New Jersey

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State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Jersey’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.3%
Change from
2018 to 2019
8,882,190
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.79%
Change from
2018 to 2019
410,004
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,007
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.83%
Change from
2018 to 2019
40.25%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.38%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.56%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 9,005,644 8,908,520 8,882,190
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 428,932 417,347 410,004
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 161,729 156,502 165,007
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,013,232 3,993,090 3,975,956
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.71% 37.50% 40.25%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.35% 79.26% 79.56%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60% 4.10% 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.80% 17.20% 17.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.20% 8.70% 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 426,339 415,138 419,810
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 488,053 486,308 483,549
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 651,488 647,490 645,496
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 145,046 139,156 139,959
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 152,855 153,048 159,180
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,884 2,518 2,818
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 47,960 48,133 43,830
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 588
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 22,255 19,462 23,990
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 45,457 44,226 46,678

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,680 7,655 7,628
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.20% 5.30% 5.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 196,663 191,337 186,881

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 62,722 62,428 61,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 141,510 140,676 138,495
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 222,386 222,865 221,906
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.20% 28.00% 27.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.70% 3.10% 4.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,805 1,759 1,833
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 6,063 4,014 6,046
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,560 2,684 2,587
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,946 3,540 3,415
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 44 26 42
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 33 17 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 79.00% 65.00% 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.37 0.19 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 29.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 9,051 6,693 6,508
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 302,140 297,575 293,602
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 191 304 324
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 135 211 226

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A $4,537,574
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A $232,187,608
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. N/A N/A 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A N/A 8,810
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 45.99% 45.08% 44.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.72% 14.36% 14.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 7.51% 7.25% 7.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 75.29% 80.14% 98.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 53.26% 52.50% 52.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 82.32% 80.53% 83.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 89.57% 88.80% 89.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.06% 28.03% 31.47%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,103,352
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,610
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 55,312
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 365,337
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 420,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 138
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 302
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 440
AbilityOne wages (products). $440,745
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,882,285

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 33 24
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 37 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4,323 3,301 2,068
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 224 224 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,547 3,525 2,068

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~EMPLOYMENT FIRST is a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Individuals with disabilities are a multi-skilled workforce resource for employers. An inclusive workplace promotes diversity, expands the tax base and creates an expanded pool of qualified candidates for available jobs. ‘Employment First’ is about creating an environment for individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, that empowers them with choices for their future, reduces poverty, eases demand on state and community based social service agencies and provides workers with a sense of achievement.
Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services. (Page 57) Title I

DVRS subscribes to the Employment First principles adopted by the Governor in April 2012, and the agency believes that these principles should be accomplished in the context of long-term career pathway development. (Page 110) Title I

Since the Governor has declared through Executive Order, that New Jersey become the 14th Employment First state, the DVRS is reexamining all of the current MOUs in order to ensure policy aligns with the intent of Employment First. (Page 239) Title IV

The DDD serves individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, who meet the functional criteria of having a developmental disability, are eligible for and maintain Medicaid eligibility, and are at least 18 years of age at the time of application and 21 years of age to receive services. Conditions generally considered developmental disabilities include intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, spina bifida, and autism. Part of DDD’s implementation of the Employment First Initiative includes an annual discussion with individuals served, family members, and Support Coordinators providing care management services to identify each individual’s current employment status and identify how to assist the individual in reaching his/her employment outcomes. (Page 242) Title IV

New Jersey is an Employment First State, and particular attention is given to youth with the most significant disabilities who, through informed choice, wish to pursue competitive integrated employment. DVRS has approved supported employment vendors who also vendor with DDD. The DDD system provides support coordinators to their participants who identify the individualized services needed and help arrange for those supports. DVRS counselors meet with DDD support coordinators and identify supported employment vendors common to both agencies in order to ensure a smooth transition of funding. DVRS is piloting “discovery” throughout the state in order to provide counselors with the tools to address the needs of this unique population. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

New Jersey is also an Employment First state, and DVRS has identified goals to increase the number of individuals with significant ID/DD to avail themselves to DVRS services that result in an integrated competitive employment outcome. (Page 251) Title IV

• Strategic objectives to meet the DVRS Employment First initiative include the following:
• More individuals with significant developmental disabilities (DD) and ASD will have greater access to become DVRS consumers.
• DVRS staff members, vendors, and state partners will have the expectation that employment is the first and preferred option for adult activity for those with DD.
• DD consumers including transition students and persons in workshops will have increased opportunities for a smooth transition into employment via a defined process established by DVRS and state partners.
• DD consumers will be provided with programs and services that offer job targeted skill development, education and training.
• DD individuals will have increased opportunities to become DVRS consumers, obtain job skills, and obtain competitive employment that matches their interests, skills & capabilities.
• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

In addition, the agency recently signed a new Memorandum of Understanding with the DVRS, the general VR agency, and DDD, a sister agency within the New Jersey Department of Human Services and an agency that provides a full array of employment supports including extended services to individuals with a wide array of developmental disabilities, with the goal of furthering Employment First principles in the state by increasing access to supports needed to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 331) Title IV

Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act will be used for the provision of services that lead to supported employment. The goal is to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities to attain competitive, integrated employment. Priorities will be given to individuals with disabilities, including youth with disabilities, who demonstrate a need for intensive supported employment support in order to achieve substantial, gainful employment. These goals align with New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

DVRS and CBI recently entered into a new MOU with DDD. The MOU identifies that resources to expand extended services and supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities will be allocated for youth being served by DDD through individualized budget allocations specific for employment support in competitive, integrated settings. This agreement further supports New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

CBVI will continue to provide professional staff with developmental instruction that will enhance the delivery of VR services. Specifically, CBVI has and will continue to provide its staff with instruction in Customized Employment practices, the use of labor market information in career planning, leadership development programs, and other VR-specific opportunities and courses, as they are made available. (Page 305) Title IV

Additionally, under a MOU with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities, a pilot program called Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. (Page 314) Title IV

The Blindness Learning Community, a training and technical assistance initiative that focused on building the capacity of staff at supported employment agencies to more effectively serve individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind and require supported employment services to obtain and maintain a job. This training focused on blindness-specific topics, as well as person-centered approaches to evaluation and job development, including Customized Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

CBVI will develop innovative quality career and employment programs, in response to needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment.
•Develop competencies for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Supervisors in utilizing evidence-based practices, including incorporating motivational interviewing techniques, labor market information and customized employment methodologies into the counseling relationship to increase employment outcomes. (Page 343) Title IV

Update 2018: The Youth Employment Solutions pilot program was implemented in FFY 2016, and completed its first full year in the fall of 2017. Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Page 346) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~g. Sustainable Plans: The program shall have a plan for continued funding of initiative, which may include single-source or a variety of funding streams, including braided funding strategies. This should include a plan for continuing staffing and resource allocation sufficient to continue or expand the effort. (Page 146) Title I

• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

Under the DVRS EF strategy, long-term SE services will be provided by the DDD and the DMHAS for consumers who qualify for these services after a DVRS consumer is successfully placed in employment. This braiding of funding provides supports to a higher number of consumers. The DVRS continues to partner with the DDD and the DMHAS in order to do this. (Page 290) Title IV

The SCSEP program is currently working with host sites to leverage resources that will ensure successful outcomes for participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency, and expanding training opportunities in community service activities. The state will also provide a wide range of programs and services to participants, spanning multiple divisions and departments. Funds for the Older Americans Act are leveraged with state general funds, and other programs and services located within the Division of Workforce Development and Economic Opportunity. (Page 391) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~New Jersey DVRS has a significant presence in most of the high schools across the state assessing and counseling, attending IEP meetings and working with the schools andother community partners. This will provide a foundation for developing and offering a wide range of pre-employment transition services, including developing IPEs for students with disabilities, coordinating and developing internships and other summer or afterschool employment. (Page 267) Title IV

The Commission maintains, in conjunction with the DVRS, an Interagency Agreement for Transition from School to Adult Life with the appropriate SEA (Offices of Special Education Programs -OSEP). This agreement complies with the provisions of 34 CFR 361.22(b). Under the agreement, the agency provides technical consultations to transition-aged youth and/or their parents/guardians and other members of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team in the form of telephone consultations, face-to-face meetings, and/or attendance at IEP meetings. The IEP shall designate the individuals and agencies responsible for the provision of transition services to be implemented while the student is in school.
Throughout the transition process, contact with the Local Educational Agency (LEA) and the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired at the agency remains constant. The need for specialized training, specific programs and assistive technology are addressed as part of the IEP and are also developed more fully in the Transition IPE. Technical consultation begun in the earlier grades with the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired is continued through the transition process, and the transition counselor actively seeks participation in the development of IEPs. The transition counselors may also begin evaluative activities at age fourteen that ultimately lead to development of the IPE and continue to play an organizational role with technical consultations and through their active participation in school-to-work activities, task force memberships, career fairs, etc. At various points during the transition process students are evaluated and presented with opportunities to participate in specific programs funded by the Commission, such as:
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 1.0, a year-round program targeted to high school-aged blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind consumers that focuses on development of work readiness and blindness-specific skills of independence, mentorship and instruction in self-advocacy from blind and vision-impaired role models, and a work-based learning opportunity in an integrated setting;
•Life 101, a two-week summer program for Freshman and Sophomores in high school to focus on acquisition of Pre-Employment Transition Services, including core blindness-specific skills of independence, job exploration counseling, including counseling on post-secondary education opportunities and work readiness training, provided in a residential environment at the Commission’s Joseph Kohn Training Center;
•The College Prep Experience Program, dedicated to providing students likely to seek post-secondary education with the necessary skills to function successfully as blind or vision-impaired students, including post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, self-advocacy skills instruction, and work readiness skills;
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 2.0, an extension of EDGE 1.0, that serves to assist undergraduate college students in successfully making the transition from a secondary to post-secondary academic setting, and facilitates the development of work readiness and self-advocacy skills, ongoing post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, and work-based learning through internships and other work experiences;
•Work Skills Prep, a two-week summer program for blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind students, possessing additional complex disabilities, that delivers workplace readiness and self-advocacy skills instruction through hands-on activities and work-based learning opportunities. (Pages 311-312) Title IV

The agency also developed the Youth Employment Solutions (YES) program in partnership with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system, and who will benefit from supported employment services. This pilot program targeted of the agency’s Work Skills Preparation Program (WSP), a summer Pre-Employment Transition Services Program for students who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind, who have multiple disabilities, including intellectual and developmental disabilities. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment services provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program during the first 18 months of the pilot, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Pages 350-351) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~New Jersey’s Talent Development Strategy is focused on five critical themes.
Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued Credentials
Theme 2: Expanding High-Quality Employer-Driven Partnerships
Theme 3: Providing Career Navigation Assistance through One Stop Career Centers and Broad Partnerships
Theme 4: Strengthening Governance through Effective Workforce Development Boards and Regional Collaborations
Theme 5: Ensuring System Integrity through Metrics and Greater Transparency
The strategies associated with each of these themes are detailed below (see Section, II.c.2), including:
•Career Pathways Definition and Career Pathways for Secondary Education Students
•Identification of Industry-Valued Credentials
•Literacy Priorities and Standards
•Employment First Framework and Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (Page 54) Title I

Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services.
As part of this effort, New Jersey will work to expand career pathways for individuals with disabilities and to ensure that an increasing number of individuals with disabilities obtain a post-secondary industry-valued credential or degree. (Pages 57-58) Title I

b. The development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment; (Page 80) Title I

DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DVRS will encourage and provide TA to CRPs who wish to become an employment network. (Page 281) Title IV

The DVRS is housed in LWD as part of workforce development. This provides a solid foundation to work with the state’s workforce investment system. The DVRS is a core participant in the One—Stop Career Center system and maintains an active presence in the eighteen local WDBs as well as the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC), New Jersey’s State WDB. The DVRS local offices are now located within the OSCCs in 16 catchment areas throughout the state.
The LWD has established four priorities for the next three years:
1. Reemployment —What steps can LWD take to decrease the amount of time that people receive UI?
2. Opportunity —How can LWD assist more people to move from government benefits (SSI, SSDI, GA, and TANF) to work?
3. Alignment —How can LWD increase the number of people who have an industry recognized, post—secondary credential?
4. Accountability —What data and information about program performance would help us to improve services? The DVRS, as part of workforce development, provided input to these priorities to ensure that other components of the statewide workforce investment system can appropriately assist individuals with disabilities who access general services. (Page 283) Title IV

Strategies to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program include the following:
o Updating the extended employment guidelines;
o Standardizing vendor reporting forms;
o Monitoring required vendor accreditation and staff development;
o Meeting with the APSE board;
o Continuing the liaison meetings with ACCSES NJ;
o Outreaching to the DDD to provide employment services to individuals affected by deinstitutionalization;
o Encouraging CRPs to become employment networks; and
o Participating as a lead member to implement the Employment First initiative in the state. (Page 284) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~All Vocational Rehabilitation business services staff will have full access to the Salesforce platform, which will be the client relationship management system for the entire WIOA and One-Stop system statewide. This will allow smooth communication on specific businesses and WIOA Title I business representatives will be able to easily task the DVRS staff to respond to a business need or other specific activity like a modification assessment or other work. (Page 120) Title IV

The SETC has a relationship with the two State Rehabilitation Councils, outlined in prior sections, dedicated to the cause of increasing the number of individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Through the recommendations of the Councils, policies and practices are examined to ensure that One-Stop services are fully accessible to all. Members from both Councils assisted in the creation of an Accessibility Checklist. The Accessibility Checklist will be used to analyze the competency of a One-Stop Career Center in the areas of: staff training and knowledge; employer engagement; customer focus; quality of programs; and technology. (Page 162) Title IV

CBVI has developed a Business Relations Unit to strengthen the relationships with employers as a secondary customer of the VR program and to coordinate efforts with the larger employment engagement developed for the Workforce Development system in New Jersey. The members of the unit will work with employers throughout the state to assist in addressing their need for qualified candidates to fill critical vacancies in their workforce and provide education on disability-related topics. Services provided by the Business Relations Unit can include, but are not limited to, consultation and evaluation around assistive technology and accessibility issues; disability awareness training; recruitment for internships and employment vacancies; and targeted hiring events. CBVI’s Business Relations Unit will also seek opportunities for customers to engage in career exploration activities with business partners, such as informational interviews, job shadowing, and work experiences. (Page 314) Title IV

The agency is also undertaking additional strategic initiatives to improve performance in line with the new performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
•Establishing a business relations unit designed to meet the needs of the business community in New Jersey. CBVI is one of eleven state agencies in the first cohort that received intensive technical assistance from the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center at the University of Massachusetts-Boston with the goal of assisting the agency to develop this service unit to promote employer engagement;
•Coordinate with DVRS to develop targeted hiring events at a regular basis;
•Train all agency counselors on using Labor Market Information (LMI) to increase informed choice in the process of choosing a career pathway;
•Implement at the agency the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP) created by the National Employment Team to increase employment opportunities for consumers. The TAP has job listings from companies throughout the United States.
•Coordinate with the Workforce Development System in New Jersey in developing and participating in Career Fairs throughout the state. (Page 342) Title IV

LVERs in New Jersey are aligned with the business services team in order to keep their focus on employer engagement. Jobseeker staff communicate on a regular basis with the LVERs to ensure they are generating job orders consistent with the skills, education and aptitude of the veterans being served. (Page 369) Title IV

Data Collection

DVRS upgraded its case management system to a fully functional AWARE system from Alliance Enterprises during FFY 2014. This was DVRS’s first full year working in the upgraded AWARE system. AWARE made it possible for DVRS to streamline information, easier to generate and compile data and reports required by RSA in a timely manner and for internal management reviews. AWARE provides all required reporting elements from the U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). These reports include: •Quarterly VR 113 -Cumulative Caseload Report •Annual VR 911 -Case Services Report •Annual VR-2 -VR Program/Cost Report (Page 129) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act requires States and local workforce areas to certify their One-Stop Career Centers based on requirements and criteria outlined in Section 121(g). The following are the general requirements that will assist in the development and implementation of New Jersey’s One-Stop Center Certification Process. The eligibility for receiving infrastructure funding is contingent upon the establishment of an objective criteria and process that will be administered by the local WDB areas. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria and process must be developed with standards related to service coordination on the overall system. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria must include factors relating to the effectiveness, accessibility, and improvement of the one-stop delivery system. The criteria must focus on the negotiated local levels of performance, the integration of available services and the needs of the local area employers. The local board areas have the autonomy to develop additional criteria that will respond to labor market, economic and demographic conditions and trends found in the local area. The One-Stop Center Certification Process must be reviewed and or modified by state or local plans on a biennial basis. (Pages 63-64) Title I

Wagner-Peyser provides accessibility for all populations to the full range of One-Stop Career Center employment and training programs. Programs designed to serve the needs of special populations with or without significant barriers to employment are integrated into the universal access provided by Wagner-Peyser and WIOA. Members of special populations, however, identified as having significant barriers to employment often require more intensive services to reach the employment goal. Significant barriers include poor previous attachment to the workforce, literacy or language barriers, ex-offender status, educational or occupational skills gap or lack of a credential, physical or mental disability, and driver’s license suspension. To help special populations with significant barriers to employment, New Jersey has created targeted programs and dedicated staff to help ensure positive outcomes. The challenge is to meet customers where they are by creating a proactive approach to promote and serve special populations. Once special populations enter the One-Stop Career Center system, ensuring that customers receive the services needed to reach their goal becomes a staff responsibility. All One-Stop Career Center staff members need to take ownership for the customer experience by providing warm handoffs when referrals to other service providers are appropriate. That involves taking the extra time to walk customers to where they need to go, introducing them to staff that can help them, and then circling back with customers to make sure their needs were met. Staff need to follow-up with customers to ensure all jobseekers remain engaged and focused on overcoming barriers to enable them to successfully (re)enter the workforce. Maintaining a stronger, more supportive connection to customers will result in better outcomes and improve the perceived value of the One-Stop Career Centers. (Pages 76-77) Title I

Additionally, DVRS staff work with businesses to identify a firm or worksite’s need for modifications to physical, organizational or other aspects of their business in order to be more welcoming and accessible for individuals with disabilities, both as employees and as customers. DVRS staff can support other business representatives in helping companies develop better accessibility plans and make reasonable accommodations when hiring individuals with disabilities. (Pages 119-120) Title I

In addition, CBVI will work in collaboration with the WIOA Training Unit and DVRS within LWD to develop specific training protocols for staff with the One-Stop Delivery System with the goal to increase awareness about issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility of the various components of that system. CBVI staff will be available to provide ongoing technical assistance and coaching to build staff skills sets that promote a welcoming environment for individuals with disabilities, including those individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind. (Page 160) Title I

The Accessibility Checklist is used as a foundational element of the One-Stop Career Center Certification process established by the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC) in its Policy Resolution 2016-14 on September 20, 2016. Specifically the One-Stop Certification policy maintains objective criteria and processes through which local boards will certify their One-Stops. New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Center Certification by local WDBs includes as a pre-requisite that the WDB verifies the accessibility of its physical locations. This is not limited to physical accommodations; accessibility considers staff knowledge, technology, signage, marketing materials and access to programs and services, through the use of the One-Stop Accessibility Checklist. SETC Policy 2016-14 is provided in Appendix 4 of this Plan. (Pages 162-163) Title I

In relation to staff training and methods to ensure the programmatic accessibility of One-Stop Career Centers, New Jersey is putting in place a process of staff training by DVRS and CBVI for One-Stop staff. The Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CBVI) will develop appropriate blindness and low-vision sensitivity and substantive vocational rehabilitation training to be shared with the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) and its One-Stop programs so that potential blind and vision-impaired consumers who make initial contact with One-Stop programs are able to receive adequate assistance before, or instead of, referral to CBVI for comprehensive services. CBVI will work in collaboration with DVRS and other core partners in LWD to develop the inter-agency training program to be implemented at the various One-Stop Career Centers throughout the state. (Page 163) Title I

The Disability subcommittee of the WIOA Blueprint Team developed an accessibility checklist and training protocols for the One-Stop Career Centers. The SRCs should be given the opportunity to review those documents and make recommendations for improvement. In the absence of this opportunity, the accessibility checklist should be relied upon strongly in helping these facilities provide an accessible service environment. (Page 300) Title IV

Veterans

New Jersey is at the forefront in the nation in using its Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) funding to work with businesses. New Jersey’s Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veteran Opportunity Program contacts (DVOPs) have developed national best practices in making outreach to businesses, developing priority hiring partnerships with New Jersey companies, and placing veterans into employment. Many New Jersey firms and national employers with New Jersey locations are seeking qualified and dependable veterans, and many have stepped up to hire significant numbers of veterans and build coordinated hiring initiatives with Veterans and One-Stop programs. This systematic approach by large companies is something New Jersey’s WIOA and partner staff have been highly successful in building. When building one of these relationships, LWD dedicate a lead business representative (usually one of the LVERs) to be the company’s main point of contact to respond to their needs statewide, and to manage the local relationships between various company worksites and One-Stops such that the same level of services is offered across the state. The JVSG system is in the process of demonstrating and mentoring other Business Representatives in this model, since this kind of centralized contact and statewide coordination is a central part of the “sector team” approach being developed under New Jersey’s Talent Network initiative. The LVERs now work within the same LWD division as other business representatives and are fully integrated within the wider Business Services division. They are deeply embedded with the other Business Services staff at New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Centers. Because there are fewer LVERs and DVOP staff statewide, there is not representation at every One-Stop Career Center. However, they are mobile and strategically sited across New Jersey’s workforce regions, and can provide customized services to companies out of any of the One-Stop locations across New Jersey. (Page 120) Title IV

LWD will also establish guidance on how to determine veterans and veterans with significant barriers early in the triage and intake process within the One-Stop Career Centers. This will require cross training of Employment Service and WIOA-funded staff in the One-Stop Career Centers who are functionally responsible for triage. There is and will continue to be prominent signage in all One-Stop Career Centers informing customers that veterans receive priority of service. (Page 162) Title IV Veterans interested in federal employment opportunities receive preference based on the conditions of their military service and the presence of a service-connected disability. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and One-Stop Career Center staff will work with veterans to provide them with information on the federal application process and how to locate and apply for federal job opportunities using usajobs.gov. (Page 365) Title IV

Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 01-16 Change 1 or most recent guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. DVOP specialists are expected to provide intensive case management services for the VR&E customers which include a comprehensive assessment and individual employment plan based upon the employment plan provided by the VA. The goal is to provide the VR&E veterans with the tools to be successful in the job search such as a robust résumé, career guidance, and job search assistance. (Page 366) Title IV

Serving the workforce directed needs of New Jersey’s veterans is a responsibility shared by all One-Stop Career Center staff. Effective intake and customer flow procedures, staff training, technical assistance/reinforcement, and monitoring contribute to ensuring that only a subset of eligible veterans identified as having a significant barrier to employment as defined in 38 U.S.C. 4103A(a)(1) and guidance containing the Secretary’s priorities. All veterans served by the DVOP will be assessed and have an employability plan that directs the delivery of intensive services. (Pages 368-369) Title IV

