2018 to 2019
65,253
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
30,329
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.64%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.48%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.28%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,050,493 1,062,305 1,068,778
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 69,553 67,140 65,253
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 31,935 31,719 30,329
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 442,802 444,569 443,716
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 45.91% 47.24% 46.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.09% 79.99% 79.28%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.70% 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.30% 19.80% 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.70% 12.00% 11.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 77,995 75,690 75,831
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 64,267 65,000 66,377
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 128,081 125,382 127,174
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 387
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,560 4,582 4,317
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 7,371 8,245 9,569
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 648 867 929
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,392 5,391 3,675
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,191 590 474

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,848 1,753 1,728
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 10.70% 10.40% 10.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 27,274 26,628 26,058

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,188 1,691 1,180
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,381 2,900 1,903
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 6,841 6,495 4,141
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 17.40% 26.00% 28.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.50% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 2.60% 2.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 99 62
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 323 507 599
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,549 1,519 2,179
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 859 10 11
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 384 5 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 45.00% 50.00% 55.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 38.20 0.48 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 23.00% 98.00% 17.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,387 1,047 925
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 39,880 39,118 38,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 47 38 44
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 40 32 34

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 $2,216,146 $2,350,592
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $5,101,199 $4,657,057
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $17,794,322 $17,141,490
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $7,962 $2,314,472 $2,295,357
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,013 219 189
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 489 440
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 1,204 1,180
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.00 48.24 48.18

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 46.96% 47.72% 49.51%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.02% 12.28% 11.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.49% 1.07% 1.06%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.94% 98.70% 98.68%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.55% 22.14% 22.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.28% 73.86% 75.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.97% 86.86% 87.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 51.06% 51.72% 52.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 294,615
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,038
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 42,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 25,481
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 68,289
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 381
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 626
AbilityOne wages (products). $139,465
AbilityOne wages (services). $243,632

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 23 19 16
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 23 19 16
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 889 748 441
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 889 748 441

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Supported employment services are the primary emphasis of the VRBS and CRP relationship and were the focus of the needs assessment.
Issues identified to improve supported employment services include:

1) Expansion of services to rural and remote areas by the continued certification of private providers who meet VRBS’ qualification levels for job assistance and supported employment services
2) Expansion of mental health providers as CRP’s to serve those with severe and persistent mental illness
3) Planning for the needs of consumers requiring higher level of long-term supports was identified through participation with the Supported Employment Leadership Network (the employment first network of Montana. (Page 152) Title I

Customized Employment

~~2017 Qtr. 3: Guidance was given to all VRBS business team member to make contact with two businesses monthly to provide information and assist with issues such as the untapped pool of resources offered by persons with disabilities, customized employment and VRBS resources. (Page 172) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Montana, as a small state with limited workforce program funds and a significant small-business climate (97% of all private businesses have fewer than 50 employees), faces unique challenges and is committed to ensuring its workforce system meets the needs of the state’s businesses and workers, today and in the future. Such challenges demand that WIOA core and other partners effectively leverage partnerships and collaborate in service delivery efforts. These efforts allow the state to ensure that customer expectations and needs are understood; that service offerings and locations meet those needs without duplication; that data evaluation tools and processes are in place; and that the system continually evolves and improves on its own. To support these efforts, Montana continues to work together across provider and program lines to develop a seamless, demand-driven workforce service delivery system comprised of public and private organizations, businesses, local, state and federal employment and training programs, secondary, post-secondary and adult education programs, Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services, and other human capital support agencies. (Page 64) Title I

Montana’s State Workforce Innovation Board continues to prioritize service coordination with core partners throughout Montana. In addition to Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation representation on the board, programs continue to work on program integration and braiding services. Adult Education aligned its providers to coincide with the districts outlined in the state plan to further integrate services, in addition, the board weighed in on workforce portions of each provider application submitted through Adult Education’s RFP process. The Board also included provisions under its One-Stop Certification requiring the One-Stop Operator continue updating the WIOA Committee on its progress coordinating services with core partners and work on additional coordination efforts throughout the state. (Page 91) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. (Page 61) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~7. VRBS are provided pursuant to an individualized plan for employment (IPE) which is developed jointly by the rehabilitation counselor and the eligible individual. In those situations where referral has been made to campus disability support services, the appropriate disability services staff may also be involved in helping to develop the IPE.8. The VRBS’ rehabilitation counselor and the MUS campus disability support services staff will respect the individual’s right and responsibility to fully participate in all decisions regarding his or her vocational future. The IPE shall be developed and implemented in a manner that allows the individual an opportunity to exercise informed choice in selecting an employment outcome, the specific vocational rehabilitation services that are to be provided, the entity that will provide those services, and the methods that will be used to procure the vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 130) Title I

While not part of the MOU with the OPI, VRBS commits to the development and approval of an IPE before each eligible student able to be served under the order of selection leaves the school setting. Should Montana come out of order of selection, VRBS is committed to development and approval of an IPE before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 131) Title I

The OPI shall assist school districts to inform VRBS of students with disabilities who are on an IEP and may be in need of assistance through VRBS. The notice to VRBS shall occur no later than the first IEP at which transition services are considered in order for VRBS to participate in the future development of the student’s IEP. For students enrolling closer to graduation or age 21, school districts are urged to inform VRBS as soon as those students are identified.
For all IEP meetings subsequent to the first meeting, the OPI shall encourage school districts to schedule IEP meetings for eligible students with disabilities in a timely manner, and to include notice to VRBS and the invitation for the VRBS counselor to participate subject to parental approval. Development of vocational goals and objectives shall occur in collaboration with the IEP team.
For the first IEP meeting following the initial notice to VRBS, the OPI shall encourage school districts to inform VRBS of the meeting in advance to allow sufficient time for VRBS to acquire the necessary diagnostic data to determine the student’s eligibility. The notice to VRBS should include an invitation to the VRBS counselor to participate, from then on, in transition planning within the IEP process. VRBS participation in IEP meetings is subject to parental approval. (Page 131) Title I

The following are sections of the MOU with the Office of Public Instruction that deal with financial responsibilities of each agencies and related matters.
The OPI shall assist local school districts with coordination of vocationally related services with VRBS for eligible students. Coordination should commence in the early stages of transition. Vocationally-related service coordination
and corresponding agency responsibilities should be identified in the IEP and included on the student’s IPE when appropriate.
VRBS will provide assistive technology services relevant to functions outside those assistive technology services required to access the educational program. (Page 132) Title I

The primary method of improving and expanding VR services to students with disabilities have been described elsewhere in this document. The main method has been contracting for Pre-ETS services with school districts. There also have been additional contracts with programs like Montana Youth Transitions, Montana Youth Leadership Forum, Moving On, Project Search, Easter Seals volunteer experience program, Montana Center for Inclusive Education’s Virtual college peer mentoring program, and exploring specialized Pre-ETS collaboration with the tribal VR programs located in Montana.
In addition, VRBS counselors have been encouraged to take applications with students with disabilities at a younger age and provide IPE services that are focused on vocational and career exploration rather than a specific vocational goal. (Page 164) Title I
 

Career Pathways

~~Braiding funds with other core partners for conferences and trainings focused on supporting career pathways will be the manner in which leadership dollars will align with the work of our core partners. This collaboration across core partner agencies will evolve to meet the needs of WIOA implementation and sustainability. Secondly, the state will support the eligible providers’ ability to integrate and sustain career pathways in their instructional practice. Funds will be available to support regional meetings with workforce and one-stop partners to help AE programs identify the components of job-driven training that needs to be incorporated into their curriculum. Regional professional development will make use of leadership dollars to assist programs in learning how to become responsive to local labor market demands. Thirdly, the state will use funds to develop templates and identify resources that support a systemic approach to career pathways; technical assistance will be made available for providers on the use of state developed resources that will inform their pathway implementation. (Page 41) Title I

WIOA youth providers coordinate services with Vocational Rehabilitation whenever the opportunity is presented. Youth with disabilities have benefited from services provided through both programs. Now with the emphasis on career pathways and ultimately employment there is need for more collaboration and coordination between the WIOA youth program and Vocational-Rehabilitation to ensure youth are competitively seek and obtain jobs with real pay with livable wages. (Page 83) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~VRBS coordinates with businesses through several avenues, including new initiatives that are in the planning stage, all of which are designed to enhance efforts to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including pre-employment transition services.
These initiatives include:
o A standalone VRBS Business Services website for businesses to use to learn about the services we have to offer
o Coordination with Montana Workforce Centers to input and collect data on Business Services. This allows VRBS to collaborate with the Workforce Centers and document ongoing relationships with business and ensure deliverables and services are provided.
o Improved knowledge of Labor Market Information and how to incorporate this information into Business Services practices
o Business Services Team members are Windmills curriculum trainers. This training is used as an employer-employee awareness program specifically addressing attitudinal barriers. (Page 135) Title I

VRBS believes that WIOA provides significant guidance on what constitutes 21st century VR practice. There are three new pillars to VR practice that counselors need to develop skills in:
• skills to address the evolving needs of employers and labor force to meet the demands of a changing society and work place.
• skills to assist the persons with the most significant disabilities find jobs in competitive integrated settings.
• skills to work youth and high school students with disabilities to be prepared to competitively enter the world of work and post-secondary education. (Page 145) Title I
 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2017 Qtr. 2: Individuals working for a 14(c) employer who choose to pursue competitive integrated employment by signing the CCIR validation form are referred to VRBS. VRBS then makes contact with those individuals and initiates the process to provide VR services. (Page 174) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The State of Montana offers services to individuals with disabilities through the Job Service offices across the state. The workforce system is continually developing new and fostering ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive and integrated access to services and expanding the system’s capacity to serve customers and businesses with disabilities. Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. DRCs also attend training annually to receive new information and collaborate on the best ways to support their targeted populations. This training has been done in conjunction with Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services and the Developmental Disabilities Bureau. Montana is a single-area planning state; therefore the state of Montana designed its one-stop system to best meet the workforce needs of the state. As part of the one-stop certification, the SWIB certified the comprehensive one-stop and the affiliate centers. Part of the criteria for system certification was that the comprehensive one-stop and all its affiliate centers delivered services in an integrated and accessible way to ensure that all sites can serve all customers, regardless of ability. (Page 61) Title I

Montana’s one-stop service delivery system will comply with provisions of the American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. As part of Montana’s one-stop operator application process, it will request that all applicants submit information on its facility’s ADA accessibility to better assess barriers to services and better serve persons with disabilities. (Page 62) Title I

All professional development will be located in accessible facilities and necessary adaptive accommodations will be made to make the content of workshop accessible to all participants (e.g., large print, Braille, speech to text software, adaptive technology). (Page 122) Title I

Veterans

Veterans and eligible persons will receive employment, training and job placement services at the Montana Job Service Centers like other Montana Job Service Center customers. However, veterans and eligible persons will receive priority of service over non-veterans when it comes to receiving employment, training, and job placement services. All veterans, spouses, and caregivers who enter a Job Service Centers that house a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialist will be screened for eligibility to determine if the veteran and other eligible persons qualify for DVOP services. DVOPs will work one on one with eligible veterans and eligible persons to provide training in job placement and employment skills to include, but not limited to, resume writing and review, interview concepts and skills, and searching for employment. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

Montana currently does not employ LVER staff. DVOPs are charged with providing case management and individualized careers services to young veterans aged 18-24, eligible spouses, and veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBEs) as outlined in Veterans Program Letter most current guidance, which include: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those who: 1) are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or, 2) were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability; (Page 206) Title IV

DVOPs provide a range of services including career planning and counseling, comprehensive assessments, individual employment plan development, short-term pre-vocational services, and other career services within the Montana Job Service Centers. These services include but are not limited to: •Outreach to locate veterans in need of intensive services; •Comprehensive Assessment, including a documented plan of service (IEP); •Counseling and career/vocational guidance; •Referral of veterans to supportive or remedial services; •Promoting Vocational Rehab and WIOA services; •Referral of veterans to job focused and outcome-driven training or certification; •Job development; •Development of VA funded Special Incentive and OJT; •Review all open case files of current participants with an SBE in a priority category and perform case management duties; and •Referral of veterans to employment opportunities. (Page 206) Title IV Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) programs are administered by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (MTDLI) and are co-located and fully integrated within the Montana Job Service Centers. JVSG funds six FTE including Disabled Veterans Outreach Specialists (DVOP) and a Veteran Intensive Service Coordinator. Customers entering the Job Service Centers are screened for eligibility and referred to JVSG staff as appropriate. In most cases, JVSG clients are co-enrolled in Title I-B programs. (Page 207) Title IV

The JVSG and workforce center staff participates in state and local area training sessions and initiatives centered around sectors and career pathways. JVSG and workforce center staff utilize local labor market information as a tool when eligible veterans and persons are making job-driven training decisions. Through the complete training process, the DVOP specialists, WIOA and Wagner-Peyser staff will work in conjunction with the business service team to assist eligible veterans and persons to identify employment opportunities through the state labor exchange. The tools in which we measure the services provided include but not limited to: •Interviewing of Job Service Center staff •Monitoring MWorks (Montana case management system) •Review of program files and documentation •Customer surveys •Site visits •Accompanying DVET during federal audits •Quarterly Managers Report •Regional Director meetings (Page 210) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~VRBS presently has cooperative agreements with all of the six Section 121 projects (Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation, Fort Peck Reservation, Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Northern Cheyenne Reservation and the Blackfeet Reservation) located in Montana. The purpose of these agreements is to establish procedures to assure continued coordination between the 121 projects and VRBS. These agreements are implemented for the sole purpose of enhancing, to the greatest extent possible, the delivery of rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities living in the state of Montana and residing on or near the six reservations that currently have a tribal vocational rehabilitation project.
This cooperative agreement has provisions that include:
1. To make available the required supported employment/follow-along services from community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that are certified mental health providers. Follow- along services may be provided through community based psychiatric rehabilitation and support, and through case management services.
2. To serve persons identified as eligible for mental health service under Medicaid or the Mental Health Service Plan.
3. To strengthen supported employment services to Montana citizens eligible for vocational rehabilitation’s supported employment services and for community mental health services funded by the Addictive and Mental Disorders Division.
      131.To provide cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies.
      132.To establish and evaluate annual goals for our interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services. (Page 126-127) Title I

Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities are important stakeholders in providing supported employment services. Their contributions are described later as they have their own sections below.
Enrolled CRPs: VRBS works with a number of community based organizations across the state. Many are enrolled as extended support service providers to assure quality in service delivery for consumers. VRBS has enrolled programs in mental health services, developmental disabilities, as well as other disability organizations to provide these services at the local level. (Pages 134-135)
VRBS has a negotiated cooperative agreement with the Addictive & Mental Disorders Division. The cooperative agreement provides guidance for: cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies, establishment and evaluation of annual goals for interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services, and makes available the required supported employment/extended support/follow-along services from enrolled community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and certified mental health providers. (Pages 137-138) Title I

Quality of Supported Employment Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services (VRBS) enrolls providers who will be making supported employment time limited services available. The enrollment process requires that providers have met a set of standards described in administrative rules. This enrollment process ensures that the providers maintain the necessary education, skills, and degree of professional expertise to provide a level of service commensurate with VRBS work service standard. VRBS values its priority partners who have met the required standards. Supported employment providers evaluated by the developmental disability system or mental health system represent the majority of our providers. The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS) are also utilized by providers. Other providers are individuals who have been selected to provide services for a limited number of consumers in a rural area where there are no established providers. (Pages 176-177) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HB 294 Montana Accessible Playgrounds Grant Program - 07/01/2017

“HB 294 creates a grant program that encourages municipalities and school districts to develop

accessible playgrounds. Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Parks Division, administers this grant program.

