New Mexico

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State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,096,829
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.82%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,583
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.72%
Change from
2018 to 2019
58,712
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
3.44%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.14%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 2,088,070 2,095,428 2,096,829
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 169,264 159,258 165,583
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 57,005 53,008 58,712
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 751,217 758,180 776,150
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.68% 33.28% 35.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 71.45% 71.59% 74.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.20% 4.90% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 27.00% 24.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 18.80% 18.10% 17.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 164,508 161,987 167,869
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 157,848 164,593 161,116
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 249,066 251,581 251,190
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 5,551 6,728 7,766
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 147,519 149,694 150,848
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 30,655 33,152 26,564
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,111 1,827 3,266
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 8,640 7,657 11,100
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 26,067 25,274 28,712

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,809 1,939 1,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.50% 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 64,863 63,955 63,154

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 912 1,898 2,193
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,067 5,913 4,667
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,254 7,657 5,717
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.00% 24.80% 38.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.40% 1.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00% 2.10% 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 82 137 115
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 230 209 210
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,574 4,564 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 7 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 86.00% 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.34 0.29 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.00% 25.00% 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,437 2,452 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 101,334 100,689 100,032
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 37 57 60
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 35 60 76

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,888,000 $8,268,943 $8,859,461
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $5,896,000 $5,860,642 $7,808,918
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $34,916,000 $55,353,119 $61,293,385
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 25.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,135 4,574 4,459
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 500 521 806
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.30 61.10 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.80% 49.82% 49.93%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.19% 18.62% 18.14%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.92% 0.87% 0.79%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 87.25% 93.08% 95.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 42.85% 41.13% 40.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.34% 76.39% 75.47%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.37% 80.94% 82.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.49% 35.26% 35.46%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 91 185 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 91 185 59

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment (Page 360) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~NMDVR has been collaborating with other NM state agency partners in supporting and funding “Partners for Employment”. This innovative state—wide contract brings together a variety of both in—state and out of state vocational experts to develop and implement the Discovery process for individuals with the most significant disabling conditions. This process, as well as other non—traditional career development paths, is intended to support and encourage vocational strategies which result in successful employment outcomes for participants. The majority of individuals served as a result of this collaboration are receiving direct training and support by nationally known experts employed by Marc Gold and Associates. In the last several months, NMDVR has participated in and been intimately involved in agency training provided by Marc Gold and Associates. In turn, NMDVR counselors are working directly with employment teams who have made the commitment to support NMDVR participants toward meeting their specific vocational objectives. (Page 348) Title IV

Since this collaboration 154 field staff have been trained in the Discovery process for non— traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. As of state Performance Year 2018, 10 FTE are submitted for legislative approval process as part of the three-year expansion plan. (Page 354) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:
o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;
o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers; (Page 120) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~The New Mexico Aging and Disability Resource Center maintains a database with over 3,700 national, state and local resources to assist those in need in New Mexico. Its Resource Directory lists 40 providers serving Deming, the main city in Luna County. These provide financial, care-giving, nutrition and health services. For Gallup, the major city in McKinley County, the database lists 102 service providers, offering an even broader array of services. (Page 474) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note—taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. Commission high school clients will also be supported by the CREC contract. (Pages 422-423 431-432) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Workforce Connection Center staff are active in the School to Work Transition Alliance helping to develop better ways to reach out and accommodate individuals (Page 183) Title I
In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. (Page 298) Title IV

Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. The Division continues to be involved nationally with Transition Services for students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. (Page 298) Title IV

The integrated continuum of services is to be flexible enough to meet the needs of all IDEA eligible students to qualify for DVR services within the available resources, maximize opportunity for students and eliminate limitations and obstacles. Currently Public Education Department is working with Regional Educational Cooperative Memberships to establish intergovernmental agreements. The MOU further outlines: A. Assure that all students with disabilities as defined by the IDEA and its implementing regulations receive appropriate services; B. Coordinate services to students with disabilities so as to maximize learner outcomes and provide for a successful transition to appropriate employment as specified in student Individualized Education Programs (IEPs); C. Formalize referral procedures with appropriate agency(ies) to ensure students with disabilities are provided with opportunities for services; D. Coordinate services delivery and follow—up/along with the education/rehabilitation services continuum; E. Establish joint trainings to provide staff development and other training activities for Local Educational Agency (LEA) transition specialists and other individuals involved in transition planning. (Page 300) Title IV

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. (Page 301) Title IV

The Division has determined that 13 new counselor positions will be necessary to adequately meet the growing population needs, and provide the appropriate support to our Transition students. Therefore, expanding the Vocational Counselor positions and increasing to 89 caseloads is ideal. Furthermore, efforts in restructuring of approved agency positions has successfully added 2-Program Managers. Other staffing initiatives have included collaborative efforts in development of contracts with the Central Regional Educational Cooperatives, which have resulted in 21 Vocational Transition Specialists available to support outreach efforts to Transition age population across the state. (Page 314) Title IV

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 327) Title IV

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services. DVR counselors continue to attend Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) and are working collaboratively with CREC VTS to attend IEP’s. VTS and NM DVR staff are providing PRE-ETS services throughout the state. These services include Guidance to employment, Self-Advocacy, Work Readiness, and Guidance to Post-Secondary education and Work Experience. VTS have referred 151 students as potential DVR participants to DVR offices across the state. (Page 362) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high—growth industries. In 2017, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (NMDVR) opened a satellite office within the Bernalillo County Workforce Connection Center. The purpose of this NMDVR office is to help individuals with disabilities find employment. This office will consist of two Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, and a Vocational Rehabilitation Technician. This unit will also be supported by the NMDVR Business Specialist. The goal of this co-location will be to allow individuals with disabilities to be jointly served between the various workforce partners and NMDVR. NMDVR can provide technical assistance to both workforce partners and Job Seekers with disabilities on issues regarding disabilities. (Page 352) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The Board also reviews, evaluates and reports annually on the performance of all workforce development activities administered by state agencies involved with workforce development. Key areas of focus include developing linkages with the public education and higher education agencies to ensure coordination of vocational education, apprenticeship, adult education and literacy, employment training programs and vocational rehabilitation programs with other workforce development and training programs. Any problems identified by the State Board will be included in the annual report on strategic plan implementation and the measures that will be taken to address those problems. (Page 89) Title I

WIOA places a keen emphasis on work-based experiences across target groups, particularly youth, individuals with barriers to employment, and individuals with disabilities, as a means to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. WIOA also provides enhanced access and flexibility for work-based training options, such as Registered Apprenticeship, on-the-job (OJT), customized, and incumbent worker training, transitional jobs, and internships. Registered Apprenticeship should be used more often as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job-driven strategy for employers and industries. OJT continues to be a key method of delivering training services to adults and dislocated workers, and states and local areas have the flexibility under WIOA to increase the reimbursement level to up to 75 percent. (Page 94) Title I

Under WIOA, vocational rehabilitation programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a local board youth provider on finalizing a memorandum of understanding to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, an NMDVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. (Page 119) Title I

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the New Mexico Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:

o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;

o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers;

o regular technical assistance and best practices sharing across all partner programs to increase awareness of Registered Apprenticeship and opportunities for individuals with disabilities;

o coordinated marketing and outreach strategies as a means of identifying participants across all programs who are appropriate candidates for Registered Apprenticeship;

o ways the Vocational Rehabilitation programs can assist disabled veterans with guidance and services to maintain their employment through Registered Apprenticeship programs;

o training initiatives such as TechHire, and New Mexico Career Solutions (a career readiness tool) and internships, as New Mexico has a portal for getting out-of-school youth engaged in searching for job opportunities; and

o agreements through memoranda of understanding with partners and contracts with service providers to guide and govern resources for youth with disabilities, such as vocational training and initiatives to obtain high school equivalency. (Page 119-120) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions also administers Wagner-Peyser Employment Services, which it does from the state level through its Employment Services Division, along with the administration of Trade Adjustment Assistance, Work Opportunity Tax Credit, Rapid Response, and Veterans programs. NMDWS receives funding from USDOL to hire and oversee state merit staff responsible for direct delivery of the Wagner Peyser employment services and the other related services to jobseekers and employers. Merit staff is located throughout 18 field offices and the programs are co-located with the WIOA programs in every local board area. (Page 151) Title III