DVOP specialists concentrate on the delivery of intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment as defined in USDOL guidance using a case management approach. Subsequent guidance with additional eligibility categories will not substantially impact service delivery. In a fully-integrated environment where resources are leveraged to maximize efficiency and positive outcomes, the DVOP specialist is not personally delivering all of the career services but is managing the customer toward employment based on the outcome of an assessment and employment plan. In this environment, the DVOP needs to ensure that this management is recorded in the LWD AOSOS case management system under the DVOP specialist’s account. To help ensure that accountability information is recorded in a consistent manner that reflects the level of effort by the DVOP, LWD has created a custom tab in the AOSOS case management system specifically for the DVOP specialist. Management exception reports are also being developed in partnership with LWD’s newly created Division of Workforce Research and Analytics. Unlike traditional, after-the-fact, reports that provide summary tabulations, exception reports provide actionable information from individual customer records that can be run on a regular or ad-hoc basis to identify potential mistakes, oversights, or need for customer follow-up. Items on the exception report include whether the customer is an eligible veteran, whether they have received an intensive service, whether they are in case management, and whether they have a significant barrier. Future enhancements may include whether there is a completed employment plan, and whether Federal Bonding program eligibility letter was generated for the customer. (Page 371) Title IV

DVOP specialists are out-stationed at facilities where there are veterans that might benefit from intensive services, including the East Orange Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System at 385 Tremont Street in East Orange. Outreach activities to identify and assist veterans in need of intensive services have fostered relationships with the Lyons Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System in Lyons, Fort Monmouth Shelter in Freehold, NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs at multiple locations, Lunch Break in Red Bank (homeless veterans), MOCEANS (homeless, low income, and educationally deficient veterans) in Long Branch, and the Veterans Transitional Housing Program (Veterans Haven) in Winslow. (Page 374) Title IV J

VSG staff is deployed with clearly delineated distinct duties for the DVOP specialist and LVER. These clearly distinct duties include the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans by the DVOP specialist and outreach to the employer community and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system for the LVER. DVOP specialists and LVER provide specialized service that complement and add value to OSCC veterans’ services. DVOP specialists and LVER do not duplicate services provided by other OSCC labor exchange staff. In the case of the DVOP specialist, this is ensured by a requirement that the significant barrier/18-24 year old veteran designation be documented for every customer served. (Page 375) Title IV

New Jersey will continue to distinguish military service veterans according to USDOL guidance primarily to determine eligibility for DVOP services. Covered persons must be given priority of service which means they go to the front of the line for all One-Stop services including employment, training, and placement services. In some limited cases, a spouse of a veteran can be classified as a covered person and must be given priority of service. Only covered persons who are also defined as “eligible” can be served or should be referred to the DVOP. (Page 378) Title IV

Special disabled/disabled are those eligible veterans who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs or who were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability. Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with most current guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. (Page 379) Title IV

Often employers are willing to hire veterans that possess most of the qualities they desire in an ideal employee if the hire can in some way be incentivized. LVERs have been using the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, VOW, Federal Bonding Program, and on-the-job training (OJT) grants to help seal the connection between veterans and employers. New Jersey’s state-funded Workforce Development Partnership Program has helped employers through the Opportunities4Jersey on-the-job training program defray some of the extraordinary costs involved in training new workers by paying up to 50% of new hires salary for up to six months. (Page 381) Title IV

As the LVER reorganization moves forward, LWD anticipates more job order development successes as DVOP specialists and LVERs define their roles and responsibilities along guidance supplied in VPL 03-14, VPL 04-14 and VPL 08-14. LWD will concentrate LVER staff efforts on targeted job development services for veterans especially veterans determined to be job ready after receipt of intensive services from a DVOP specialist. These measures will assist LWD in enhancing the existing processes and oversight to ensure DVOP specialists provide intensive services for veterans with employment barriers, including homeless veterans, veterans with disabilities, and the other service categories listed in most current guidance. (Page 381) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DVRS is continuing to establish an MOU with the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS). The last formal agreement ended October 1, 2014. DVRS will reach out to DMHAS to establish an MOU that outlines the coordination of services in FFY 2017. (Page 251) Title I

There are presently an approved cadre of community providers throughout the state who provide supported employment services on a fee for service basis. The Commission continues to make use of time limited job coaching services to address the needs of consumers who are chronically unemployed and those who present with issues of mental health or are otherwise ineligible for services from the DDD. The Commission has traditionally placed approximately between four and five percent of all successful rehabilitations into supported employment. (Page 353) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 75

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Bridges to Employment Supported Employment - 11/14/2019

“At Bridges to Employment, we provide comprehensive career services to meet a variety of today's workforce needs. Our services range from vocational assessment and career exploration to job placement and on-the-job training. Bridges to Employment also provides an array of additional services customized for students, entry level job seekers as well as those seeking a career change.

Whether you are an employer seeking to add qualified candidates to your workforce, or a job seeker looking for some assistance in finding just the right job match for you, you have come to the right place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment - 10/23/2019

~~“The New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment returns in 2019. The conference is developed with the input of educators, service providers, families, employers and others who are committed to the concept of Employment First, which is premised on the assumption that individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment. The conference offers case studies, public policy information, employer presentations and more.  This is the only state employment conference designed for families, educators, employers and service providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate, No. 104: Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act - 03/27/2018

“It shall be an unlawful employment practice, or, as the case may be, an unlawful discrimination:

a. For an employer, because of the race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, civil union status, domestic partnership status, affectional or sexual orientation, genetic information, pregnancy or breastfeeding, sex, gender identity or expression, disability or atypical hereditary cellular or blood trait of any individual, or because of the liability for service in the Armed Forces of the United States or the nationality of any individual, or because of the refusal to submit to a genetic test or make available the results of a genetic test to an employer, to refuse to hire or employ or to bar or to discharge or require to retire, unless justified by lawful considerations other than age, from employment such individual or to discriminate against such individual in compensation or in terms, conditions or privileges of employment;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Assembly, No. 1827: Concerns Earned Sick Leave - 03/06/2018

“Each employer shall provide earned sick leave to each employee working for the employer in the State. For every 30 hours worked, the employee shall accrue one hour of earned sick leave. The employer shall not be required to permit the employee to accrue at any one time, or carry forward from one benefit year to the next, more than 40 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is a small employer, or more than 72 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is not a small employer. Unless the employee has accrued earned sick leave prior to the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue on the effective date of this act for any employee hired before the effective date of this act and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, and if hired after the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue upon the date of hire and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, unless the employer agrees to an earlier date. The employee may use earned sick leave as it is accrued.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Jersey ABLE Legislation - 02/24/2015

Authorizes establishment of tax-exempt Achieving a Better Life Experience accounts for persons with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

New Jersey Governor’s Employment First Declaration - 04/19/2012

~~“Recognizing the opportunity for New Jersey to improve employment statistics by increasing the number of people with disabilities in the general workforce, Governor Christie declared New  Jersey an “Employment First” state on April 19, 2012.  The initiative embraces the philosophy – implemented through policies, programs, and services – that promotes competitive employment in the general workforce as the first and preferred post education outcome for people with any type of disability.The Employment First initiative sets the bar higher and creates an expectation that people with disabilities, like everyone else, will have to “opt out” of employment rather than “opt in.”  In an effort to increase employment outcomes for people with disabilities, most states have incorporated Employment First activities or philosophies of some kind.  Each State Agency, including the Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division), involved in assisting individuals with disabilities with services and supports was asked to identify and remove barriers to employment and implement policy to increase employment outcomes for the individuals with disabilities they serve." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other

Other Disability Related Services and Supports - 04/10/2019

~~“In this section, DDS has compiled a list of various other services and supports available to NJ Residents with disabilities.  The programs have been categorized by target disability as a matter of reference, although some may serve multiple populations.  Where a NJ Website was not available, a national website has been provided.   

Please note: While DDS Information and Referral Specialists are familiar with each of the programs listed and can provide general information, these programs are not administered by DDS.  Please follow the links on each page to learn more about and/or to apply to a particular program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Community Care Program Policies &Procedures Manual, Version 3.0 - 03/29/2019

~~“Supported Employment –Individual Employment SupportActivities  needed  to  help  a  participant  obtain  and  maintain  an  individual  job  in  competitive  or  customized employment, or self-employment, in an integrated work setting in the general workforce for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The service may be delivered for an intensive period upon the participant’s initial employment to support the participant who, because of their disability, would not be able to sustain employment without supports. Supports in the intensive period are delivered in a face-to-face setting, one-on-one. The service may also be delivered to a participant on a less intensive, ongoing basis (“follow along”) where supports are delivered either face-to-face or by phone with the participant and/or his or her employer. Services are individualized and may include but are not limited to: job development, discovery, training  and  systematic  instruction,  job  coaching,  benefit  support,  travel  training,  and  other  workplace  support services including services not specifically related to job-skill training that enable the participant to be successful in integrating into the job setting.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Bridges to Employment Supported Employment - 11/14/2019

“At Bridges to Employment, we provide comprehensive career services to meet a variety of today's workforce needs. Our services range from vocational assessment and career exploration to job placement and on-the-job training. Bridges to Employment also provides an array of additional services customized for students, entry level job seekers as well as those seeking a career change.

Whether you are an employer seeking to add qualified candidates to your workforce, or a job seeker looking for some assistance in finding just the right job match for you, you have come to the right place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Division of Developmental Disabilities for Supported Employment Services - 09/19/2008

"The purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is to assist the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS), the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CBVI) and the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) to operate in an efficient and successful manner to ensure quality service provision. This, in turn, will help guide efforts toward improving employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities who are entering the workforce."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility NJ - 01/15/2005

~~“Within the  past decade, considerable scholarly and applied research reports have described the barriers to employment and economic independence faced by people with disabilities. Despite many government efforts and research that provides compelling reasons for hiring people with disabilities, the rates of employment for New Jersey residents with disabilities remain unacceptably low. In New Jersey, as in the United States as a whole, residents with disabilities are half as likely as those without disabilities to be employed. Among those individuals in the state with a disability who are employed, both earnings and household incomes are lower than their non-disabled counterparts.

To reemphasize New Jersey’s concern and commitment to address these issues, New Jersey has developed DiscoverAbility: New Jersey’s Strategic Plan to Create a Comprehensive Employment System for People with Disabilities. This plan, which will become a core element of the state’s Strategic Unified Workforce Investment Plan, provides New Jersey with a shared vision and a strategic roadmap toward building a more comprehensive system of employment services and supports for people with disabilities. The plan is meant to be visionary, directional, and ambitious yet attainable — requiring coordination and cooperation, public/private partnerships, community and consumer support as well as state leadership to achieve its goals. The plan reflects a culmination of thought, advice, input, and interest from a wide variety of stakeholders including people with disabilities and their families, employers, government agencies, community-based service providers, researchers and scholars, and others interested in employment and disability issues. DiscoverAbility builds on the state’s longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities, while incorporating contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities and improve employment and economic outcomes. The plan is a clear roadmap to change but is also a fluid and evolving document. It puts forth a vision that reflects the desired  ”ideal state,” and a mission that reflects what New Jersey hopes to achieve through implementation of this plan.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Meeting the Employment Transportation Needs of People with Disabilities in New Jersey - 01/01/2005

~~“Getting and keeping a job can be a challenge for anyone, regardless of disability status.  For people with disabilities in New Jersey, the challenge can be even greater.  Although the state has a large and extensive public transportation network, many suburban and rural areas have little or no public transportation.  In addition, in areas where transportation options are available, they are not always accessible and affordable.   In an effort to address transportation and other barriers to work for people with disabilities wishing to work in a competitive work environment, in 2000, the New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Disability Services (DDS) applied for and was awarded a Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 Medicaid Infrastructure Grant from the federal Health Care Financing Administration.  The goal of the project, is to design and implement services that support individuals with disabilities as they secure and sustain competitive employment in an integrated setting. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

It’s All About Work Program

It's All About Work is a program developed by the New Jersey Association of Centers for Independent Living in conjunction with the NJ Division on Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) to help prepare transition students and adults for the world of work and inclusive community living.

This comprehensive program, is designed to meet the challenges faced by persons with disabilities whose goal is to obtain employment. ACI works with school districts in Middlesex, Somerset and Union counties to bring It's All About Work curriculum to its transition students (age 14 to 21).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NJ WorkAbility

~~NJ WorkAbility, one of the NJ FamilyCare Aged, Blind and Disabled Programs, offers people with disabilities who are working, and whose income would otherwise make them ineligible for Medicaid, the opportunity to receive full Medicaid coverage.

ELIGIBILITY

Eligibility CriteriaMust be between the ages of 16-64Must be working (full or part time) and have proof of employmentMust have been determined “disabled” by the Social Security Administration OR the Disability Review Team at the Division of Medical Assistance & Health Services (to review for disability in spite of “gainful work activity”)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Opportunity Partnership Training Grant (OPG) program - 12/20/2017

“Name of Grant Program: Opportunity Partnership…

 

The purpose of the Opportunity Partnership Training Grant (OPG) program is to assist displaced/dislocated workers secure employment by providing occupational training in industry-valued credential areas that employers have identified as a requirement of the job. The Opportunity Partnership Grants is designed to provide industry needed occupational training to a statewide audience of displaced/dislocated workers, to support the development of high-quality employer-driven partnerships, to build on career pathways in the state's key industries, and to increase the number of adults who have obtained an industry-valued credential.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

New Integrated Health Advisory Panel Holds First Meeting - 12/20/2017

“TRENTON – The advisory panel appointed to help guide the creation of an integrated primary and behavioral healthcare system in New Jersey held its first official meeting today.

Created last month by the Department of Health (DOH) as part of Governor Chris Christie’s reorganization plan which moved the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services into the DOH, this panel of experts will hold quarterly meetings to discuss the issues affecting the blending of separate systems of care in order to create one system that treats the whole person…

The 18-member Integrated Health Advisory Panel includes the DOH Commissioner or designee as Vice-Chairperson, and brings expertise in clinical services, medical care, policy, legal issues, and technology. It will assist in creating a patient-centered system of care that includes prevention, wellness, treatment, and sustained recovery through coordinated care. It also will advise on issues impacting integrated care including research, data-driven and evidence-based practices; statutory and regulatory barriers; education of community providers; and expansion of and increased access to patient-centered delivery and information integration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Pre-Employment Transition Services Grant - 08/11/2017

“Name of Grant Program:      Pre-Employment Transition Services

Fiscal Year of Grant Program:       2017

Start Date and End Date of Grant Program:    January 1, 2018 – December 31, 2018

Purpose for Which Funds will be Used:

Entities that Can Apply for Funding Under This NGO:

 

Eligible applicants for this 12-month, competitively-awarded grant must be organizations with the capacity to serve people with disabilities. Applicants can be private or public non-profit or for profit organizations including faith-based organizations (FBO), such as non-profit organizations with a religious or faith-based association, community-based organizations (CBO), such as non-profit local, neighborhood or grass-roots entities, or Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP), such as for profit or non-profit programs providing employment-related services to people with disabilities. Such organizations are generally familiar with community needs, appropriate service delivery and are often viewed by clients as comfortable venues for access to services.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Career Pathways Initiative - 06/01/2017

“Name of Grant Program:      Career Pathways Initiative

 

Fiscal Year of Grant Program:       2017

 

Start Date and End Date of Grant Program:    September 1, 2017 – August 31, 2018

 

Purpose for Which Funds will be Used:

 

The purpose of the grant is to establish model demonstrations to expand or improve programs serving persons with the most significant disabilities who are currently in extended employment. Funding for this competitive grant is under the auspices of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS), which will serve as administrator and fiscal agent for the funds awarded. In particular, the DVRS is interested in proposals that develop, implement, and build upon career pathway initiatives that will lead to community based competitive integrated employment opportunities within the seven Talent Networks. The term “career pathway programs” means a clear sequence of education coursework and training credentials and should lead to the attainment of an industry-recognized degree or credential, which may include stackable credentials of value in the labor market and that articulate progressively to higher-level credentials or degrees.

 

Entities that Can Apply for Funding Under This NGO:

 

Eligible applicants for this 12-month, competitively awarded grant must be agencies that provide Extended Employment Programs authorized and approved by the LWD. The organization must currently be using a center-based employment model and be interested in transitioning participants into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Jersey” - 02/01/2017

~~“In an effort to learn more about how states are transforming their LTSS systems under the Balancing Incentive Program, CMS and its technical assistance provider, Mission Analytics, selected five Program states that implemented structural changes successfully and used Program funds innovatively to expand access to community LTSS. In the spring of 2016, Mission Analytics conducted site visits to these states, interviewing key state staff and stakeholders, and developed case studies based on findings.

This case study focuses on the launch of New Jersey’s MLTSS program, which was supported by the Balancing Incentive Program. New Jersey spent 70% of the enhanced FMAP earned through the Program on the expanded services offered under MLTSS. These funds were directed to new individuals receiving services, additional services provided to new and existing community LTSS users, and enhanced care management offered through Managed Care Organizations (MCOs). Since the launch of MLTSS in July 2014, almost 6,000 more people have accessed community LTSS. In addition, MCOs offer expanded care management to their enrollees, connecting individuals to providers and coordinating acute and long-term care. The Balancing Incentive Program provided New Jersey with a crucial source of revenue, helping the state fund these expansions during MLTSS’ first two years.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supportive Housing Assoc. of New Jersey (SHA) Community Housing with Support: - 05/01/2016

~~“The Supportive Housing Association of New Jersey (SHA) is a statewide, nonprofit organization , founded in 1998, whose mission is to promote and maintain a strong supportive housing industry in New Jersey serving people with special needs.We do this by:Providing resources and services to our membership of over 100 organizations which include nonprofit and for-profit housing developers, service providers, allied statewide advocacy organizations, corporate vendors and professional organizations, all dedicated to the supportive housing industryStrengthening the capacity of member organizations to provide supportive housing services through information, training, and collaborationAdvocating for innovation and systems-change to provide more flexible funding and increased mainstream housing opportunities to allow people with disabilities to live as independently as possibleEducating policy makers, elected officials, people living with disabilities/families and the public on the use and benefits of the supportive housing model”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011 - 07/01/2011

In 2011 New Jersey was awarded an EDI grant to continue working on the peer wellness coach idea, but from an employment standpoint.   In light of the health challenges facing individuals with SMI in a variety of positions (i.e., service participant, peer provider), the proposed project intended to: 1) have each Supported Employment (SE) program develop the capacity to deliver wellness coaching services in order to help remove the employment barrier of poor health management; 2) help each IMR provider organization develop the capacity to deliver wellness coaching services also with the goal of removing the barrier of health concerns in the pursuit of educational and employment goals; and 3) provide wellness coaching specifically to peer providers with health and wellness concerns  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ODEP Disability Employment Initiative 2010 - 07/01/2010

The New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development will build their DEI project upon earlier Work Incentive Grant and Disability Program Navigator grant activities. The approach utilizes Rehabilitation Services Administration Technical Assistance and Continuing Education training for One-Stop Career Center staff and the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant to conduct outreach to employers and expand the availability of Technical Assistance Centers, as well as market discoverAbility events. Other strategic approaches include year round career exploration, career education and planning, self assessment, and work readiness skills training and apprenticeship opportunities through the Youth Transitions to Work program. Another key strategy will be focused on the development of self-employment opportunities, including working with the Business Leadership Network’s Disability Supplier Diversity Program to certify companies as disability owned and operated companies.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Money Follows the Person - 05/25/2007

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federal demonstration project that helps eligible individuals who have been residing in nursing homes and developmental centers for a minimum of 90 consecutive days move into a community-setting. The setting will offer transitional services and long-term supports that prevent or delay the need to return to institutionalization care. The same public funds that pay for services in the institution will pay for services in the community, only the service providers may change. Participants are monitored to ensure the program meets their needs and interviewed periodically as part of the grant’s evaluation process. Participants receive a special package of services through MFP for one year after they move from an institution.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment - 10/23/2019

~~“The New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment returns in 2019. The conference is developed with the input of educators, service providers, families, employers and others who are committed to the concept of Employment First, which is premised on the assumption that individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment. The conference offers case studies, public policy information, employer presentations and more.  This is the only state employment conference designed for families, educators, employers and service providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Dare to Dream in 2019 High School Student Leadership Conference - 12/20/2018

~~“The New Jersey Department of Education, Office of Special Education is sponsoring regional Dare to Dream Student Leadership conferences that highlight strategies and information to prepare high school students with disabilities for college and career readiness. Each conference features keynote presentations from accomplished students and young adults with disabilities who have demonstrated exemplary self-advocacy and leadership skills. Additionally, the conference program includes a variety of concurrent workshop sessions that provide conference attendees opportunities to gain insight into the transition from school to adult life process. The conference gives students the opportunity to participate in workshops led by their peers on topics such as: self-discovery, student self-advocacy, learning styles, developing career paths and understanding rights and responsibilities in college..”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DiscoverAbility NJ Leadership Academy - 01/15/2005

DiscoverAiblity NJ has partnered with Rutgers University’s Center for Nonprofit Management and Governance at the School of Social Work to provide an intensive Leadership Academy for rising professionals in the field of disability employment. New Jersey is currently developing a framework as well as identifying curriculum for the Leadership Academy to be implemented in 2011.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Training and Technical Assistance

~~“The Boggs Center Employment Team provides Supported Employment Training and Technical Assistance throughout the state  of New Jersey. Training courses are intended to provide both new and veteran employment specialists with the most up to date and proven best practices in supported employment. Furthermore, trainings can be modified or developed to meet the specific needs of agencies or general professional development. Technical Assistance is provided via consultation to support capacity building and systemic growth.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Department of Education

~~This page has resources for those who work with the Structured Learning Experiences (SLE) program.

All teachers supervising Structured Learning Experiences (SLEs) complete a training program required by DOE. This includes courses on federal and state child wage and hour laws, regulations and hazardous orders, the OSHA 10 general industry certificate program and a course on designing and implementing SLE student training plans. Nearly 1,000 teachers have participated in the required training.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Travel Training & Information Series

DiscoverAbility NJ partnered with the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University to pilot a travel/ training and information series is designed to inform job coaches/employment counselors of a variety of transportation options and how to access them. Progress to date includes the initiation of a review of federal, state, foundation/non-profit funding programs to determine additional opportunities for para-transit funding, planning for key informant listening sessions, and a data sharing agreement from NJ Transit. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Marketing & Training on Disability Benefits

DiscoverAbility NJ has partnered with the World Institute on Disability (WID) to improve the capacity to figure benefits and support for better employment outcomes by upgrading the current New Jersey Benefits Calculator (DB 101) and translating it into Spanish. DiscoverAbility NJ has partnered with the Family Resource Network to provide a NJ DB101 training program to 17 ARC Directors, 26 One Stop Directors, 9 Center for Independent Living Directors and 19 Vocational Rehabilitation offices. www.njdb101.org is a powerful internet based tool that can help job seekers with disabilities carefully plan for the transition to work through enhanced knowledge about health care coverage and other public benefits. DiscoverAbilty NJ supports this effort and is working to increase knowledge and use of the customized disability benefits website. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Garden State Employment and Training Association (GSETA) Scholarships

DiscoverAbility NJ sponsored ten scholarships for disability employment service providers to attend the GSETA Fall Conference. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility Learning at Work Symposium

DiscoverAbility NJ is a living document that was built upon the state's longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities. At the same time it included contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities (for instance, better transportation services) and improve employment and economic outcomes.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility NJ

DiscoverAbility NJ is a living document that was built upon the state's longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities. At the same time it included contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities (for instance, better transportation services) and improve employment and economic outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Community Care Program - 03/27/2019

~~“The Community Care Program is a Medicaid home and community  based services (HCBS) waiver program. It provides services for eligible individuals who live in a provider-managed setting, such as a group home or supervised apartment, or who live in their family home or their own apartment or home, to assist them to live as independently as possible. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Program Funding and Mechanics Protocol Approval - 02/14/2019

~~“In this extension of the demonstration, the state will continue healthcare delivery reforms that were initiated during the previous demonstration period. Specifically, the state will continue its expansion of managed care to Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) and behavioral health services, targeted home and community-based services (HCBS) programs for children and in-home community supports for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities. In addition, the state will implement new targeted initiatives to provide behavioral health and substance use disorder services and expand the scope and duration of supports services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. CMS has agreed to extend the state’s delivery system reform incentive payment (DSRIP) program with the condition that the program will expire on June 30, 2020.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Frequently Asked Questions: Moving DDD’s Community Care Waiver (CCW) to New Jersey’s Comprehensive Medicaid Waiver - 09/28/2017

~~“Effective November 1, 2017, DDD’s 1915(c) Community Care Waiver (CCW) will be incorporated into New Jersey’s larger and more wide-ranging 1115(a) demonstration waiver, known as the Comprehensive Medicaid Waiver.