This program provides grants only to supplement local and private funds in order to secure other

grant funding that require a match for developing accessible playgrounds.

The legislature appropriated $100,000 for the biennium beginning July 1, 2017 and ending June

30, 2019. Any state funds distributed must be matched at a rate of 1 to 1 minimum, with $1 in

state funds to $1 or more in other grant funds. A grant may not exceed $10,000.

The department (Fish, Wildlife & Parks) shall ensure that funds are distributed only as necessary

to secure other grant funding that will increase accessibility in existing playgrounds or for the

costs of accessibility features in new playgrounds. The money may not be used during initial

construction for accessibility features required by The Americans With Disabilities Act for

newly constructed playgrounds or to upgrade existing restroom or parking facilities that are not

compliant with applicable accessibility standards.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

House Bill 638 Provider Rate Increases for Direct Care Staff - 05/09/2017

“An Act appropriating money to the Department of Public Health and Human Services for a developmental disability and aging services provider rate increase for direct care worker wages; authorizing a fund transfer from the older Montanans trust fund to direct care wages account.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Montana ABLE Legislation Senate Bill 399 - 05/05/2015

It is the intent of the legislature to give Montana residents access to a program authorized section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. 529A, to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, federal and state medical and disability insurance, a beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Veteran Services - 04/01/2019

~~“Locate a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) SpecialistThe Employment Specialists at Montana's Job Service offices can assist all Veterans in securing employment and training, as well as refer Veterans to other service providers in both public and private agencies and organizations. Below is a list of contact information for all of Montana's Job Service offices, with specific listings for the DVOP Specialist. Visit a Montana Job Service near you.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan - 02/01/2019

~~“The 2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan is a Department-wide plan, outlining a shared vision and mission, as well as goals, objectives, and strategies.  The plan defines common priorities and focuses resources and actions on achieving collective goals.  The plan draws on the strengths of the Department and addresses health and human services needs throughout the state.   The plan provides the framework for more detailed strategic and implementation plans for divisions, bureaus, and programs. 

DPHHS will update this strategic plan annually and use it ongoing to support continuous improvement efforts.  “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

Disability Resources - 01/28/2019

~~“Whether you are an Employer or a Job Seeker, if you have questions related to employment and disabilities, contact us for assistance. We can connect you to resources to answer those questions….The Montana Department of Labor and Industry Disability Consultant can assist you with information in the following topics• Job Listings and Referrals• Resume Assistance• Community Resource Information• Americans with Disabilities Act• Resource Library and Computers• Child Care Information• Labor Market Information• Career Exploration• Job Search Assistance• Career Planning”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Presentation to the 2019 Health and Human Services Joint Appropriation Subcommittee Disability Employment and Transitions Division - 01/28/2019

~~“The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services presented a Report on the services it provides to more than 21,000 Montanans with disabilities. These include access to services to strengthen their economic and social well-being across their life span. Details about these services and supports are available by accessing the web link to the document.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities opens at MSU - 11/27/2018

~~“The MSU LIFE Scholars Program is an inclusive post-secondary experience that opened this fall to its first seven students, according to Christy Sofianek, program director. The program consists of three main components: academics, career development and campus engagement. Students who are enrolled in the program may choose to either audit classes or take them for credit. Students this fall selected courses in meteorology, creative writing, public speaking, horse handling, aviation and tae kwon do, among other subjects, Sofianek said. LIFE Scholars also engage in extra-curricular campus activities and complete an internship in order to develop job skills and explore careers."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Cuts Contracts With Developmental Disability Caregivers - 12/28/2017

“The state health department is cutting ties at the end of March with private contractors who help people with developmental disabilities.

That’s a result of cuts to Medicaid due to the state’s budget cuts, enacted by Governor Steve Bullock because of the state bringing in lower than expected revenue.

The cuts mean that in the coming months, 2,700 people with developmental disabilities who get help from case managers will move from private organizations overseeing their care to the state health department.

The department says it was forced to make this change because of budget cuts in the 2017 legislative session and the recent special legislative session.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Partnerships for Transitions - 01/01/2018

“Partnerships in Transition is a project to address the challenges and barriers to youth transitioning from school to the adult employment and service delivery system. The project increased transition outcomes for youth with developmental disabilities statewide through a systematic approach that included skill development, capacity building, information dissemination and the creation of community and web-based information resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Center for Inclusive Education - 06/01/2014

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.   Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project   The Montana State University Billings Montana Center for Inclusive Education WIPA project has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA project is to help Social Security Disability beneficiaries understand and utilize employment supports and work incentives so they can achieve their employment and vocational goals. The Community Work Incentive Coordinator (CWIC)    • Provides effective work incentives planning and assistance services to Social Security beneficiaries.    • Promotes and supports employment outcomes for Social Security beneficiaries with disabilities.    • Partners with community agencies and conducts community outreach.    • Understands Social Security Disability benefits programs as well as other federal/state/local programs for which beneficiaries might be eligible.    • Provides healthcare planning and counseling.    • The project utilizes community networks such as Vocational Rehabilitation, and Montana Offices of Public Assistance to help in the identification of individuals with disabilities that could benefit from receiving this information. The CWIC provides statewide coverage in local areas either electronically or in person.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DPHHS Developmental Services Division - 01/01/2010

In July 2009, the Disability Services Division (DSD) of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) was restructured under the Medicaid and Health Services Branch of DPHHS. In January 2010, the name was changed to Developmental Services Division.

The Montana Disability Services Division joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) in 2011, since then it has worked to address concerns reflected in the State Strategic Employment Assessment. Building a focused state workplan through key stakeholder input is reflective of the Division’s strong interest in improving employment statewide, across both urban and rural settings.   The Division continues to engage self-advocates and families in planning efforts. This is helping to create strong external pressures and demands for increasing integrated employment opportunities and the expectation of work, regardless of disability.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project

~~“The Montana State University Billings WIPA program has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement  Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA program is to assist Social Security Disability beneficiaries to make informed choices about work and to support working beneficiaries to make a successful transition to self-sufficiency.  More information about WIPA services and eligibility criteria can be found by accessing the web link.. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

~~By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The University of Montana Rural Institute Transition Projects

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:-Providing education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;-Developing creative strategies and transition models;-Offering training and assistance on-site and long distance;-Promoting systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and 

Systems
  • Other

University of Montana Rural Institute Center for Excellence in Disability Education, Research, And Service

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has strived to collaborate with partners across Montana and across the nation to further its mission. Partners include Department of Public Health and Human Services, Montana Child Care Resource and Referral Network,  Missoula City/County Public Health Department, Montana Department of Commerce,  Montana’s Office of Public Instruction,  State Deaf-Blind Coordinator, and  Vocational Rehabilitation agencies throughout the state.

Systems
  • Other

The University of Montana Rural Transition & Employment

"What We Do

Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.

Our transition activities are unique in that they promote:

Customized Employment strategies for youth with disabilities;The use of Social Security work incentives for students;Transition planning for middle school students;Collaborative funding across agencies to create individually-driven employment supports;Self-employment as vocational experience or as a post-school outcome; andSelf-determination for youth as we empower them to identify strengths, skills, and needs for transition planning.

Visit our link to “Articles and Products” for information and tools you can use in your own programs."

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) - 02/18/2019

~~“Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) is a Medicaid program designed for elderly or disabled residents that require in-home care service. Individuals can receive care services from the state (agency based) or they can elect to hire and train their own care providers who are then paid by the Provider Agency. This type of self-directed care program is also referred to as cash and counseling, consumer direction, or participant direction.

One element of CFC / PAS that is attractive to many families is that certain family members can be hired to provide personal care; they can be paid caregivers. Although spouses, parents, and legal guardians are not eligible, the adult children of aging parents and ex-wives or ex-husbands can be paid to provide personal care services.  More information on CFC/PAS can be obtained by accessing the web link.""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“MFP is a demonstration program [that] helps Montana shift its long term care system by reducing the use of institutionally based services and increasing the use of home and community based services (HCBS). MFP is focused on helping individuals transition from in-patient facilities to the community. [The Program’s vision is to] create a sustainable system that supports community options as a first choice for individuals needing long term care services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DHHS "Employing People with Disabilities" Self-Assessment Tool - 04/14/2016

Using this self-assessment tool, Governor Brian Schweitzer of Montana encourages the employers in his state to self-assess how “friendly” their business is to people with disabilities and encourages them to explore the potential of workers with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

MT INVEST Employment Specialist Training

Many of us know somebody that has a disability. Individuals with disabilities can face additional challenges to obtaining and retaining good jobs. To create an opportunity for that person to be most successful, there are several activities and/or steps to identify employment options that are a good match to the person’s skills, interests, and workplace preference (likes quiet or likes noise and activity for example). The curriculum and testing will help learners develop the skill of facilitating Employment Supports, as well as inspire and motivate employment staff to new levels of performance and professionalism. Whether you are helping a family member or friend, or whether you are or plan to be, an employment specialist professional: this information can help you bring successful results to those you are assisting.

The course consists of five sections, including resources and sample forms:

1. Introduction to Community Employment

2. Assessment for the Job Seeker

3. Job Development

4. Job Analysis, Training & Job Coaching

5. Long-Term Supports, Customer Service & Review

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.

As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana Center for Inclusive Education

The Montana Center on Disabilities (MCD) is part of Montana State University-Billings. MCD works to make sure that all people are part of the community.  The Center supports the idea that people with disabilities can make their own choices about how they live and work.  MCD does this by offering education and information to many people.  One focus is on giving young people with disabilities the tools to become leaders.

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The University of Montana Rural Institute: Transition & Employment Projects

“The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:    • Provision of education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;    • Development of innovative strategies and transition models;    • Demonstration, outreach and technical assistance, both on-site and long distance;    • Promotion of systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and    • Information dissemination.   Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/27/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals  with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work s   ervice options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/17/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work service options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services.“ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Administrative Register Issue No. 22 “ARM 37.40.705” - 11/16/2018

~~“The department has revised this rule to remove reference to a home- based requirement for receipt of home health services and to clarify coverage for medical supplies, equipment, and appliances. Fiscal Impact These rule amendments will increase the number of beneficiaries who are eligible for home health services due to the removal of the home bound status requirement and the expansion of service delivery locations.  This may lead to a cost shift for programs that currently provide services to medically needy populations.  The 1915(c) HCBS Big Sky Waiver and 1915(c) Waiver for Individuals with Severe Disabling Mental Illness programs provide private-duty nursing services to 257 Medicaid members who could be eligible for home health services depending on the care they need.  The expected shift in services could lead to an increase in home health services expenses.  The total estimated annual fiscal impact for the home health services amendment is $1.1 million.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT HCBW for Individuals w/DD (0208.R06.00) Comprehensive Waiver - 07/01/2018

~~"Provides day supports and activities, homemaker, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment - follow along support, nutritionist services, occupational therapy, physical therapy, private duty nursing, speech therapy, supports brokerage, adult foster support, assisted living, behavioral support services, caregiver training and support, community transition services, companion services, environmental modifications, individual goods and services, meals, personal care, personal emergency response system (PERS), personal supports, psychological evaluation, counseling and consultation services, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, retirement services, specialized medical equipment and supplies, supported employment - co-worker support, supported employment - individual employment support, supported employment - small group employment support, transportation for individuals w/IDD/DD ages 0 - no max age”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Home and Community Based Services Waiver (Big Sky Waiver) - 01/01/2017

“This Montana Medicaid program allows individuals that require nursing home level care to receive that care in their home or community in place of in a nursing home.  A wide variety care services and non-care support is provided both to the program participant and to their primary caregiver to allow them to live at home or in an assisted living residence.  Even minor home modifications which can decrease the beneficiary's reliance on other persons are considered an allowable expense.