In accordance with requirements from the Social Security Administration, there are two essential contacts. All of the benefits advisers work with the local SSA offices and specifically with the Area Work Incentive Coordinator (AWIC). Together they find solutions on how the help all, including Jackson Class members not terminate working due to a glitch in the process. This includes developing individualized 1619(b) thresholds, over payments which could be mediated by use of work incentives, and proper use of the Ticket to Work. NMDVR has four Memorandum of Understanding on how the Ticket to Work will be used with local Employment Networks (ENs). This includes who has the Ticket at any point and making use of partnership plus as a viable service to participants, once they are closed by NMDVR. Lastly, although not a requirement, NMDVR has been instrumental in the New Mexico Ticket Partners a group made on NMDVR staff (Benefits Advisement and Ticket Coordinator), ENs, the SSA Work Incentive Coordinator (WIPA), Disability Rights NM (DRNM) Protection and Advocacy for Beneficiaries on Social Security (PABSS), Workforce, Veterans services, and other job development services who may be interested in becoming of connecting with the Ticket to Work. Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) works with self-employment working on how earnings from different types of business structures could affect SSA calculation of benefits as well at the accounting system the participants choices for their business. (Page 293-294; Page 296) Title IV

Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) have been asked to provide training to all state and nonprofit providers of supported employment, usually at the area meetings. They also assist in cases on a one on one process to help the providers and beneficiaries of SSDB to develop reports, work incentive plans, and complete SSA paperwork. (Page 306) Title IV
Partners for Employment is identified as the statewide entity to oversee and manage a variety of Supported Employment Programs. This program is intended to serve and support individuals with a variety of disabling conditions. The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR coordinates with SSA to implement the Ticket to Work Program and obtain employment outcomes. Two units within the agency provide the required services within the agency: 1) Ticket to Work/Security Services and the Benefits Advisement Services.

The TTW services works with cost reimbursement; placing and removing the participants from “in use” status; instructing field staff on what is needed for a participant to move through the rehab process; providing technical assistance to field staff; advocating when a problem arises in the process of in use and medical continuing disability protection (CDR); attending SSA training and quarterly meetings; provide documentation to SSA about Ticket related issues, attends Ticket to Work Partners meeting; and assist with MOU in the community for Partnership Plus. Four MOUs with local/national Employment Networks (ENs). (Page 326-327)

Benefits Advisors work with participants one on one, helping them move through the stages of change regarding employment while on Public Benefits. They serve people 14 to full retirement age. BAS are required to complete a Community Partners Work Incentive Coordinator certificate and choose a specialty as well. Specialties include transition issues, tax help, A Better Life Experience (ABLE), Money Smart, and Self Employment. Some Benefits Advisors have taken on two specialties. (Page 327) Title IV

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 392) Title IV

Establishing a firm and reassuring foundation of monthly income and medical insurance is important to the fundamental job—readiness of each consumer, so the Commission contracted with New Mexico Legal Aid to provide assistance to consumers that needed help with guidance and counseling with respect to SSI and SSDI work incentives. A great deal of emphasis is placed on consumers possessing skills that will help them overcome their vision loss, and the Commission encourages attendance at the Orientation Center. All interested consumers are taken on a tour of the center by their counselor. Those who choose not to attend the center are provided training in their own communities by the Commission’s Independent Living Teachers. Counselors spend a great deal of time and effort assisting the consumer to identify their own career goal, and counselors ask that consumers research identified career goals to determine whether a contemplated career is a good fit. (Page 441) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~In addition, the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a federal tax credit administered at the state level that is available to employers that hire workers in designated target groups that have barriers to employment. Employers can potentially get a tax credit ranging from $1,200 to $9,600 depending on the target group. The tax credit is designed to help job seekers gain on-the-job experience, move towards economic self-sufficiency, and at the same time help reduce employers’ federal tax liability. WOTC target groups include qualified TANF recipients, qualified veterans, qualified ex-felons, designated community residents, vocational rehabilitation referrals, qualified food stamp recipients, qualified social security income recipients, and long-term family assistance recipients. (Page 110) Title I

Data Collection

The division was involved with Pepnet2 national grant, where the division worked closely with Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; Work Force Connections; and New Mexico School of the Deaf (NMSD) to establish a goal on being able to share data collection and increasing expectations to reduce systemic barriers and close the education employment gaps for deaf individuals. Last Year the grant reestablished through The National Deaf Center, and as of today, this committee is still working on establishing a data collection system. It is the plan of the Division to continue to be an active member of this committee to help provide resources, strategies, and opportunities for dialog at local, state and national level for Deaf individuals, families and professionals in order to reduce systemic barriers and close the education and employment gaps for deaf individuals. (Page 349) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtained employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. NMDVR sponsored ACRE training for community partners: • In collaboration with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Partners for Employment is offering a limited number of scholarships for private job developers to take the ACRE-certified Supported Employment Online Course offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). (Page 331) Title IV

NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtain employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. (Page 356) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA Grievance and Complaint Resolution — This policy will ensure that no individual will be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in the administration of or in connection with any such program or activity because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief or, for any beneficiary, because of the beneficiary’s citizenship status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or for participation in any Title I financially assisted program or activity. The policy establishes procedures for processing complaints and grievances, which apply to all levels of the New Mexico workforce system. This policy covers equal opportunity requirements, discrimination grievances, local and state complaints; and criminal fraud and abuse complaints. (Page 147) Title I

Below are some examples of how the local boards are trying to make the Workforce Connection Centers more assessable to individuals with disabilities, as follows. o Installation of automatic, push button doors o Assistive devices, such as TTY machines o Lift tables and other products for people with disabilities o Computers with enhanced keyboard for clients that have visual problems o Community Outreach Program for the Deaf provides interpreter services o Local policies regarding Reasonable Accommodation, Disability Related Non-Discrimination and EEOC complaints (Page 183) Title I

At the state level, NMHED is committed to removing barriers to access by providing access to grants, financial aid and counseling, instruction and services in various locations in the community. Under the oversight of NMHED, we ensure that institution provide counselling and advising, academic accommodations and other support services to ensure needs of traditionally underrepresented students are met. Programs are committed to the policies of equal opportunity and affirmative action for employees and will actively recruit applicants from traditionally underrepresented groups and seek to develop a diverse faculty and staff. Providers disseminate anti-discrimination policies through employee and student handbooks and other official materials. Provide all activities in ADA accessible facilities. Disseminate program fliers and information in multiple languages. Coordinate and offer cultural sensitivity, ADA and related training for program faculty and staff. (Page 288) Title I

Veterans

Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (VA VR&E). This program provides veterans with SBE and service members with assistance to help with job training, employment accommodations, resume development and job seeking skills coaching. Other services include entrepreneurship, independent living services for those severely disabled and unable to work. NMDWS has a Memorandum of Understanding with the VA VR&E program to assist whose veterans with individualized career services and career planning. One DVOP specialist is designated as an Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) to facilitate the VA VR&E referrals to DVOP specialists in the Workforce Connection Centers. In Albuquerque, the ISC coordinated with the LVER in the Workforce Connection Center in Albuquerque to organize two (2) employer Meet-and-Greet events for VA VR&E participants. In 2017, 182 veterans were referred to VRE, 70 obtained suitable employment, with an average wage of $18.38, and a rehabilitated rate of 81.5 percent. (Page 116) Title I