This is an internal, administrative change.  It has no effect on an individual’s DDD-funded services and there is nothing that an individual or his parent/guardian needs to do.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Jersey” - 02/01/2017

~~“In an effort to learn more about how states are transforming their LTSS systems under the Balancing Incentive Program, CMS and its technical assistance provider, Mission Analytics, selected five Program states that implemented structural changes successfully and used Program funds innovatively to expand access to community LTSS. In the spring of 2016, Mission Analytics conducted site visits to these states, interviewing key state staff and stakeholders, and developed case studies based on findings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey HCBS Transition Plan - 04/17/2015

The Statewide Transition Plan outlines to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) how New Jersey will meet compliance with federal Home and Community Based Settings regulations by 2019.The Statewide Transition Plan sets forth the determination of New Jersey’s compliance with the regulation requirements for home and community-based settings and person-centered planning.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 02/09/2012

The New Jersey State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 12/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Department of Human Services Division of Developmental Disabilities Olmstead Plan - 05/02/2007

Action Step 8: Expansion of Community Supports (RFP to expand agencies qualified to provide housing, residential, employment/day medical, and behavioral supports) with outcome of 63 agencies qualified to provide employment/day supports, and

Action Step 9: Identification of Independent Support Coordination Agencies with a goal of awarding support coordination contracts to six additional agencies qualified for employment/day supports.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Medicaid State Plan

The New Jersey Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how New Jersey administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how New Jersey may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicaid Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federal demonstration project that helps eligible individuals who have been residing in nursing homes and developmental centers for a minimum of 90 consecutive days move into a community-setting. The setting will offer transitional services and long-term supports that prevent or delay the need to return to institutionalization care. The same public funds that pay for services in the institution will pay for services in the community, only the service providers may change. Participants are monitored to ensure the program meets their needs and interviewed periodically as part of the grant’s evaluation process. Participants receive a special package of services through MFP for one year after they move from an institution. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

With a commitment to Liberty and Prosperity, workers with disabilities are encouraged to aim high and go after their dreams for employment and economic advancement in the Garden State of New Jersey!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Jersey’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.3%
Change from
2018 to 2019
8,882,190
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.79%
Change from
2018 to 2019
410,004
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,007
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.83%
Change from
2018 to 2019
40.25%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.38%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.56%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 9,005,644 8,908,520 8,882,190
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 428,932 417,347 410,004
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 161,729 156,502 165,007
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,013,232 3,993,090 3,975,956
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.71% 37.50% 40.25%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.35% 79.26% 79.56%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60% 4.10% 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.80% 17.20% 17.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.20% 8.70% 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 426,339 415,138 419,810
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 488,053 486,308 483,549
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 651,488 647,490 645,496
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 145,046 139,156 139,959
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 152,855 153,048 159,180
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,884 2,518 2,818
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 47,960 48,133 43,830
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 588
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 22,255 19,462 23,990
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 45,457 44,226 46,678

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,680 7,655 7,628
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.20% 5.30% 5.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 196,663 191,337 186,881

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 62,722 62,428 61,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 141,510 140,676 138,495
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 222,386 222,865 221,906
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.20% 28.00% 27.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.70% 3.10% 4.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,805 1,759 1,833
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 6,063 4,014 6,046
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,560 2,684 2,587
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,946 3,540 3,415
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 44 26 42
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 33 17 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 79.00% 65.00% 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.37 0.19 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 29.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 9,051 6,693 6,508
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 302,140 297,575 293,602
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 191 304 324
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 135 211 226

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A $4,537,574
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A $232,187,608
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. N/A N/A 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A N/A 8,810
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 45.99% 45.08% 44.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.72% 14.36% 14.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 7.51% 7.25% 7.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 75.29% 80.14% 98.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 53.26% 52.50% 52.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 82.32% 80.53% 83.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 89.57% 88.80% 89.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.06% 28.03% 31.47%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,103,352
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,610
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 55,312
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 365,337
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 420,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 138
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 302
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 440
AbilityOne wages (products). $440,745
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,882,285

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 33 24
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 37 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4,323 3,301 2,068
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 224 224 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,547 3,525 2,068

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~EMPLOYMENT FIRST is a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Individuals with disabilities are a multi-skilled workforce resource for employers. An inclusive workplace promotes diversity, expands the tax base and creates an expanded pool of qualified candidates for available jobs. ‘Employment First’ is about creating an environment for individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, that empowers them with choices for their future, reduces poverty, eases demand on state and community based social service agencies and provides workers with a sense of achievement.
Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services. (Page 57) Title I

DVRS subscribes to the Employment First principles adopted by the Governor in April 2012, and the agency believes that these principles should be accomplished in the context of long-term career pathway development. (Page 110) Title I

Since the Governor has declared through Executive Order, that New Jersey become the 14th Employment First state, the DVRS is reexamining all of the current MOUs in order to ensure policy aligns with the intent of Employment First. (Page 239) Title IV

The DDD serves individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, who meet the functional criteria of having a developmental disability, are eligible for and maintain Medicaid eligibility, and are at least 18 years of age at the time of application and 21 years of age to receive services. Conditions generally considered developmental disabilities include intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, spina bifida, and autism. Part of DDD’s implementation of the Employment First Initiative includes an annual discussion with individuals served, family members, and Support Coordinators providing care management services to identify each individual’s current employment status and identify how to assist the individual in reaching his/her employment outcomes. (Page 242) Title IV

New Jersey is an Employment First State, and particular attention is given to youth with the most significant disabilities who, through informed choice, wish to pursue competitive integrated employment. DVRS has approved supported employment vendors who also vendor with DDD. The DDD system provides support coordinators to their participants who identify the individualized services needed and help arrange for those supports. DVRS counselors meet with DDD support coordinators and identify supported employment vendors common to both agencies in order to ensure a smooth transition of funding. DVRS is piloting “discovery” throughout the state in order to provide counselors with the tools to address the needs of this unique population. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

New Jersey is also an Employment First state, and DVRS has identified goals to increase the number of individuals with significant ID/DD to avail themselves to DVRS services that result in an integrated competitive employment outcome. (Page 251) Title IV

• Strategic objectives to meet the DVRS Employment First initiative include the following:
• More individuals with significant developmental disabilities (DD) and ASD will have greater access to become DVRS consumers.
• DVRS staff members, vendors, and state partners will have the expectation that employment is the first and preferred option for adult activity for those with DD.
• DD consumers including transition students and persons in workshops will have increased opportunities for a smooth transition into employment via a defined process established by DVRS and state partners.
• DD consumers will be provided with programs and services that offer job targeted skill development, education and training.
• DD individuals will have increased opportunities to become DVRS consumers, obtain job skills, and obtain competitive employment that matches their interests, skills & capabilities.
• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

In addition, the agency recently signed a new Memorandum of Understanding with the DVRS, the general VR agency, and DDD, a sister agency within the New Jersey Department of Human Services and an agency that provides a full array of employment supports including extended services to individuals with a wide array of developmental disabilities, with the goal of furthering Employment First principles in the state by increasing access to supports needed to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 331) Title IV

Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act will be used for the provision of services that lead to supported employment. The goal is to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities to attain competitive, integrated employment. Priorities will be given to individuals with disabilities, including youth with disabilities, who demonstrate a need for intensive supported employment support in order to achieve substantial, gainful employment. These goals align with New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

DVRS and CBI recently entered into a new MOU with DDD. The MOU identifies that resources to expand extended services and supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities will be allocated for youth being served by DDD through individualized budget allocations specific for employment support in competitive, integrated settings. This agreement further supports New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

CBVI will continue to provide professional staff with developmental instruction that will enhance the delivery of VR services. Specifically, CBVI has and will continue to provide its staff with instruction in Customized Employment practices, the use of labor market information in career planning, leadership development programs, and other VR-specific opportunities and courses, as they are made available. (Page 305) Title IV

Additionally, under a MOU with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities, a pilot program called Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. (Page 314) Title IV

The Blindness Learning Community, a training and technical assistance initiative that focused on building the capacity of staff at supported employment agencies to more effectively serve individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind and require supported employment services to obtain and maintain a job. This training focused on blindness-specific topics, as well as person-centered approaches to evaluation and job development, including Customized Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

CBVI will develop innovative quality career and employment programs, in response to needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment.
•Develop competencies for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Supervisors in utilizing evidence-based practices, including incorporating motivational interviewing techniques, labor market information and customized employment methodologies into the counseling relationship to increase employment outcomes. (Page 343) Title IV

Update 2018: The Youth Employment Solutions pilot program was implemented in FFY 2016, and completed its first full year in the fall of 2017. Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Page 346) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~g. Sustainable Plans: The program shall have a plan for continued funding of initiative, which may include single-source or a variety of funding streams, including braided funding strategies. This should include a plan for continuing staffing and resource allocation sufficient to continue or expand the effort. (Page 146) Title I

• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

Under the DVRS EF strategy, long-term SE services will be provided by the DDD and the DMHAS for consumers who qualify for these services after a DVRS consumer is successfully placed in employment. This braiding of funding provides supports to a higher number of consumers. The DVRS continues to partner with the DDD and the DMHAS in order to do this. (Page 290) Title IV

The SCSEP program is currently working with host sites to leverage resources that will ensure successful outcomes for participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency, and expanding training opportunities in community service activities. The state will also provide a wide range of programs and services to participants, spanning multiple divisions and departments. Funds for the Older Americans Act are leveraged with state general funds, and other programs and services located within the Division of Workforce Development and Economic Opportunity. (Page 391) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~New Jersey DVRS has a significant presence in most of the high schools across the state assessing and counseling, attending IEP meetings and working with the schools andother community partners. This will provide a foundation for developing and offering a wide range of pre-employment transition services, including developing IPEs for students with disabilities, coordinating and developing internships and other summer or afterschool employment. (Page 267) Title IV

The Commission maintains, in conjunction with the DVRS, an Interagency Agreement for Transition from School to Adult Life with the appropriate SEA (Offices of Special Education Programs -OSEP). This agreement complies with the provisions of 34 CFR 361.22(b). Under the agreement, the agency provides technical consultations to transition-aged youth and/or their parents/guardians and other members of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team in the form of telephone consultations, face-to-face meetings, and/or attendance at IEP meetings. The IEP shall designate the individuals and agencies responsible for the provision of transition services to be implemented while the student is in school.
Throughout the transition process, contact with the Local Educational Agency (LEA) and the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired at the agency remains constant. The need for specialized training, specific programs and assistive technology are addressed as part of the IEP and are also developed more fully in the Transition IPE. Technical consultation begun in the earlier grades with the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired is continued through the transition process, and the transition counselor actively seeks participation in the development of IEPs. The transition counselors may also begin evaluative activities at age fourteen that ultimately lead to development of the IPE and continue to play an organizational role with technical consultations and through their active participation in school-to-work activities, task force memberships, career fairs, etc. At various points during the transition process students are evaluated and presented with opportunities to participate in specific programs funded by the Commission, such as:
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 1.0, a year-round program targeted to high school-aged blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind consumers that focuses on development of work readiness and blindness-specific skills of independence, mentorship and instruction in self-advocacy from blind and vision-impaired role models, and a work-based learning opportunity in an integrated setting;
•Life 101, a two-week summer program for Freshman and Sophomores in high school to focus on acquisition of Pre-Employment Transition Services, including core blindness-specific skills of independence, job exploration counseling, including counseling on post-secondary education opportunities and work readiness training, provided in a residential environment at the Commission’s Joseph Kohn Training Center;
•The College Prep Experience Program, dedicated to providing students likely to seek post-secondary education with the necessary skills to function successfully as blind or vision-impaired students, including post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, self-advocacy skills instruction, and work readiness skills;
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 2.0, an extension of EDGE 1.0, that serves to assist undergraduate college students in successfully making the transition from a secondary to post-secondary academic setting, and facilitates the development of work readiness and self-advocacy skills, ongoing post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, and work-based learning through internships and other work experiences;
•Work Skills Prep, a two-week summer program for blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind students, possessing additional complex disabilities, that delivers workplace readiness and self-advocacy skills instruction through hands-on activities and work-based learning opportunities. (Pages 311-312) Title IV

The agency also developed the Youth Employment Solutions (YES) program in partnership with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system, and who will benefit from supported employment services. This pilot program targeted of the agency’s Work Skills Preparation Program (WSP), a summer Pre-Employment Transition Services Program for students who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind, who have multiple disabilities, including intellectual and developmental disabilities. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment services provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program during the first 18 months of the pilot, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Pages 350-351) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~New Jersey’s Talent Development Strategy is focused on five critical themes.
Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued Credentials
Theme 2: Expanding High-Quality Employer-Driven Partnerships
Theme 3: Providing Career Navigation Assistance through One Stop Career Centers and Broad Partnerships
Theme 4: Strengthening Governance through Effective Workforce Development Boards and Regional Collaborations
Theme 5: Ensuring System Integrity through Metrics and Greater Transparency
The strategies associated with each of these themes are detailed below (see Section, II.c.2), including:
•Career Pathways Definition and Career Pathways for Secondary Education Students
•Identification of Industry-Valued Credentials
•Literacy Priorities and Standards
•Employment First Framework and Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (Page 54) Title I

Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services.
As part of this effort, New Jersey will work to expand career pathways for individuals with disabilities and to ensure that an increasing number of individuals with disabilities obtain a post-secondary industry-valued credential or degree. (Pages 57-58) Title I

b. The development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment; (Page 80) Title I

DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DVRS will encourage and provide TA to CRPs who wish to become an employment network. (Page 281) Title IV

The DVRS is housed in LWD as part of workforce development. This provides a solid foundation to work with the state’s workforce investment system. The DVRS is a core participant in the One—Stop Career Center system and maintains an active presence in the eighteen local WDBs as well as the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC), New Jersey’s State WDB. The DVRS local offices are now located within the OSCCs in 16 catchment areas throughout the state.
The LWD has established four priorities for the next three years:
1. Reemployment —What steps can LWD take to decrease the amount of time that people receive UI?
2. Opportunity —How can LWD assist more people to move from government benefits (SSI, SSDI, GA, and TANF) to work?
3. Alignment —How can LWD increase the number of people who have an industry recognized, post—secondary credential?
4. Accountability —What data and information about program performance would help us to improve services? The DVRS, as part of workforce development, provided input to these priorities to ensure that other components of the statewide workforce investment system can appropriately assist individuals with disabilities who access general services. (Page 283) Title IV

Strategies to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program include the following:
o Updating the extended employment guidelines;
o Standardizing vendor reporting forms;
o Monitoring required vendor accreditation and staff development;
o Meeting with the APSE board;
o Continuing the liaison meetings with ACCSES NJ;
o Outreaching to the DDD to provide employment services to individuals affected by deinstitutionalization;
o Encouraging CRPs to become employment networks; and
o Participating as a lead member to implement the Employment First initiative in the state. (Page 284) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~All Vocational Rehabilitation business services staff will have full access to the Salesforce platform, which will be the client relationship management system for the entire WIOA and One-Stop system statewide. This will allow smooth communication on specific businesses and WIOA Title I business representatives will be able to easily task the DVRS staff to respond to a business need or other specific activity like a modification assessment or other work. (Page 120) Title IV

The SETC has a relationship with the two State Rehabilitation Councils, outlined in prior sections, dedicated to the cause of increasing the number of individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Through the recommendations of the Councils, policies and practices are examined to ensure that One-Stop services are fully accessible to all. Members from both Councils assisted in the creation of an Accessibility Checklist. The Accessibility Checklist will be used to analyze the competency of a One-Stop Career Center in the areas of: staff training and knowledge; employer engagement; customer focus; quality of programs; and technology. (Page 162) Title IV

CBVI has developed a Business Relations Unit to strengthen the relationships with employers as a secondary customer of the VR program and to coordinate efforts with the larger employment engagement developed for the Workforce Development system in New Jersey. The members of the unit will work with employers throughout the state to assist in addressing their need for qualified candidates to fill critical vacancies in their workforce and provide education on disability-related topics. Services provided by the Business Relations Unit can include, but are not limited to, consultation and evaluation around assistive technology and accessibility issues; disability awareness training; recruitment for internships and employment vacancies; and targeted hiring events. CBVI’s Business Relations Unit will also seek opportunities for customers to engage in career exploration activities with business partners, such as informational interviews, job shadowing, and work experiences. (Page 314) Title IV

The agency is also undertaking additional strategic initiatives to improve performance in line with the new performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
•Establishing a business relations unit designed to meet the needs of the business community in New Jersey. CBVI is one of eleven state agencies in the first cohort that received intensive technical assistance from the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center at the University of Massachusetts-Boston with the goal of assisting the agency to develop this service unit to promote employer engagement;
•Coordinate with DVRS to develop targeted hiring events at a regular basis;
•Train all agency counselors on using Labor Market Information (LMI) to increase informed choice in the process of choosing a career pathway;
•Implement at the agency the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP) created by the National Employment Team to increase employment opportunities for consumers. The TAP has job listings from companies throughout the United States.
•Coordinate with the Workforce Development System in New Jersey in developing and participating in Career Fairs throughout the state. (Page 342) Title IV

LVERs in New Jersey are aligned with the business services team in order to keep their focus on employer engagement. Jobseeker staff communicate on a regular basis with the LVERs to ensure they are generating job orders consistent with the skills, education and aptitude of the veterans being served. (Page 369) Title IV

Data Collection

DVRS upgraded its case management system to a fully functional AWARE system from Alliance Enterprises during FFY 2014. This was DVRS’s first full year working in the upgraded AWARE system. AWARE made it possible for DVRS to streamline information, easier to generate and compile data and reports required by RSA in a timely manner and for internal management reviews. AWARE provides all required reporting elements from the U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). These reports include: •Quarterly VR 113 -Cumulative Caseload Report •Annual VR 911 -Case Services Report •Annual VR-2 -VR Program/Cost Report (Page 129) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act requires States and local workforce areas to certify their One-Stop Career Centers based on requirements and criteria outlined in Section 121(g). The following are the general requirements that will assist in the development and implementation of New Jersey’s One-Stop Center Certification Process. The eligibility for receiving infrastructure funding is contingent upon the establishment of an objective criteria and process that will be administered by the local WDB areas. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria and process must be developed with standards related to service coordination on the overall system. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria must include factors relating to the effectiveness, accessibility, and improvement of the one-stop delivery system. The criteria must focus on the negotiated local levels of performance, the integration of available services and the needs of the local area employers. The local board areas have the autonomy to develop additional criteria that will respond to labor market, economic and demographic conditions and trends found in the local area. The One-Stop Center Certification Process must be reviewed and or modified by state or local plans on a biennial basis. (Pages 63-64) Title I

Wagner-Peyser provides accessibility for all populations to the full range of One-Stop Career Center employment and training programs. Programs designed to serve the needs of special populations with or without significant barriers to employment are integrated into the universal access provided by Wagner-Peyser and WIOA. Members of special populations, however, identified as having significant barriers to employment often require more intensive services to reach the employment goal. Significant barriers include poor previous attachment to the workforce, literacy or language barriers, ex-offender status, educational or occupational skills gap or lack of a credential, physical or mental disability, and driver’s license suspension. To help special populations with significant barriers to employment, New Jersey has created targeted programs and dedicated staff to help ensure positive outcomes. The challenge is to meet customers where they are by creating a proactive approach to promote and serve special populations. Once special populations enter the One-Stop Career Center system, ensuring that customers receive the services needed to reach their goal becomes a staff responsibility. All One-Stop Career Center staff members need to take ownership for the customer experience by providing warm handoffs when referrals to other service providers are appropriate. That involves taking the extra time to walk customers to where they need to go, introducing them to staff that can help them, and then circling back with customers to make sure their needs were met. Staff need to follow-up with customers to ensure all jobseekers remain engaged and focused on overcoming barriers to enable them to successfully (re)enter the workforce. Maintaining a stronger, more supportive connection to customers will result in better outcomes and improve the perceived value of the One-Stop Career Centers. (Pages 76-77) Title I

Additionally, DVRS staff work with businesses to identify a firm or worksite’s need for modifications to physical, organizational or other aspects of their business in order to be more welcoming and accessible for individuals with disabilities, both as employees and as customers. DVRS staff can support other business representatives in helping companies develop better accessibility plans and make reasonable accommodations when hiring individuals with disabilities. (Pages 119-120) Title I

In addition, CBVI will work in collaboration with the WIOA Training Unit and DVRS within LWD to develop specific training protocols for staff with the One-Stop Delivery System with the goal to increase awareness about issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility of the various components of that system. CBVI staff will be available to provide ongoing technical assistance and coaching to build staff skills sets that promote a welcoming environment for individuals with disabilities, including those individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind. (Page 160) Title I

The Accessibility Checklist is used as a foundational element of the One-Stop Career Center Certification process established by the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC) in its Policy Resolution 2016-14 on September 20, 2016. Specifically the One-Stop Certification policy maintains objective criteria and processes through which local boards will certify their One-Stops. New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Center Certification by local WDBs includes as a pre-requisite that the WDB verifies the accessibility of its physical locations. This is not limited to physical accommodations; accessibility considers staff knowledge, technology, signage, marketing materials and access to programs and services, through the use of the One-Stop Accessibility Checklist. SETC Policy 2016-14 is provided in Appendix 4 of this Plan. (Pages 162-163) Title I

In relation to staff training and methods to ensure the programmatic accessibility of One-Stop Career Centers, New Jersey is putting in place a process of staff training by DVRS and CBVI for One-Stop staff. The Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CBVI) will develop appropriate blindness and low-vision sensitivity and substantive vocational rehabilitation training to be shared with the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) and its One-Stop programs so that potential blind and vision-impaired consumers who make initial contact with One-Stop programs are able to receive adequate assistance before, or instead of, referral to CBVI for comprehensive services. CBVI will work in collaboration with DVRS and other core partners in LWD to develop the inter-agency training program to be implemented at the various One-Stop Career Centers throughout the state. (Page 163) Title I

The Disability subcommittee of the WIOA Blueprint Team developed an accessibility checklist and training protocols for the One-Stop Career Centers. The SRCs should be given the opportunity to review those documents and make recommendations for improvement. In the absence of this opportunity, the accessibility checklist should be relied upon strongly in helping these facilities provide an accessible service environment. (Page 300) Title IV