 

This waiver is also referred to as the Elderly/Physically Disabled Waiver and Big Sky Home and Community Based Services.

 

Under this waiver, Montana residents have the option of self-direction or consumer direction. Meaning, participants have the right to choose their care providers. However, care providers are subjected to approval by the state. Interestingly, certain family members are eligible to be hired as personal care attendants. Typically, spouses are excluded from this option but under certain circumstances spouses can be paid providers.  More commonly, the adult children who are caring for aging parents are paid as caregivers. Care providers must be qualified to provide care therefore the types of care family members can be paid to provide is usually limited to personal care or homemaker services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HELP-Link - 01/01/2016

~~“HELP-Link is a free workforce program that connects Medicaid enrollees with high quality workforce training, employment services, and job openings in local communities. HELP-Link is a voluntary workforce program specifically designed to assist individuals participating in the Montana HELP Plan (also known as Medicaid Expansion) in order to improve their employment and wage outcomes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Montana HCBS Transition Plan - 06/01/2014

CMS has issued regulations that define the settings in which it is permissible for states to pay for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS).The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in, and support full access to, the greater community.  This includes opportunities to engage in community life, control personal resources, receive services in the community, and, when appropriate, seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS…   To assist states in making this transition, CMS has published guidance to provide further information about settings in which HCBS may or may not be allowed.  States will be allowed a maximum of five years to make the transition and must submit a transition plan to CMS within one year of the effective date of the rule   DPHHS submitted their transition plan late 2014  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT Medicaid HCBS Program: Supported Employment, Individual Employment Support - 01/31/2014

“Individual employment supports are habilitation services and staff supports needed by a person to acquire integrated employment or career advancement in the general workforce. Individual employment support is delivered in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting. The outcome of this service is paid employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting within the general workforce that meets the person's personal and career goals, as documented in the plan of care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

When it comes to efforts to increase employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in Montana, the sky is the limit in the "Big Sky Country."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Montana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.61%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,068,778
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.89%
Change from
2018 to 2019
65,253
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
30,329
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.64%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.48%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.28%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,050,493 1,062,305 1,068,778
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 69,553 67,140 65,253
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 31,935 31,719 30,329
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 442,802 444,569 443,716
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 45.91% 47.24% 46.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.09% 79.99% 79.28%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.70% 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.30% 19.80% 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.70% 12.00% 11.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 77,995 75,690 75,831
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 64,267 65,000 66,377
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 128,081 125,382 127,174
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 387
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,560 4,582 4,317
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 7,371 8,245 9,569
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 648 867 929
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,392 5,391 3,675
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,191 590 474

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,848 1,753 1,728
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 10.70% 10.40% 10.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 27,274 26,628 26,058

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,188 1,691 1,180
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,381 2,900 1,903
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 6,841 6,495 4,141
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 17.40% 26.00% 28.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.50% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.20% 2.60% 2.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 99 62
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 323 507 599
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,549 1,519 2,179
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 859 10 11
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 384 5 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 45.00% 50.00% 55.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 38.20 0.48 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 23.00% 98.00% 17.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,387 1,047 925
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 39,880 39,118 38,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 47 38 44
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 40 32 34

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $0 $2,216,146 $2,350,592
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $5,101,199 $4,657,057
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $17,794,322 $17,141,490
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $7,962 $2,314,472 $2,295,357
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 0.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,013 219 189
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 489 440
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 1,204 1,180
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.00 48.24 48.18

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 46.96% 47.72% 49.51%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.02% 12.28% 11.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.49% 1.07% 1.06%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.94% 98.70% 98.68%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.55% 22.14% 22.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.28% 73.86% 75.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.97% 86.86% 87.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 51.06% 51.72% 52.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 294,615
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,038
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 42,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 25,481
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 68,289
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 381
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 626
AbilityOne wages (products). $139,465
AbilityOne wages (services). $243,632

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 23 19 16
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 23 19 16
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 889 748 441
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 889 748 441

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Supported employment services are the primary emphasis of the VRBS and CRP relationship and were the focus of the needs assessment.
Issues identified to improve supported employment services include:

1) Expansion of services to rural and remote areas by the continued certification of private providers who meet VRBS’ qualification levels for job assistance and supported employment services
2) Expansion of mental health providers as CRP’s to serve those with severe and persistent mental illness
3) Planning for the needs of consumers requiring higher level of long-term supports was identified through participation with the Supported Employment Leadership Network (the employment first network of Montana. (Page 152) Title I

Customized Employment

~~2017 Qtr. 3: Guidance was given to all VRBS business team member to make contact with two businesses monthly to provide information and assist with issues such as the untapped pool of resources offered by persons with disabilities, customized employment and VRBS resources. (Page 172) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Montana, as a small state with limited workforce program funds and a significant small-business climate (97% of all private businesses have fewer than 50 employees), faces unique challenges and is committed to ensuring its workforce system meets the needs of the state’s businesses and workers, today and in the future. Such challenges demand that WIOA core and other partners effectively leverage partnerships and collaborate in service delivery efforts. These efforts allow the state to ensure that customer expectations and needs are understood; that service offerings and locations meet those needs without duplication; that data evaluation tools and processes are in place; and that the system continually evolves and improves on its own. To support these efforts, Montana continues to work together across provider and program lines to develop a seamless, demand-driven workforce service delivery system comprised of public and private organizations, businesses, local, state and federal employment and training programs, secondary, post-secondary and adult education programs, Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services, and other human capital support agencies. (Page 64) Title I

Montana’s State Workforce Innovation Board continues to prioritize service coordination with core partners throughout Montana. In addition to Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation representation on the board, programs continue to work on program integration and braiding services. Adult Education aligned its providers to coincide with the districts outlined in the state plan to further integrate services, in addition, the board weighed in on workforce portions of each provider application submitted through Adult Education’s RFP process. The Board also included provisions under its One-Stop Certification requiring the One-Stop Operator continue updating the WIOA Committee on its progress coordinating services with core partners and work on additional coordination efforts throughout the state. (Page 91) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. (Page 61) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~7. VRBS are provided pursuant to an individualized plan for employment (IPE) which is developed jointly by the rehabilitation counselor and the eligible individual. In those situations where referral has been made to campus disability support services, the appropriate disability services staff may also be involved in helping to develop the IPE.8. The VRBS’ rehabilitation counselor and the MUS campus disability support services staff will respect the individual’s right and responsibility to fully participate in all decisions regarding his or her vocational future. The IPE shall be developed and implemented in a manner that allows the individual an opportunity to exercise informed choice in selecting an employment outcome, the specific vocational rehabilitation services that are to be provided, the entity that will provide those services, and the methods that will be used to procure the vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 130) Title I

While not part of the MOU with the OPI, VRBS commits to the development and approval of an IPE before each eligible student able to be served under the order of selection leaves the school setting. Should Montana come out of order of selection, VRBS is committed to development and approval of an IPE before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 131) Title I

The OPI shall assist school districts to inform VRBS of students with disabilities who are on an IEP and may be in need of assistance through VRBS. The notice to VRBS shall occur no later than the first IEP at which transition services are considered in order for VRBS to participate in the future development of the student’s IEP. For students enrolling closer to graduation or age 21, school districts are urged to inform VRBS as soon as those students are identified.
For all IEP meetings subsequent to the first meeting, the OPI shall encourage school districts to schedule IEP meetings for eligible students with disabilities in a timely manner, and to include notice to VRBS and the invitation for the VRBS counselor to participate subject to parental approval. Development of vocational goals and objectives shall occur in collaboration with the IEP team.
For the first IEP meeting following the initial notice to VRBS, the OPI shall encourage school districts to inform VRBS of the meeting in advance to allow sufficient time for VRBS to acquire the necessary diagnostic data to determine the student’s eligibility. The notice to VRBS should include an invitation to the VRBS counselor to participate, from then on, in transition planning within the IEP process. VRBS participation in IEP meetings is subject to parental approval. (Page 131) Title I

The following are sections of the MOU with the Office of Public Instruction that deal with financial responsibilities of each agencies and related matters.
The OPI shall assist local school districts with coordination of vocationally related services with VRBS for eligible students. Coordination should commence in the early stages of transition. Vocationally-related service coordination
and corresponding agency responsibilities should be identified in the IEP and included on the student’s IPE when appropriate.
VRBS will provide assistive technology services relevant to functions outside those assistive technology services required to access the educational program. (Page 132) Title I

The primary method of improving and expanding VR services to students with disabilities have been described elsewhere in this document. The main method has been contracting for Pre-ETS services with school districts. There also have been additional contracts with programs like Montana Youth Transitions, Montana Youth Leadership Forum, Moving On, Project Search, Easter Seals volunteer experience program, Montana Center for Inclusive Education’s Virtual college peer mentoring program, and exploring specialized Pre-ETS collaboration with the tribal VR programs located in Montana.
In addition, VRBS counselors have been encouraged to take applications with students with disabilities at a younger age and provide IPE services that are focused on vocational and career exploration rather than a specific vocational goal. (Page 164) Title I
 

Career Pathways

~~Braiding funds with other core partners for conferences and trainings focused on supporting career pathways will be the manner in which leadership dollars will align with the work of our core partners. This collaboration across core partner agencies will evolve to meet the needs of WIOA implementation and sustainability. Secondly, the state will support the eligible providers’ ability to integrate and sustain career pathways in their instructional practice. Funds will be available to support regional meetings with workforce and one-stop partners to help AE programs identify the components of job-driven training that needs to be incorporated into their curriculum. Regional professional development will make use of leadership dollars to assist programs in learning how to become responsive to local labor market demands. Thirdly, the state will use funds to develop templates and identify resources that support a systemic approach to career pathways; technical assistance will be made available for providers on the use of state developed resources that will inform their pathway implementation. (Page 41) Title I

WIOA youth providers coordinate services with Vocational Rehabilitation whenever the opportunity is presented. Youth with disabilities have benefited from services provided through both programs. Now with the emphasis on career pathways and ultimately employment there is need for more collaboration and coordination between the WIOA youth program and Vocational-Rehabilitation to ensure youth are competitively seek and obtain jobs with real pay with livable wages. (Page 83) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~VRBS coordinates with businesses through several avenues, including new initiatives that are in the planning stage, all of which are designed to enhance efforts to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including pre-employment transition services.
These initiatives include:
o A standalone VRBS Business Services website for businesses to use to learn about the services we have to offer
o Coordination with Montana Workforce Centers to input and collect data on Business Services. This allows VRBS to collaborate with the Workforce Centers and document ongoing relationships with business and ensure deliverables and services are provided.
o Improved knowledge of Labor Market Information and how to incorporate this information into Business Services practices
o Business Services Team members are Windmills curriculum trainers. This training is used as an employer-employee awareness program specifically addressing attitudinal barriers. (Page 135) Title I

VRBS believes that WIOA provides significant guidance on what constitutes 21st century VR practice. There are three new pillars to VR practice that counselors need to develop skills in:
• skills to address the evolving needs of employers and labor force to meet the demands of a changing society and work place.
• skills to assist the persons with the most significant disabilities find jobs in competitive integrated settings.
• skills to work youth and high school students with disabilities to be prepared to competitively enter the world of work and post-secondary education. (Page 145) Title I
 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2017 Qtr. 2: Individuals working for a 14(c) employer who choose to pursue competitive integrated employment by signing the CCIR validation form are referred to VRBS. VRBS then makes contact with those individuals and initiates the process to provide VR services. (Page 174) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The State of Montana offers services to individuals with disabilities through the Job Service offices across the state. The workforce system is continually developing new and fostering ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive and integrated access to services and expanding the system’s capacity to serve customers and businesses with disabilities. Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. DRCs also attend training annually to receive new information and collaborate on the best ways to support their targeted populations. This training has been done in conjunction with Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services and the Developmental Disabilities Bureau. Montana is a single-area planning state; therefore the state of Montana designed its one-stop system to best meet the workforce needs of the state. As part of the one-stop certification, the SWIB certified the comprehensive one-stop and the affiliate centers. Part of the criteria for system certification was that the comprehensive one-stop and all its affiliate centers delivered services in an integrated and accessible way to ensure that all sites can serve all customers, regardless of ability. (Page 61) Title I

Montana’s one-stop service delivery system will comply with provisions of the American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. As part of Montana’s one-stop operator application process, it will request that all applicants submit information on its facility’s ADA accessibility to better assess barriers to services and better serve persons with disabilities. (Page 62) Title I

All professional development will be located in accessible facilities and necessary adaptive accommodations will be made to make the content of workshop accessible to all participants (e.g., large print, Braille, speech to text software, adaptive technology). (Page 122) Title I

Veterans

Veterans and eligible persons will receive employment, training and job placement services at the Montana Job Service Centers like other Montana Job Service Center customers. However, veterans and eligible persons will receive priority of service over non-veterans when it comes to receiving employment, training, and job placement services. All veterans, spouses, and caregivers who enter a Job Service Centers that house a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialist will be screened for eligibility to determine if the veteran and other eligible persons qualify for DVOP services. DVOPs will work one on one with eligible veterans and eligible persons to provide training in job placement and employment skills to include, but not limited to, resume writing and review, interview concepts and skills, and searching for employment. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

Montana currently does not employ LVER staff. DVOPs are charged with providing case management and individualized careers services to young veterans aged 18-24, eligible spouses, and veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBEs) as outlined in Veterans Program Letter most current guidance, which include: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those who: 1) are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or, 2) were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability; (Page 206) Title IV