Veteran’s staff works closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and private sector partners who provide training or education benefits to prepare veterans with job opportunities. The DVOP positions provide outreach assistance to veterans, particularly those who have a disability and need intensive services to remove barriers to employment. A full range of available employment and training services to veterans include job search, job development, resume writing, dress for success, and interviewing skills. LVER staff conducts outreach to employers to encourage job development for all veterans and to establish a network of employers and service providers for veterans seeking assistance through the workforce system; make referrals to vocational and training institutions; and work to capitalize on resources, such as the WIOA training dollars with veterans’ preference. LVERs are also team members in the Business Services sections of the Workforce Connection Centers, meeting with and assisting employers with posting job orders, organization of job fairs, and identifying job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. (Page 187) Title I

The State intends to use Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists to provide individualized career services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) or are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP Specialist employment services. The State intends to use Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) to perform only the duties which are related to outreach to the employer community and for capacity building within the state’s employment service delivery system to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for job seeking veterans. (Page 457) Title IV

NMDWS ensures that the New Mexico Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant staff of DVOP specialists and LVER staff are properly integrated at the local Workforce Connection Centers (WCC). DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WCC. They are included among the WCC partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by WCC that provide online and/or in-person workforce development or related support service as part of the workforce development system. Although the DVOP specialists and LVERs are integrated in WCC, the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 prohibit DVOPs and LVERs from performing non-veteran related duties that detract from their ability to perform their statutorily-defined duties related to meeting the employment needs of eligible veterans. (Page 461-462) Title IV

(3) DVOP specialists are out-stationed to VA Medical Center’s Supportive Employment Programs (Work and Compensated Therapy); Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, Supportive Services to Veterans and Families and veteran per diem grant recipient’s, wounded warrior military treatment locations, veterans’ court and correctional facilities (minimum level). A DVOP specialist is designated as the Intensive Services Coordinator and located at the VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program office. DVOP specialists’ supports and attends the Stand Down events and other community homeless events as part of their outreach. Additionally, they schedule and conduct outreach to Native American veterans located on tribal lands. (4) LVERs are team members in the WCC Business Section to meet with and assist employers with posting job orders. They assist with the organization of job fairs and meet with employers to identify job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. They work closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and the private sector that provides training or education benefits to prepare veterans with careers or job opportunities. (Page 462) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The Division is involved in a Vocational Technical Assistance Center project targeted at five economically disadvantaged communities (mostly Hispanic and Native American) in Albuquerque (87102, 87105, 87106, 87108 and 87121) to address barriers to employment regarding individuals with Mental Health Conditions and /or Persons with Substance Abuse Disorders. This project is a collaboration between the Division, Rehabilitation Service Administration, U.S. Department of Education, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, and the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation. The goal is to expand VR services to this target population and expand and strengthen partnerships with local social service and community development agencies, correctional agencies, community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), school systems, employers, community leaders, and other relevant stakeholders. This project will involve the Division in development of knowledge (training) in working with this target population and will design strategies to provide technical assistance and coordination of activities to maximize community service and alliance building. This project has the support of twenty local partnerships to implement comprehensive support services to address barriers in employment to this target population. (Page 293) Title IV

The Division does not target specific disability groups to provide supported employment services. However, long— term support funding by the state is currently available for those individuals who are either developmentally disabled or who have significant disabling mental illness. Provision of Supported Employment as it relates to Mental Health Service. The Department of Human Services provides administrative support to and houses the Behavioral Health Collaborative to provide a long—term funding mechanism for Behavioral Health recipients. Behavioral Health Services and funding is allocated through the Collaborative to provide comprehensive and vocational services to individuals with significant disabling mental illness. Both mechanisms mentioned above are used to fund long—term supported employment services and extended services. (Page 305-306) Title IV

Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. In the past years, the infrastructure providing mental health in the state was shaken and a team from Arizona was brought in to provide services. This outside entity remained in the state for a short time before leaving. Since then the agencies which once provided services had returned and have worked on trying to develop a viable system again. During the transition periods, much of what was provided in Psychosocial Rehabilitation services was discontinued or changed, losing the supported employment and other job services. BAS has been available to help with participants of NMDVR who work are part of the Behavioral Health System. (Page 311) Title IV

During the past four years, work continued toward intra—agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. (Page 327) Title IV

Project E3 provides technical assistance (TA} to State VR agencies and their partners to address barriers to VR participation and competitive integrated employment of historically underserved groups of individuals with disabilities who are economically disadvantaged. This RSA/Southern U. of Baton Rouge project concentrates on five specific zip codes in Albuquerque: 87102, 87105, 87106, 87108, and 87121. This project will focus on ways to breakdown employment barriers for people w/ Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders in these zip codes. Both DVR and Community Providers will be collaborating on this project. (Page 356-357) Title IV

Continue to seek long-term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. (Page 360) Title IV

The agency currently does not have a cooperative agreement with the agency responsible for providing mental health services, but the agency does provide training to staff on how to better serve individuals with mental illness and on the resources available. The agency will develop a cooperative agreement with state agencies that provide mental health services. (Page 392) Title IV
The agency will work cooperatively with the Department of Health, with the Medical Assistance Division, with the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division, and with the Behavioral Health Services Division. The agency will designate specific liaisons and points of contact for each of these entities, will provide information as appropriate, and will enter into a cooperative agreement with the Department of Health. (Page 409) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Employment Services are provided as part of the one-stop delivery system. Currently, each local workforce development area has at least one comprehensive workforce development center that includes, at a minimum, three partners: WIOA Adult and Dislocated Worker services, Wagner- Peyser Employment Services, and access to Unemployment Insurance services. Each Employment Services field office is assigned a site manager who ensures the workforce centers are universally accessible, customer centered, and training is job-driven. This includes providing easy access to and assistance with workforce related activities, such as looking for a job, exploring work preparation and career development services, as well as seamless referral to WIOA employment, on-the-job-training, and occupational training programs. (Page 108) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Getting Started with My Workforce Connection - 05/23/2019

~~“The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions is changing the way you access job seeking services and Unemployment Insurance benefits with a more secure and simplified login process. As of May 15, both existing and new users for the New Mexico Workforce Connection Online System (www.jobs.state.nm.us ) and the New Mexico Unemployment Insurance (UI) Tax & Claims System will be prompted to create a new single account. In order to create your new account, you will need to have a valid and accessible email address that you do not share with anyone else. Your email address will be used for account management and security purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services – Field Services - 03/01/2019

~~“There are 16 field offices of the New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services located throughout the state. Each is staffed by an accredited Veterans’ Service Officer (VSO) to assist veterans and their dependents with filing for their federal and state benefits. Most VSO’s also have regularly-scheduled outreach visits to smaller surrounding communities.”

Systems
  • Other

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability - 01/01/2019

~~“OBJECTIVES• Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public• Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers• Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community with needed services and supports • Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Services Offered by the Albuquerque Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~~“VA’s Albuquerque Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in New Mexico. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) Program - 08/28/2018

~~“The Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) program covers disabled working individuals who, because of earnings, do not qualify for Medicaid under any other programs. Individuals must meet the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) criteria for disability without regard to "substantial gainful activity".