Veterans

New Jersey is at the forefront in the nation in using its Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) funding to work with businesses. New Jersey’s Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veteran Opportunity Program contacts (DVOPs) have developed national best practices in making outreach to businesses, developing priority hiring partnerships with New Jersey companies, and placing veterans into employment. Many New Jersey firms and national employers with New Jersey locations are seeking qualified and dependable veterans, and many have stepped up to hire significant numbers of veterans and build coordinated hiring initiatives with Veterans and One-Stop programs. This systematic approach by large companies is something New Jersey’s WIOA and partner staff have been highly successful in building. When building one of these relationships, LWD dedicate a lead business representative (usually one of the LVERs) to be the company’s main point of contact to respond to their needs statewide, and to manage the local relationships between various company worksites and One-Stops such that the same level of services is offered across the state. The JVSG system is in the process of demonstrating and mentoring other Business Representatives in this model, since this kind of centralized contact and statewide coordination is a central part of the “sector team” approach being developed under New Jersey’s Talent Network initiative. The LVERs now work within the same LWD division as other business representatives and are fully integrated within the wider Business Services division. They are deeply embedded with the other Business Services staff at New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Centers. Because there are fewer LVERs and DVOP staff statewide, there is not representation at every One-Stop Career Center. However, they are mobile and strategically sited across New Jersey’s workforce regions, and can provide customized services to companies out of any of the One-Stop locations across New Jersey. (Page 120) Title IV

LWD will also establish guidance on how to determine veterans and veterans with significant barriers early in the triage and intake process within the One-Stop Career Centers. This will require cross training of Employment Service and WIOA-funded staff in the One-Stop Career Centers who are functionally responsible for triage. There is and will continue to be prominent signage in all One-Stop Career Centers informing customers that veterans receive priority of service. (Page 162) Title IV Veterans interested in federal employment opportunities receive preference based on the conditions of their military service and the presence of a service-connected disability. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and One-Stop Career Center staff will work with veterans to provide them with information on the federal application process and how to locate and apply for federal job opportunities using usajobs.gov. (Page 365) Title IV

Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 01-16 Change 1 or most recent guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. DVOP specialists are expected to provide intensive case management services for the VR&E customers which include a comprehensive assessment and individual employment plan based upon the employment plan provided by the VA. The goal is to provide the VR&E veterans with the tools to be successful in the job search such as a robust résumé, career guidance, and job search assistance. (Page 366) Title IV

Serving the workforce directed needs of New Jersey’s veterans is a responsibility shared by all One-Stop Career Center staff. Effective intake and customer flow procedures, staff training, technical assistance/reinforcement, and monitoring contribute to ensuring that only a subset of eligible veterans identified as having a significant barrier to employment as defined in 38 U.S.C. 4103A(a)(1) and guidance containing the Secretary’s priorities. All veterans served by the DVOP will be assessed and have an employability plan that directs the delivery of intensive services. (Pages 368-369) Title IV

DVOP specialists concentrate on the delivery of intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment as defined in USDOL guidance using a case management approach. Subsequent guidance with additional eligibility categories will not substantially impact service delivery. In a fully-integrated environment where resources are leveraged to maximize efficiency and positive outcomes, the DVOP specialist is not personally delivering all of the career services but is managing the customer toward employment based on the outcome of an assessment and employment plan. In this environment, the DVOP needs to ensure that this management is recorded in the LWD AOSOS case management system under the DVOP specialist’s account. To help ensure that accountability information is recorded in a consistent manner that reflects the level of effort by the DVOP, LWD has created a custom tab in the AOSOS case management system specifically for the DVOP specialist. Management exception reports are also being developed in partnership with LWD’s newly created Division of Workforce Research and Analytics. Unlike traditional, after-the-fact, reports that provide summary tabulations, exception reports provide actionable information from individual customer records that can be run on a regular or ad-hoc basis to identify potential mistakes, oversights, or need for customer follow-up. Items on the exception report include whether the customer is an eligible veteran, whether they have received an intensive service, whether they are in case management, and whether they have a significant barrier. Future enhancements may include whether there is a completed employment plan, and whether Federal Bonding program eligibility letter was generated for the customer. (Page 371) Title IV

DVOP specialists are out-stationed at facilities where there are veterans that might benefit from intensive services, including the East Orange Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System at 385 Tremont Street in East Orange. Outreach activities to identify and assist veterans in need of intensive services have fostered relationships with the Lyons Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System in Lyons, Fort Monmouth Shelter in Freehold, NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs at multiple locations, Lunch Break in Red Bank (homeless veterans), MOCEANS (homeless, low income, and educationally deficient veterans) in Long Branch, and the Veterans Transitional Housing Program (Veterans Haven) in Winslow. (Page 374) Title IV J

VSG staff is deployed with clearly delineated distinct duties for the DVOP specialist and LVER. These clearly distinct duties include the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans by the DVOP specialist and outreach to the employer community and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system for the LVER. DVOP specialists and LVER provide specialized service that complement and add value to OSCC veterans’ services. DVOP specialists and LVER do not duplicate services provided by other OSCC labor exchange staff. In the case of the DVOP specialist, this is ensured by a requirement that the significant barrier/18-24 year old veteran designation be documented for every customer served. (Page 375) Title IV

New Jersey will continue to distinguish military service veterans according to USDOL guidance primarily to determine eligibility for DVOP services. Covered persons must be given priority of service which means they go to the front of the line for all One-Stop services including employment, training, and placement services. In some limited cases, a spouse of a veteran can be classified as a covered person and must be given priority of service. Only covered persons who are also defined as “eligible” can be served or should be referred to the DVOP. (Page 378) Title IV

Special disabled/disabled are those eligible veterans who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs or who were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability. Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with most current guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. (Page 379) Title IV

Often employers are willing to hire veterans that possess most of the qualities they desire in an ideal employee if the hire can in some way be incentivized. LVERs have been using the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, VOW, Federal Bonding Program, and on-the-job training (OJT) grants to help seal the connection between veterans and employers. New Jersey’s state-funded Workforce Development Partnership Program has helped employers through the Opportunities4Jersey on-the-job training program defray some of the extraordinary costs involved in training new workers by paying up to 50% of new hires salary for up to six months. (Page 381) Title IV

As the LVER reorganization moves forward, LWD anticipates more job order development successes as DVOP specialists and LVERs define their roles and responsibilities along guidance supplied in VPL 03-14, VPL 04-14 and VPL 08-14. LWD will concentrate LVER staff efforts on targeted job development services for veterans especially veterans determined to be job ready after receipt of intensive services from a DVOP specialist. These measures will assist LWD in enhancing the existing processes and oversight to ensure DVOP specialists provide intensive services for veterans with employment barriers, including homeless veterans, veterans with disabilities, and the other service categories listed in most current guidance. (Page 381) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DVRS is continuing to establish an MOU with the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS). The last formal agreement ended October 1, 2014. DVRS will reach out to DMHAS to establish an MOU that outlines the coordination of services in FFY 2017. (Page 251) Title I

There are presently an approved cadre of community providers throughout the state who provide supported employment services on a fee for service basis. The Commission continues to make use of time limited job coaching services to address the needs of consumers who are chronically unemployed and those who present with issues of mental health or are otherwise ineligible for services from the DDD. The Commission has traditionally placed approximately between four and five percent of all successful rehabilitations into supported employment. (Page 353) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 75

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Bridges to Employment Supported Employment - 11/14/2019

“At Bridges to Employment, we provide comprehensive career services to meet a variety of today's workforce needs. Our services range from vocational assessment and career exploration to job placement and on-the-job training. Bridges to Employment also provides an array of additional services customized for students, entry level job seekers as well as those seeking a career change.

Whether you are an employer seeking to add qualified candidates to your workforce, or a job seeker looking for some assistance in finding just the right job match for you, you have come to the right place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment - 10/23/2019

~~“The New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment returns in 2019. The conference is developed with the input of educators, service providers, families, employers and others who are committed to the concept of Employment First, which is premised on the assumption that individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment. The conference offers case studies, public policy information, employer presentations and more.  This is the only state employment conference designed for families, educators, employers and service providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate, No. 104: Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act - 03/27/2018

“It shall be an unlawful employment practice, or, as the case may be, an unlawful discrimination:

a. For an employer, because of the race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, civil union status, domestic partnership status, affectional or sexual orientation, genetic information, pregnancy or breastfeeding, sex, gender identity or expression, disability or atypical hereditary cellular or blood trait of any individual, or because of the liability for service in the Armed Forces of the United States or the nationality of any individual, or because of the refusal to submit to a genetic test or make available the results of a genetic test to an employer, to refuse to hire or employ or to bar or to discharge or require to retire, unless justified by lawful considerations other than age, from employment such individual or to discriminate against such individual in compensation or in terms, conditions or privileges of employment;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Assembly, No. 1827: Concerns Earned Sick Leave - 03/06/2018

“Each employer shall provide earned sick leave to each employee working for the employer in the State. For every 30 hours worked, the employee shall accrue one hour of earned sick leave. The employer shall not be required to permit the employee to accrue at any one time, or carry forward from one benefit year to the next, more than 40 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is a small employer, or more than 72 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is not a small employer. Unless the employee has accrued earned sick leave prior to the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue on the effective date of this act for any employee hired before the effective date of this act and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, and if hired after the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue upon the date of hire and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, unless the employer agrees to an earlier date. The employee may use earned sick leave as it is accrued.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Jersey ABLE Legislation - 02/24/2015

Authorizes establishment of tax-exempt Achieving a Better Life Experience accounts for persons with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

New Jersey Governor’s Employment First Declaration - 04/19/2012

~~“Recognizing the opportunity for New Jersey to improve employment statistics by increasing the number of people with disabilities in the general workforce, Governor Christie declared New  Jersey an “Employment First” state on April 19, 2012.  The initiative embraces the philosophy – implemented through policies, programs, and services – that promotes competitive employment in the general workforce as the first and preferred post education outcome for people with any type of disability.The Employment First initiative sets the bar higher and creates an expectation that people with disabilities, like everyone else, will have to “opt out” of employment rather than “opt in.”  In an effort to increase employment outcomes for people with disabilities, most states have incorporated Employment First activities or philosophies of some kind.  Each State Agency, including the Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division), involved in assisting individuals with disabilities with services and supports was asked to identify and remove barriers to employment and implement policy to increase employment outcomes for the individuals with disabilities they serve." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other

Other Disability Related Services and Supports - 04/10/2019

~~“In this section, DDS has compiled a list of various other services and supports available to NJ Residents with disabilities.  The programs have been categorized by target disability as a matter of reference, although some may serve multiple populations.  Where a NJ Website was not available, a national website has been provided.   

Please note: While DDS Information and Referral Specialists are familiar with each of the programs listed and can provide general information, these programs are not administered by DDS.  Please follow the links on each page to learn more about and/or to apply to a particular program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Community Care Program Policies &Procedures Manual, Version 3.0 - 03/29/2019

~~“Supported Employment –Individual Employment SupportActivities  needed  to  help  a  participant  obtain  and  maintain  an  individual  job  in  competitive  or  customized employment, or self-employment, in an integrated work setting in the general workforce for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The service may be delivered for an intensive period upon the participant’s initial employment to support the participant who, because of their disability, would not be able to sustain employment without supports. Supports in the intensive period are delivered in a face-to-face setting, one-on-one. The service may also be delivered to a participant on a less intensive, ongoing basis (“follow along”) where supports are delivered either face-to-face or by phone with the participant and/or his or her employer. Services are individualized and may include but are not limited to: job development, discovery, training  and  systematic  instruction,  job  coaching,  benefit  support,  travel  training,  and  other  workplace  support services including services not specifically related to job-skill training that enable the participant to be successful in integrating into the job setting.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Bridges to Employment Supported Employment - 11/14/2019

“At Bridges to Employment, we provide comprehensive career services to meet a variety of today's workforce needs. Our services range from vocational assessment and career exploration to job placement and on-the-job training. Bridges to Employment also provides an array of additional services customized for students, entry level job seekers as well as those seeking a career change.

Whether you are an employer seeking to add qualified candidates to your workforce, or a job seeker looking for some assistance in finding just the right job match for you, you have come to the right place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Division of Developmental Disabilities for Supported Employment Services - 09/19/2008

"The purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is to assist the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS), the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CBVI) and the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) to operate in an efficient and successful manner to ensure quality service provision. This, in turn, will help guide efforts toward improving employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities who are entering the workforce."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility NJ - 01/15/2005

~~“Within the  past decade, considerable scholarly and applied research reports have described the barriers to employment and economic independence faced by people with disabilities. Despite many government efforts and research that provides compelling reasons for hiring people with disabilities, the rates of employment for New Jersey residents with disabilities remain unacceptably low. In New Jersey, as in the United States as a whole, residents with disabilities are half as likely as those without disabilities to be employed. Among those individuals in the state with a disability who are employed, both earnings and household incomes are lower than their non-disabled counterparts.

To reemphasize New Jersey’s concern and commitment to address these issues, New Jersey has developed DiscoverAbility: New Jersey’s Strategic Plan to Create a Comprehensive Employment System for People with Disabilities. This plan, which will become a core element of the state’s Strategic Unified Workforce Investment Plan, provides New Jersey with a shared vision and a strategic roadmap toward building a more comprehensive system of employment services and supports for people with disabilities. The plan is meant to be visionary, directional, and ambitious yet attainable — requiring coordination and cooperation, public/private partnerships, community and consumer support as well as state leadership to achieve its goals. The plan reflects a culmination of thought, advice, input, and interest from a wide variety of stakeholders including people with disabilities and their families, employers, government agencies, community-based service providers, researchers and scholars, and others interested in employment and disability issues. DiscoverAbility builds on the state’s longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities, while incorporating contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities and improve employment and economic outcomes. The plan is a clear roadmap to change but is also a fluid and evolving document. It puts forth a vision that reflects the desired  ”ideal state,” and a mission that reflects what New Jersey hopes to achieve through implementation of this plan.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Meeting the Employment Transportation Needs of People with Disabilities in New Jersey - 01/01/2005

~~“Getting and keeping a job can be a challenge for anyone, regardless of disability status.  For people with disabilities in New Jersey, the challenge can be even greater.  Although the state has a large and extensive public transportation network, many suburban and rural areas have little or no public transportation.  In addition, in areas where transportation options are available, they are not always accessible and affordable.   In an effort to address transportation and other barriers to work for people with disabilities wishing to work in a competitive work environment, in 2000, the New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Disability Services (DDS) applied for and was awarded a Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 Medicaid Infrastructure Grant from the federal Health Care Financing Administration.  The goal of the project, is to design and implement services that support individuals with disabilities as they secure and sustain competitive employment in an integrated setting. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

It’s All About Work Program

It's All About Work is a program developed by the New Jersey Association of Centers for Independent Living in conjunction with the NJ Division on Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) to help prepare transition students and adults for the world of work and inclusive community living.

This comprehensive program, is designed to meet the challenges faced by persons with disabilities whose goal is to obtain employment. ACI works with school districts in Middlesex, Somerset and Union counties to bring It's All About Work curriculum to its transition students (age 14 to 21).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NJ WorkAbility

~~NJ WorkAbility, one of the NJ FamilyCare Aged, Blind and Disabled Programs, offers people with disabilities who are working, and whose income would otherwise make them ineligible for Medicaid, the opportunity to receive full Medicaid coverage.

ELIGIBILITY

Eligibility CriteriaMust be between the ages of 16-64Must be working (full or part time) and have proof of employmentMust have been determined “disabled” by the Social Security Administration OR the Disability Review Team at the Division of Medical Assistance & Health Services (to review for disability in spite of “gainful work activity”)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Opportunity Partnership Training Grant (OPG) program - 12/20/2017

“Name of Grant Program: Opportunity Partnership…

 

The purpose of the Opportunity Partnership Training Grant (OPG) program is to assist displaced/dislocated workers secure employment by providing occupational training in industry-valued credential areas that employers have identified as a requirement of the job. The Opportunity Partnership Grants is designed to provide industry needed occupational training to a statewide audience of displaced/dislocated workers, to support the development of high-quality employer-driven partnerships, to build on career pathways in the state's key industries, and to increase the number of adults who have obtained an industry-valued credential.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

New Integrated Health Advisory Panel Holds First Meeting - 12/20/2017

“TRENTON – The advisory panel appointed to help guide the creation of an integrated primary and behavioral healthcare system in New Jersey held its first official meeting today.

Created last month by the Department of Health (DOH) as part of Governor Chris Christie’s reorganization plan which moved the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services into the DOH, this panel of experts will hold quarterly meetings to discuss the issues affecting the blending of separate systems of care in order to create one system that treats the whole person…

The 18-member Integrated Health Advisory Panel includes the DOH Commissioner or designee as Vice-Chairperson, and brings expertise in clinical services, medical care, policy, legal issues, and technology. It will assist in creating a patient-centered system of care that includes prevention, wellness, treatment, and sustained recovery through coordinated care. It also will advise on issues impacting integrated care including research, data-driven and evidence-based practices; statutory and regulatory barriers; education of community providers; and expansion of and increased access to patient-centered delivery and information integration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Pre-Employment Transition Services Grant - 08/11/2017

“Name of Grant Program:      Pre-Employment Transition Services

Fiscal Year of Grant Program:       2017

Start Date and End Date of Grant Program:    January 1, 2018 – December 31, 2018

Purpose for Which Funds will be Used:

Entities that Can Apply for Funding Under This NGO:

 

Eligible applicants for this 12-month, competitively-awarded grant must be organizations with the capacity to serve people with disabilities. Applicants can be private or public non-profit or for profit organizations including faith-based organizations (FBO), such as non-profit organizations with a religious or faith-based association, community-based organizations (CBO), such as non-profit local, neighborhood or grass-roots entities, or Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP), such as for profit or non-profit programs providing employment-related services to people with disabilities. Such organizations are generally familiar with community needs, appropriate service delivery and are often viewed by clients as comfortable venues for access to services.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Career Pathways Initiative - 06/01/2017

“Name of Grant Program:      Career Pathways Initiative

 

Fiscal Year of Grant Program:       2017

 

Start Date and End Date of Grant Program:    September 1, 2017 – August 31, 2018

 

Purpose for Which Funds will be Used:

 

The purpose of the grant is to establish model demonstrations to expand or improve programs serving persons with the most significant disabilities who are currently in extended employment. Funding for this competitive grant is under the auspices of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS), which will serve as administrator and fiscal agent for the funds awarded. In particular, the DVRS is interested in proposals that develop, implement, and build upon career pathway initiatives that will lead to community based competitive integrated employment opportunities within the seven Talent Networks. The term “career pathway programs” means a clear sequence of education coursework and training credentials and should lead to the attainment of an industry-recognized degree or credential, which may include stackable credentials of value in the labor market and that articulate progressively to higher-level credentials or degrees.

 

Entities that Can Apply for Funding Under This NGO:

 

Eligible applicants for this 12-month, competitively awarded grant must be agencies that provide Extended Employment Programs authorized and approved by the LWD. The organization must currently be using a center-based employment model and be interested in transitioning participants into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Jersey” - 02/01/2017

~~“In an effort to learn more about how states are transforming their LTSS systems under the Balancing Incentive Program, CMS and its technical assistance provider, Mission Analytics, selected five Program states that implemented structural changes successfully and used Program funds innovatively to expand access to community LTSS. In the spring of 2016, Mission Analytics conducted site visits to these states, interviewing key state staff and stakeholders, and developed case studies based on findings.

This case study focuses on the launch of New Jersey’s MLTSS program, which was supported by the Balancing Incentive Program. New Jersey spent 70% of the enhanced FMAP earned through the Program on the expanded services offered under MLTSS. These funds were directed to new individuals receiving services, additional services provided to new and existing community LTSS users, and enhanced care management offered through Managed Care Organizations (MCOs). Since the launch of MLTSS in July 2014, almost 6,000 more people have accessed community LTSS. In addition, MCOs offer expanded care management to their enrollees, connecting individuals to providers and coordinating acute and long-term care. The Balancing Incentive Program provided New Jersey with a crucial source of revenue, helping the state fund these expansions during MLTSS’ first two years.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supportive Housing Assoc. of New Jersey (SHA) Community Housing with Support: - 05/01/2016

~~“The Supportive Housing Association of New Jersey (SHA) is a statewide, nonprofit organization , founded in 1998, whose mission is to promote and maintain a strong supportive housing industry in New Jersey serving people with special needs.We do this by:Providing resources and services to our membership of over 100 organizations which include nonprofit and for-profit housing developers, service providers, allied statewide advocacy organizations, corporate vendors and professional organizations, all dedicated to the supportive housing industryStrengthening the capacity of member organizations to provide supportive housing services through information, training, and collaborationAdvocating for innovation and systems-change to provide more flexible funding and increased mainstream housing opportunities to allow people with disabilities to live as independently as possibleEducating policy makers, elected officials, people living with disabilities/families and the public on the use and benefits of the supportive housing model”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011 - 07/01/2011

In 2011 New Jersey was awarded an EDI grant to continue working on the peer wellness coach idea, but from an employment standpoint.   In light of the health challenges facing individuals with SMI in a variety of positions (i.e., service participant, peer provider), the proposed project intended to: 1) have each Supported Employment (SE) program develop the capacity to deliver wellness coaching services in order to help remove the employment barrier of poor health management; 2) help each IMR provider organization develop the capacity to deliver wellness coaching services also with the goal of removing the barrier of health concerns in the pursuit of educational and employment goals; and 3) provide wellness coaching specifically to peer providers with health and wellness concerns  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ODEP Disability Employment Initiative 2010 - 07/01/2010

The New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development will build their DEI project upon earlier Work Incentive Grant and Disability Program Navigator grant activities. The approach utilizes Rehabilitation Services Administration Technical Assistance and Continuing Education training for One-Stop Career Center staff and the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant to conduct outreach to employers and expand the availability of Technical Assistance Centers, as well as market discoverAbility events. Other strategic approaches include year round career exploration, career education and planning, self assessment, and work readiness skills training and apprenticeship opportunities through the Youth Transitions to Work program. Another key strategy will be focused on the development of self-employment opportunities, including working with the Business Leadership Network’s Disability Supplier Diversity Program to certify companies as disability owned and operated companies.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Money Follows the Person - 05/25/2007

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federal demonstration project that helps eligible individuals who have been residing in nursing homes and developmental centers for a minimum of 90 consecutive days move into a community-setting. The setting will offer transitional services and long-term supports that prevent or delay the need to return to institutionalization care. The same public funds that pay for services in the institution will pay for services in the community, only the service providers may change. Participants are monitored to ensure the program meets their needs and interviewed periodically as part of the grant’s evaluation process. Participants receive a special package of services through MFP for one year after they move from an institution.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment - 10/23/2019

~~“The New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment returns in 2019. The conference is developed with the input of educators, service providers, families, employers and others who are committed to the concept of Employment First, which is premised on the assumption that individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment. The conference offers case studies, public policy information, employer presentations and more.  This is the only state employment conference designed for families, educators, employers and service providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Dare to Dream in 2019 High School Student Leadership Conference - 12/20/2018

~~“The New Jersey Department of Education, Office of Special Education is sponsoring regional Dare to Dream Student Leadership conferences that highlight strategies and information to prepare high school students with disabilities for college and career readiness. Each conference features keynote presentations from accomplished students and young adults with disabilities who have demonstrated exemplary self-advocacy and leadership skills. Additionally, the conference program includes a variety of concurrent workshop sessions that provide conference attendees opportunities to gain insight into the transition from school to adult life process. The conference gives students the opportunity to participate in workshops led by their peers on topics such as: self-discovery, student self-advocacy, learning styles, developing career paths and understanding rights and responsibilities in college..”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DiscoverAbility NJ Leadership Academy - 01/15/2005

DiscoverAiblity NJ has partnered with Rutgers University’s Center for Nonprofit Management and Governance at the School of Social Work to provide an intensive Leadership Academy for rising professionals in the field of disability employment. New Jersey is currently developing a framework as well as identifying curriculum for the Leadership Academy to be implemented in 2011.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Training and Technical Assistance

~~“The Boggs Center Employment Team provides Supported Employment Training and Technical Assistance throughout the state  of New Jersey. Training courses are intended to provide both new and veteran employment specialists with the most up to date and proven best practices in supported employment. Furthermore, trainings can be modified or developed to meet the specific needs of agencies or general professional development. Technical Assistance is provided via consultation to support capacity building and systemic growth.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Department of Education

~~This page has resources for those who work with the Structured Learning Experiences (SLE) program.