DVOPs provide a range of services including career planning and counseling, comprehensive assessments, individual employment plan development, short-term pre-vocational services, and other career services within the Montana Job Service Centers. These services include but are not limited to: •Outreach to locate veterans in need of intensive services; •Comprehensive Assessment, including a documented plan of service (IEP); •Counseling and career/vocational guidance; •Referral of veterans to supportive or remedial services; •Promoting Vocational Rehab and WIOA services; •Referral of veterans to job focused and outcome-driven training or certification; •Job development; •Development of VA funded Special Incentive and OJT; •Review all open case files of current participants with an SBE in a priority category and perform case management duties; and •Referral of veterans to employment opportunities. (Page 206) Title IV Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) programs are administered by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (MTDLI) and are co-located and fully integrated within the Montana Job Service Centers. JVSG funds six FTE including Disabled Veterans Outreach Specialists (DVOP) and a Veteran Intensive Service Coordinator. Customers entering the Job Service Centers are screened for eligibility and referred to JVSG staff as appropriate. In most cases, JVSG clients are co-enrolled in Title I-B programs. (Page 207) Title IV

The JVSG and workforce center staff participates in state and local area training sessions and initiatives centered around sectors and career pathways. JVSG and workforce center staff utilize local labor market information as a tool when eligible veterans and persons are making job-driven training decisions. Through the complete training process, the DVOP specialists, WIOA and Wagner-Peyser staff will work in conjunction with the business service team to assist eligible veterans and persons to identify employment opportunities through the state labor exchange. The tools in which we measure the services provided include but not limited to: •Interviewing of Job Service Center staff •Monitoring MWorks (Montana case management system) •Review of program files and documentation •Customer surveys •Site visits •Accompanying DVET during federal audits •Quarterly Managers Report •Regional Director meetings (Page 210) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~VRBS presently has cooperative agreements with all of the six Section 121 projects (Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation, Fort Peck Reservation, Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Northern Cheyenne Reservation and the Blackfeet Reservation) located in Montana. The purpose of these agreements is to establish procedures to assure continued coordination between the 121 projects and VRBS. These agreements are implemented for the sole purpose of enhancing, to the greatest extent possible, the delivery of rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities living in the state of Montana and residing on or near the six reservations that currently have a tribal vocational rehabilitation project.
This cooperative agreement has provisions that include:
1. To make available the required supported employment/follow-along services from community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that are certified mental health providers. Follow- along services may be provided through community based psychiatric rehabilitation and support, and through case management services.
2. To serve persons identified as eligible for mental health service under Medicaid or the Mental Health Service Plan.
3. To strengthen supported employment services to Montana citizens eligible for vocational rehabilitation’s supported employment services and for community mental health services funded by the Addictive and Mental Disorders Division.
      131.To provide cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies.
      132.To establish and evaluate annual goals for our interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services. (Page 126-127) Title I

Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities are important stakeholders in providing supported employment services. Their contributions are described later as they have their own sections below.
Enrolled CRPs: VRBS works with a number of community based organizations across the state. Many are enrolled as extended support service providers to assure quality in service delivery for consumers. VRBS has enrolled programs in mental health services, developmental disabilities, as well as other disability organizations to provide these services at the local level. (Pages 134-135)
VRBS has a negotiated cooperative agreement with the Addictive & Mental Disorders Division. The cooperative agreement provides guidance for: cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies, establishment and evaluation of annual goals for interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services, and makes available the required supported employment/extended support/follow-along services from enrolled community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and certified mental health providers. (Pages 137-138) Title I

Quality of Supported Employment Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services (VRBS) enrolls providers who will be making supported employment time limited services available. The enrollment process requires that providers have met a set of standards described in administrative rules. This enrollment process ensures that the providers maintain the necessary education, skills, and degree of professional expertise to provide a level of service commensurate with VRBS work service standard. VRBS values its priority partners who have met the required standards. Supported employment providers evaluated by the developmental disability system or mental health system represent the majority of our providers. The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS) are also utilized by providers. Other providers are individuals who have been selected to provide services for a limited number of consumers in a rural area where there are no established providers. (Pages 176-177) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HB 294 Montana Accessible Playgrounds Grant Program - 07/01/2017

“HB 294 creates a grant program that encourages municipalities and school districts to develop

accessible playgrounds. Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Parks Division, administers this grant program.

This program provides grants only to supplement local and private funds in order to secure other

grant funding that require a match for developing accessible playgrounds.

The legislature appropriated $100,000 for the biennium beginning July 1, 2017 and ending June

30, 2019. Any state funds distributed must be matched at a rate of 1 to 1 minimum, with $1 in

state funds to $1 or more in other grant funds. A grant may not exceed $10,000.

The department (Fish, Wildlife & Parks) shall ensure that funds are distributed only as necessary

to secure other grant funding that will increase accessibility in existing playgrounds or for the

costs of accessibility features in new playgrounds. The money may not be used during initial

construction for accessibility features required by The Americans With Disabilities Act for

newly constructed playgrounds or to upgrade existing restroom or parking facilities that are not

compliant with applicable accessibility standards.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

House Bill 638 Provider Rate Increases for Direct Care Staff - 05/09/2017

“An Act appropriating money to the Department of Public Health and Human Services for a developmental disability and aging services provider rate increase for direct care worker wages; authorizing a fund transfer from the older Montanans trust fund to direct care wages account.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Montana ABLE Legislation Senate Bill 399 - 05/05/2015

It is the intent of the legislature to give Montana residents access to a program authorized section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. 529A, to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, federal and state medical and disability insurance, a beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Veteran Services - 04/01/2019

~~“Locate a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) SpecialistThe Employment Specialists at Montana's Job Service offices can assist all Veterans in securing employment and training, as well as refer Veterans to other service providers in both public and private agencies and organizations. Below is a list of contact information for all of Montana's Job Service offices, with specific listings for the DVOP Specialist. Visit a Montana Job Service near you.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan - 02/01/2019

~~“The 2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan is a Department-wide plan, outlining a shared vision and mission, as well as goals, objectives, and strategies.  The plan defines common priorities and focuses resources and actions on achieving collective goals.  The plan draws on the strengths of the Department and addresses health and human services needs throughout the state.   The plan provides the framework for more detailed strategic and implementation plans for divisions, bureaus, and programs. 

DPHHS will update this strategic plan annually and use it ongoing to support continuous improvement efforts.  “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

Disability Resources - 01/28/2019

~~“Whether you are an Employer or a Job Seeker, if you have questions related to employment and disabilities, contact us for assistance. We can connect you to resources to answer those questions….The Montana Department of Labor and Industry Disability Consultant can assist you with information in the following topics• Job Listings and Referrals• Resume Assistance• Community Resource Information• Americans with Disabilities Act• Resource Library and Computers• Child Care Information• Labor Market Information• Career Exploration• Job Search Assistance• Career Planning”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Presentation to the 2019 Health and Human Services Joint Appropriation Subcommittee Disability Employment and Transitions Division - 01/28/2019

~~“The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services presented a Report on the services it provides to more than 21,000 Montanans with disabilities. These include access to services to strengthen their economic and social well-being across their life span. Details about these services and supports are available by accessing the web link to the document.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities opens at MSU - 11/27/2018

~~“The MSU LIFE Scholars Program is an inclusive post-secondary experience that opened this fall to its first seven students, according to Christy Sofianek, program director. The program consists of three main components: academics, career development and campus engagement. Students who are enrolled in the program may choose to either audit classes or take them for credit. Students this fall selected courses in meteorology, creative writing, public speaking, horse handling, aviation and tae kwon do, among other subjects, Sofianek said. LIFE Scholars also engage in extra-curricular campus activities and complete an internship in order to develop job skills and explore careers."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Cuts Contracts With Developmental Disability Caregivers - 12/28/2017

“The state health department is cutting ties at the end of March with private contractors who help people with developmental disabilities.

That’s a result of cuts to Medicaid due to the state’s budget cuts, enacted by Governor Steve Bullock because of the state bringing in lower than expected revenue.

The cuts mean that in the coming months, 2,700 people with developmental disabilities who get help from case managers will move from private organizations overseeing their care to the state health department.

The department says it was forced to make this change because of budget cuts in the 2017 legislative session and the recent special legislative session.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Partnerships for Transitions - 01/01/2018

“Partnerships in Transition is a project to address the challenges and barriers to youth transitioning from school to the adult employment and service delivery system. The project increased transition outcomes for youth with developmental disabilities statewide through a systematic approach that included skill development, capacity building, information dissemination and the creation of community and web-based information resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Center for Inclusive Education - 06/01/2014

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.   Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project   The Montana State University Billings Montana Center for Inclusive Education WIPA project has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA project is to help Social Security Disability beneficiaries understand and utilize employment supports and work incentives so they can achieve their employment and vocational goals. The Community Work Incentive Coordinator (CWIC)    • Provides effective work incentives planning and assistance services to Social Security beneficiaries.    • Promotes and supports employment outcomes for Social Security beneficiaries with disabilities.    • Partners with community agencies and conducts community outreach.    • Understands Social Security Disability benefits programs as well as other federal/state/local programs for which beneficiaries might be eligible.    • Provides healthcare planning and counseling.    • The project utilizes community networks such as Vocational Rehabilitation, and Montana Offices of Public Assistance to help in the identification of individuals with disabilities that could benefit from receiving this information. The CWIC provides statewide coverage in local areas either electronically or in person.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DPHHS Developmental Services Division - 01/01/2010

In July 2009, the Disability Services Division (DSD) of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) was restructured under the Medicaid and Health Services Branch of DPHHS. In January 2010, the name was changed to Developmental Services Division.

The Montana Disability Services Division joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) in 2011, since then it has worked to address concerns reflected in the State Strategic Employment Assessment. Building a focused state workplan through key stakeholder input is reflective of the Division’s strong interest in improving employment statewide, across both urban and rural settings.   The Division continues to engage self-advocates and families in planning efforts. This is helping to create strong external pressures and demands for increasing integrated employment opportunities and the expectation of work, regardless of disability.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project

~~“The Montana State University Billings WIPA program has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement  Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA program is to assist Social Security Disability beneficiaries to make informed choices about work and to support working beneficiaries to make a successful transition to self-sufficiency.  More information about WIPA services and eligibility criteria can be found by accessing the web link.. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

~~By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The University of Montana Rural Institute Transition Projects

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:-Providing education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;-Developing creative strategies and transition models;-Offering training and assistance on-site and long distance;-Promoting systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and 

Systems
  • Other

University of Montana Rural Institute Center for Excellence in Disability Education, Research, And Service

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has strived to collaborate with partners across Montana and across the nation to further its mission. Partners include Department of Public Health and Human Services, Montana Child Care Resource and Referral Network,  Missoula City/County Public Health Department, Montana Department of Commerce,  Montana’s Office of Public Instruction,  State Deaf-Blind Coordinator, and  Vocational Rehabilitation agencies throughout the state.

Systems
  • Other

The University of Montana Rural Transition & Employment

"What We Do

Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.

Our transition activities are unique in that they promote:

Customized Employment strategies for youth with disabilities;The use of Social Security work incentives for students;Transition planning for middle school students;Collaborative funding across agencies to create individually-driven employment supports;Self-employment as vocational experience or as a post-school outcome; andSelf-determination for youth as we empower them to identify strengths, skills, and needs for transition planning.

Visit our link to “Articles and Products” for information and tools you can use in your own programs."

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) - 02/18/2019

~~“Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) is a Medicaid program designed for elderly or disabled residents that require in-home care service. Individuals can receive care services from the state (agency based) or they can elect to hire and train their own care providers who are then paid by the Provider Agency. This type of self-directed care program is also referred to as cash and counseling, consumer direction, or participant direction.

One element of CFC / PAS that is attractive to many families is that certain family members can be hired to provide personal care; they can be paid caregivers. Although spouses, parents, and legal guardians are not eligible, the adult children of aging parents and ex-wives or ex-husbands can be paid to provide personal care services.  More information on CFC/PAS can be obtained by accessing the web link.""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“MFP is a demonstration program [that] helps Montana shift its long term care system by reducing the use of institutionally based services and increasing the use of home and community based services (HCBS). MFP is focused on helping individuals transition from in-patient facilities to the community. [The Program’s vision is to] create a sustainable system that supports community options as a first choice for individuals needing long term care services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DHHS "Employing People with Disabilities" Self-Assessment Tool - 04/14/2016

Using this self-assessment tool, Governor Brian Schweitzer of Montana encourages the employers in his state to self-assess how “friendly” their business is to people with disabilities and encourages them to explore the potential of workers with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

MT INVEST Employment Specialist Training

Many of us know somebody that has a disability. Individuals with disabilities can face additional challenges to obtaining and retaining good jobs. To create an opportunity for that person to be most successful, there are several activities and/or steps to identify employment options that are a good match to the person’s skills, interests, and workplace preference (likes quiet or likes noise and activity for example). The curriculum and testing will help learners develop the skill of facilitating Employment Supports, as well as inspire and motivate employment staff to new levels of performance and professionalism. Whether you are helping a family member or friend, or whether you are or plan to be, an employment specialist professional: this information can help you bring successful results to those you are assisting.

The course consists of five sections, including resources and sample forms:

1. Introduction to Community Employment

2. Assessment for the Job Seeker

3. Job Development

4. Job Analysis, Training & Job Coaching

5. Long-Term Supports, Customer Service & Review

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.

As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana Center for Inclusive Education

The Montana Center on Disabilities (MCD) is part of Montana State University-Billings. MCD works to make sure that all people are part of the community.  The Center supports the idea that people with disabilities can make their own choices about how they live and work.  MCD does this by offering education and information to many people.  One focus is on giving young people with disabilities the tools to become leaders.