The program also covers those individuals with a recent attachment to the work force. An individual is considered to have recent attachment to the work force if he/she has enough earnings in a quarter to meet the SSA’s definition of a qualifying quarter or has lost SSI and Medicaid due to the initial receipt of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, until Medicare entitlement. Apply at any ISD office and request to apply for Medicaid category 074”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workforce Partners - 05/02/2019

~~This page has links and information about various statewide Partner Programs

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

“The Governor and the State Workforce Development Board have been assigned broad authority under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to provide policy and guidance to local boards, local one-stop delivery systems, and one-stop partner programs. Members of the board are appointed by the Governor and serve as the Governor's employer-driven workforce development adviser for programs and policies under WIOA. The board performs functions that include strategic planning, policy guidance, capacity building, and leadership and oversight of the state system operations.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 05/01/2019

~~“For the  two  Medicaid  waivers  providing  noninstitutional  care  to  people  with  developmental disabilities, the FY20 general fund appropriation to the department is sufficient to add more than 330 slots, the largest increase since at least FY07. However, with nearly 5,000 people awaiting services and estimates indicating it can take as long as 13 and one-half years before a client begins receiving services, more work remains. The long wait poses a hardship for families and can end up costing the state more in the long run if a client’s conditions worsen or if a client becomes less responsive to rehabilitation. Because of this, the Legislature also appropriated $1.5 million with language requiring the department to develop a new Medicaid waiver to provide supportive services to people on the wait list. ”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Money Follows the Person - 10/01/2012

~~“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to

•  increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services,• [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice,• strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions• put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,096,829
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.82%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,583
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.72%
Change from
2018 to 2019
58,712
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
3.44%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.14%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 2,088,070 2,095,428 2,096,829
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 169,264 159,258 165,583
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 57,005 53,008 58,712
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 751,217 758,180 776,150
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.68% 33.28% 35.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 71.45% 71.59% 74.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.20% 4.90% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 27.00% 24.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 18.80% 18.10% 17.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 164,508 161,987 167,869
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 157,848 164,593 161,116
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 249,066 251,581 251,190
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 5,551 6,728 7,766
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 147,519 149,694 150,848
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 30,655 33,152 26,564
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,111 1,827 3,266
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 8,640 7,657 11,100
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 26,067 25,274 28,712

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,809 1,939 1,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.50% 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 64,863 63,955 63,154

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 912 1,898 2,193
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,067 5,913 4,667
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,254 7,657 5,717
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.00% 24.80% 38.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.40% 1.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00% 2.10% 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 82 137 115
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 230 209 210
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,574 4,564 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 7 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 86.00% 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.34 0.29 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.00% 25.00% 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,437 2,452 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 101,334 100,689 100,032
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 37 57 60
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 35 60 76

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,888,000 $8,268,943 $8,859,461
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $5,896,000 $5,860,642 $7,808,918
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $34,916,000 $55,353,119 $61,293,385
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 25.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,135 4,574 4,459
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 500 521 806
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.30 61.10 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.80% 49.82% 49.93%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.19% 18.62% 18.14%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.92% 0.87% 0.79%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 87.25% 93.08% 95.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 42.85% 41.13% 40.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.34% 76.39% 75.47%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.37% 80.94% 82.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.49% 35.26% 35.46%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 91 185 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 91 185 59

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment (Page 360) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~NMDVR has been collaborating with other NM state agency partners in supporting and funding “Partners for Employment”. This innovative state—wide contract brings together a variety of both in—state and out of state vocational experts to develop and implement the Discovery process for individuals with the most significant disabling conditions. This process, as well as other non—traditional career development paths, is intended to support and encourage vocational strategies which result in successful employment outcomes for participants. The majority of individuals served as a result of this collaboration are receiving direct training and support by nationally known experts employed by Marc Gold and Associates. In the last several months, NMDVR has participated in and been intimately involved in agency training provided by Marc Gold and Associates. In turn, NMDVR counselors are working directly with employment teams who have made the commitment to support NMDVR participants toward meeting their specific vocational objectives. (Page 348) Title IV

Since this collaboration 154 field staff have been trained in the Discovery process for non— traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. As of state Performance Year 2018, 10 FTE are submitted for legislative approval process as part of the three-year expansion plan. (Page 354) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:
o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;
o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers; (Page 120) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~The New Mexico Aging and Disability Resource Center maintains a database with over 3,700 national, state and local resources to assist those in need in New Mexico. Its Resource Directory lists 40 providers serving Deming, the main city in Luna County. These provide financial, care-giving, nutrition and health services. For Gallup, the major city in McKinley County, the database lists 102 service providers, offering an even broader array of services. (Page 474) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note—taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. Commission high school clients will also be supported by the CREC contract. (Pages 422-423 431-432) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Workforce Connection Center staff are active in the School to Work Transition Alliance helping to develop better ways to reach out and accommodate individuals (Page 183) Title I
In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. (Page 298) Title IV

Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. The Division continues to be involved nationally with Transition Services for students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. (Page 298) Title IV

The integrated continuum of services is to be flexible enough to meet the needs of all IDEA eligible students to qualify for DVR services within the available resources, maximize opportunity for students and eliminate limitations and obstacles. Currently Public Education Department is working with Regional Educational Cooperative Memberships to establish intergovernmental agreements. The MOU further outlines: A. Assure that all students with disabilities as defined by the IDEA and its implementing regulations receive appropriate services; B. Coordinate services to students with disabilities so as to maximize learner outcomes and provide for a successful transition to appropriate employment as specified in student Individualized Education Programs (IEPs); C. Formalize referral procedures with appropriate agency(ies) to ensure students with disabilities are provided with opportunities for services; D. Coordinate services delivery and follow—up/along with the education/rehabilitation services continuum; E. Establish joint trainings to provide staff development and other training activities for Local Educational Agency (LEA) transition specialists and other individuals involved in transition planning. (Page 300) Title IV

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. (Page 301) Title IV

The Division has determined that 13 new counselor positions will be necessary to adequately meet the growing population needs, and provide the appropriate support to our Transition students. Therefore, expanding the Vocational Counselor positions and increasing to 89 caseloads is ideal. Furthermore, efforts in restructuring of approved agency positions has successfully added 2-Program Managers. Other staffing initiatives have included collaborative efforts in development of contracts with the Central Regional Educational Cooperatives, which have resulted in 21 Vocational Transition Specialists available to support outreach efforts to Transition age population across the state. (Page 314) Title IV

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 327) Title IV

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services. DVR counselors continue to attend Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) and are working collaboratively with CREC VTS to attend IEP’s. VTS and NM DVR staff are providing PRE-ETS services throughout the state. These services include Guidance to employment, Self-Advocacy, Work Readiness, and Guidance to Post-Secondary education and Work Experience. VTS have referred 151 students as potential DVR participants to DVR offices across the state. (Page 362) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high—growth industries. In 2017, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (NMDVR) opened a satellite office within the Bernalillo County Workforce Connection Center. The purpose of this NMDVR office is to help individuals with disabilities find employment. This office will consist of two Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, and a Vocational Rehabilitation Technician. This unit will also be supported by the NMDVR Business Specialist. The goal of this co-location will be to allow individuals with disabilities to be jointly served between the various workforce partners and NMDVR. NMDVR can provide technical assistance to both workforce partners and Job Seekers with disabilities on issues regarding disabilities. (Page 352) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The Board also reviews, evaluates and reports annually on the performance of all workforce development activities administered by state agencies involved with workforce development. Key areas of focus include developing linkages with the public education and higher education agencies to ensure coordination of vocational education, apprenticeship, adult education and literacy, employment training programs and vocational rehabilitation programs with other workforce development and training programs. Any problems identified by the State Board will be included in the annual report on strategic plan implementation and the measures that will be taken to address those problems. (Page 89) Title I

WIOA places a keen emphasis on work-based experiences across target groups, particularly youth, individuals with barriers to employment, and individuals with disabilities, as a means to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. WIOA also provides enhanced access and flexibility for work-based training options, such as Registered Apprenticeship, on-the-job (OJT), customized, and incumbent worker training, transitional jobs, and internships. Registered Apprenticeship should be used more often as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job-driven strategy for employers and industries. OJT continues to be a key method of delivering training services to adults and dislocated workers, and states and local areas have the flexibility under WIOA to increase the reimbursement level to up to 75 percent. (Page 94) Title I

Under WIOA, vocational rehabilitation programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a local board youth provider on finalizing a memorandum of understanding to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, an NMDVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. (Page 119) Title I