All teachers supervising Structured Learning Experiences (SLEs) complete a training program required by DOE. This includes courses on federal and state child wage and hour laws, regulations and hazardous orders, the OSHA 10 general industry certificate program and a course on designing and implementing SLE student training plans. Nearly 1,000 teachers have participated in the required training.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Travel Training & Information Series

DiscoverAbility NJ partnered with the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University to pilot a travel/ training and information series is designed to inform job coaches/employment counselors of a variety of transportation options and how to access them. Progress to date includes the initiation of a review of federal, state, foundation/non-profit funding programs to determine additional opportunities for para-transit funding, planning for key informant listening sessions, and a data sharing agreement from NJ Transit. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Marketing & Training on Disability Benefits

DiscoverAbility NJ has partnered with the World Institute on Disability (WID) to improve the capacity to figure benefits and support for better employment outcomes by upgrading the current New Jersey Benefits Calculator (DB 101) and translating it into Spanish. DiscoverAbility NJ has partnered with the Family Resource Network to provide a NJ DB101 training program to 17 ARC Directors, 26 One Stop Directors, 9 Center for Independent Living Directors and 19 Vocational Rehabilitation offices. www.njdb101.org is a powerful internet based tool that can help job seekers with disabilities carefully plan for the transition to work through enhanced knowledge about health care coverage and other public benefits. DiscoverAbilty NJ supports this effort and is working to increase knowledge and use of the customized disability benefits website. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Garden State Employment and Training Association (GSETA) Scholarships

DiscoverAbility NJ sponsored ten scholarships for disability employment service providers to attend the GSETA Fall Conference. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility Learning at Work Symposium

DiscoverAbility NJ is a living document that was built upon the state's longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities. At the same time it included contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities (for instance, better transportation services) and improve employment and economic outcomes.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility NJ

DiscoverAbility NJ is a living document that was built upon the state's longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities. At the same time it included contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities (for instance, better transportation services) and improve employment and economic outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Community Care Program - 03/27/2019

~~“The Community Care Program is a Medicaid home and community  based services (HCBS) waiver program. It provides services for eligible individuals who live in a provider-managed setting, such as a group home or supervised apartment, or who live in their family home or their own apartment or home, to assist them to live as independently as possible. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Program Funding and Mechanics Protocol Approval - 02/14/2019

~~“In this extension of the demonstration, the state will continue healthcare delivery reforms that were initiated during the previous demonstration period. Specifically, the state will continue its expansion of managed care to Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) and behavioral health services, targeted home and community-based services (HCBS) programs for children and in-home community supports for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities. In addition, the state will implement new targeted initiatives to provide behavioral health and substance use disorder services and expand the scope and duration of supports services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. CMS has agreed to extend the state’s delivery system reform incentive payment (DSRIP) program with the condition that the program will expire on June 30, 2020.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Frequently Asked Questions: Moving DDD’s Community Care Waiver (CCW) to New Jersey’s Comprehensive Medicaid Waiver - 09/28/2017

~~“Effective November 1, 2017, DDD’s 1915(c) Community Care Waiver (CCW) will be incorporated into New Jersey’s larger and more wide-ranging 1115(a) demonstration waiver, known as the Comprehensive Medicaid Waiver.

This is an internal, administrative change.  It has no effect on an individual’s DDD-funded services and there is nothing that an individual or his parent/guardian needs to do.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Jersey” - 02/01/2017

~~“In an effort to learn more about how states are transforming their LTSS systems under the Balancing Incentive Program, CMS and its technical assistance provider, Mission Analytics, selected five Program states that implemented structural changes successfully and used Program funds innovatively to expand access to community LTSS. In the spring of 2016, Mission Analytics conducted site visits to these states, interviewing key state staff and stakeholders, and developed case studies based on findings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey HCBS Transition Plan - 04/17/2015

The Statewide Transition Plan outlines to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) how New Jersey will meet compliance with federal Home and Community Based Settings regulations by 2019.The Statewide Transition Plan sets forth the determination of New Jersey’s compliance with the regulation requirements for home and community-based settings and person-centered planning.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 02/09/2012

The New Jersey State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 12/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Department of Human Services Division of Developmental Disabilities Olmstead Plan - 05/02/2007

Action Step 8: Expansion of Community Supports (RFP to expand agencies qualified to provide housing, residential, employment/day medical, and behavioral supports) with outcome of 63 agencies qualified to provide employment/day supports, and

Action Step 9: Identification of Independent Support Coordination Agencies with a goal of awarding support coordination contracts to six additional agencies qualified for employment/day supports.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Medicaid State Plan

The New Jersey Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how New Jersey administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how New Jersey may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicaid Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federal demonstration project that helps eligible individuals who have been residing in nursing homes and developmental centers for a minimum of 90 consecutive days move into a community-setting. The setting will offer transitional services and long-term supports that prevent or delay the need to return to institutionalization care. The same public funds that pay for services in the institution will pay for services in the community, only the service providers may change. Participants are monitored to ensure the program meets their needs and interviewed periodically as part of the grant’s evaluation process. Participants receive a special package of services through MFP for one year after they move from an institution. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

With a commitment to Liberty and Prosperity, workers with disabilities are encouraged to aim high and go after their dreams for employment and economic advancement in the Garden State of New Jersey!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Jersey’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.3%
Change from
2018 to 2019
8,882,190
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.79%
Change from
2018 to 2019
410,004
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,007
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.83%
Change from
2018 to 2019
40.25%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.38%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.56%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 9,005,644 8,908,520 8,882,190
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 428,932 417,347 410,004
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 161,729 156,502 165,007
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,013,232 3,993,090 3,975,956
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.71% 37.50% 40.25%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.35% 79.26% 79.56%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60% 4.10% 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.80% 17.20% 17.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.20% 8.70% 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 426,339 415,138 419,810
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 488,053 486,308 483,549
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 651,488 647,490 645,496
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 145,046 139,156 139,959
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 152,855 153,048 159,180
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,884 2,518 2,818
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 47,960 48,133 43,830
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 588
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 22,255 19,462 23,990
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 45,457 44,226 46,678

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,680 7,655 7,628
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.20% 5.30% 5.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 196,663 191,337 186,881

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 62,722 62,428 61,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 141,510 140,676 138,495
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 222,386 222,865 221,906
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.20% 28.00% 27.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.70% 3.10% 4.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,805 1,759 1,833
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 6,063 4,014 6,046
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,560 2,684 2,587
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,946 3,540 3,415
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.02 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 44 26 42
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 33 17 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 79.00% 65.00% 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.37 0.19 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 29.00% 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 9,051 6,693 6,508
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 302,140 297,575 293,602
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 191 304 324
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 135 211 226

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A $4,537,574
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A $232,187,608
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. N/A N/A 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A N/A 8,810
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 45.99% 45.08% 44.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.72% 14.36% 14.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 7.51% 7.25% 7.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 75.29% 80.14% 98.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 53.26% 52.50% 52.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 82.32% 80.53% 83.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 89.57% 88.80% 89.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.06% 28.03% 31.47%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,103,352
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,610
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 55,312
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 365,337
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 420,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 138
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 302
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 440
AbilityOne wages (products). $440,745
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,882,285

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 33 24
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 37 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4,323 3,301 2,068
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 224 224 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,547 3,525 2,068

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~EMPLOYMENT FIRST is a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Individuals with disabilities are a multi-skilled workforce resource for employers. An inclusive workplace promotes diversity, expands the tax base and creates an expanded pool of qualified candidates for available jobs. ‘Employment First’ is about creating an environment for individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, that empowers them with choices for their future, reduces poverty, eases demand on state and community based social service agencies and provides workers with a sense of achievement.
Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services. (Page 57) Title I

DVRS subscribes to the Employment First principles adopted by the Governor in April 2012, and the agency believes that these principles should be accomplished in the context of long-term career pathway development. (Page 110) Title I

Since the Governor has declared through Executive Order, that New Jersey become the 14th Employment First state, the DVRS is reexamining all of the current MOUs in order to ensure policy aligns with the intent of Employment First. (Page 239) Title IV

The DDD serves individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, who meet the functional criteria of having a developmental disability, are eligible for and maintain Medicaid eligibility, and are at least 18 years of age at the time of application and 21 years of age to receive services. Conditions generally considered developmental disabilities include intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, spina bifida, and autism. Part of DDD’s implementation of the Employment First Initiative includes an annual discussion with individuals served, family members, and Support Coordinators providing care management services to identify each individual’s current employment status and identify how to assist the individual in reaching his/her employment outcomes. (Page 242) Title IV

New Jersey is an Employment First State, and particular attention is given to youth with the most significant disabilities who, through informed choice, wish to pursue competitive integrated employment. DVRS has approved supported employment vendors who also vendor with DDD. The DDD system provides support coordinators to their participants who identify the individualized services needed and help arrange for those supports. DVRS counselors meet with DDD support coordinators and identify supported employment vendors common to both agencies in order to ensure a smooth transition of funding. DVRS is piloting “discovery” throughout the state in order to provide counselors with the tools to address the needs of this unique population. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

New Jersey is also an Employment First state, and DVRS has identified goals to increase the number of individuals with significant ID/DD to avail themselves to DVRS services that result in an integrated competitive employment outcome. (Page 251) Title IV

• Strategic objectives to meet the DVRS Employment First initiative include the following:
• More individuals with significant developmental disabilities (DD) and ASD will have greater access to become DVRS consumers.
• DVRS staff members, vendors, and state partners will have the expectation that employment is the first and preferred option for adult activity for those with DD.
• DD consumers including transition students and persons in workshops will have increased opportunities for a smooth transition into employment via a defined process established by DVRS and state partners.
• DD consumers will be provided with programs and services that offer job targeted skill development, education and training.
• DD individuals will have increased opportunities to become DVRS consumers, obtain job skills, and obtain competitive employment that matches their interests, skills & capabilities.
• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

In addition, the agency recently signed a new Memorandum of Understanding with the DVRS, the general VR agency, and DDD, a sister agency within the New Jersey Department of Human Services and an agency that provides a full array of employment supports including extended services to individuals with a wide array of developmental disabilities, with the goal of furthering Employment First principles in the state by increasing access to supports needed to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 331) Title IV

Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act will be used for the provision of services that lead to supported employment. The goal is to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities to attain competitive, integrated employment. Priorities will be given to individuals with disabilities, including youth with disabilities, who demonstrate a need for intensive supported employment support in order to achieve substantial, gainful employment. These goals align with New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

DVRS and CBI recently entered into a new MOU with DDD. The MOU identifies that resources to expand extended services and supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities will be allocated for youth being served by DDD through individualized budget allocations specific for employment support in competitive, integrated settings. This agreement further supports New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

CBVI will continue to provide professional staff with developmental instruction that will enhance the delivery of VR services. Specifically, CBVI has and will continue to provide its staff with instruction in Customized Employment practices, the use of labor market information in career planning, leadership development programs, and other VR-specific opportunities and courses, as they are made available. (Page 305) Title IV

Additionally, under a MOU with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities, a pilot program called Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. (Page 314) Title IV

The Blindness Learning Community, a training and technical assistance initiative that focused on building the capacity of staff at supported employment agencies to more effectively serve individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind and require supported employment services to obtain and maintain a job. This training focused on blindness-specific topics, as well as person-centered approaches to evaluation and job development, including Customized Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

CBVI will develop innovative quality career and employment programs, in response to needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment.
•Develop competencies for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Supervisors in utilizing evidence-based practices, including incorporating motivational interviewing techniques, labor market information and customized employment methodologies into the counseling relationship to increase employment outcomes. (Page 343) Title IV

Update 2018: The Youth Employment Solutions pilot program was implemented in FFY 2016, and completed its first full year in the fall of 2017. Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Page 346) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~g. Sustainable Plans: The program shall have a plan for continued funding of initiative, which may include single-source or a variety of funding streams, including braided funding strategies. This should include a plan for continuing staffing and resource allocation sufficient to continue or expand the effort. (Page 146) Title I

• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

Under the DVRS EF strategy, long-term SE services will be provided by the DDD and the DMHAS for consumers who qualify for these services after a DVRS consumer is successfully placed in employment. This braiding of funding provides supports to a higher number of consumers. The DVRS continues to partner with the DDD and the DMHAS in order to do this. (Page 290) Title IV

The SCSEP program is currently working with host sites to leverage resources that will ensure successful outcomes for participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency, and expanding training opportunities in community service activities. The state will also provide a wide range of programs and services to participants, spanning multiple divisions and departments. Funds for the Older Americans Act are leveraged with state general funds, and other programs and services located within the Division of Workforce Development and Economic Opportunity. (Page 391) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~New Jersey DVRS has a significant presence in most of the high schools across the state assessing and counseling, attending IEP meetings and working with the schools andother community partners. This will provide a foundation for developing and offering a wide range of pre-employment transition services, including developing IPEs for students with disabilities, coordinating and developing internships and other summer or afterschool employment. (Page 267) Title IV

The Commission maintains, in conjunction with the DVRS, an Interagency Agreement for Transition from School to Adult Life with the appropriate SEA (Offices of Special Education Programs -OSEP). This agreement complies with the provisions of 34 CFR 361.22(b). Under the agreement, the agency provides technical consultations to transition-aged youth and/or their parents/guardians and other members of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team in the form of telephone consultations, face-to-face meetings, and/or attendance at IEP meetings. The IEP shall designate the individuals and agencies responsible for the provision of transition services to be implemented while the student is in school.
Throughout the transition process, contact with the Local Educational Agency (LEA) and the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired at the agency remains constant. The need for specialized training, specific programs and assistive technology are addressed as part of the IEP and are also developed more fully in the Transition IPE. Technical consultation begun in the earlier grades with the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired is continued through the transition process, and the transition counselor actively seeks participation in the development of IEPs. The transition counselors may also begin evaluative activities at age fourteen that ultimately lead to development of the IPE and continue to play an organizational role with technical consultations and through their active participation in school-to-work activities, task force memberships, career fairs, etc. At various points during the transition process students are evaluated and presented with opportunities to participate in specific programs funded by the Commission, such as:
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 1.0, a year-round program targeted to high school-aged blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind consumers that focuses on development of work readiness and blindness-specific skills of independence, mentorship and instruction in self-advocacy from blind and vision-impaired role models, and a work-based learning opportunity in an integrated setting;
•Life 101, a two-week summer program for Freshman and Sophomores in high school to focus on acquisition of Pre-Employment Transition Services, including core blindness-specific skills of independence, job exploration counseling, including counseling on post-secondary education opportunities and work readiness training, provided in a residential environment at the Commission’s Joseph Kohn Training Center;
•The College Prep Experience Program, dedicated to providing students likely to seek post-secondary education with the necessary skills to function successfully as blind or vision-impaired students, including post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, self-advocacy skills instruction, and work readiness skills;
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 2.0, an extension of EDGE 1.0, that serves to assist undergraduate college students in successfully making the transition from a secondary to post-secondary academic setting, and facilitates the development of work readiness and self-advocacy skills, ongoing post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, and work-based learning through internships and other work experiences;
•Work Skills Prep, a two-week summer program for blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind students, possessing additional complex disabilities, that delivers workplace readiness and self-advocacy skills instruction through hands-on activities and work-based learning opportunities. (Pages 311-312) Title IV

The agency also developed the Youth Employment Solutions (YES) program in partnership with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system, and who will benefit from supported employment services. This pilot program targeted of the agency’s Work Skills Preparation Program (WSP), a summer Pre-Employment Transition Services Program for students who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind, who have multiple disabilities, including intellectual and developmental disabilities. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment services provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program during the first 18 months of the pilot, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Pages 350-351) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~New Jersey’s Talent Development Strategy is focused on five critical themes.
Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued Credentials
Theme 2: Expanding High-Quality Employer-Driven Partnerships
Theme 3: Providing Career Navigation Assistance through One Stop Career Centers and Broad Partnerships
Theme 4: Strengthening Governance through Effective Workforce Development Boards and Regional Collaborations
Theme 5: Ensuring System Integrity through Metrics and Greater Transparency
The strategies associated with each of these themes are detailed below (see Section, II.c.2), including:
•Career Pathways Definition and Career Pathways for Secondary Education Students
•Identification of Industry-Valued Credentials
•Literacy Priorities and Standards
•Employment First Framework and Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (Page 54) Title I

Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services.
As part of this effort, New Jersey will work to expand career pathways for individuals with disabilities and to ensure that an increasing number of individuals with disabilities obtain a post-secondary industry-valued credential or degree. (Pages 57-58) Title I

b. The development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment; (Page 80) Title I

DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DVRS will encourage and provide TA to CRPs who wish to become an employment network. (Page 281) Title IV

The DVRS is housed in LWD as part of workforce development. This provides a solid foundation to work with the state’s workforce investment system. The DVRS is a core participant in the One—Stop Career Center system and maintains an active presence in the eighteen local WDBs as well as the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC), New Jersey’s State WDB. The DVRS local offices are now located within the OSCCs in 16 catchment areas throughout the state.
The LWD has established four priorities for the next three years:
1. Reemployment —What steps can LWD take to decrease the amount of time that people receive UI?
2. Opportunity —How can LWD assist more people to move from government benefits (SSI, SSDI, GA, and TANF) to work?
3. Alignment —How can LWD increase the number of people who have an industry recognized, post—secondary credential?
4. Accountability —What data and information about program performance would help us to improve services? The DVRS, as part of workforce development, provided input to these priorities to ensure that other components of the statewide workforce investment system can appropriately assist individuals with disabilities who access general services. (Page 283) Title IV

Strategies to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program include the following:
o Updating the extended employment guidelines;
o Standardizing vendor reporting forms;
o Monitoring required vendor accreditation and staff development;
o Meeting with the APSE board;
o Continuing the liaison meetings with ACCSES NJ;
o Outreaching to the DDD to provide employment services to individuals affected by deinstitutionalization;
o Encouraging CRPs to become employment networks; and
o Participating as a lead member to implement the Employment First initiative in the state. (Page 284) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~All Vocational Rehabilitation business services staff will have full access to the Salesforce platform, which will be the client relationship management system for the entire WIOA and One-Stop system statewide. This will allow smooth communication on specific businesses and WIOA Title I business representatives will be able to easily task the DVRS staff to respond to a business need or other specific activity like a modification assessment or other work. (Page 120) Title IV

The SETC has a relationship with the two State Rehabilitation Councils, outlined in prior sections, dedicated to the cause of increasing the number of individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Through the recommendations of the Councils, policies and practices are examined to ensure that One-Stop services are fully accessible to all. Members from both Councils assisted in the creation of an Accessibility Checklist. The Accessibility Checklist will be used to analyze the competency of a One-Stop Career Center in the areas of: staff training and knowledge; employer engagement; customer focus; quality of programs; and technology. (Page 162) Title IV

CBVI has developed a Business Relations Unit to strengthen the relationships with employers as a secondary customer of the VR program and to coordinate efforts with the larger employment engagement developed for the Workforce Development system in New Jersey. The members of the unit will work with employers throughout the state to assist in addressing their need for qualified candidates to fill critical vacancies in their workforce and provide education on disability-related topics. Services provided by the Business Relations Unit can include, but are not limited to, consultation and evaluation around assistive technology and accessibility issues; disability awareness training; recruitment for internships and employment vacancies; and targeted hiring events. CBVI’s Business Relations Unit will also seek opportunities for customers to engage in career exploration activities with business partners, such as informational interviews, job shadowing, and work experiences. (Page 314) Title IV

The agency is also undertaking additional strategic initiatives to improve performance in line with the new performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
•Establishing a business relations unit designed to meet the needs of the business community in New Jersey. CBVI is one of eleven state agencies in the first cohort that received intensive technical assistance from the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center at the University of Massachusetts-Boston with the goal of assisting the agency to develop this service unit to promote employer engagement;
•Coordinate with DVRS to develop targeted hiring events at a regular basis;
•Train all agency counselors on using Labor Market Information (LMI) to increase informed choice in the process of choosing a career pathway;
•Implement at the agency the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP) created by the National Employment Team to increase employment opportunities for consumers. The TAP has job listings from companies throughout the United States.
•Coordinate with the Workforce Development System in New Jersey in developing and participating in Career Fairs throughout the state. (Page 342) Title IV

LVERs in New Jersey are aligned with the business services team in order to keep their focus on employer engagement. Jobseeker staff communicate on a regular basis with the LVERs to ensure they are generating job orders consistent with the skills, education and aptitude of the veterans being served. (Page 369) Title IV

Data Collection

DVRS upgraded its case management system to a fully functional AWARE system from Alliance Enterprises during FFY 2014. This was DVRS’s first full year working in the upgraded AWARE system. AWARE made it possible for DVRS to streamline information, easier to generate and compile data and reports required by RSA in a timely manner and for internal management reviews. AWARE provides all required reporting elements from the U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). These reports include: •Quarterly VR 113 -Cumulative Caseload Report •Annual VR 911 -Case Services Report •Annual VR-2 -VR Program/Cost Report (Page 129) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act requires States and local workforce areas to certify their One-Stop Career Centers based on requirements and criteria outlined in Section 121(g). The following are the general requirements that will assist in the development and implementation of New Jersey’s One-Stop Center Certification Process. The eligibility for receiving infrastructure funding is contingent upon the establishment of an objective criteria and process that will be administered by the local WDB areas. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria and process must be developed with standards related to service coordination on the overall system. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria must include factors relating to the effectiveness, accessibility, and improvement of the one-stop delivery system. The criteria must focus on the negotiated local levels of performance, the integration of available services and the needs of the local area employers. The local board areas have the autonomy to develop additional criteria that will respond to labor market, economic and demographic conditions and trends found in the local area. The One-Stop Center Certification Process must be reviewed and or modified by state or local plans on a biennial basis. (Pages 63-64) Title I