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The University of Montana Rural Institute: Transition & Employment Projects

“The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:    • Provision of education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;    • Development of innovative strategies and transition models;    • Demonstration, outreach and technical assistance, both on-site and long distance;    • Promotion of systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and    • Information dissemination.   Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/27/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals  with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work s   ervice options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/17/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work service options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services.“ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Administrative Register Issue No. 22 “ARM 37.40.705” - 11/16/2018

~~“The department has revised this rule to remove reference to a home- based requirement for receipt of home health services and to clarify coverage for medical supplies, equipment, and appliances. Fiscal Impact These rule amendments will increase the number of beneficiaries who are eligible for home health services due to the removal of the home bound status requirement and the expansion of service delivery locations.  This may lead to a cost shift for programs that currently provide services to medically needy populations.  The 1915(c) HCBS Big Sky Waiver and 1915(c) Waiver for Individuals with Severe Disabling Mental Illness programs provide private-duty nursing services to 257 Medicaid members who could be eligible for home health services depending on the care they need.  The expected shift in services could lead to an increase in home health services expenses.  The total estimated annual fiscal impact for the home health services amendment is $1.1 million.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT HCBW for Individuals w/DD (0208.R06.00) Comprehensive Waiver - 07/01/2018

~~"Provides day supports and activities, homemaker, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment - follow along support, nutritionist services, occupational therapy, physical therapy, private duty nursing, speech therapy, supports brokerage, adult foster support, assisted living, behavioral support services, caregiver training and support, community transition services, companion services, environmental modifications, individual goods and services, meals, personal care, personal emergency response system (PERS), personal supports, psychological evaluation, counseling and consultation services, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, retirement services, specialized medical equipment and supplies, supported employment - co-worker support, supported employment - individual employment support, supported employment - small group employment support, transportation for individuals w/IDD/DD ages 0 - no max age”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Home and Community Based Services Waiver (Big Sky Waiver) - 01/01/2017

“This Montana Medicaid program allows individuals that require nursing home level care to receive that care in their home or community in place of in a nursing home.  A wide variety care services and non-care support is provided both to the program participant and to their primary caregiver to allow them to live at home or in an assisted living residence.  Even minor home modifications which can decrease the beneficiary's reliance on other persons are considered an allowable expense.

 

This waiver is also referred to as the Elderly/Physically Disabled Waiver and Big Sky Home and Community Based Services.

 

Under this waiver, Montana residents have the option of self-direction or consumer direction. Meaning, participants have the right to choose their care providers. However, care providers are subjected to approval by the state. Interestingly, certain family members are eligible to be hired as personal care attendants. Typically, spouses are excluded from this option but under certain circumstances spouses can be paid providers.  More commonly, the adult children who are caring for aging parents are paid as caregivers. Care providers must be qualified to provide care therefore the types of care family members can be paid to provide is usually limited to personal care or homemaker services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HELP-Link - 01/01/2016

~~“HELP-Link is a free workforce program that connects Medicaid enrollees with high quality workforce training, employment services, and job openings in local communities. HELP-Link is a voluntary workforce program specifically designed to assist individuals participating in the Montana HELP Plan (also known as Medicaid Expansion) in order to improve their employment and wage outcomes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Montana HCBS Transition Plan - 06/01/2014

CMS has issued regulations that define the settings in which it is permissible for states to pay for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS).The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in, and support full access to, the greater community.  This includes opportunities to engage in community life, control personal resources, receive services in the community, and, when appropriate, seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS…   To assist states in making this transition, CMS has published guidance to provide further information about settings in which HCBS may or may not be allowed.  States will be allowed a maximum of five years to make the transition and must submit a transition plan to CMS within one year of the effective date of the rule   DPHHS submitted their transition plan late 2014  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT Medicaid HCBS Program: Supported Employment, Individual Employment Support - 01/31/2014

“Individual employment supports are habilitation services and staff supports needed by a person to acquire integrated employment or career advancement in the general workforce. Individual employment support is delivered in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting. The outcome of this service is paid employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting within the general workforce that meets the person's personal and career goals, as documented in the plan of care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

When it comes to efforts to increase employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in Montana, the sky is the limit in the "Big Sky Country."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Montana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.61%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,068,778
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.89%
Change from
2018 to 2019
65,253
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
30,329
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.64%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.48%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.28%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 1,068,778
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 65,253
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 30,329
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 443,716
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.28%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 75,831
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 66,377
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 127,174
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 387
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,317
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,569
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 929
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,675
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 474

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,728
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 10.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 26,058

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,180
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,903
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 4,141
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 62
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 599
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,179
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 11
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 925
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 38,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 44
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 34

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,350,592
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,657,057
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,141,490
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,295,357
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 189
Number of people served in facility based work. 440
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,180
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.18

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.51%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.06%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.68%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 52.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 294,615
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,038
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 42,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 25,481
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 68,289
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 381
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 626
AbilityOne wages (products). $139,465
AbilityOne wages (services). $243,632

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 16
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 16
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 441
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 441

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Supported employment services are the primary emphasis of the VRBS and CRP relationship and were the focus of the needs assessment.
Issues identified to improve supported employment services include:

1) Expansion of services to rural and remote areas by the continued certification of private providers who meet VRBS’ qualification levels for job assistance and supported employment services
2) Expansion of mental health providers as CRP’s to serve those with severe and persistent mental illness
3) Planning for the needs of consumers requiring higher level of long-term supports was identified through participation with the Supported Employment Leadership Network (the employment first network of Montana. (Page 152) Title I

Customized Employment

~~2017 Qtr. 3: Guidance was given to all VRBS business team member to make contact with two businesses monthly to provide information and assist with issues such as the untapped pool of resources offered by persons with disabilities, customized employment and VRBS resources. (Page 172) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Montana, as a small state with limited workforce program funds and a significant small-business climate (97% of all private businesses have fewer than 50 employees), faces unique challenges and is committed to ensuring its workforce system meets the needs of the state’s businesses and workers, today and in the future. Such challenges demand that WIOA core and other partners effectively leverage partnerships and collaborate in service delivery efforts. These efforts allow the state to ensure that customer expectations and needs are understood; that service offerings and locations meet those needs without duplication; that data evaluation tools and processes are in place; and that the system continually evolves and improves on its own. To support these efforts, Montana continues to work together across provider and program lines to develop a seamless, demand-driven workforce service delivery system comprised of public and private organizations, businesses, local, state and federal employment and training programs, secondary, post-secondary and adult education programs, Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services, and other human capital support agencies. (Page 64) Title I

Montana’s State Workforce Innovation Board continues to prioritize service coordination with core partners throughout Montana. In addition to Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation representation on the board, programs continue to work on program integration and braiding services. Adult Education aligned its providers to coincide with the districts outlined in the state plan to further integrate services, in addition, the board weighed in on workforce portions of each provider application submitted through Adult Education’s RFP process. The Board also included provisions under its One-Stop Certification requiring the One-Stop Operator continue updating the WIOA Committee on its progress coordinating services with core partners and work on additional coordination efforts throughout the state. (Page 91) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. (Page 61) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~7. VRBS are provided pursuant to an individualized plan for employment (IPE) which is developed jointly by the rehabilitation counselor and the eligible individual. In those situations where referral has been made to campus disability support services, the appropriate disability services staff may also be involved in helping to develop the IPE.8. The VRBS’ rehabilitation counselor and the MUS campus disability support services staff will respect the individual’s right and responsibility to fully participate in all decisions regarding his or her vocational future. The IPE shall be developed and implemented in a manner that allows the individual an opportunity to exercise informed choice in selecting an employment outcome, the specific vocational rehabilitation services that are to be provided, the entity that will provide those services, and the methods that will be used to procure the vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 130) Title I

While not part of the MOU with the OPI, VRBS commits to the development and approval of an IPE before each eligible student able to be served under the order of selection leaves the school setting. Should Montana come out of order of selection, VRBS is committed to development and approval of an IPE before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 131) Title I

The OPI shall assist school districts to inform VRBS of students with disabilities who are on an IEP and may be in need of assistance through VRBS. The notice to VRBS shall occur no later than the first IEP at which transition services are considered in order for VRBS to participate in the future development of the student’s IEP. For students enrolling closer to graduation or age 21, school districts are urged to inform VRBS as soon as those students are identified.
For all IEP meetings subsequent to the first meeting, the OPI shall encourage school districts to schedule IEP meetings for eligible students with disabilities in a timely manner, and to include notice to VRBS and the invitation for the VRBS counselor to participate subject to parental approval. Development of vocational goals and objectives shall occur in collaboration with the IEP team.
For the first IEP meeting following the initial notice to VRBS, the OPI shall encourage school districts to inform VRBS of the meeting in advance to allow sufficient time for VRBS to acquire the necessary diagnostic data to determine the student’s eligibility. The notice to VRBS should include an invitation to the VRBS counselor to participate, from then on, in transition planning within the IEP process. VRBS participation in IEP meetings is subject to parental approval. (Page 131) Title I

The following are sections of the MOU with the Office of Public Instruction that deal with financial responsibilities of each agencies and related matters.
The OPI shall assist local school districts with coordination of vocationally related services with VRBS for eligible students. Coordination should commence in the early stages of transition. Vocationally-related service coordination
and corresponding agency responsibilities should be identified in the IEP and included on the student’s IPE when appropriate.
VRBS will provide assistive technology services relevant to functions outside those assistive technology services required to access the educational program. (Page 132) Title I

The primary method of improving and expanding VR services to students with disabilities have been described elsewhere in this document. The main method has been contracting for Pre-ETS services with school districts. There also have been additional contracts with programs like Montana Youth Transitions, Montana Youth Leadership Forum, Moving On, Project Search, Easter Seals volunteer experience program, Montana Center for Inclusive Education’s Virtual college peer mentoring program, and exploring specialized Pre-ETS collaboration with the tribal VR programs located in Montana.
In addition, VRBS counselors have been encouraged to take applications with students with disabilities at a younger age and provide IPE services that are focused on vocational and career exploration rather than a specific vocational goal. (Page 164) Title I
 

Career Pathways

~~Braiding funds with other core partners for conferences and trainings focused on supporting career pathways will be the manner in which leadership dollars will align with the work of our core partners. This collaboration across core partner agencies will evolve to meet the needs of WIOA implementation and sustainability. Secondly, the state will support the eligible providers’ ability to integrate and sustain career pathways in their instructional practice. Funds will be available to support regional meetings with workforce and one-stop partners to help AE programs identify the components of job-driven training that needs to be incorporated into their curriculum. Regional professional development will make use of leadership dollars to assist programs in learning how to become responsive to local labor market demands. Thirdly, the state will use funds to develop templates and identify resources that support a systemic approach to career pathways; technical assistance will be made available for providers on the use of state developed resources that will inform their pathway implementation. (Page 41) Title I

WIOA youth providers coordinate services with Vocational Rehabilitation whenever the opportunity is presented. Youth with disabilities have benefited from services provided through both programs. Now with the emphasis on career pathways and ultimately employment there is need for more collaboration and coordination between the WIOA youth program and Vocational-Rehabilitation to ensure youth are competitively seek and obtain jobs with real pay with livable wages. (Page 83) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~VRBS coordinates with businesses through several avenues, including new initiatives that are in the planning stage, all of which are designed to enhance efforts to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including pre-employment transition services.
These initiatives include:
o A standalone VRBS Business Services website for businesses to use to learn about the services we have to offer
o Coordination with Montana Workforce Centers to input and collect data on Business Services. This allows VRBS to collaborate with the Workforce Centers and document ongoing relationships with business and ensure deliverables and services are provided.
o Improved knowledge of Labor Market Information and how to incorporate this information into Business Services practices
o Business Services Team members are Windmills curriculum trainers. This training is used as an employer-employee awareness program specifically addressing attitudinal barriers. (Page 135) Title I

VRBS believes that WIOA provides significant guidance on what constitutes 21st century VR practice. There are three new pillars to VR practice that counselors need to develop skills in:
• skills to address the evolving needs of employers and labor force to meet the demands of a changing society and work place.
• skills to assist the persons with the most significant disabilities find jobs in competitive integrated settings.
• skills to work youth and high school students with disabilities to be prepared to competitively enter the world of work and post-secondary education. (Page 145) Title I
 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2017 Qtr. 2: Individuals working for a 14(c) employer who choose to pursue competitive integrated employment by signing the CCIR validation form are referred to VRBS. VRBS then makes contact with those individuals and initiates the process to provide VR services. (Page 174) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The State of Montana offers services to individuals with disabilities through the Job Service offices across the state. The workforce system is continually developing new and fostering ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive and integrated access to services and expanding the system’s capacity to serve customers and businesses with disabilities. Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. DRCs also attend training annually to receive new information and collaborate on the best ways to support their targeted populations. This training has been done in conjunction with Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services and the Developmental Disabilities Bureau. Montana is a single-area planning state; therefore the state of Montana designed its one-stop system to best meet the workforce needs of the state. As part of the one-stop certification, the SWIB certified the comprehensive one-stop and the affiliate centers. Part of the criteria for system certification was that the comprehensive one-stop and all its affiliate centers delivered services in an integrated and accessible way to ensure that all sites can serve all customers, regardless of ability. (Page 61) Title I

Montana’s one-stop service delivery system will comply with provisions of the American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. As part of Montana’s one-stop operator application process, it will request that all applicants submit information on its facility’s ADA accessibility to better assess barriers to services and better serve persons with disabilities. (Page 62) Title I

All professional development will be located in accessible facilities and necessary adaptive accommodations will be made to make the content of workshop accessible to all participants (e.g., large print, Braille, speech to text software, adaptive technology). (Page 122) Title I

Veterans

Veterans and eligible persons will receive employment, training and job placement services at the Montana Job Service Centers like other Montana Job Service Center customers. However, veterans and eligible persons will receive priority of service over non-veterans when it comes to receiving employment, training, and job placement services. All veterans, spouses, and caregivers who enter a Job Service Centers that house a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialist will be screened for eligibility to determine if the veteran and other eligible persons qualify for DVOP services. DVOPs will work one on one with eligible veterans and eligible persons to provide training in job placement and employment skills to include, but not limited to, resume writing and review, interview concepts and skills, and searching for employment. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