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the New Mexico Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:

o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;

o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers;

o regular technical assistance and best practices sharing across all partner programs to increase awareness of Registered Apprenticeship and opportunities for individuals with disabilities;

o coordinated marketing and outreach strategies as a means of identifying participants across all programs who are appropriate candidates for Registered Apprenticeship;

o ways the Vocational Rehabilitation programs can assist disabled veterans with guidance and services to maintain their employment through Registered Apprenticeship programs;

o training initiatives such as TechHire, and New Mexico Career Solutions (a career readiness tool) and internships, as New Mexico has a portal for getting out-of-school youth engaged in searching for job opportunities; and

o agreements through memoranda of understanding with partners and contracts with service providers to guide and govern resources for youth with disabilities, such as vocational training and initiatives to obtain high school equivalency. (Page 119-120) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions also administers Wagner-Peyser Employment Services, which it does from the state level through its Employment Services Division, along with the administration of Trade Adjustment Assistance, Work Opportunity Tax Credit, Rapid Response, and Veterans programs. NMDWS receives funding from USDOL to hire and oversee state merit staff responsible for direct delivery of the Wagner Peyser employment services and the other related services to jobseekers and employers. Merit staff is located throughout 18 field offices and the programs are co-located with the WIOA programs in every local board area. (Page 151) Title III

In accordance with requirements from the Social Security Administration, there are two essential contacts. All of the benefits advisers work with the local SSA offices and specifically with the Area Work Incentive Coordinator (AWIC). Together they find solutions on how the help all, including Jackson Class members not terminate working due to a glitch in the process. This includes developing individualized 1619(b) thresholds, over payments which could be mediated by use of work incentives, and proper use of the Ticket to Work. NMDVR has four Memorandum of Understanding on how the Ticket to Work will be used with local Employment Networks (ENs). This includes who has the Ticket at any point and making use of partnership plus as a viable service to participants, once they are closed by NMDVR. Lastly, although not a requirement, NMDVR has been instrumental in the New Mexico Ticket Partners a group made on NMDVR staff (Benefits Advisement and Ticket Coordinator), ENs, the SSA Work Incentive Coordinator (WIPA), Disability Rights NM (DRNM) Protection and Advocacy for Beneficiaries on Social Security (PABSS), Workforce, Veterans services, and other job development services who may be interested in becoming of connecting with the Ticket to Work. Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) works with self-employment working on how earnings from different types of business structures could affect SSA calculation of benefits as well at the accounting system the participants choices for their business. (Page 293-294; Page 296) Title IV

Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) have been asked to provide training to all state and nonprofit providers of supported employment, usually at the area meetings. They also assist in cases on a one on one process to help the providers and beneficiaries of SSDB to develop reports, work incentive plans, and complete SSA paperwork. (Page 306) Title IV
Partners for Employment is identified as the statewide entity to oversee and manage a variety of Supported Employment Programs. This program is intended to serve and support individuals with a variety of disabling conditions. The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR coordinates with SSA to implement the Ticket to Work Program and obtain employment outcomes. Two units within the agency provide the required services within the agency: 1) Ticket to Work/Security Services and the Benefits Advisement Services.

The TTW services works with cost reimbursement; placing and removing the participants from “in use” status; instructing field staff on what is needed for a participant to move through the rehab process; providing technical assistance to field staff; advocating when a problem arises in the process of in use and medical continuing disability protection (CDR); attending SSA training and quarterly meetings; provide documentation to SSA about Ticket related issues, attends Ticket to Work Partners meeting; and assist with MOU in the community for Partnership Plus. Four MOUs with local/national Employment Networks (ENs). (Page 326-327)

Benefits Advisors work with participants one on one, helping them move through the stages of change regarding employment while on Public Benefits. They serve people 14 to full retirement age. BAS are required to complete a Community Partners Work Incentive Coordinator certificate and choose a specialty as well. Specialties include transition issues, tax help, A Better Life Experience (ABLE), Money Smart, and Self Employment. Some Benefits Advisors have taken on two specialties. (Page 327) Title IV

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 392) Title IV

Establishing a firm and reassuring foundation of monthly income and medical insurance is important to the fundamental job—readiness of each consumer, so the Commission contracted with New Mexico Legal Aid to provide assistance to consumers that needed help with guidance and counseling with respect to SSI and SSDI work incentives. A great deal of emphasis is placed on consumers possessing skills that will help them overcome their vision loss, and the Commission encourages attendance at the Orientation Center. All interested consumers are taken on a tour of the center by their counselor. Those who choose not to attend the center are provided training in their own communities by the Commission’s Independent Living Teachers. Counselors spend a great deal of time and effort assisting the consumer to identify their own career goal, and counselors ask that consumers research identified career goals to determine whether a contemplated career is a good fit. (Page 441) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~In addition, the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a federal tax credit administered at the state level that is available to employers that hire workers in designated target groups that have barriers to employment. Employers can potentially get a tax credit ranging from $1,200 to $9,600 depending on the target group. The tax credit is designed to help job seekers gain on-the-job experience, move towards economic self-sufficiency, and at the same time help reduce employers’ federal tax liability. WOTC target groups include qualified TANF recipients, qualified veterans, qualified ex-felons, designated community residents, vocational rehabilitation referrals, qualified food stamp recipients, qualified social security income recipients, and long-term family assistance recipients. (Page 110) Title I

Data Collection

The division was involved with Pepnet2 national grant, where the division worked closely with Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; Work Force Connections; and New Mexico School of the Deaf (NMSD) to establish a goal on being able to share data collection and increasing expectations to reduce systemic barriers and close the education employment gaps for deaf individuals. Last Year the grant reestablished through The National Deaf Center, and as of today, this committee is still working on establishing a data collection system. It is the plan of the Division to continue to be an active member of this committee to help provide resources, strategies, and opportunities for dialog at local, state and national level for Deaf individuals, families and professionals in order to reduce systemic barriers and close the education and employment gaps for deaf individuals. (Page 349) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtained employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. NMDVR sponsored ACRE training for community partners: • In collaboration with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Partners for Employment is offering a limited number of scholarships for private job developers to take the ACRE-certified Supported Employment Online Course offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). (Page 331) Title IV

NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtain employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. (Page 356) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA Grievance and Complaint Resolution — This policy will ensure that no individual will be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in the administration of or in connection with any such program or activity because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief or, for any beneficiary, because of the beneficiary’s citizenship status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or for participation in any Title I financially assisted program or activity. The policy establishes procedures for processing complaints and grievances, which apply to all levels of the New Mexico workforce system. This policy covers equal opportunity requirements, discrimination grievances, local and state complaints; and criminal fraud and abuse complaints. (Page 147) Title I

Below are some examples of how the local boards are trying to make the Workforce Connection Centers more assessable to individuals with disabilities, as follows. o Installation of automatic, push button doors o Assistive devices, such as TTY machines o Lift tables and other products for people with disabilities o Computers with enhanced keyboard for clients that have visual problems o Community Outreach Program for the Deaf provides interpreter services o Local policies regarding Reasonable Accommodation, Disability Related Non-Discrimination and EEOC complaints (Page 183) Title I

At the state level, NMHED is committed to removing barriers to access by providing access to grants, financial aid and counseling, instruction and services in various locations in the community. Under the oversight of NMHED, we ensure that institution provide counselling and advising, academic accommodations and other support services to ensure needs of traditionally underrepresented students are met. Programs are committed to the policies of equal opportunity and affirmative action for employees and will actively recruit applicants from traditionally underrepresented groups and seek to develop a diverse faculty and staff. Providers disseminate anti-discrimination policies through employee and student handbooks and other official materials. Provide all activities in ADA accessible facilities. Disseminate program fliers and information in multiple languages. Coordinate and offer cultural sensitivity, ADA and related training for program faculty and staff. (Page 288) Title I