Wagner-Peyser provides accessibility for all populations to the full range of One-Stop Career Center employment and training programs. Programs designed to serve the needs of special populations with or without significant barriers to employment are integrated into the universal access provided by Wagner-Peyser and WIOA. Members of special populations, however, identified as having significant barriers to employment often require more intensive services to reach the employment goal. Significant barriers include poor previous attachment to the workforce, literacy or language barriers, ex-offender status, educational or occupational skills gap or lack of a credential, physical or mental disability, and driver’s license suspension. To help special populations with significant barriers to employment, New Jersey has created targeted programs and dedicated staff to help ensure positive outcomes. The challenge is to meet customers where they are by creating a proactive approach to promote and serve special populations. Once special populations enter the One-Stop Career Center system, ensuring that customers receive the services needed to reach their goal becomes a staff responsibility. All One-Stop Career Center staff members need to take ownership for the customer experience by providing warm handoffs when referrals to other service providers are appropriate. That involves taking the extra time to walk customers to where they need to go, introducing them to staff that can help them, and then circling back with customers to make sure their needs were met. Staff need to follow-up with customers to ensure all jobseekers remain engaged and focused on overcoming barriers to enable them to successfully (re)enter the workforce. Maintaining a stronger, more supportive connection to customers will result in better outcomes and improve the perceived value of the One-Stop Career Centers. (Pages 76-77) Title I

Additionally, DVRS staff work with businesses to identify a firm or worksite’s need for modifications to physical, organizational or other aspects of their business in order to be more welcoming and accessible for individuals with disabilities, both as employees and as customers. DVRS staff can support other business representatives in helping companies develop better accessibility plans and make reasonable accommodations when hiring individuals with disabilities. (Pages 119-120) Title I

In addition, CBVI will work in collaboration with the WIOA Training Unit and DVRS within LWD to develop specific training protocols for staff with the One-Stop Delivery System with the goal to increase awareness about issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility of the various components of that system. CBVI staff will be available to provide ongoing technical assistance and coaching to build staff skills sets that promote a welcoming environment for individuals with disabilities, including those individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind. (Page 160) Title I

The Accessibility Checklist is used as a foundational element of the One-Stop Career Center Certification process established by the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC) in its Policy Resolution 2016-14 on September 20, 2016. Specifically the One-Stop Certification policy maintains objective criteria and processes through which local boards will certify their One-Stops. New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Center Certification by local WDBs includes as a pre-requisite that the WDB verifies the accessibility of its physical locations. This is not limited to physical accommodations; accessibility considers staff knowledge, technology, signage, marketing materials and access to programs and services, through the use of the One-Stop Accessibility Checklist. SETC Policy 2016-14 is provided in Appendix 4 of this Plan. (Pages 162-163) Title I

In relation to staff training and methods to ensure the programmatic accessibility of One-Stop Career Centers, New Jersey is putting in place a process of staff training by DVRS and CBVI for One-Stop staff. The Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CBVI) will develop appropriate blindness and low-vision sensitivity and substantive vocational rehabilitation training to be shared with the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) and its One-Stop programs so that potential blind and vision-impaired consumers who make initial contact with One-Stop programs are able to receive adequate assistance before, or instead of, referral to CBVI for comprehensive services. CBVI will work in collaboration with DVRS and other core partners in LWD to develop the inter-agency training program to be implemented at the various One-Stop Career Centers throughout the state. (Page 163) Title I

The Disability subcommittee of the WIOA Blueprint Team developed an accessibility checklist and training protocols for the One-Stop Career Centers. The SRCs should be given the opportunity to review those documents and make recommendations for improvement. In the absence of this opportunity, the accessibility checklist should be relied upon strongly in helping these facilities provide an accessible service environment. (Page 300) Title IV

Veterans

New Jersey is at the forefront in the nation in using its Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) funding to work with businesses. New Jersey’s Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veteran Opportunity Program contacts (DVOPs) have developed national best practices in making outreach to businesses, developing priority hiring partnerships with New Jersey companies, and placing veterans into employment. Many New Jersey firms and national employers with New Jersey locations are seeking qualified and dependable veterans, and many have stepped up to hire significant numbers of veterans and build coordinated hiring initiatives with Veterans and One-Stop programs. This systematic approach by large companies is something New Jersey’s WIOA and partner staff have been highly successful in building. When building one of these relationships, LWD dedicate a lead business representative (usually one of the LVERs) to be the company’s main point of contact to respond to their needs statewide, and to manage the local relationships between various company worksites and One-Stops such that the same level of services is offered across the state. The JVSG system is in the process of demonstrating and mentoring other Business Representatives in this model, since this kind of centralized contact and statewide coordination is a central part of the “sector team” approach being developed under New Jersey’s Talent Network initiative. The LVERs now work within the same LWD division as other business representatives and are fully integrated within the wider Business Services division. They are deeply embedded with the other Business Services staff at New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Centers. Because there are fewer LVERs and DVOP staff statewide, there is not representation at every One-Stop Career Center. However, they are mobile and strategically sited across New Jersey’s workforce regions, and can provide customized services to companies out of any of the One-Stop locations across New Jersey. (Page 120) Title IV

LWD will also establish guidance on how to determine veterans and veterans with significant barriers early in the triage and intake process within the One-Stop Career Centers. This will require cross training of Employment Service and WIOA-funded staff in the One-Stop Career Centers who are functionally responsible for triage. There is and will continue to be prominent signage in all One-Stop Career Centers informing customers that veterans receive priority of service. (Page 162) Title IV Veterans interested in federal employment opportunities receive preference based on the conditions of their military service and the presence of a service-connected disability. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and One-Stop Career Center staff will work with veterans to provide them with information on the federal application process and how to locate and apply for federal job opportunities using usajobs.gov. (Page 365) Title IV

Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 01-16 Change 1 or most recent guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. DVOP specialists are expected to provide intensive case management services for the VR&E customers which include a comprehensive assessment and individual employment plan based upon the employment plan provided by the VA. The goal is to provide the VR&E veterans with the tools to be successful in the job search such as a robust résumé, career guidance, and job search assistance. (Page 366) Title IV

Serving the workforce directed needs of New Jersey’s veterans is a responsibility shared by all One-Stop Career Center staff. Effective intake and customer flow procedures, staff training, technical assistance/reinforcement, and monitoring contribute to ensuring that only a subset of eligible veterans identified as having a significant barrier to employment as defined in 38 U.S.C. 4103A(a)(1) and guidance containing the Secretary’s priorities. All veterans served by the DVOP will be assessed and have an employability plan that directs the delivery of intensive services. (Pages 368-369) Title IV

DVOP specialists concentrate on the delivery of intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment as defined in USDOL guidance using a case management approach. Subsequent guidance with additional eligibility categories will not substantially impact service delivery. In a fully-integrated environment where resources are leveraged to maximize efficiency and positive outcomes, the DVOP specialist is not personally delivering all of the career services but is managing the customer toward employment based on the outcome of an assessment and employment plan. In this environment, the DVOP needs to ensure that this management is recorded in the LWD AOSOS case management system under the DVOP specialist’s account. To help ensure that accountability information is recorded in a consistent manner that reflects the level of effort by the DVOP, LWD has created a custom tab in the AOSOS case management system specifically for the DVOP specialist. Management exception reports are also being developed in partnership with LWD’s newly created Division of Workforce Research and Analytics. Unlike traditional, after-the-fact, reports that provide summary tabulations, exception reports provide actionable information from individual customer records that can be run on a regular or ad-hoc basis to identify potential mistakes, oversights, or need for customer follow-up. Items on the exception report include whether the customer is an eligible veteran, whether they have received an intensive service, whether they are in case management, and whether they have a significant barrier. Future enhancements may include whether there is a completed employment plan, and whether Federal Bonding program eligibility letter was generated for the customer. (Page 371) Title IV

DVOP specialists are out-stationed at facilities where there are veterans that might benefit from intensive services, including the East Orange Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System at 385 Tremont Street in East Orange. Outreach activities to identify and assist veterans in need of intensive services have fostered relationships with the Lyons Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System in Lyons, Fort Monmouth Shelter in Freehold, NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs at multiple locations, Lunch Break in Red Bank (homeless veterans), MOCEANS (homeless, low income, and educationally deficient veterans) in Long Branch, and the Veterans Transitional Housing Program (Veterans Haven) in Winslow. (Page 374) Title IV J

VSG staff is deployed with clearly delineated distinct duties for the DVOP specialist and LVER. These clearly distinct duties include the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans by the DVOP specialist and outreach to the employer community and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system for the LVER. DVOP specialists and LVER provide specialized service that complement and add value to OSCC veterans’ services. DVOP specialists and LVER do not duplicate services provided by other OSCC labor exchange staff. In the case of the DVOP specialist, this is ensured by a requirement that the significant barrier/18-24 year old veteran designation be documented for every customer served. (Page 375) Title IV

New Jersey will continue to distinguish military service veterans according to USDOL guidance primarily to determine eligibility for DVOP services. Covered persons must be given priority of service which means they go to the front of the line for all One-Stop services including employment, training, and placement services. In some limited cases, a spouse of a veteran can be classified as a covered person and must be given priority of service. Only covered persons who are also defined as “eligible” can be served or should be referred to the DVOP. (Page 378) Title IV

Special disabled/disabled are those eligible veterans who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs or who were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability. Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with most current guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. (Page 379) Title IV

Often employers are willing to hire veterans that possess most of the qualities they desire in an ideal employee if the hire can in some way be incentivized. LVERs have been using the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, VOW, Federal Bonding Program, and on-the-job training (OJT) grants to help seal the connection between veterans and employers. New Jersey’s state-funded Workforce Development Partnership Program has helped employers through the Opportunities4Jersey on-the-job training program defray some of the extraordinary costs involved in training new workers by paying up to 50% of new hires salary for up to six months. (Page 381) Title IV

As the LVER reorganization moves forward, LWD anticipates more job order development successes as DVOP specialists and LVERs define their roles and responsibilities along guidance supplied in VPL 03-14, VPL 04-14 and VPL 08-14. LWD will concentrate LVER staff efforts on targeted job development services for veterans especially veterans determined to be job ready after receipt of intensive services from a DVOP specialist. These measures will assist LWD in enhancing the existing processes and oversight to ensure DVOP specialists provide intensive services for veterans with employment barriers, including homeless veterans, veterans with disabilities, and the other service categories listed in most current guidance. (Page 381) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DVRS is continuing to establish an MOU with the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS). The last formal agreement ended October 1, 2014. DVRS will reach out to DMHAS to establish an MOU that outlines the coordination of services in FFY 2017. (Page 251) Title I

There are presently an approved cadre of community providers throughout the state who provide supported employment services on a fee for service basis. The Commission continues to make use of time limited job coaching services to address the needs of consumers who are chronically unemployed and those who present with issues of mental health or are otherwise ineligible for services from the DDD. The Commission has traditionally placed approximately between four and five percent of all successful rehabilitations into supported employment. (Page 353) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 75

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Bridges to Employment Supported Employment - 11/14/2019

“At Bridges to Employment, we provide comprehensive career services to meet a variety of today's workforce needs. Our services range from vocational assessment and career exploration to job placement and on-the-job training. Bridges to Employment also provides an array of additional services customized for students, entry level job seekers as well as those seeking a career change.

Whether you are an employer seeking to add qualified candidates to your workforce, or a job seeker looking for some assistance in finding just the right job match for you, you have come to the right place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment - 10/23/2019

~~“The New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment returns in 2019. The conference is developed with the input of educators, service providers, families, employers and others who are committed to the concept of Employment First, which is premised on the assumption that individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment. The conference offers case studies, public policy information, employer presentations and more.  This is the only state employment conference designed for families, educators, employers and service providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate, No. 104: Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act - 03/27/2018

“It shall be an unlawful employment practice, or, as the case may be, an unlawful discrimination:

a. For an employer, because of the race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, civil union status, domestic partnership status, affectional or sexual orientation, genetic information, pregnancy or breastfeeding, sex, gender identity or expression, disability or atypical hereditary cellular or blood trait of any individual, or because of the liability for service in the Armed Forces of the United States or the nationality of any individual, or because of the refusal to submit to a genetic test or make available the results of a genetic test to an employer, to refuse to hire or employ or to bar or to discharge or require to retire, unless justified by lawful considerations other than age, from employment such individual or to discriminate against such individual in compensation or in terms, conditions or privileges of employment;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Assembly, No. 1827: Concerns Earned Sick Leave - 03/06/2018

“Each employer shall provide earned sick leave to each employee working for the employer in the State. For every 30 hours worked, the employee shall accrue one hour of earned sick leave. The employer shall not be required to permit the employee to accrue at any one time, or carry forward from one benefit year to the next, more than 40 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is a small employer, or more than 72 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is not a small employer. Unless the employee has accrued earned sick leave prior to the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue on the effective date of this act for any employee hired before the effective date of this act and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, and if hired after the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue upon the date of hire and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, unless the employer agrees to an earlier date. The employee may use earned sick leave as it is accrued.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Jersey ABLE Legislation - 02/24/2015

Authorizes establishment of tax-exempt Achieving a Better Life Experience accounts for persons with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

New Jersey Governor’s Employment First Declaration - 04/19/2012

~~“Recognizing the opportunity for New Jersey to improve employment statistics by increasing the number of people with disabilities in the general workforce, Governor Christie declared New  Jersey an “Employment First” state on April 19, 2012.  The initiative embraces the philosophy – implemented through policies, programs, and services – that promotes competitive employment in the general workforce as the first and preferred post education outcome for people with any type of disability.The Employment First initiative sets the bar higher and creates an expectation that people with disabilities, like everyone else, will have to “opt out” of employment rather than “opt in.”  In an effort to increase employment outcomes for people with disabilities, most states have incorporated Employment First activities or philosophies of some kind.  Each State Agency, including the Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division), involved in assisting individuals with disabilities with services and supports was asked to identify and remove barriers to employment and implement policy to increase employment outcomes for the individuals with disabilities they serve." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other

Other Disability Related Services and Supports - 04/10/2019

~~“In this section, DDS has compiled a list of various other services and supports available to NJ Residents with disabilities.  The programs have been categorized by target disability as a matter of reference, although some may serve multiple populations.  Where a NJ Website was not available, a national website has been provided.   

Please note: While DDS Information and Referral Specialists are familiar with each of the programs listed and can provide general information, these programs are not administered by DDS.  Please follow the links on each page to learn more about and/or to apply to a particular program.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Community Care Program Policies &Procedures Manual, Version 3.0 - 03/29/2019

~~“Supported Employment –Individual Employment SupportActivities  needed  to  help  a  participant  obtain  and  maintain  an  individual  job  in  competitive  or  customized employment, or self-employment, in an integrated work setting in the general workforce for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The service may be delivered for an intensive period upon the participant’s initial employment to support the participant who, because of their disability, would not be able to sustain employment without supports. Supports in the intensive period are delivered in a face-to-face setting, one-on-one. The service may also be delivered to a participant on a less intensive, ongoing basis (“follow along”) where supports are delivered either face-to-face or by phone with the participant and/or his or her employer. Services are individualized and may include but are not limited to: job development, discovery, training  and  systematic  instruction,  job  coaching,  benefit  support,  travel  training,  and  other  workplace  support services including services not specifically related to job-skill training that enable the participant to be successful in integrating into the job setting.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Bridges to Employment Supported Employment - 11/14/2019

“At Bridges to Employment, we provide comprehensive career services to meet a variety of today's workforce needs. Our services range from vocational assessment and career exploration to job placement and on-the-job training. Bridges to Employment also provides an array of additional services customized for students, entry level job seekers as well as those seeking a career change.

Whether you are an employer seeking to add qualified candidates to your workforce, or a job seeker looking for some assistance in finding just the right job match for you, you have come to the right place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Division of Developmental Disabilities for Supported Employment Services - 09/19/2008

"The purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is to assist the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS), the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CBVI) and the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) to operate in an efficient and successful manner to ensure quality service provision. This, in turn, will help guide efforts toward improving employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities who are entering the workforce."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility NJ - 01/15/2005

~~“Within the  past decade, considerable scholarly and applied research reports have described the barriers to employment and economic independence faced by people with disabilities. Despite many government efforts and research that provides compelling reasons for hiring people with disabilities, the rates of employment for New Jersey residents with disabilities remain unacceptably low. In New Jersey, as in the United States as a whole, residents with disabilities are half as likely as those without disabilities to be employed. Among those individuals in the state with a disability who are employed, both earnings and household incomes are lower than their non-disabled counterparts.

To reemphasize New Jersey’s concern and commitment to address these issues, New Jersey has developed DiscoverAbility: New Jersey’s Strategic Plan to Create a Comprehensive Employment System for People with Disabilities. This plan, which will become a core element of the state’s Strategic Unified Workforce Investment Plan, provides New Jersey with a shared vision and a strategic roadmap toward building a more comprehensive system of employment services and supports for people with disabilities. The plan is meant to be visionary, directional, and ambitious yet attainable — requiring coordination and cooperation, public/private partnerships, community and consumer support as well as state leadership to achieve its goals. The plan reflects a culmination of thought, advice, input, and interest from a wide variety of stakeholders including people with disabilities and their families, employers, government agencies, community-based service providers, researchers and scholars, and others interested in employment and disability issues. DiscoverAbility builds on the state’s longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities, while incorporating contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities and improve employment and economic outcomes. The plan is a clear roadmap to change but is also a fluid and evolving document. It puts forth a vision that reflects the desired  ”ideal state,” and a mission that reflects what New Jersey hopes to achieve through implementation of this plan.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Meeting the Employment Transportation Needs of People with Disabilities in New Jersey - 01/01/2005

~~“Getting and keeping a job can be a challenge for anyone, regardless of disability status.  For people with disabilities in New Jersey, the challenge can be even greater.  Although the state has a large and extensive public transportation network, many suburban and rural areas have little or no public transportation.  In addition, in areas where transportation options are available, they are not always accessible and affordable.   In an effort to address transportation and other barriers to work for people with disabilities wishing to work in a competitive work environment, in 2000, the New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Disability Services (DDS) applied for and was awarded a Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 Medicaid Infrastructure Grant from the federal Health Care Financing Administration.  The goal of the project, is to design and implement services that support individuals with disabilities as they secure and sustain competitive employment in an integrated setting. “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

It’s All About Work Program

It's All About Work is a program developed by the New Jersey Association of Centers for Independent Living in conjunction with the NJ Division on Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) to help prepare transition students and adults for the world of work and inclusive community living.

This comprehensive program, is designed to meet the challenges faced by persons with disabilities whose goal is to obtain employment. ACI works with school districts in Middlesex, Somerset and Union counties to bring It's All About Work curriculum to its transition students (age 14 to 21).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NJ WorkAbility

~~NJ WorkAbility, one of the NJ FamilyCare Aged, Blind and Disabled Programs, offers people with disabilities who are working, and whose income would otherwise make them ineligible for Medicaid, the opportunity to receive full Medicaid coverage.

ELIGIBILITY

Eligibility CriteriaMust be between the ages of 16-64Must be working (full or part time) and have proof of employmentMust have been determined “disabled” by the Social Security Administration OR the Disability Review Team at the Division of Medical Assistance & Health Services (to review for disability in spite of “gainful work activity”)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Opportunity Partnership Training Grant (OPG) program - 12/20/2017

“Name of Grant Program: Opportunity Partnership…

 

The purpose of the Opportunity Partnership Training Grant (OPG) program is to assist displaced/dislocated workers secure employment by providing occupational training in industry-valued credential areas that employers have identified as a requirement of the job. The Opportunity Partnership Grants is designed to provide industry needed occupational training to a statewide audience of displaced/dislocated workers, to support the development of high-quality employer-driven partnerships, to build on career pathways in the state's key industries, and to increase the number of adults who have obtained an industry-valued credential.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging

New Integrated Health Advisory Panel Holds First Meeting - 12/20/2017

“TRENTON – The advisory panel appointed to help guide the creation of an integrated primary and behavioral healthcare system in New Jersey held its first official meeting today.

Created last month by the Department of Health (DOH) as part of Governor Chris Christie’s reorganization plan which moved the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services into the DOH, this panel of experts will hold quarterly meetings to discuss the issues affecting the blending of separate systems of care in order to create one system that treats the whole person…

The 18-member Integrated Health Advisory Panel includes the DOH Commissioner or designee as Vice-Chairperson, and brings expertise in clinical services, medical care, policy, legal issues, and technology. It will assist in creating a patient-centered system of care that includes prevention, wellness, treatment, and sustained recovery through coordinated care. It also will advise on issues impacting integrated care including research, data-driven and evidence-based practices; statutory and regulatory barriers; education of community providers; and expansion of and increased access to patient-centered delivery and information integration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Pre-Employment Transition Services Grant - 08/11/2017

“Name of Grant Program:      Pre-Employment Transition Services

Fiscal Year of Grant Program:       2017

Start Date and End Date of Grant Program:    January 1, 2018 – December 31, 2018

Purpose for Which Funds will be Used:

Entities that Can Apply for Funding Under This NGO:

 

Eligible applicants for this 12-month, competitively-awarded grant must be organizations with the capacity to serve people with disabilities. Applicants can be private or public non-profit or for profit organizations including faith-based organizations (FBO), such as non-profit organizations with a religious or faith-based association, community-based organizations (CBO), such as non-profit local, neighborhood or grass-roots entities, or Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP), such as for profit or non-profit programs providing employment-related services to people with disabilities. Such organizations are generally familiar with community needs, appropriate service delivery and are often viewed by clients as comfortable venues for access to services.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Career Pathways Initiative - 06/01/2017

“Name of Grant Program:      Career Pathways Initiative

 

Fiscal Year of Grant Program:       2017

 

Start Date and End Date of Grant Program:    September 1, 2017 – August 31, 2018

 

Purpose for Which Funds will be Used:

 

The purpose of the grant is to establish model demonstrations to expand or improve programs serving persons with the most significant disabilities who are currently in extended employment. Funding for this competitive grant is under the auspices of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS), which will serve as administrator and fiscal agent for the funds awarded. In particular, the DVRS is interested in proposals that develop, implement, and build upon career pathway initiatives that will lead to community based competitive integrated employment opportunities within the seven Talent Networks. The term “career pathway programs” means a clear sequence of education coursework and training credentials and should lead to the attainment of an industry-recognized degree or credential, which may include stackable credentials of value in the labor market and that articulate progressively to higher-level credentials or degrees.

 

Entities that Can Apply for Funding Under This NGO:

 

Eligible applicants for this 12-month, competitively awarded grant must be agencies that provide Extended Employment Programs authorized and approved by the LWD. The organization must currently be using a center-based employment model and be interested in transitioning participants into competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Jersey” - 02/01/2017

~~“In an effort to learn more about how states are transforming their LTSS systems under the Balancing Incentive Program, CMS and its technical assistance provider, Mission Analytics, selected five Program states that implemented structural changes successfully and used Program funds innovatively to expand access to community LTSS. In the spring of 2016, Mission Analytics conducted site visits to these states, interviewing key state staff and stakeholders, and developed case studies based on findings.