Montana currently does not employ LVER staff. DVOPs are charged with providing case management and individualized careers services to young veterans aged 18-24, eligible spouses, and veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBEs) as outlined in Veterans Program Letter most current guidance, which include: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those who: 1) are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or, 2) were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability; (Page 206) Title IV

DVOPs provide a range of services including career planning and counseling, comprehensive assessments, individual employment plan development, short-term pre-vocational services, and other career services within the Montana Job Service Centers. These services include but are not limited to: •Outreach to locate veterans in need of intensive services; •Comprehensive Assessment, including a documented plan of service (IEP); •Counseling and career/vocational guidance; •Referral of veterans to supportive or remedial services; •Promoting Vocational Rehab and WIOA services; •Referral of veterans to job focused and outcome-driven training or certification; •Job development; •Development of VA funded Special Incentive and OJT; •Review all open case files of current participants with an SBE in a priority category and perform case management duties; and •Referral of veterans to employment opportunities. (Page 206) Title IV Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) programs are administered by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (MTDLI) and are co-located and fully integrated within the Montana Job Service Centers. JVSG funds six FTE including Disabled Veterans Outreach Specialists (DVOP) and a Veteran Intensive Service Coordinator. Customers entering the Job Service Centers are screened for eligibility and referred to JVSG staff as appropriate. In most cases, JVSG clients are co-enrolled in Title I-B programs. (Page 207) Title IV

The JVSG and workforce center staff participates in state and local area training sessions and initiatives centered around sectors and career pathways. JVSG and workforce center staff utilize local labor market information as a tool when eligible veterans and persons are making job-driven training decisions. Through the complete training process, the DVOP specialists, WIOA and Wagner-Peyser staff will work in conjunction with the business service team to assist eligible veterans and persons to identify employment opportunities through the state labor exchange. The tools in which we measure the services provided include but not limited to: •Interviewing of Job Service Center staff •Monitoring MWorks (Montana case management system) •Review of program files and documentation •Customer surveys •Site visits •Accompanying DVET during federal audits •Quarterly Managers Report •Regional Director meetings (Page 210) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~VRBS presently has cooperative agreements with all of the six Section 121 projects (Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation, Fort Peck Reservation, Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Northern Cheyenne Reservation and the Blackfeet Reservation) located in Montana. The purpose of these agreements is to establish procedures to assure continued coordination between the 121 projects and VRBS. These agreements are implemented for the sole purpose of enhancing, to the greatest extent possible, the delivery of rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities living in the state of Montana and residing on or near the six reservations that currently have a tribal vocational rehabilitation project.
This cooperative agreement has provisions that include:
1. To make available the required supported employment/follow-along services from community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that are certified mental health providers. Follow- along services may be provided through community based psychiatric rehabilitation and support, and through case management services.
2. To serve persons identified as eligible for mental health service under Medicaid or the Mental Health Service Plan.
3. To strengthen supported employment services to Montana citizens eligible for vocational rehabilitation’s supported employment services and for community mental health services funded by the Addictive and Mental Disorders Division.
      131.To provide cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies.
      132.To establish and evaluate annual goals for our interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services. (Page 126-127) Title I

Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities are important stakeholders in providing supported employment services. Their contributions are described later as they have their own sections below.
Enrolled CRPs: VRBS works with a number of community based organizations across the state. Many are enrolled as extended support service providers to assure quality in service delivery for consumers. VRBS has enrolled programs in mental health services, developmental disabilities, as well as other disability organizations to provide these services at the local level. (Pages 134-135)
VRBS has a negotiated cooperative agreement with the Addictive & Mental Disorders Division. The cooperative agreement provides guidance for: cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies, establishment and evaluation of annual goals for interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services, and makes available the required supported employment/extended support/follow-along services from enrolled community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and certified mental health providers. (Pages 137-138) Title I

Quality of Supported Employment Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services (VRBS) enrolls providers who will be making supported employment time limited services available. The enrollment process requires that providers have met a set of standards described in administrative rules. This enrollment process ensures that the providers maintain the necessary education, skills, and degree of professional expertise to provide a level of service commensurate with VRBS work service standard. VRBS values its priority partners who have met the required standards. Supported employment providers evaluated by the developmental disability system or mental health system represent the majority of our providers. The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS) are also utilized by providers. Other providers are individuals who have been selected to provide services for a limited number of consumers in a rural area where there are no established providers. (Pages 176-177) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HOUSE BILL NO. 658 - 05/20/2019

~~“ AN  ACT  GENERALLY  REVISING  HEALTH  CARE  LAWS;  EXTENDING  THE  MEDICAID  EXPANSIONPROGRAM PERMANENT BY REVISING THE TERMINATION DATE OF THE MONTANA HEALTH ANDECONOMIC  LIVELIHOOD  PARTNERSHIP  ACT;  ESTABLISHING  COMMUNITY  ENGAGEMENTREQUIREMENTS FOR HELP ACT PARTICIPANTS; REVISING MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATIONPROCEDURES; ESTABLISHING A HELP ACT EMPLOYER GRANT PROGRAM; ENACTING A FEE ONHEALTH SERVICE CORPORATIONS; ESTABLISHING A FEE ON HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT REVENUE;REVISING TAXPAYER INTEGRITY FEES; CREATING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; ALLOWING THEGOVERNOR TO AUTHORIZE A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION TRANSFER FOR THE DEPARTMENTOF  PUBLIC  HEALTH  AND  HUMAN  SERVICES;  REQUIRING  THE  GOVERNOR  TO REPORT  TO  THELEGISLATIVE  FINANCE  COMMITTEE;  EXTENDING  RULEMAKING  AUTHORITY; PROVIDINGAPPROPRIATIONS; REMOVING STATUTORY APPROPRIATION…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HB 294 Montana Accessible Playgrounds Grant Program - 07/01/2017

“HB 294 creates a grant program that encourages municipalities and school districts to develop

accessible playgrounds. Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Parks Division, administers this grant program.

This program provides grants only to supplement local and private funds in order to secure other

grant funding that require a match for developing accessible playgrounds.

The legislature appropriated $100,000 for the biennium beginning July 1, 2017 and ending June

30, 2019. Any state funds distributed must be matched at a rate of 1 to 1 minimum, with $1 in

state funds to $1 or more in other grant funds. A grant may not exceed $10,000.

The department (Fish, Wildlife & Parks) shall ensure that funds are distributed only as necessary

to secure other grant funding that will increase accessibility in existing playgrounds or for the

costs of accessibility features in new playgrounds. The money may not be used during initial

construction for accessibility features required by The Americans With Disabilities Act for

newly constructed playgrounds or to upgrade existing restroom or parking facilities that are not

compliant with applicable accessibility standards.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

House Bill 638 Provider Rate Increases for Direct Care Staff - 05/09/2017

“An Act appropriating money to the Department of Public Health and Human Services for a developmental disability and aging services provider rate increase for direct care worker wages; authorizing a fund transfer from the older Montanans trust fund to direct care wages account.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Montana ABLE Legislation Senate Bill 399 - 05/05/2015

It is the intent of the legislature to give Montana residents access to a program authorized section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. 529A, to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life and to provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, federal and state medical and disability insurance, a beneficiary's employment, and other sources.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana State Approving Agency (SAA) Veterans Education - 01/16/2020

“The State Approving Agency (SAA) was established to ensure that Veterans or eligible dependents can use the GI Bill in an approved educational program. The primary function of the Montana SAA is to review, evaluate, and approve quality educational and training programs for Veterans' benefits.” 

On this page you can access links to Veterans Education Pages:

Veterans InformationSchool InformationEmployer Information and OJT/ApprenticeshipsFlight School InformationLicensing and Certification Test ReimbursementVeterans Honorary High School Diploma

Other Helpful Links

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

MONTANA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM SERVICES MANUAL - 07/01/2019

~~“PERSONAL SUPPORTSThe personal supports worker assists the member in carrying out daily living tasks and other activities essential for living in the community. Services may include assistance with homemaking, personal care, general supervision and community integration. Personal Supports may also provide the necessary assistance and supports to maintain employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting and/or day service needs of the in integrated, community settings. Personal supports activities are generally defined in the plan of care and are flexible in meeting the changing needs of the member.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Works- Business - 06/01/2019

~~“Keeping a business strong requires a skilled workforce. We have tools to post positions, tax credit incentives, and resources on workforce development and training.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Veteran Services - 04/01/2019

~~“Locate a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) SpecialistThe Employment Specialists at Montana's Job Service offices can assist all Veterans in securing employment and training, as well as refer Veterans to other service providers in both public and private agencies and organizations. Below is a list of contact information for all of Montana's Job Service offices, with specific listings for the DVOP Specialist. Visit a Montana Job Service near you.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan - 02/01/2019

~~“The 2019-2024 DPHHS strategic plan is a Department-wide plan, outlining a shared vision and mission, as well as goals, objectives, and strategies.  The plan defines common priorities and focuses resources and actions on achieving collective goals.  The plan draws on the strengths of the Department and addresses health and human services needs throughout the state.   The plan provides the framework for more detailed strategic and implementation plans for divisions, bureaus, and programs. 

DPHHS will update this strategic plan annually and use it ongoing to support continuous improvement efforts.  “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

Disability Resources - 01/28/2019

~~“Whether you are an Employer or a Job Seeker, if you have questions related to employment and disabilities, contact us for assistance. We can connect you to resources to answer those questions….The Montana Department of Labor and Industry Disability Consultant can assist you with information in the following topics• Job Listings and Referrals• Resume Assistance• Community Resource Information• Americans with Disabilities Act• Resource Library and Computers• Child Care Information• Labor Market Information• Career Exploration• Job Search Assistance• Career Planning”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Presentation to the 2019 Health and Human Services Joint Appropriation Subcommittee Disability Employment and Transitions Division - 01/28/2019

~~“The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services presented a Report on the services it provides to more than 21,000 Montanans with disabilities. These include access to services to strengthen their economic and social well-being across their life span. Details about these services and supports are available by accessing the web link to the document.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities opens at MSU - 11/27/2018

~~“The MSU LIFE Scholars Program is an inclusive post-secondary experience that opened this fall to its first seven students, according to Christy Sofianek, program director. The program consists of three main components: academics, career development and campus engagement. Students who are enrolled in the program may choose to either audit classes or take them for credit. Students this fall selected courses in meteorology, creative writing, public speaking, horse handling, aviation and tae kwon do, among other subjects, Sofianek said. LIFE Scholars also engage in extra-curricular campus activities and complete an internship in order to develop job skills and explore careers."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Cuts Contracts With Developmental Disability Caregivers - 12/28/2017

“The state health department is cutting ties at the end of March with private contractors who help people with developmental disabilities.

That’s a result of cuts to Medicaid due to the state’s budget cuts, enacted by Governor Steve Bullock because of the state bringing in lower than expected revenue.

The cuts mean that in the coming months, 2,700 people with developmental disabilities who get help from case managers will move from private organizations overseeing their care to the state health department.

The department says it was forced to make this change because of budget cuts in the 2017 legislative session and the recent special legislative session.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Partnerships for Transitions - 01/01/2018

“Partnerships in Transition is a project to address the challenges and barriers to youth transitioning from school to the adult employment and service delivery system. The project increased transition outcomes for youth with developmental disabilities statewide through a systematic approach that included skill development, capacity building, information dissemination and the creation of community and web-based information resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Montana Center for Inclusive Education - 06/01/2014

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.   Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project   The Montana State University Billings Montana Center for Inclusive Education WIPA project has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA project is to help Social Security Disability beneficiaries understand and utilize employment supports and work incentives so they can achieve their employment and vocational goals. The Community Work Incentive Coordinator (CWIC)    • Provides effective work incentives planning and assistance services to Social Security beneficiaries.    • Promotes and supports employment outcomes for Social Security beneficiaries with disabilities.    • Partners with community agencies and conducts community outreach.    • Understands Social Security Disability benefits programs as well as other federal/state/local programs for which beneficiaries might be eligible.    • Provides healthcare planning and counseling.    • The project utilizes community networks such as Vocational Rehabilitation, and Montana Offices of Public Assistance to help in the identification of individuals with disabilities that could benefit from receiving this information. The CWIC provides statewide coverage in local areas either electronically or in person.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DPHHS Developmental Services Division - 01/01/2010

In July 2009, the Disability Services Division (DSD) of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) was restructured under the Medicaid and Health Services Branch of DPHHS. In January 2010, the name was changed to Developmental Services Division.

The Montana Disability Services Division joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) in 2011, since then it has worked to address concerns reflected in the State Strategic Employment Assessment. Building a focused state workplan through key stakeholder input is reflective of the Division’s strong interest in improving employment statewide, across both urban and rural settings.   The Division continues to engage self-advocates and families in planning efforts. This is helping to create strong external pressures and demands for increasing integrated employment opportunities and the expectation of work, regardless of disability.
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Project

~~“The Montana State University Billings WIPA program has been awarded a grant as part of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement  Act that was established in 1999. The goal of the WIPA program is to assist Social Security Disability beneficiaries to make informed choices about work and to support working beneficiaries to make a successful transition to self-sufficiency.  More information about WIPA services and eligibility criteria can be found by accessing the web link.. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

~~By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The University of Montana Rural Institute Transition Projects

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:-Providing education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;-Developing creative strategies and transition models;-Offering training and assistance on-site and long distance;-Promoting systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and 

Systems
  • Other

University of Montana Rural Institute Center for Excellence in Disability Education, Research, And Service

~~The University of Montana Rural Institute has strived to collaborate with partners across Montana and across the nation to further its mission. Partners include Department of Public Health and Human Services, Montana Child Care Resource and Referral Network,  Missoula City/County Public Health Department, Montana Department of Commerce,  Montana’s Office of Public Instruction,  State Deaf-Blind Coordinator, and  Vocational Rehabilitation agencies throughout the state.