Veterans

Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (VA VR&E). This program provides veterans with SBE and service members with assistance to help with job training, employment accommodations, resume development and job seeking skills coaching. Other services include entrepreneurship, independent living services for those severely disabled and unable to work. NMDWS has a Memorandum of Understanding with the VA VR&E program to assist whose veterans with individualized career services and career planning. One DVOP specialist is designated as an Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) to facilitate the VA VR&E referrals to DVOP specialists in the Workforce Connection Centers. In Albuquerque, the ISC coordinated with the LVER in the Workforce Connection Center in Albuquerque to organize two (2) employer Meet-and-Greet events for VA VR&E participants. In 2017, 182 veterans were referred to VRE, 70 obtained suitable employment, with an average wage of $18.38, and a rehabilitated rate of 81.5 percent. (Page 116) Title I

Veteran’s staff works closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and private sector partners who provide training or education benefits to prepare veterans with job opportunities. The DVOP positions provide outreach assistance to veterans, particularly those who have a disability and need intensive services to remove barriers to employment. A full range of available employment and training services to veterans include job search, job development, resume writing, dress for success, and interviewing skills. LVER staff conducts outreach to employers to encourage job development for all veterans and to establish a network of employers and service providers for veterans seeking assistance through the workforce system; make referrals to vocational and training institutions; and work to capitalize on resources, such as the WIOA training dollars with veterans’ preference. LVERs are also team members in the Business Services sections of the Workforce Connection Centers, meeting with and assisting employers with posting job orders, organization of job fairs, and identifying job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. (Page 187) Title I

The State intends to use Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists to provide individualized career services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) or are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP Specialist employment services. The State intends to use Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) to perform only the duties which are related to outreach to the employer community and for capacity building within the state’s employment service delivery system to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for job seeking veterans. (Page 457) Title IV

NMDWS ensures that the New Mexico Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant staff of DVOP specialists and LVER staff are properly integrated at the local Workforce Connection Centers (WCC). DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WCC. They are included among the WCC partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by WCC that provide online and/or in-person workforce development or related support service as part of the workforce development system. Although the DVOP specialists and LVERs are integrated in WCC, the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 prohibit DVOPs and LVERs from performing non-veteran related duties that detract from their ability to perform their statutorily-defined duties related to meeting the employment needs of eligible veterans. (Page 461-462) Title IV

(3) DVOP specialists are out-stationed to VA Medical Center’s Supportive Employment Programs (Work and Compensated Therapy); Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, Supportive Services to Veterans and Families and veteran per diem grant recipient’s, wounded warrior military treatment locations, veterans’ court and correctional facilities (minimum level). A DVOP specialist is designated as the Intensive Services Coordinator and located at the VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program office. DVOP specialists’ supports and attends the Stand Down events and other community homeless events as part of their outreach. Additionally, they schedule and conduct outreach to Native American veterans located on tribal lands. (4) LVERs are team members in the WCC Business Section to meet with and assist employers with posting job orders. They assist with the organization of job fairs and meet with employers to identify job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. They work closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and the private sector that provides training or education benefits to prepare veterans with careers or job opportunities. (Page 462) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The Division is involved in a Vocational Technical Assistance Center project targeted at five economically disadvantaged communities (mostly Hispanic and Native American) in Albuquerque (87102, 87105, 87106, 87108 and 87121) to address barriers to employment regarding individuals with Mental Health Conditions and /or Persons with Substance Abuse Disorders. This project is a collaboration between the Division, Rehabilitation Service Administration, U.S. Department of Education, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, and the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation. The goal is to expand VR services to this target population and expand and strengthen partnerships with local social service and community development agencies, correctional agencies, community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), school systems, employers, community leaders, and other relevant stakeholders. This project will involve the Division in development of knowledge (training) in working with this target population and will design strategies to provide technical assistance and coordination of activities to maximize community service and alliance building. This project has the support of twenty local partnerships to implement comprehensive support services to address barriers in employment to this target population. (Page 293) Title IV

The Division does not target specific disability groups to provide supported employment services. However, long— term support funding by the state is currently available for those individuals who are either developmentally disabled or who have significant disabling mental illness. Provision of Supported Employment as it relates to Mental Health Service. The Department of Human Services provides administrative support to and houses the Behavioral Health Collaborative to provide a long—term funding mechanism for Behavioral Health recipients. Behavioral Health Services and funding is allocated through the Collaborative to provide comprehensive and vocational services to individuals with significant disabling mental illness. Both mechanisms mentioned above are used to fund long—term supported employment services and extended services. (Page 305-306) Title IV

Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. In the past years, the infrastructure providing mental health in the state was shaken and a team from Arizona was brought in to provide services. This outside entity remained in the state for a short time before leaving. Since then the agencies which once provided services had returned and have worked on trying to develop a viable system again. During the transition periods, much of what was provided in Psychosocial Rehabilitation services was discontinued or changed, losing the supported employment and other job services. BAS has been available to help with participants of NMDVR who work are part of the Behavioral Health System. (Page 311) Title IV

During the past four years, work continued toward intra—agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. (Page 327) Title IV

Project E3 provides technical assistance (TA} to State VR agencies and their partners to address barriers to VR participation and competitive integrated employment of historically underserved groups of individuals with disabilities who are economically disadvantaged. This RSA/Southern U. of Baton Rouge project concentrates on five specific zip codes in Albuquerque: 87102, 87105, 87106, 87108, and 87121. This project will focus on ways to breakdown employment barriers for people w/ Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders in these zip codes. Both DVR and Community Providers will be collaborating on this project. (Page 356-357) Title IV

Continue to seek long-term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. (Page 360) Title IV

The agency currently does not have a cooperative agreement with the agency responsible for providing mental health services, but the agency does provide training to staff on how to better serve individuals with mental illness and on the resources available. The agency will develop a cooperative agreement with state agencies that provide mental health services. (Page 392) Title IV
The agency will work cooperatively with the Department of Health, with the Medical Assistance Division, with the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division, and with the Behavioral Health Services Division. The agency will designate specific liaisons and points of contact for each of these entities, will provide information as appropriate, and will enter into a cooperative agreement with the Department of Health. (Page 409) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Employment Services are provided as part of the one-stop delivery system. Currently, each local workforce development area has at least one comprehensive workforce development center that includes, at a minimum, three partners: WIOA Adult and Dislocated Worker services, Wagner- Peyser Employment Services, and access to Unemployment Insurance services. Each Employment Services field office is assigned a site manager who ensures the workforce centers are universally accessible, customer centered, and training is job-driven. This includes providing easy access to and assistance with workforce related activities, such as looking for a job, exploring work preparation and career development services, as well as seamless referral to WIOA employment, on-the-job-training, and occupational training programs. (Page 108) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Getting Started with My Workforce Connection - 05/23/2019

~~“The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions is changing the way you access job seeking services and Unemployment Insurance benefits with a more secure and simplified login process. As of May 15, both existing and new users for the New Mexico Workforce Connection Online System (www.jobs.state.nm.us ) and the New Mexico Unemployment Insurance (UI) Tax & Claims System will be prompted to create a new single account. In order to create your new account, you will need to have a valid and accessible email address that you do not share with anyone else. Your email address will be used for account management and security purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services – Field Services - 03/01/2019

~~“There are 16 field offices of the New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services located throughout the state. Each is staffed by an accredited Veterans’ Service Officer (VSO) to assist veterans and their dependents with filing for their federal and state benefits. Most VSO’s also have regularly-scheduled outreach visits to smaller surrounding communities.”

Systems
  • Other

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability - 01/01/2019

~~“OBJECTIVES• Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public• Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers• Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community with needed services and supports • Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Services Offered by the Albuquerque Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~~“VA’s Albuquerque Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in New Mexico. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) Program - 08/28/2018

~~“The Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) program covers disabled working individuals who, because of earnings, do not qualify for Medicaid under any other programs. Individuals must meet the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) criteria for disability without regard to "substantial gainful activity".