This case study focuses on the launch of New Jersey’s MLTSS program, which was supported by the Balancing Incentive Program. New Jersey spent 70% of the enhanced FMAP earned through the Program on the expanded services offered under MLTSS. These funds were directed to new individuals receiving services, additional services provided to new and existing community LTSS users, and enhanced care management offered through Managed Care Organizations (MCOs). Since the launch of MLTSS in July 2014, almost 6,000 more people have accessed community LTSS. In addition, MCOs offer expanded care management to their enrollees, connecting individuals to providers and coordinating acute and long-term care. The Balancing Incentive Program provided New Jersey with a crucial source of revenue, helping the state fund these expansions during MLTSS’ first two years.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supportive Housing Assoc. of New Jersey (SHA) Community Housing with Support: - 05/01/2016

~~“The Supportive Housing Association of New Jersey (SHA) is a statewide, nonprofit organization , founded in 1998, whose mission is to promote and maintain a strong supportive housing industry in New Jersey serving people with special needs.We do this by:Providing resources and services to our membership of over 100 organizations which include nonprofit and for-profit housing developers, service providers, allied statewide advocacy organizations, corporate vendors and professional organizations, all dedicated to the supportive housing industryStrengthening the capacity of member organizations to provide supportive housing services through information, training, and collaborationAdvocating for innovation and systems-change to provide more flexible funding and increased mainstream housing opportunities to allow people with disabilities to live as independently as possibleEducating policy makers, elected officials, people living with disabilities/families and the public on the use and benefits of the supportive housing model”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) - 2011 - 07/01/2011

In 2011 New Jersey was awarded an EDI grant to continue working on the peer wellness coach idea, but from an employment standpoint.   In light of the health challenges facing individuals with SMI in a variety of positions (i.e., service participant, peer provider), the proposed project intended to: 1) have each Supported Employment (SE) program develop the capacity to deliver wellness coaching services in order to help remove the employment barrier of poor health management; 2) help each IMR provider organization develop the capacity to deliver wellness coaching services also with the goal of removing the barrier of health concerns in the pursuit of educational and employment goals; and 3) provide wellness coaching specifically to peer providers with health and wellness concerns  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ODEP Disability Employment Initiative 2010 - 07/01/2010

The New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development will build their DEI project upon earlier Work Incentive Grant and Disability Program Navigator grant activities. The approach utilizes Rehabilitation Services Administration Technical Assistance and Continuing Education training for One-Stop Career Center staff and the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant to conduct outreach to employers and expand the availability of Technical Assistance Centers, as well as market discoverAbility events. Other strategic approaches include year round career exploration, career education and planning, self assessment, and work readiness skills training and apprenticeship opportunities through the Youth Transitions to Work program. Another key strategy will be focused on the development of self-employment opportunities, including working with the Business Leadership Network’s Disability Supplier Diversity Program to certify companies as disability owned and operated companies.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Money Follows the Person - 05/25/2007

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federal demonstration project that helps eligible individuals who have been residing in nursing homes and developmental centers for a minimum of 90 consecutive days move into a community-setting. The setting will offer transitional services and long-term supports that prevent or delay the need to return to institutionalization care. The same public funds that pay for services in the institution will pay for services in the community, only the service providers may change. Participants are monitored to ensure the program meets their needs and interviewed periodically as part of the grant’s evaluation process. Participants receive a special package of services through MFP for one year after they move from an institution.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment - 10/23/2019

~~“The New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment returns in 2019. The conference is developed with the input of educators, service providers, families, employers and others who are committed to the concept of Employment First, which is premised on the assumption that individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment. The conference offers case studies, public policy information, employer presentations and more.  This is the only state employment conference designed for families, educators, employers and service providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Dare to Dream in 2019 High School Student Leadership Conference - 12/20/2018

~~“The New Jersey Department of Education, Office of Special Education is sponsoring regional Dare to Dream Student Leadership conferences that highlight strategies and information to prepare high school students with disabilities for college and career readiness. Each conference features keynote presentations from accomplished students and young adults with disabilities who have demonstrated exemplary self-advocacy and leadership skills. Additionally, the conference program includes a variety of concurrent workshop sessions that provide conference attendees opportunities to gain insight into the transition from school to adult life process. The conference gives students the opportunity to participate in workshops led by their peers on topics such as: self-discovery, student self-advocacy, learning styles, developing career paths and understanding rights and responsibilities in college..”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DiscoverAbility NJ Leadership Academy - 01/15/2005

DiscoverAiblity NJ has partnered with Rutgers University’s Center for Nonprofit Management and Governance at the School of Social Work to provide an intensive Leadership Academy for rising professionals in the field of disability employment. New Jersey is currently developing a framework as well as identifying curriculum for the Leadership Academy to be implemented in 2011.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Supported Employment Training and Technical Assistance

~~“The Boggs Center Employment Team provides Supported Employment Training and Technical Assistance throughout the state  of New Jersey. Training courses are intended to provide both new and veteran employment specialists with the most up to date and proven best practices in supported employment. Furthermore, trainings can be modified or developed to meet the specific needs of agencies or general professional development. Technical Assistance is provided via consultation to support capacity building and systemic growth.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Department of Education

~~This page has resources for those who work with the Structured Learning Experiences (SLE) program.

All teachers supervising Structured Learning Experiences (SLEs) complete a training program required by DOE. This includes courses on federal and state child wage and hour laws, regulations and hazardous orders, the OSHA 10 general industry certificate program and a course on designing and implementing SLE student training plans. Nearly 1,000 teachers have participated in the required training.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Travel Training & Information Series

DiscoverAbility NJ partnered with the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University to pilot a travel/ training and information series is designed to inform job coaches/employment counselors of a variety of transportation options and how to access them. Progress to date includes the initiation of a review of federal, state, foundation/non-profit funding programs to determine additional opportunities for para-transit funding, planning for key informant listening sessions, and a data sharing agreement from NJ Transit. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Marketing & Training on Disability Benefits

DiscoverAbility NJ has partnered with the World Institute on Disability (WID) to improve the capacity to figure benefits and support for better employment outcomes by upgrading the current New Jersey Benefits Calculator (DB 101) and translating it into Spanish. DiscoverAbility NJ has partnered with the Family Resource Network to provide a NJ DB101 training program to 17 ARC Directors, 26 One Stop Directors, 9 Center for Independent Living Directors and 19 Vocational Rehabilitation offices. www.njdb101.org is a powerful internet based tool that can help job seekers with disabilities carefully plan for the transition to work through enhanced knowledge about health care coverage and other public benefits. DiscoverAbilty NJ supports this effort and is working to increase knowledge and use of the customized disability benefits website. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Garden State Employment and Training Association (GSETA) Scholarships

DiscoverAbility NJ sponsored ten scholarships for disability employment service providers to attend the GSETA Fall Conference. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility Learning at Work Symposium

DiscoverAbility NJ is a living document that was built upon the state's longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities. At the same time it included contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities (for instance, better transportation services) and improve employment and economic outcomes.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DiscoverAbility NJ

DiscoverAbility NJ is a living document that was built upon the state's longstanding efforts to improve the labor market participation of people with disabilities. At the same time it included contemporary thinking about what is needed to increase their work opportunities (for instance, better transportation services) and improve employment and economic outcomes."

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Community Care Program - 03/27/2019

~~“The Community Care Program is a Medicaid home and community  based services (HCBS) waiver program. It provides services for eligible individuals who live in a provider-managed setting, such as a group home or supervised apartment, or who live in their family home or their own apartment or home, to assist them to live as independently as possible. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) Program Funding and Mechanics Protocol Approval - 02/14/2019

~~“In this extension of the demonstration, the state will continue healthcare delivery reforms that were initiated during the previous demonstration period. Specifically, the state will continue its expansion of managed care to Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) and behavioral health services, targeted home and community-based services (HCBS) programs for children and in-home community supports for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities. In addition, the state will implement new targeted initiatives to provide behavioral health and substance use disorder services and expand the scope and duration of supports services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. CMS has agreed to extend the state’s delivery system reform incentive payment (DSRIP) program with the condition that the program will expire on June 30, 2020.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Frequently Asked Questions: Moving DDD’s Community Care Waiver (CCW) to New Jersey’s Comprehensive Medicaid Waiver - 09/28/2017

~~“Effective November 1, 2017, DDD’s 1915(c) Community Care Waiver (CCW) will be incorporated into New Jersey’s larger and more wide-ranging 1115(a) demonstration waiver, known as the Comprehensive Medicaid Waiver.

This is an internal, administrative change.  It has no effect on an individual’s DDD-funded services and there is nothing that an individual or his parent/guardian needs to do.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Innovations in the Balancing Incentive Program: New Jersey” - 02/01/2017

~~“In an effort to learn more about how states are transforming their LTSS systems under the Balancing Incentive Program, CMS and its technical assistance provider, Mission Analytics, selected five Program states that implemented structural changes successfully and used Program funds innovatively to expand access to community LTSS. In the spring of 2016, Mission Analytics conducted site visits to these states, interviewing key state staff and stakeholders, and developed case studies based on findings.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey HCBS Transition Plan - 04/17/2015

The Statewide Transition Plan outlines to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) how New Jersey will meet compliance with federal Home and Community Based Settings regulations by 2019.The Statewide Transition Plan sets forth the determination of New Jersey’s compliance with the regulation requirements for home and community-based settings and person-centered planning.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Jersey ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 02/09/2012

The New Jersey State Department of Education’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 9, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 12/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Department of Human Services Division of Developmental Disabilities Olmstead Plan - 05/02/2007

Action Step 8: Expansion of Community Supports (RFP to expand agencies qualified to provide housing, residential, employment/day medical, and behavioral supports) with outcome of 63 agencies qualified to provide employment/day supports, and

Action Step 9: Identification of Independent Support Coordination Agencies with a goal of awarding support coordination contracts to six additional agencies qualified for employment/day supports.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Medicaid State Plan

The New Jersey Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how New Jersey administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how New Jersey may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Medicaid Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federal demonstration project that helps eligible individuals who have been residing in nursing homes and developmental centers for a minimum of 90 consecutive days move into a community-setting. The setting will offer transitional services and long-term supports that prevent or delay the need to return to institutionalization care. The same public funds that pay for services in the institution will pay for services in the community, only the service providers may change. Participants are monitored to ensure the program meets their needs and interviewed periodically as part of the grant’s evaluation process. Participants receive a special package of services through MFP for one year after they move from an institution. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

States - Phablet

Snapshot

With a commitment to Liberty and Prosperity, workers with disabilities are encouraged to aim high and go after their dreams for employment and economic advancement in the Garden State of New Jersey!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Jersey’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.3%
Change from
2018 to 2019
8,882,190
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.79%
Change from
2018 to 2019
410,004
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,007
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.83%
Change from
2018 to 2019
40.25%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.38%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.56%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 8,882,190
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 410,004
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 165,007
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,975,956
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.25%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.56%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.00%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 419,810
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 483,549
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 645,496
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 139,959
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 159,180
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,818
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 43,830
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 588
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,990
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 46,678

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,628
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 186,881

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 61,555
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 138,495
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 221,906
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 27.70%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,833
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 6,046
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,587
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,415
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 42
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 25
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 6,508
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 293,602
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 324
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 226

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,537,574
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $232,187,608
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8,810
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 44.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 7.14%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 52.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 83.67%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 89.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.47%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,103,352
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,610
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 55,312
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 365,337
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 420,649
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 138
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 302
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 440
AbilityOne wages (products). $440,745
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,882,285

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 24
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,068
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,068

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~EMPLOYMENT FIRST is a framework for systems change that is centered on the premise that all citizens with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Individuals with disabilities are a multi-skilled workforce resource for employers. An inclusive workplace promotes diversity, expands the tax base and creates an expanded pool of qualified candidates for available jobs. ‘Employment First’ is about creating an environment for individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant disabilities, that empowers them with choices for their future, reduces poverty, eases demand on state and community based social service agencies and provides workers with a sense of achievement.
Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services. (Page 57) Title I

DVRS subscribes to the Employment First principles adopted by the Governor in April 2012, and the agency believes that these principles should be accomplished in the context of long-term career pathway development. (Page 110) Title I

Since the Governor has declared through Executive Order, that New Jersey become the 14th Employment First state, the DVRS is reexamining all of the current MOUs in order to ensure policy aligns with the intent of Employment First. (Page 239) Title IV

The DDD serves individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, who meet the functional criteria of having a developmental disability, are eligible for and maintain Medicaid eligibility, and are at least 18 years of age at the time of application and 21 years of age to receive services. Conditions generally considered developmental disabilities include intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, spina bifida, and autism. Part of DDD’s implementation of the Employment First Initiative includes an annual discussion with individuals served, family members, and Support Coordinators providing care management services to identify each individual’s current employment status and identify how to assist the individual in reaching his/her employment outcomes. (Page 242) Title IV

New Jersey is an Employment First State, and particular attention is given to youth with the most significant disabilities who, through informed choice, wish to pursue competitive integrated employment. DVRS has approved supported employment vendors who also vendor with DDD. The DDD system provides support coordinators to their participants who identify the individualized services needed and help arrange for those supports. DVRS counselors meet with DDD support coordinators and identify supported employment vendors common to both agencies in order to ensure a smooth transition of funding. DVRS is piloting “discovery” throughout the state in order to provide counselors with the tools to address the needs of this unique population. (Pages 248-249) Title IV

New Jersey is also an Employment First state, and DVRS has identified goals to increase the number of individuals with significant ID/DD to avail themselves to DVRS services that result in an integrated competitive employment outcome. (Page 251) Title IV

• Strategic objectives to meet the DVRS Employment First initiative include the following:
• More individuals with significant developmental disabilities (DD) and ASD will have greater access to become DVRS consumers.
• DVRS staff members, vendors, and state partners will have the expectation that employment is the first and preferred option for adult activity for those with DD.
• DD consumers including transition students and persons in workshops will have increased opportunities for a smooth transition into employment via a defined process established by DVRS and state partners.
• DD consumers will be provided with programs and services that offer job targeted skill development, education and training.
• DD individuals will have increased opportunities to become DVRS consumers, obtain job skills, and obtain competitive employment that matches their interests, skills & capabilities.
• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

In addition, the agency recently signed a new Memorandum of Understanding with the DVRS, the general VR agency, and DDD, a sister agency within the New Jersey Department of Human Services and an agency that provides a full array of employment supports including extended services to individuals with a wide array of developmental disabilities, with the goal of furthering Employment First principles in the state by increasing access to supports needed to obtain and maintain employment. (Page 331) Title IV

Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act will be used for the provision of services that lead to supported employment. The goal is to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities to attain competitive, integrated employment. Priorities will be given to individuals with disabilities, including youth with disabilities, who demonstrate a need for intensive supported employment support in order to achieve substantial, gainful employment. These goals align with New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

DVRS and CBI recently entered into a new MOU with DDD. The MOU identifies that resources to expand extended services and supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities will be allocated for youth being served by DDD through individualized budget allocations specific for employment support in competitive, integrated settings. This agreement further supports New Jersey’s emphasis on Employment First. (Page 332) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

CBVI will continue to provide professional staff with developmental instruction that will enhance the delivery of VR services. Specifically, CBVI has and will continue to provide its staff with instruction in Customized Employment practices, the use of labor market information in career planning, leadership development programs, and other VR-specific opportunities and courses, as they are made available. (Page 305) Title IV

Additionally, under a MOU with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities, a pilot program called Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. (Page 314) Title IV

The Blindness Learning Community, a training and technical assistance initiative that focused on building the capacity of staff at supported employment agencies to more effectively serve individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind and require supported employment services to obtain and maintain a job. This training focused on blindness-specific topics, as well as person-centered approaches to evaluation and job development, including Customized Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

CBVI will develop innovative quality career and employment programs, in response to needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment.
•Develop competencies for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Supervisors in utilizing evidence-based practices, including incorporating motivational interviewing techniques, labor market information and customized employment methodologies into the counseling relationship to increase employment outcomes. (Page 343) Title IV

Update 2018: The Youth Employment Solutions pilot program was implemented in FFY 2016, and completed its first full year in the fall of 2017. Youth Employment Solutions (YES) was initiated to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment service provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Page 346) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~g. Sustainable Plans: The program shall have a plan for continued funding of initiative, which may include single-source or a variety of funding streams, including braided funding strategies. This should include a plan for continuing staffing and resource allocation sufficient to continue or expand the effort. (Page 146) Title I

• Through a leverage of services with DDD, DVRS will serve an increased amount of individuals with DD, including individuals with ASD. (Page 263) Title IV

Under the DVRS EF strategy, long-term SE services will be provided by the DDD and the DMHAS for consumers who qualify for these services after a DVRS consumer is successfully placed in employment. This braiding of funding provides supports to a higher number of consumers. The DVRS continues to partner with the DDD and the DMHAS in order to do this. (Page 290) Title IV

The SCSEP program is currently working with host sites to leverage resources that will ensure successful outcomes for participants that foster individual economic self-sufficiency, and expanding training opportunities in community service activities. The state will also provide a wide range of programs and services to participants, spanning multiple divisions and departments. Funds for the Older Americans Act are leveraged with state general funds, and other programs and services located within the Division of Workforce Development and Economic Opportunity. (Page 391) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~New Jersey DVRS has a significant presence in most of the high schools across the state assessing and counseling, attending IEP meetings and working with the schools andother community partners. This will provide a foundation for developing and offering a wide range of pre-employment transition services, including developing IPEs for students with disabilities, coordinating and developing internships and other summer or afterschool employment. (Page 267) Title IV

The Commission maintains, in conjunction with the DVRS, an Interagency Agreement for Transition from School to Adult Life with the appropriate SEA (Offices of Special Education Programs -OSEP). This agreement complies with the provisions of 34 CFR 361.22(b). Under the agreement, the agency provides technical consultations to transition-aged youth and/or their parents/guardians and other members of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team in the form of telephone consultations, face-to-face meetings, and/or attendance at IEP meetings. The IEP shall designate the individuals and agencies responsible for the provision of transition services to be implemented while the student is in school.
Throughout the transition process, contact with the Local Educational Agency (LEA) and the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired at the agency remains constant. The need for specialized training, specific programs and assistive technology are addressed as part of the IEP and are also developed more fully in the Transition IPE. Technical consultation begun in the earlier grades with the Teacher of the Blind and Visually Impaired is continued through the transition process, and the transition counselor actively seeks participation in the development of IEPs. The transition counselors may also begin evaluative activities at age fourteen that ultimately lead to development of the IPE and continue to play an organizational role with technical consultations and through their active participation in school-to-work activities, task force memberships, career fairs, etc. At various points during the transition process students are evaluated and presented with opportunities to participate in specific programs funded by the Commission, such as:
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 1.0, a year-round program targeted to high school-aged blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind consumers that focuses on development of work readiness and blindness-specific skills of independence, mentorship and instruction in self-advocacy from blind and vision-impaired role models, and a work-based learning opportunity in an integrated setting;
•Life 101, a two-week summer program for Freshman and Sophomores in high school to focus on acquisition of Pre-Employment Transition Services, including core blindness-specific skills of independence, job exploration counseling, including counseling on post-secondary education opportunities and work readiness training, provided in a residential environment at the Commission’s Joseph Kohn Training Center;
•The College Prep Experience Program, dedicated to providing students likely to seek post-secondary education with the necessary skills to function successfully as blind or vision-impaired students, including post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, self-advocacy skills instruction, and work readiness skills;
•Employment, Development, Guidance, and Engagement (EDGE) 2.0, an extension of EDGE 1.0, that serves to assist undergraduate college students in successfully making the transition from a secondary to post-secondary academic setting, and facilitates the development of work readiness and self-advocacy skills, ongoing post-secondary enrollment counseling, job exploration counseling, and work-based learning through internships and other work experiences;
•Work Skills Prep, a two-week summer program for blind, vision-impaired, and deaf-blind students, possessing additional complex disabilities, that delivers workplace readiness and self-advocacy skills instruction through hands-on activities and work-based learning opportunities. (Pages 311-312) Title IV

The agency also developed the Youth Employment Solutions (YES) program in partnership with The College of New Jersey’s Center for Complex and Sensory Disabilities to facilitate competitive, integrated employment outcomes for youth with the most significant disabilities who have exited the secondary school system, and who will benefit from supported employment services. This pilot program targeted of the agency’s Work Skills Preparation Program (WSP), a summer Pre-Employment Transition Services Program for students who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind, who have multiple disabilities, including intellectual and developmental disabilities. This program utilizes the Customized Employment model to engage the youth in the Discovery Process, and, in partnership with a supported employment services provider and the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, develops a Customized Employment placement. Once an employment placement has been achieved, the identified supported employment service provider takes over with providing on-the-job supports. Of the 15 individuals who have worked with the YES program during the first 18 months of the pilot, five have obtained competitive, integrated employment. Given the improved success rate compared to prior employment rates of graduates of the WSP program, additional youth have been identified to begin the program in Spring/Summer 2018, and CBVI will look to expand the program in the future. (Pages 350-351) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~New Jersey’s Talent Development Strategy is focused on five critical themes.
Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued Credentials
Theme 2: Expanding High-Quality Employer-Driven Partnerships
Theme 3: Providing Career Navigation Assistance through One Stop Career Centers and Broad Partnerships
Theme 4: Strengthening Governance through Effective Workforce Development Boards and Regional Collaborations
Theme 5: Ensuring System Integrity through Metrics and Greater Transparency
The strategies associated with each of these themes are detailed below (see Section, II.c.2), including:
•Career Pathways Definition and Career Pathways for Secondary Education Students
•Identification of Industry-Valued Credentials
•Literacy Priorities and Standards
•Employment First Framework and Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (Page 54) Title I

Competitive integrated employment will be seen as the first and primary option for all individuals with disabilities, including individuals with the most significant intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD), who apply through informed choice for workforce services.
As part of this effort, New Jersey will work to expand career pathways for individuals with disabilities and to ensure that an increasing number of individuals with disabilities obtain a post-secondary industry-valued credential or degree. (Pages 57-58) Title I

b. The development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment; (Page 80) Title I

DVRS is committed to establishing Employment First initiatives throughout the state. Strategies included establishing Project SEARCH and developing targeted hiring events for qualified candidates with disabilities; both these efforts have been accomplished as of FY 2018. The business outreach unit will lead these efforts. Additionally, DVRS identified goals to improve services to Deaf/hard of hearing consumers. Strategies to reach these goals include establishing regional Deaf language specialist positions throughout the state, improving the direct access for Deaf consumers via video phones in the offices, updating the DVRS hearing aid policy that includes best practices regarding individuals with cochlear implants, and working with the three Deaf centers to increase outreach to this population. DVRS also plans to contract with the Boggs Center, New Jersey’s Center of Excellence on Developmental Disabilities, to provide technical assistance for the following:
o TA to designated institutes of higher education in order to establish programs for youth with ID/DD that will provide industry-recognized credentials and a Career Pathways approach for their skill development; and
o TA to designated sheltered workshop staff for training in Customized Employment and Person-Centered Planning. (Pages 283-284) Title IV

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DVRS will encourage and provide TA to CRPs who wish to become an employment network. (Page 281) Title IV

The DVRS is housed in LWD as part of workforce development. This provides a solid foundation to work with the state’s workforce investment system. The DVRS is a core participant in the One—Stop Career Center system and maintains an active presence in the eighteen local WDBs as well as the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC), New Jersey’s State WDB. The DVRS local offices are now located within the OSCCs in 16 catchment areas throughout the state.
The LWD has established four priorities for the next three years:
1. Reemployment —What steps can LWD take to decrease the amount of time that people receive UI?
2. Opportunity —How can LWD assist more people to move from government benefits (SSI, SSDI, GA, and TANF) to work?
3. Alignment —How can LWD increase the number of people who have an industry recognized, post—secondary credential?
4. Accountability —What data and information about program performance would help us to improve services? The DVRS, as part of workforce development, provided input to these priorities to ensure that other components of the statewide workforce investment system can appropriately assist individuals with disabilities who access general services. (Page 283) Title IV