Systems
  • Other

The University of Montana Rural Transition & Employment

"What We Do

Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.

Our transition activities are unique in that they promote:

Customized Employment strategies for youth with disabilities;The use of Social Security work incentives for students;Transition planning for middle school students;Collaborative funding across agencies to create individually-driven employment supports;Self-employment as vocational experience or as a post-school outcome; andSelf-determination for youth as we empower them to identify strengths, skills, and needs for transition planning.

Visit our link to “Articles and Products” for information and tools you can use in your own programs."

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) - 02/18/2019

~~“Montana Community First Choice / Personal Assistance Programs (CFC / PAS) is a Medicaid program designed for elderly or disabled residents that require in-home care service. Individuals can receive care services from the state (agency based) or they can elect to hire and train their own care providers who are then paid by the Provider Agency. This type of self-directed care program is also referred to as cash and counseling, consumer direction, or participant direction.

One element of CFC / PAS that is attractive to many families is that certain family members can be hired to provide personal care; they can be paid caregivers. Although spouses, parents, and legal guardians are not eligible, the adult children of aging parents and ex-wives or ex-husbands can be paid to provide personal care services.  More information on CFC/PAS can be obtained by accessing the web link.""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“MFP is a demonstration program [that] helps Montana shift its long term care system by reducing the use of institutionally based services and increasing the use of home and community based services (HCBS). MFP is focused on helping individuals transition from in-patient facilities to the community. [The Program’s vision is to] create a sustainable system that supports community options as a first choice for individuals needing long term care services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations; small business owners; self-employed individuals; part time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Consumers of behavioral health services, Comprehensive behavioral health centers, Substance Abuse Prevention providers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Agencies/people who serve pregnant women, Veteran’s service organizations, The disability community, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Hospitals, Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, Post-secondary Educational Institutions, Economic Development Authorities, and Chambers of Commerce.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MT DHHS "Employing People with Disabilities" Self-Assessment Tool - 04/14/2016

Using this self-assessment tool, Governor Brian Schweitzer of Montana encourages the employers in his state to self-assess how “friendly” their business is to people with disabilities and encourages them to explore the potential of workers with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

MT INVEST Employment Specialist Training

Many of us know somebody that has a disability. Individuals with disabilities can face additional challenges to obtaining and retaining good jobs. To create an opportunity for that person to be most successful, there are several activities and/or steps to identify employment options that are a good match to the person’s skills, interests, and workplace preference (likes quiet or likes noise and activity for example). The curriculum and testing will help learners develop the skill of facilitating Employment Supports, as well as inspire and motivate employment staff to new levels of performance and professionalism. Whether you are helping a family member or friend, or whether you are or plan to be, an employment specialist professional: this information can help you bring successful results to those you are assisting.

The course consists of five sections, including resources and sample forms:

1. Introduction to Community Employment

2. Assessment for the Job Seeker

3. Job Development

4. Job Analysis, Training & Job Coaching

5. Long-Term Supports, Customer Service & Review

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities

By conducting research across the focus areas of health, employment, and community participation and independent living, RTC: Rural uncovers the relationships among personal and environmental factors that show how people experience the rural environment to maintain quality of life. This work has led to the development of health promotion programs, disability and employment policy, and support and education for providers who serve people with disabilities.

As leaders in rural disability research, our projects incorporate the collaboration of stakeholders and consumers from the disability community. We seek input and advice in shaping research projects both during their development and throughout the research process.  This partnership ensures the relevance of our research as we work to improve overall quality of life of people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Montana Center for Inclusive Education

The Montana Center on Disabilities (MCD) is part of Montana State University-Billings. MCD works to make sure that all people are part of the community.  The Center supports the idea that people with disabilities can make their own choices about how they live and work.  MCD does this by offering education and information to many people.  One focus is on giving young people with disabilities the tools to become leaders.

The vision of the Montana Center for Inclusive Education (MCIE) is creation of a fully inclusive society that values diversity. The mission supporting this vision states that MCIE serves the diverse population of Montana and provides continuing professional development opportunities for educators and direct service providers. MCIE also provides grant management and fiscal management for the Montana State University Billings (MSUB) College of Education’s externally funded projects.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The University of Montana Rural Institute: Transition & Employment Projects

“The University of Montana Rural Institute has been a leader in the area of transition planning for youth with disabilities since 1995. Activities have included:    • Provision of education and training to schools, families, students and agencies;    • Development of innovative strategies and transition models;    • Demonstration, outreach and technical assistance, both on-site and long distance;    • Promotion of systems changes to support effective transition for youth from school to adult life; and    • Information dissemination.   Since 2000, we’ve focused several of our projects on customized community employment for youth with significant disabilities. We have developed and implemented unique models of transition planning that continue to evolve as we learn more from the youth and families with whom we work.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services Waiver Renewal - 02/03/2020

“Effective July 1, 2020

On or before 03/31/2020, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will submit a request to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to renew the Montana Medicaid Severe and Disabling Mental Illness (SDMI) 1915(c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver. The department is requesting approval to operate the renewed waiver from 07/01/2020to 06/30/2025.

The Montana Medicaid SDMI 1915(c) HCBS Waiver (Waiver) provides long term services in supports to members with a severe and disabling mental illness in a community setting as an alternative to receiving long term care services in a nursing facility setting. It is a combination 1915(c) and 1915(b)(4) waiver, combining a specialized array of services with conflict free case management statewide.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Providers Manual - 05/03/2019

~~This page has general information on the Providers’ Manual“Providers must be familiar with current rules and regulations governing the Montana Medicaid program. The provider manuals are meant to assist providers in billing Medicaid; they do not contain all Medicaid rules and regulations.Rule citations in the text are a reference tool; they are not a summary of the entire rule.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/27/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals  with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work s   ervice options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid in Montana 2019 Report Presented to the 2019 Montana State Legislature - 01/17/2019

~~“Waivers –HCBS Individuals with Developmental DisabilitiesThe waiver offers 30 separate  services,  provided  in  a variety of  residential and  work settings.   Waiver participants  live  in  a  variety of  circumstances,  including family homes, group  homes,  apartments, foster homes  and  assisted  living  situations.  Work service options covered  by this  waiver include day supports  and  activities, and  supported  employment (including individual and  group  supports). A variety of  other services  and  supports  are available, including extended State Plan services.“ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Administrative Register Issue No. 22 “ARM 37.40.705” - 11/16/2018

~~“The department has revised this rule to remove reference to a home- based requirement for receipt of home health services and to clarify coverage for medical supplies, equipment, and appliances. Fiscal Impact These rule amendments will increase the number of beneficiaries who are eligible for home health services due to the removal of the home bound status requirement and the expansion of service delivery locations.  This may lead to a cost shift for programs that currently provide services to medically needy populations.  The 1915(c) HCBS Big Sky Waiver and 1915(c) Waiver for Individuals with Severe Disabling Mental Illness programs provide private-duty nursing services to 257 Medicaid members who could be eligible for home health services depending on the care they need.  The expected shift in services could lead to an increase in home health services expenses.  The total estimated annual fiscal impact for the home health services amendment is $1.1 million.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT HCBW for Individuals w/DD (0208.R06.00) Comprehensive Waiver - 07/01/2018

~~"Provides day supports and activities, homemaker, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment - follow along support, nutritionist services, occupational therapy, physical therapy, private duty nursing, speech therapy, supports brokerage, adult foster support, assisted living, behavioral support services, caregiver training and support, community transition services, companion services, environmental modifications, individual goods and services, meals, personal care, personal emergency response system (PERS), personal supports, psychological evaluation, counseling and consultation services, remote monitoring equipment, remote monitoring, retirement services, specialized medical equipment and supplies, supported employment - co-worker support, supported employment - individual employment support, supported employment - small group employment support, transportation for individuals w/IDD/DD ages 0 - no max age”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Montana Medicaid Home and Community Based Services Waiver (Big Sky Waiver) - 01/01/2017

“This Montana Medicaid program allows individuals that require nursing home level care to receive that care in their home or community in place of in a nursing home.  A wide variety care services and non-care support is provided both to the program participant and to their primary caregiver to allow them to live at home or in an assisted living residence.  Even minor home modifications which can decrease the beneficiary's reliance on other persons are considered an allowable expense.

 

This waiver is also referred to as the Elderly/Physically Disabled Waiver and Big Sky Home and Community Based Services.

 

Under this waiver, Montana residents have the option of self-direction or consumer direction. Meaning, participants have the right to choose their care providers. However, care providers are subjected to approval by the state. Interestingly, certain family members are eligible to be hired as personal care attendants. Typically, spouses are excluded from this option but under certain circumstances spouses can be paid providers.  More commonly, the adult children who are caring for aging parents are paid as caregivers. Care providers must be qualified to provide care therefore the types of care family members can be paid to provide is usually limited to personal care or homemaker services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HELP-Link - 01/01/2016

~~“HELP-Link is a free workforce program that connects Medicaid enrollees with high quality workforce training, employment services, and job openings in local communities. HELP-Link is a voluntary workforce program specifically designed to assist individuals participating in the Montana HELP Plan (also known as Medicaid Expansion) in order to improve their employment and wage outcomes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Montana HCBS Transition Plan - 06/01/2014

CMS has issued regulations that define the settings in which it is permissible for states to pay for Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS).The purpose of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in, and support full access to, the greater community.  This includes opportunities to engage in community life, control personal resources, receive services in the community, and, when appropriate, seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings to the same degree as individuals who do not receive HCBS…   To assist states in making this transition, CMS has published guidance to provide further information about settings in which HCBS may or may not be allowed.  States will be allowed a maximum of five years to make the transition and must submit a transition plan to CMS within one year of the effective date of the rule   DPHHS submitted their transition plan late 2014  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MT Medicaid HCBS Program: Supported Employment, Individual Employment Support - 01/31/2014

“Individual employment supports are habilitation services and staff supports needed by a person to acquire integrated employment or career advancement in the general workforce. Individual employment support is delivered in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting. The outcome of this service is paid employment in a competitive, customized, or self-employment setting within the general workforce that meets the person's personal and career goals, as documented in the plan of care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

When it comes to efforts to increase employment opportunities for workers with disabilities in Montana, the sky is the limit in the "Big Sky Country."

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Montana’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.61%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,068,778
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.89%
Change from
2018 to 2019
65,253
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
30,329
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.64%
Change from
2018 to 2019
46.48%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.9%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.28%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 1,068,778
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 65,253
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 30,329
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 443,716
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.48%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.28%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 75,831
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 66,377
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 127,174
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 387
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,317
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,569
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 929
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 3,675
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 474

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,728
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 10.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 26,058

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,180
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,903
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 4,141
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 62
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 599
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,179
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 11
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 6
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 925
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 38,653
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 44
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 34

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,350,592
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,657,057
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $17,141,490
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,295,357
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 189
Number of people served in facility based work. 440
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,180
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.18

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.51%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.32%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.06%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.68%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 52.45%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 294,615
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,038
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 42,808
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 25,481
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 68,289
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 245
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 381
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 626
AbilityOne wages (products). $139,465
AbilityOne wages (services). $243,632

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 16
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 16
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 441
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 441

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Supported employment services are the primary emphasis of the VRBS and CRP relationship and were the focus of the needs assessment.
Issues identified to improve supported employment services include:

1) Expansion of services to rural and remote areas by the continued certification of private providers who meet VRBS’ qualification levels for job assistance and supported employment services
2) Expansion of mental health providers as CRP’s to serve those with severe and persistent mental illness
3) Planning for the needs of consumers requiring higher level of long-term supports was identified through participation with the Supported Employment Leadership Network (the employment first network of Montana. (Page 152) Title I

Customized Employment

~~2017 Qtr. 3: Guidance was given to all VRBS business team member to make contact with two businesses monthly to provide information and assist with issues such as the untapped pool of resources offered by persons with disabilities, customized employment and VRBS resources. (Page 172) Title I

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Montana, as a small state with limited workforce program funds and a significant small-business climate (97% of all private businesses have fewer than 50 employees), faces unique challenges and is committed to ensuring its workforce system meets the needs of the state’s businesses and workers, today and in the future. Such challenges demand that WIOA core and other partners effectively leverage partnerships and collaborate in service delivery efforts. These efforts allow the state to ensure that customer expectations and needs are understood; that service offerings and locations meet those needs without duplication; that data evaluation tools and processes are in place; and that the system continually evolves and improves on its own. To support these efforts, Montana continues to work together across provider and program lines to develop a seamless, demand-driven workforce service delivery system comprised of public and private organizations, businesses, local, state and federal employment and training programs, secondary, post-secondary and adult education programs, Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services, and other human capital support agencies. (Page 64) Title I

Montana’s State Workforce Innovation Board continues to prioritize service coordination with core partners throughout Montana. In addition to Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation representation on the board, programs continue to work on program integration and braiding services. Adult Education aligned its providers to coincide with the districts outlined in the state plan to further integrate services, in addition, the board weighed in on workforce portions of each provider application submitted through Adult Education’s RFP process. The Board also included provisions under its One-Stop Certification requiring the One-Stop Operator continue updating the WIOA Committee on its progress coordinating services with core partners and work on additional coordination efforts throughout the state. (Page 91) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. (Page 61) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~7. VRBS are provided pursuant to an individualized plan for employment (IPE) which is developed jointly by the rehabilitation counselor and the eligible individual. In those situations where referral has been made to campus disability support services, the appropriate disability services staff may also be involved in helping to develop the IPE.8. The VRBS’ rehabilitation counselor and the MUS campus disability support services staff will respect the individual’s right and responsibility to fully participate in all decisions regarding his or her vocational future. The IPE shall be developed and implemented in a manner that allows the individual an opportunity to exercise informed choice in selecting an employment outcome, the specific vocational rehabilitation services that are to be provided, the entity that will provide those services, and the methods that will be used to procure the vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 130) Title I