The program also covers those individuals with a recent attachment to the work force. An individual is considered to have recent attachment to the work force if he/she has enough earnings in a quarter to meet the SSA’s definition of a qualifying quarter or has lost SSI and Medicaid due to the initial receipt of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, until Medicare entitlement. Apply at any ISD office and request to apply for Medicaid category 074”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workforce Partners - 05/02/2019

~~This page has links and information about various statewide Partner Programs

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

“The Governor and the State Workforce Development Board have been assigned broad authority under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to provide policy and guidance to local boards, local one-stop delivery systems, and one-stop partner programs. Members of the board are appointed by the Governor and serve as the Governor's employer-driven workforce development adviser for programs and policies under WIOA. The board performs functions that include strategic planning, policy guidance, capacity building, and leadership and oversight of the state system operations.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 05/01/2019

~~“For the  two  Medicaid  waivers  providing  noninstitutional  care  to  people  with  developmental disabilities, the FY20 general fund appropriation to the department is sufficient to add more than 330 slots, the largest increase since at least FY07. However, with nearly 5,000 people awaiting services and estimates indicating it can take as long as 13 and one-half years before a client begins receiving services, more work remains. The long wait poses a hardship for families and can end up costing the state more in the long run if a client’s conditions worsen or if a client becomes less responsive to rehabilitation. Because of this, the Legislature also appropriated $1.5 million with language requiring the department to develop a new Medicaid waiver to provide supportive services to people on the wait list. ”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Money Follows the Person - 10/01/2012

~~“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to

•  increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services,• [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice,• strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions• put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,096,829
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.82%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,583
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.72%
Change from
2018 to 2019
58,712
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
3.44%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.14%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 2,088,070 2,095,428 2,096,829
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 169,264 159,258 165,583
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 57,005 53,008 58,712
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 751,217 758,180 776,150
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.68% 33.28% 35.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 71.45% 71.59% 74.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.20% 4.90% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40% 27.00% 24.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 18.80% 18.10% 17.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 164,508 161,987 167,869
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 157,848 164,593 161,116
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 249,066 251,581 251,190
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 5,551 6,728 7,766
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 147,519 149,694 150,848
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 30,655 33,152 26,564
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,111 1,827 3,266
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 8,640 7,657 11,100
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 26,067 25,274 28,712

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,809 1,939 1,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.50% 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 64,863 63,955 63,154

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 912 1,898 2,193
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,067 5,913 4,667
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,254 7,657 5,717
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.00% 24.80% 38.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.40% 1.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00% 2.10% 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 82 137 115
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 230 209 210
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,574 4,564 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 7 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 86.00% 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.34 0.29 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.00% 25.00% 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,437 2,452 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 101,334 100,689 100,032
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 37 57 60
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 35 60 76

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,888,000 $8,268,943 $8,859,461
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $5,896,000 $5,860,642 $7,808,918
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $34,916,000 $55,353,119 $61,293,385
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 25.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,135 4,574 4,459
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 500 521 806
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.30 61.10 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.80% 49.82% 49.93%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.19% 18.62% 18.14%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.92% 0.87% 0.79%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 87.25% 93.08% 95.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 42.85% 41.13% 40.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.34% 76.39% 75.47%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.37% 80.94% 82.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.49% 35.26% 35.46%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2 2 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 91 185 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 91 185 59

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment (Page 360) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~NMDVR has been collaborating with other NM state agency partners in supporting and funding “Partners for Employment”. This innovative state—wide contract brings together a variety of both in—state and out of state vocational experts to develop and implement the Discovery process for individuals with the most significant disabling conditions. This process, as well as other non—traditional career development paths, is intended to support and encourage vocational strategies which result in successful employment outcomes for participants. The majority of individuals served as a result of this collaboration are receiving direct training and support by nationally known experts employed by Marc Gold and Associates. In the last several months, NMDVR has participated in and been intimately involved in agency training provided by Marc Gold and Associates. In turn, NMDVR counselors are working directly with employment teams who have made the commitment to support NMDVR participants toward meeting their specific vocational objectives. (Page 348) Title IV

Since this collaboration 154 field staff have been trained in the Discovery process for non— traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. As of state Performance Year 2018, 10 FTE are submitted for legislative approval process as part of the three-year expansion plan. (Page 354) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:
o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;
o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers; (Page 120) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~The New Mexico Aging and Disability Resource Center maintains a database with over 3,700 national, state and local resources to assist those in need in New Mexico. Its Resource Directory lists 40 providers serving Deming, the main city in Luna County. These provide financial, care-giving, nutrition and health services. For Gallup, the major city in McKinley County, the database lists 102 service providers, offering an even broader array of services. (Page 474) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note—taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. Commission high school clients will also be supported by the CREC contract. (Pages 422-423 431-432) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Workforce Connection Center staff are active in the School to Work Transition Alliance helping to develop better ways to reach out and accommodate individuals (Page 183) Title I
In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. (Page 298) Title IV

Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. The Division continues to be involved nationally with Transition Services for students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. (Page 298) Title IV

The integrated continuum of services is to be flexible enough to meet the needs of all IDEA eligible students to qualify for DVR services within the available resources, maximize opportunity for students and eliminate limitations and obstacles. Currently Public Education Department is working with Regional Educational Cooperative Memberships to establish intergovernmental agreements. The MOU further outlines: A. Assure that all students with disabilities as defined by the IDEA and its implementing regulations receive appropriate services; B. Coordinate services to students with disabilities so as to maximize learner outcomes and provide for a successful transition to appropriate employment as specified in student Individualized Education Programs (IEPs); C. Formalize referral procedures with appropriate agency(ies) to ensure students with disabilities are provided with opportunities for services; D. Coordinate services delivery and follow—up/along with the education/rehabilitation services continuum; E. Establish joint trainings to provide staff development and other training activities for Local Educational Agency (LEA) transition specialists and other individuals involved in transition planning. (Page 300) Title IV

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. (Page 301) Title IV

The Division has determined that 13 new counselor positions will be necessary to adequately meet the growing population needs, and provide the appropriate support to our Transition students. Therefore, expanding the Vocational Counselor positions and increasing to 89 caseloads is ideal. Furthermore, efforts in restructuring of approved agency positions has successfully added 2-Program Managers. Other staffing initiatives have included collaborative efforts in development of contracts with the Central Regional Educational Cooperatives, which have resulted in 21 Vocational Transition Specialists available to support outreach efforts to Transition age population across the state. (Page 314) Title IV

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 327) Title IV

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services. DVR counselors continue to attend Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) and are working collaboratively with CREC VTS to attend IEP’s. VTS and NM DVR staff are providing PRE-ETS services throughout the state. These services include Guidance to employment, Self-Advocacy, Work Readiness, and Guidance to Post-Secondary education and Work Experience. VTS have referred 151 students as potential DVR participants to DVR offices across the state. (Page 362) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high—growth industries. In 2017, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (NMDVR) opened a satellite office within the Bernalillo County Workforce Connection Center. The purpose of this NMDVR office is to help individuals with disabilities find employment. This office will consist of two Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, and a Vocational Rehabilitation Technician. This unit will also be supported by the NMDVR Business Specialist. The goal of this co-location will be to allow individuals with disabilities to be jointly served between the various workforce partners and NMDVR. NMDVR can provide technical assistance to both workforce partners and Job Seekers with disabilities on issues regarding disabilities. (Page 352) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The Board also reviews, evaluates and reports annually on the performance of all workforce development activities administered by state agencies involved with workforce development. Key areas of focus include developing linkages with the public education and higher education agencies to ensure coordination of vocational education, apprenticeship, adult education and literacy, employment training programs and vocational rehabilitation programs with other workforce development and training programs. Any problems identified by the State Board will be included in the annual report on strategic plan implementation and the measures that will be taken to address those problems. (Page 89) Title I