Strategies to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program include the following:
o Updating the extended employment guidelines;
o Standardizing vendor reporting forms;
o Monitoring required vendor accreditation and staff development;
o Meeting with the APSE board;
o Continuing the liaison meetings with ACCSES NJ;
o Outreaching to the DDD to provide employment services to individuals affected by deinstitutionalization;
o Encouraging CRPs to become employment networks; and
o Participating as a lead member to implement the Employment First initiative in the state. (Page 284) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~All Vocational Rehabilitation business services staff will have full access to the Salesforce platform, which will be the client relationship management system for the entire WIOA and One-Stop system statewide. This will allow smooth communication on specific businesses and WIOA Title I business representatives will be able to easily task the DVRS staff to respond to a business need or other specific activity like a modification assessment or other work. (Page 120) Title IV

The SETC has a relationship with the two State Rehabilitation Councils, outlined in prior sections, dedicated to the cause of increasing the number of individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Through the recommendations of the Councils, policies and practices are examined to ensure that One-Stop services are fully accessible to all. Members from both Councils assisted in the creation of an Accessibility Checklist. The Accessibility Checklist will be used to analyze the competency of a One-Stop Career Center in the areas of: staff training and knowledge; employer engagement; customer focus; quality of programs; and technology. (Page 162) Title IV

CBVI has developed a Business Relations Unit to strengthen the relationships with employers as a secondary customer of the VR program and to coordinate efforts with the larger employment engagement developed for the Workforce Development system in New Jersey. The members of the unit will work with employers throughout the state to assist in addressing their need for qualified candidates to fill critical vacancies in their workforce and provide education on disability-related topics. Services provided by the Business Relations Unit can include, but are not limited to, consultation and evaluation around assistive technology and accessibility issues; disability awareness training; recruitment for internships and employment vacancies; and targeted hiring events. CBVI’s Business Relations Unit will also seek opportunities for customers to engage in career exploration activities with business partners, such as informational interviews, job shadowing, and work experiences. (Page 314) Title IV

The agency is also undertaking additional strategic initiatives to improve performance in line with the new performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
•Establishing a business relations unit designed to meet the needs of the business community in New Jersey. CBVI is one of eleven state agencies in the first cohort that received intensive technical assistance from the Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center at the University of Massachusetts-Boston with the goal of assisting the agency to develop this service unit to promote employer engagement;
•Coordinate with DVRS to develop targeted hiring events at a regular basis;
•Train all agency counselors on using Labor Market Information (LMI) to increase informed choice in the process of choosing a career pathway;
•Implement at the agency the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP) created by the National Employment Team to increase employment opportunities for consumers. The TAP has job listings from companies throughout the United States.
•Coordinate with the Workforce Development System in New Jersey in developing and participating in Career Fairs throughout the state. (Page 342) Title IV

LVERs in New Jersey are aligned with the business services team in order to keep their focus on employer engagement. Jobseeker staff communicate on a regular basis with the LVERs to ensure they are generating job orders consistent with the skills, education and aptitude of the veterans being served. (Page 369) Title IV

Data Collection

DVRS upgraded its case management system to a fully functional AWARE system from Alliance Enterprises during FFY 2014. This was DVRS’s first full year working in the upgraded AWARE system. AWARE made it possible for DVRS to streamline information, easier to generate and compile data and reports required by RSA in a timely manner and for internal management reviews. AWARE provides all required reporting elements from the U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). These reports include: •Quarterly VR 113 -Cumulative Caseload Report •Annual VR 911 -Case Services Report •Annual VR-2 -VR Program/Cost Report (Page 129) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act requires States and local workforce areas to certify their One-Stop Career Centers based on requirements and criteria outlined in Section 121(g). The following are the general requirements that will assist in the development and implementation of New Jersey’s One-Stop Center Certification Process. The eligibility for receiving infrastructure funding is contingent upon the establishment of an objective criteria and process that will be administered by the local WDB areas. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria and process must be developed with standards related to service coordination on the overall system. The One-Stop Center Certification criteria must include factors relating to the effectiveness, accessibility, and improvement of the one-stop delivery system. The criteria must focus on the negotiated local levels of performance, the integration of available services and the needs of the local area employers. The local board areas have the autonomy to develop additional criteria that will respond to labor market, economic and demographic conditions and trends found in the local area. The One-Stop Center Certification Process must be reviewed and or modified by state or local plans on a biennial basis. (Pages 63-64) Title I

Wagner-Peyser provides accessibility for all populations to the full range of One-Stop Career Center employment and training programs. Programs designed to serve the needs of special populations with or without significant barriers to employment are integrated into the universal access provided by Wagner-Peyser and WIOA. Members of special populations, however, identified as having significant barriers to employment often require more intensive services to reach the employment goal. Significant barriers include poor previous attachment to the workforce, literacy or language barriers, ex-offender status, educational or occupational skills gap or lack of a credential, physical or mental disability, and driver’s license suspension. To help special populations with significant barriers to employment, New Jersey has created targeted programs and dedicated staff to help ensure positive outcomes. The challenge is to meet customers where they are by creating a proactive approach to promote and serve special populations. Once special populations enter the One-Stop Career Center system, ensuring that customers receive the services needed to reach their goal becomes a staff responsibility. All One-Stop Career Center staff members need to take ownership for the customer experience by providing warm handoffs when referrals to other service providers are appropriate. That involves taking the extra time to walk customers to where they need to go, introducing them to staff that can help them, and then circling back with customers to make sure their needs were met. Staff need to follow-up with customers to ensure all jobseekers remain engaged and focused on overcoming barriers to enable them to successfully (re)enter the workforce. Maintaining a stronger, more supportive connection to customers will result in better outcomes and improve the perceived value of the One-Stop Career Centers. (Pages 76-77) Title I

Additionally, DVRS staff work with businesses to identify a firm or worksite’s need for modifications to physical, organizational or other aspects of their business in order to be more welcoming and accessible for individuals with disabilities, both as employees and as customers. DVRS staff can support other business representatives in helping companies develop better accessibility plans and make reasonable accommodations when hiring individuals with disabilities. (Pages 119-120) Title I

In addition, CBVI will work in collaboration with the WIOA Training Unit and DVRS within LWD to develop specific training protocols for staff with the One-Stop Delivery System with the goal to increase awareness about issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility of the various components of that system. CBVI staff will be available to provide ongoing technical assistance and coaching to build staff skills sets that promote a welcoming environment for individuals with disabilities, including those individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deaf-blind. (Page 160) Title I

The Accessibility Checklist is used as a foundational element of the One-Stop Career Center Certification process established by the State Employment and Training Commission (SETC) in its Policy Resolution 2016-14 on September 20, 2016. Specifically the One-Stop Certification policy maintains objective criteria and processes through which local boards will certify their One-Stops. New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Center Certification by local WDBs includes as a pre-requisite that the WDB verifies the accessibility of its physical locations. This is not limited to physical accommodations; accessibility considers staff knowledge, technology, signage, marketing materials and access to programs and services, through the use of the One-Stop Accessibility Checklist. SETC Policy 2016-14 is provided in Appendix 4 of this Plan. (Pages 162-163) Title I

In relation to staff training and methods to ensure the programmatic accessibility of One-Stop Career Centers, New Jersey is putting in place a process of staff training by DVRS and CBVI for One-Stop staff. The Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (CBVI) will develop appropriate blindness and low-vision sensitivity and substantive vocational rehabilitation training to be shared with the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) and its One-Stop programs so that potential blind and vision-impaired consumers who make initial contact with One-Stop programs are able to receive adequate assistance before, or instead of, referral to CBVI for comprehensive services. CBVI will work in collaboration with DVRS and other core partners in LWD to develop the inter-agency training program to be implemented at the various One-Stop Career Centers throughout the state. (Page 163) Title I

The Disability subcommittee of the WIOA Blueprint Team developed an accessibility checklist and training protocols for the One-Stop Career Centers. The SRCs should be given the opportunity to review those documents and make recommendations for improvement. In the absence of this opportunity, the accessibility checklist should be relied upon strongly in helping these facilities provide an accessible service environment. (Page 300) Title IV

Veterans

New Jersey is at the forefront in the nation in using its Jobs for Veterans State Grant (JVSG) funding to work with businesses. New Jersey’s Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) and Disabled Veteran Opportunity Program contacts (DVOPs) have developed national best practices in making outreach to businesses, developing priority hiring partnerships with New Jersey companies, and placing veterans into employment. Many New Jersey firms and national employers with New Jersey locations are seeking qualified and dependable veterans, and many have stepped up to hire significant numbers of veterans and build coordinated hiring initiatives with Veterans and One-Stop programs. This systematic approach by large companies is something New Jersey’s WIOA and partner staff have been highly successful in building. When building one of these relationships, LWD dedicate a lead business representative (usually one of the LVERs) to be the company’s main point of contact to respond to their needs statewide, and to manage the local relationships between various company worksites and One-Stops such that the same level of services is offered across the state. The JVSG system is in the process of demonstrating and mentoring other Business Representatives in this model, since this kind of centralized contact and statewide coordination is a central part of the “sector team” approach being developed under New Jersey’s Talent Network initiative. The LVERs now work within the same LWD division as other business representatives and are fully integrated within the wider Business Services division. They are deeply embedded with the other Business Services staff at New Jersey’s One-Stop Career Centers. Because there are fewer LVERs and DVOP staff statewide, there is not representation at every One-Stop Career Center. However, they are mobile and strategically sited across New Jersey’s workforce regions, and can provide customized services to companies out of any of the One-Stop locations across New Jersey. (Page 120) Title IV

LWD will also establish guidance on how to determine veterans and veterans with significant barriers early in the triage and intake process within the One-Stop Career Centers. This will require cross training of Employment Service and WIOA-funded staff in the One-Stop Career Centers who are functionally responsible for triage. There is and will continue to be prominent signage in all One-Stop Career Centers informing customers that veterans receive priority of service. (Page 162) Title IV Veterans interested in federal employment opportunities receive preference based on the conditions of their military service and the presence of a service-connected disability. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and One-Stop Career Center staff will work with veterans to provide them with information on the federal application process and how to locate and apply for federal job opportunities using usajobs.gov. (Page 365) Title IV

Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with Veterans Program Letter (VPL) 01-16 Change 1 or most recent guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. DVOP specialists are expected to provide intensive case management services for the VR&E customers which include a comprehensive assessment and individual employment plan based upon the employment plan provided by the VA. The goal is to provide the VR&E veterans with the tools to be successful in the job search such as a robust résumé, career guidance, and job search assistance. (Page 366) Title IV

Serving the workforce directed needs of New Jersey’s veterans is a responsibility shared by all One-Stop Career Center staff. Effective intake and customer flow procedures, staff training, technical assistance/reinforcement, and monitoring contribute to ensuring that only a subset of eligible veterans identified as having a significant barrier to employment as defined in 38 U.S.C. 4103A(a)(1) and guidance containing the Secretary’s priorities. All veterans served by the DVOP will be assessed and have an employability plan that directs the delivery of intensive services. (Pages 368-369) Title IV

DVOP specialists concentrate on the delivery of intensive services to veterans with significant barriers to employment as defined in USDOL guidance using a case management approach. Subsequent guidance with additional eligibility categories will not substantially impact service delivery. In a fully-integrated environment where resources are leveraged to maximize efficiency and positive outcomes, the DVOP specialist is not personally delivering all of the career services but is managing the customer toward employment based on the outcome of an assessment and employment plan. In this environment, the DVOP needs to ensure that this management is recorded in the LWD AOSOS case management system under the DVOP specialist’s account. To help ensure that accountability information is recorded in a consistent manner that reflects the level of effort by the DVOP, LWD has created a custom tab in the AOSOS case management system specifically for the DVOP specialist. Management exception reports are also being developed in partnership with LWD’s newly created Division of Workforce Research and Analytics. Unlike traditional, after-the-fact, reports that provide summary tabulations, exception reports provide actionable information from individual customer records that can be run on a regular or ad-hoc basis to identify potential mistakes, oversights, or need for customer follow-up. Items on the exception report include whether the customer is an eligible veteran, whether they have received an intensive service, whether they are in case management, and whether they have a significant barrier. Future enhancements may include whether there is a completed employment plan, and whether Federal Bonding program eligibility letter was generated for the customer. (Page 371) Title IV

DVOP specialists are out-stationed at facilities where there are veterans that might benefit from intensive services, including the East Orange Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System at 385 Tremont Street in East Orange. Outreach activities to identify and assist veterans in need of intensive services have fostered relationships with the Lyons Campus of the VA New Jersey Health Care System in Lyons, Fort Monmouth Shelter in Freehold, NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs at multiple locations, Lunch Break in Red Bank (homeless veterans), MOCEANS (homeless, low income, and educationally deficient veterans) in Long Branch, and the Veterans Transitional Housing Program (Veterans Haven) in Winslow. (Page 374) Title IV J

VSG staff is deployed with clearly delineated distinct duties for the DVOP specialist and LVER. These clearly distinct duties include the delivery of intensive services to targeted veterans by the DVOP specialist and outreach to the employer community and facilitation within the state’s employment service delivery system for the LVER. DVOP specialists and LVER provide specialized service that complement and add value to OSCC veterans’ services. DVOP specialists and LVER do not duplicate services provided by other OSCC labor exchange staff. In the case of the DVOP specialist, this is ensured by a requirement that the significant barrier/18-24 year old veteran designation be documented for every customer served. (Page 375) Title IV

New Jersey will continue to distinguish military service veterans according to USDOL guidance primarily to determine eligibility for DVOP services. Covered persons must be given priority of service which means they go to the front of the line for all One-Stop services including employment, training, and placement services. In some limited cases, a spouse of a veteran can be classified as a covered person and must be given priority of service. Only covered persons who are also defined as “eligible” can be served or should be referred to the DVOP. (Page 378) Title IV

Special disabled/disabled are those eligible veterans who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs or who were discharged or released from active duty because of a service-connected disability. Veterans participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program are deemed high priority customers. In accordance with most current guidance, LWD has a state level Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Labor, Veterans Employment and Training Service (US DOL/VETS) and the VA/VR&E program that delineates roles and responsibilities for staff in the partner agencies. LWD’s primary roles are to provide workforce information to veterans who are entering a VR&E Program and to provide priority job search assistance for those veterans who are completing their VR&E Program. All partner agencies are involved in a quarterly review of VR&E customers and their progress in reaching their career goals. LWD has assigned a VR&E Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) from among the DVOP specialists assigned to the Newark One-Stop Career Center. The staff is out-stationed at the VA/VR&E office at 20 Washington Place in Newark. (Page 379) Title IV

Often employers are willing to hire veterans that possess most of the qualities they desire in an ideal employee if the hire can in some way be incentivized. LVERs have been using the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, VOW, Federal Bonding Program, and on-the-job training (OJT) grants to help seal the connection between veterans and employers. New Jersey’s state-funded Workforce Development Partnership Program has helped employers through the Opportunities4Jersey on-the-job training program defray some of the extraordinary costs involved in training new workers by paying up to 50% of new hires salary for up to six months. (Page 381) Title IV

As the LVER reorganization moves forward, LWD anticipates more job order development successes as DVOP specialists and LVERs define their roles and responsibilities along guidance supplied in VPL 03-14, VPL 04-14 and VPL 08-14. LWD will concentrate LVER staff efforts on targeted job development services for veterans especially veterans determined to be job ready after receipt of intensive services from a DVOP specialist. These measures will assist LWD in enhancing the existing processes and oversight to ensure DVOP specialists provide intensive services for veterans with employment barriers, including homeless veterans, veterans with disabilities, and the other service categories listed in most current guidance. (Page 381) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DVRS is continuing to establish an MOU with the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS). The last formal agreement ended October 1, 2014. DVRS will reach out to DMHAS to establish an MOU that outlines the coordination of services in FFY 2017. (Page 251) Title I

There are presently an approved cadre of community providers throughout the state who provide supported employment services on a fee for service basis. The Commission continues to make use of time limited job coaching services to address the needs of consumers who are chronically unemployed and those who present with issues of mental health or are otherwise ineligible for services from the DDD. The Commission has traditionally placed approximately between four and five percent of all successful rehabilitations into supported employment. (Page 353) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 75

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Bridges to Employment Supported Employment - 11/14/2019

“At Bridges to Employment, we provide comprehensive career services to meet a variety of today's workforce needs. Our services range from vocational assessment and career exploration to job placement and on-the-job training. Bridges to Employment also provides an array of additional services customized for students, entry level job seekers as well as those seeking a career change.

Whether you are an employer seeking to add qualified candidates to your workforce, or a job seeker looking for some assistance in finding just the right job match for you, you have come to the right place.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment - 10/23/2019

~~“The New Jersey Conference on Disability and Employment returns in 2019. The conference is developed with the input of educators, service providers, families, employers and others who are committed to the concept of Employment First, which is premised on the assumption that individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment. The conference offers case studies, public policy information, employer presentations and more.  This is the only state employment conference designed for families, educators, employers and service providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate, No. 104: Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act - 03/27/2018

“It shall be an unlawful employment practice, or, as the case may be, an unlawful discrimination:

a. For an employer, because of the race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, civil union status, domestic partnership status, affectional or sexual orientation, genetic information, pregnancy or breastfeeding, sex, gender identity or expression, disability or atypical hereditary cellular or blood trait of any individual, or because of the liability for service in the Armed Forces of the United States or the nationality of any individual, or because of the refusal to submit to a genetic test or make available the results of a genetic test to an employer, to refuse to hire or employ or to bar or to discharge or require to retire, unless justified by lawful considerations other than age, from employment such individual or to discriminate against such individual in compensation or in terms, conditions or privileges of employment;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Assembly, No. 1827: Concerns Earned Sick Leave - 03/06/2018

“Each employer shall provide earned sick leave to each employee working for the employer in the State. For every 30 hours worked, the employee shall accrue one hour of earned sick leave. The employer shall not be required to permit the employee to accrue at any one time, or carry forward from one benefit year to the next, more than 40 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is a small employer, or more than 72 hours of earned sick leave if the employer is not a small employer. Unless the employee has accrued earned sick leave prior to the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue on the effective date of this act for any employee hired before the effective date of this act and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, and if hired after the effective date of this act, the earned sick leave shall begin to accrue upon the date of hire and the employee shall be eligible to use the earned sick leave beginning on the 90th day after the hiring of the employee, unless the employer agrees to an earlier date. The employee may use earned sick leave as it is accrued.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Jersey ABLE Legislation - 02/24/2015

Authorizes establishment of tax-exempt Achieving a Better Life Experience accounts for persons with developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

New Jersey Governor’s Employment First Declaration - 04/19/2012

~~“Recognizing the opportunity for New Jersey to improve employment statistics by increasing the number of people with disabilities in the general workforce, Governor Christie declared New  Jersey an “Employment First” state on April 19, 2012.  The initiative embraces the philosophy – implemented through policies, programs, and services – that promotes competitive employment in the general workforce as the first and preferred post education outcome for people with any type of disability.The Employment First initiative sets the bar higher and creates an expectation that people with disabilities, like everyone else, will have to “opt out” of employment rather than “opt in.”  In an effort to increase employment outcomes for people with disabilities, most states have incorporated Employment First activities or philosophies of some kind.  Each State Agency, including the Division of Developmental Disabilities (Division), involved in assisting individuals with disabilities with services and supports was asked to identify and remove barriers to employment and implement policy to increase employment outcomes for the individuals with disabilities they serve." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 34

New Jersey Combined State Plan for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 2020 - 03/26/2020

“New Jersey has chosen the option provided in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to submit a Combined State Plan. This plan includes several additional federal workforce programs administered by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDOL)….

According to the American Community Survey, there was an annual average of more than 410,000 individuals with disabilities between 2014 and 2018 residing in the Garden State.  Among this population, 44.7 percent participated in the workforce during the period with an unemployment rate of 13.5 percent. While this rate is 5.5 percentage points lower than the 2010-2014 annual average, it is still unacceptably high. Recognizing this, Governor Murphy included a $10M tax credit in his minimum wage law specifically to help individuals with disabilities join the workforce.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Veterans Affairs Veterans Service Offices - 12/12/2019

“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices (VSO), the NJ Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) provides the state's Veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained Veterans Service Officers at these offices also assist Veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to Veterans and their families. DMAVA also conducts outreach events in the community where VSOs are present to help and assist any Veteran.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Case Services Policy Manual - 11/15/2019

“This manual sets forth the operational policies of the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the NJ Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities - 11/12/2019

“This third edition of Autism: A Family Guide to Navigating the New Jersey Service Systems for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Developmental Disabilities remains the same as its two prior iterations: assist anyone in need of ASD related services to access New Jersey’s state system of programs and services for individuals with ASD. “Through the Maze” is a starting point for anyone interested in developing an understanding of the way New Jersey has arranged its governmental services for individuals and families affected by ASD; it is not intended to represent every ASD service available in New Jersey. The state has local non-profit organization partners that run intensive and comprehensive programs that fill service needs, which are not addressed by state government.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

What services does DVRS provide? - 10/31/2019

“Any individual with a physical, mental, cognitive, or other form of disability that has a substantial impediment to employment may qualify for the following services through the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS).

Career Counseling Supported Employment Evaluations and Restorations Financial Assessments and Planning Job accommodations/equipment and vehicle modifications Training Opportunities Interpretation Services Small Business Funding”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

North Jersey Partners WIOA Regional Plan - 07/01/2019

~~“Theme 1: Building Career Pathways with a focus on Industry-Valued CredentialsThrough  a  common  definition  of  career  pathways,  a  newly  created  list  of  industry-valued credentials, literacy standards and a renewed commitment to Employment First for all persons with disabilities, New Jersey will ensure that all workforce investments are enabling individuals to  access  greater  economic  opportunity  and  to  build  on  their  skills  throughout  their  careers. These  efforts  will  expand  the  number  of  career  pathways,  at  all  levels  of  education  and workforce  services,  which  will  help more  individuals  obtain  industry-valued  credentials  and degrees.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

NJDVRS Case Services Policy Manual - 06/25/2019

~~“The New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is the designated New Jersey State Agency dedicated to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with physical or mental disabilities as provided under the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.The goal of NJDVRS is to prepare and place in employment eligible persons with disabilities who, because of the significance of their disabling conditions, would otherwise be unable to secure and/or maintain employment. In addition, an increasingly important goal is to provide and promote comprehensive services for independent living designed to meet the current and future needs of individuals whose disabilities are so significant that they do not presently have potential for employment, but may benefit from rehabilitation services that will enable them to live and function as independently as possible.To achieve these ends, NJDVRS promotes the development of needed resources, human and physical, and supports a wide range of services for eligible persons with disabilities, through cooperation with industry, representatives of organized labor, the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and community rehabilitation programs. NJDVRS coordinates its efforts with these and other public agencies, Federal, State and Local.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Jersey Veterans Service Office - 05/21/2019

~~“Through our network of regional Veterans Service Offices, the N.J. Division of Veterans Services, Bureau of Veterans Benefits provides the state's 413,000 veterans and their dependents with information and guidance in filing claims. Trained veterans service officers at those offices also assist veterans with issues pertaining to employment, education, burial, counseling, housing, social and medical services, and other areas of concern to veterans and their families. Please make every effort to use these valuable services.”

Systems
  • Other

Other Disability Related Services and Supports - 04/10/2019

~~“In this section, DDS has compiled a list of various other services and supports available to NJ Residents with disabilities.  The programs have been categorized by target disability as a matter of reference, although some may serve multiple populations.  Where a NJ Website was not available, a national website has been provided.   

Please note: While DDS Information and Referral Specialists are familiar with each of the programs listed and can provide general information, these programs are not administered by DDS.  Please follow the links on