While not part of the MOU with the OPI, VRBS commits to the development and approval of an IPE before each eligible student able to be served under the order of selection leaves the school setting. Should Montana come out of order of selection, VRBS is committed to development and approval of an IPE before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 131) Title I

The OPI shall assist school districts to inform VRBS of students with disabilities who are on an IEP and may be in need of assistance through VRBS. The notice to VRBS shall occur no later than the first IEP at which transition services are considered in order for VRBS to participate in the future development of the student’s IEP. For students enrolling closer to graduation or age 21, school districts are urged to inform VRBS as soon as those students are identified.
For all IEP meetings subsequent to the first meeting, the OPI shall encourage school districts to schedule IEP meetings for eligible students with disabilities in a timely manner, and to include notice to VRBS and the invitation for the VRBS counselor to participate subject to parental approval. Development of vocational goals and objectives shall occur in collaboration with the IEP team.
For the first IEP meeting following the initial notice to VRBS, the OPI shall encourage school districts to inform VRBS of the meeting in advance to allow sufficient time for VRBS to acquire the necessary diagnostic data to determine the student’s eligibility. The notice to VRBS should include an invitation to the VRBS counselor to participate, from then on, in transition planning within the IEP process. VRBS participation in IEP meetings is subject to parental approval. (Page 131) Title I

The following are sections of the MOU with the Office of Public Instruction that deal with financial responsibilities of each agencies and related matters.
The OPI shall assist local school districts with coordination of vocationally related services with VRBS for eligible students. Coordination should commence in the early stages of transition. Vocationally-related service coordination
and corresponding agency responsibilities should be identified in the IEP and included on the student’s IPE when appropriate.
VRBS will provide assistive technology services relevant to functions outside those assistive technology services required to access the educational program. (Page 132) Title I

The primary method of improving and expanding VR services to students with disabilities have been described elsewhere in this document. The main method has been contracting for Pre-ETS services with school districts. There also have been additional contracts with programs like Montana Youth Transitions, Montana Youth Leadership Forum, Moving On, Project Search, Easter Seals volunteer experience program, Montana Center for Inclusive Education’s Virtual college peer mentoring program, and exploring specialized Pre-ETS collaboration with the tribal VR programs located in Montana.
In addition, VRBS counselors have been encouraged to take applications with students with disabilities at a younger age and provide IPE services that are focused on vocational and career exploration rather than a specific vocational goal. (Page 164) Title I
 

Career Pathways

~~Braiding funds with other core partners for conferences and trainings focused on supporting career pathways will be the manner in which leadership dollars will align with the work of our core partners. This collaboration across core partner agencies will evolve to meet the needs of WIOA implementation and sustainability. Secondly, the state will support the eligible providers’ ability to integrate and sustain career pathways in their instructional practice. Funds will be available to support regional meetings with workforce and one-stop partners to help AE programs identify the components of job-driven training that needs to be incorporated into their curriculum. Regional professional development will make use of leadership dollars to assist programs in learning how to become responsive to local labor market demands. Thirdly, the state will use funds to develop templates and identify resources that support a systemic approach to career pathways; technical assistance will be made available for providers on the use of state developed resources that will inform their pathway implementation. (Page 41) Title I

WIOA youth providers coordinate services with Vocational Rehabilitation whenever the opportunity is presented. Youth with disabilities have benefited from services provided through both programs. Now with the emphasis on career pathways and ultimately employment there is need for more collaboration and coordination between the WIOA youth program and Vocational-Rehabilitation to ensure youth are competitively seek and obtain jobs with real pay with livable wages. (Page 83) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~VRBS coordinates with businesses through several avenues, including new initiatives that are in the planning stage, all of which are designed to enhance efforts to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities in order to facilitate the provision of VR services and transition services, including pre-employment transition services.
These initiatives include:
o A standalone VRBS Business Services website for businesses to use to learn about the services we have to offer
o Coordination with Montana Workforce Centers to input and collect data on Business Services. This allows VRBS to collaborate with the Workforce Centers and document ongoing relationships with business and ensure deliverables and services are provided.
o Improved knowledge of Labor Market Information and how to incorporate this information into Business Services practices
o Business Services Team members are Windmills curriculum trainers. This training is used as an employer-employee awareness program specifically addressing attitudinal barriers. (Page 135) Title I

VRBS believes that WIOA provides significant guidance on what constitutes 21st century VR practice. There are three new pillars to VR practice that counselors need to develop skills in:
• skills to address the evolving needs of employers and labor force to meet the demands of a changing society and work place.
• skills to assist the persons with the most significant disabilities find jobs in competitive integrated settings.
• skills to work youth and high school students with disabilities to be prepared to competitively enter the world of work and post-secondary education. (Page 145) Title I
 

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2017 Qtr. 2: Individuals working for a 14(c) employer who choose to pursue competitive integrated employment by signing the CCIR validation form are referred to VRBS. VRBS then makes contact with those individuals and initiates the process to provide VR services. (Page 174) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The State of Montana offers services to individuals with disabilities through the Job Service offices across the state. The workforce system is continually developing new and fostering ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive and integrated access to services and expanding the system’s capacity to serve customers and businesses with disabilities. Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) are funded through Wagner-Peyser and are located at each Job Service office. These coordinators assist individuals with barriers with a variety of employment-related services and serve as a resource to the workforce community. The DRCs also develop linkages with and collaborate on an ongoing basis with businesses to facilitate job placement for persons with barriers to employment. The DRCs assist anyone that encounters additional barriers to securing employment, such as individuals with physical or mental disabilities, learning disabilities, ex-felons, the aging workforce, youth at risk and veterans. Disability Resource Coordinators work with partner agencies routinely to garner mutual support and share information through Community Management Teams, interagency and community organizations. The DRCs identify gaps in service and create working groups to recognize individuals who may benefit from their services. The DRCs, in collaboration with service providers, organize Resource Fairs, provide training opportunities to customers and the business community, grow relationships with public and private schools to assist with continual learning opportunities. DRCs also attend training annually to receive new information and collaborate on the best ways to support their targeted populations. This training has been done in conjunction with Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services and the Developmental Disabilities Bureau. Montana is a single-area planning state; therefore the state of Montana designed its one-stop system to best meet the workforce needs of the state. As part of the one-stop certification, the SWIB certified the comprehensive one-stop and the affiliate centers. Part of the criteria for system certification was that the comprehensive one-stop and all its affiliate centers delivered services in an integrated and accessible way to ensure that all sites can serve all customers, regardless of ability. (Page 61) Title I

Montana’s one-stop service delivery system will comply with provisions of the American’s with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 regarding the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. As part of Montana’s one-stop operator application process, it will request that all applicants submit information on its facility’s ADA accessibility to better assess barriers to services and better serve persons with disabilities. (Page 62) Title I

All professional development will be located in accessible facilities and necessary adaptive accommodations will be made to make the content of workshop accessible to all participants (e.g., large print, Braille, speech to text software, adaptive technology). (Page 122) Title I

Veterans

Veterans and eligible persons will receive employment, training and job placement services at the Montana Job Service Centers like other Montana Job Service Center customers. However, veterans and eligible persons will receive priority of service over non-veterans when it comes to receiving employment, training, and job placement services. All veterans, spouses, and caregivers who enter a Job Service Centers that house a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialist will be screened for eligibility to determine if the veteran and other eligible persons qualify for DVOP services. DVOPs will work one on one with eligible veterans and eligible persons to provide training in job placement and employment skills to include, but not limited to, resume writing and review, interview concepts and skills, and searching for employment. (Pages 205-206) Title IV

Montana currently does not employ LVER staff. DVOPs are charged with providing case management and individualized careers services to young veterans aged 18-24, eligible spouses, and veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBEs) as outlined in Veterans Program Letter most current guidance, which include: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); special disabled and disabled veterans are those who: 1) are entitled to compensation (or who, but for the receipt of military retired pay, would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs; or, 2) were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability; (Page 206) Title IV

DVOPs provide a range of services including career planning and counseling, comprehensive assessments, individual employment plan development, short-term pre-vocational services, and other career services within the Montana Job Service Centers. These services include but are not limited to: •Outreach to locate veterans in need of intensive services; •Comprehensive Assessment, including a documented plan of service (IEP); •Counseling and career/vocational guidance; •Referral of veterans to supportive or remedial services; •Promoting Vocational Rehab and WIOA services; •Referral of veterans to job focused and outcome-driven training or certification; •Job development; •Development of VA funded Special Incentive and OJT; •Review all open case files of current participants with an SBE in a priority category and perform case management duties; and •Referral of veterans to employment opportunities. (Page 206) Title IV Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) programs are administered by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry (MTDLI) and are co-located and fully integrated within the Montana Job Service Centers. JVSG funds six FTE including Disabled Veterans Outreach Specialists (DVOP) and a Veteran Intensive Service Coordinator. Customers entering the Job Service Centers are screened for eligibility and referred to JVSG staff as appropriate. In most cases, JVSG clients are co-enrolled in Title I-B programs. (Page 207) Title IV

The JVSG and workforce center staff participates in state and local area training sessions and initiatives centered around sectors and career pathways. JVSG and workforce center staff utilize local labor market information as a tool when eligible veterans and persons are making job-driven training decisions. Through the complete training process, the DVOP specialists, WIOA and Wagner-Peyser staff will work in conjunction with the business service team to assist eligible veterans and persons to identify employment opportunities through the state labor exchange. The tools in which we measure the services provided include but not limited to: •Interviewing of Job Service Center staff •Monitoring MWorks (Montana case management system) •Review of program files and documentation •Customer surveys •Site visits •Accompanying DVET during federal audits •Quarterly Managers Report •Regional Director meetings (Page 210) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~VRBS presently has cooperative agreements with all of the six Section 121 projects (Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation, Fort Peck Reservation, Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Northern Cheyenne Reservation and the Blackfeet Reservation) located in Montana. The purpose of these agreements is to establish procedures to assure continued coordination between the 121 projects and VRBS. These agreements are implemented for the sole purpose of enhancing, to the greatest extent possible, the delivery of rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities living in the state of Montana and residing on or near the six reservations that currently have a tribal vocational rehabilitation project.
This cooperative agreement has provisions that include:
1. To make available the required supported employment/follow-along services from community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that are certified mental health providers. Follow- along services may be provided through community based psychiatric rehabilitation and support, and through case management services.
2. To serve persons identified as eligible for mental health service under Medicaid or the Mental Health Service Plan.
3. To strengthen supported employment services to Montana citizens eligible for vocational rehabilitation’s supported employment services and for community mental health services funded by the Addictive and Mental Disorders Division.
      131.To provide cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies.
      132.To establish and evaluate annual goals for our interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services. (Page 126-127) Title I

Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities are important stakeholders in providing supported employment services. Their contributions are described later as they have their own sections below.
Enrolled CRPs: VRBS works with a number of community based organizations across the state. Many are enrolled as extended support service providers to assure quality in service delivery for consumers. VRBS has enrolled programs in mental health services, developmental disabilities, as well as other disability organizations to provide these services at the local level. (Pages 134-135)
VRBS has a negotiated cooperative agreement with the Addictive & Mental Disorders Division. The cooperative agreement provides guidance for: cross-training and technical assistance between our agencies, establishment and evaluation of annual goals for interagency work towards coordinated vocational and support services, and makes available the required supported employment/extended support/follow-along services from enrolled community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and certified mental health providers. (Pages 137-138) Title I

Quality of Supported Employment Vocational Rehabilitation and Blind Services (VRBS) enrolls providers who will be making supported employment time limited services available. The enrollment process requires that providers have met a set of standards described in administrative rules. This enrollment process ensures that the providers maintain the necessary education, skills, and degree of professional expertise to provide a level of service commensurate with VRBS work service standard. VRBS values its priority partners who have met the required standards. Supported employment providers evaluated by the developmental disability system or mental health system represent the majority of our providers. The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS) are also utilized by providers. Other providers are individuals who have been selected to provide services for a limited number of consumers in a rural area where there are no established providers. (Pages 176-177) Title I

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

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2020 MYTransitions Conference - 11/16/2020

This page will have information about this year’s MYTransitions Conference which is scheduled to take place on November 16-20, 2020 in Missoula, Montana.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DPHHS Announces Plan to Continue Services While Temporarily Closing Some Offices in Response to COVID-19 - 03/19/2020

“Disability Employment and Transition Division (DETD)

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Blind and Low Vision instructional staff will continue to support Montanans with disabilities by providing employment, transition, and telecommunication access services via telephone or online where appropriate. DETD staff will be reaching out to consumers on their current caseload to arrange the best way to continue services.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HJR 50: Senior and Long-Term Care - 03/15/2020

“House Joint Resolution 50 requested a study of the Senior and Long-Term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services. The committee agreed at its June 2019 meeting to devote slightly more than 25% of the committee's time to the study.

The committee kicked off the study in September 2019 by hearing a Department of Public Health and Human Services presentation on the three Medicaid-funded home and community-based services programs that the agency administers: the Personal Assistance (PAS) program, the Community First Choice (CFC) program, and the Big Sky Waiver.

In November, members heard about issues of importance to nursing home and assisted living providers. The committee shifted its focus to home health services in January, hearing from service providers and from program participants about the barriers and challenges to providing and accessing services, including problems stemming from workforce shortages.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)