WIOA places a keen emphasis on work-based experiences across target groups, particularly youth, individuals with barriers to employment, and individuals with disabilities, as a means to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. WIOA also provides enhanced access and flexibility for work-based training options, such as Registered Apprenticeship, on-the-job (OJT), customized, and incumbent worker training, transitional jobs, and internships. Registered Apprenticeship should be used more often as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job-driven strategy for employers and industries. OJT continues to be a key method of delivering training services to adults and dislocated workers, and states and local areas have the flexibility under WIOA to increase the reimbursement level to up to 75 percent. (Page 94) Title I

Under WIOA, vocational rehabilitation programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a local board youth provider on finalizing a memorandum of understanding to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, an NMDVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. (Page 119) Title I

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the New Mexico Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:

o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;

o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers;

o regular technical assistance and best practices sharing across all partner programs to increase awareness of Registered Apprenticeship and opportunities for individuals with disabilities;

o coordinated marketing and outreach strategies as a means of identifying participants across all programs who are appropriate candidates for Registered Apprenticeship;

o ways the Vocational Rehabilitation programs can assist disabled veterans with guidance and services to maintain their employment through Registered Apprenticeship programs;

o training initiatives such as TechHire, and New Mexico Career Solutions (a career readiness tool) and internships, as New Mexico has a portal for getting out-of-school youth engaged in searching for job opportunities; and

o agreements through memoranda of understanding with partners and contracts with service providers to guide and govern resources for youth with disabilities, such as vocational training and initiatives to obtain high school equivalency. (Page 119-120) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions also administers Wagner-Peyser Employment Services, which it does from the state level through its Employment Services Division, along with the administration of Trade Adjustment Assistance, Work Opportunity Tax Credit, Rapid Response, and Veterans programs. NMDWS receives funding from USDOL to hire and oversee state merit staff responsible for direct delivery of the Wagner Peyser employment services and the other related services to jobseekers and employers. Merit staff is located throughout 18 field offices and the programs are co-located with the WIOA programs in every local board area. (Page 151) Title III

In accordance with requirements from the Social Security Administration, there are two essential contacts. All of the benefits advisers work with the local SSA offices and specifically with the Area Work Incentive Coordinator (AWIC). Together they find solutions on how the help all, including Jackson Class members not terminate working due to a glitch in the process. This includes developing individualized 1619(b) thresholds, over payments which could be mediated by use of work incentives, and proper use of the Ticket to Work. NMDVR has four Memorandum of Understanding on how the Ticket to Work will be used with local Employment Networks (ENs). This includes who has the Ticket at any point and making use of partnership plus as a viable service to participants, once they are closed by NMDVR. Lastly, although not a requirement, NMDVR has been instrumental in the New Mexico Ticket Partners a group made on NMDVR staff (Benefits Advisement and Ticket Coordinator), ENs, the SSA Work Incentive Coordinator (WIPA), Disability Rights NM (DRNM) Protection and Advocacy for Beneficiaries on Social Security (PABSS), Workforce, Veterans services, and other job development services who may be interested in becoming of connecting with the Ticket to Work. Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) works with self-employment working on how earnings from different types of business structures could affect SSA calculation of benefits as well at the accounting system the participants choices for their business. (Page 293-294; Page 296) Title IV

Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) have been asked to provide training to all state and nonprofit providers of supported employment, usually at the area meetings. They also assist in cases on a one on one process to help the providers and beneficiaries of SSDB to develop reports, work incentive plans, and complete SSA paperwork. (Page 306) Title IV
Partners for Employment is identified as the statewide entity to oversee and manage a variety of Supported Employment Programs. This program is intended to serve and support individuals with a variety of disabling conditions. The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR coordinates with SSA to implement the Ticket to Work Program and obtain employment outcomes. Two units within the agency provide the required services within the agency: 1) Ticket to Work/Security Services and the Benefits Advisement Services.

The TTW services works with cost reimbursement; placing and removing the participants from “in use” status; instructing field staff on what is needed for a participant to move through the rehab process; providing technical assistance to field staff; advocating when a problem arises in the process of in use and medical continuing disability protection (CDR); attending SSA training and quarterly meetings; provide documentation to SSA about Ticket related issues, attends Ticket to Work Partners meeting; and assist with MOU in the community for Partnership Plus. Four MOUs with local/national Employment Networks (ENs). (Page 326-327)

Benefits Advisors work with participants one on one, helping them move through the stages of change regarding employment while on Public Benefits. They serve people 14 to full retirement age. BAS are required to complete a Community Partners Work Incentive Coordinator certificate and choose a specialty as well. Specialties include transition issues, tax help, A Better Life Experience (ABLE), Money Smart, and Self Employment. Some Benefits Advisors have taken on two specialties. (Page 327) Title IV

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 392) Title IV

Establishing a firm and reassuring foundation of monthly income and medical insurance is important to the fundamental job—readiness of each consumer, so the Commission contracted with New Mexico Legal Aid to provide assistance to consumers that needed help with guidance and counseling with respect to SSI and SSDI work incentives. A great deal of emphasis is placed on consumers possessing skills that will help them overcome their vision loss, and the Commission encourages attendance at the Orientation Center. All interested consumers are taken on a tour of the center by their counselor. Those who choose not to attend the center are provided training in their own communities by the Commission’s Independent Living Teachers. Counselors spend a great deal of time and effort assisting the consumer to identify their own career goal, and counselors ask that consumers research identified career goals to determine whether a contemplated career is a good fit. (Page 441) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~In addition, the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a federal tax credit administered at the state level that is available to employers that hire workers in designated target groups that have barriers to employment. Employers can potentially get a tax credit ranging from $1,200 to $9,600 depending on the target group. The tax credit is designed to help job seekers gain on-the-job experience, move towards economic self-sufficiency, and at the same time help reduce employers’ federal tax liability. WOTC target groups include qualified TANF recipients, qualified veterans, qualified ex-felons, designated community residents, vocational rehabilitation referrals, qualified food stamp recipients, qualified social security income recipients, and long-term family assistance recipients. (Page 110) Title I

Data Collection

The division was involved with Pepnet2 national grant, where the division worked closely with Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; Work Force Connections; and New Mexico School of the Deaf (NMSD) to establish a goal on being able to share data collection and increasing expectations to reduce systemic barriers and close the education employment gaps for deaf individuals. Last Year the grant reestablished through The National Deaf Center, and as of today, this committee is still working on establishing a data collection system. It is the plan of the Division to continue to be an active member of this committee to help provide resources, strategies, and opportunities for dialog at local, state and national level for Deaf individuals, families and professionals in order to reduce systemic barriers and close the education and employment gaps for deaf individuals. (Page 349) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtained employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. NMDVR sponsored ACRE training for community partners: • In collaboration with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Partners for Employment is offering a limited number of scholarships for private job developers to take the ACRE-certified Supported Employment Online Course offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). (Page 331) Title IV

NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtain employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. (Page 356) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA Grievance and Complaint Resolution — This policy will ensure that no individual will be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in the administration of or in connection with any such program or activity because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief or, for any beneficiary, because of the beneficiary’s citizenship status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or for participation in any Title I financially assisted program or activity. The policy establishes procedures for processing complaints and grievances, which apply to all levels of the New Mexico workforce system. This policy covers equal opportunity requirements, discrimination grievances, local and state complaints; and criminal fraud and abuse complaints. (Page 147) Title I

Below are some examples of how the local boards are trying to make the Workforce Connection Centers more assessable to individuals with disabilities, as follows. o Installation of automatic, push button doors o Assistive devices, such as TTY machines o Lift tables and other products for people with disabilities o Computers with enhanced keyboard for clients that have visual problems o Community Outreach Program for the Deaf provides interpreter services o Local policies regarding Reasonable Accommodation, Disability Related Non-Discrimination and EEOC complaints (Page 183) Title I

At the state level, NMHED is committed to removing barriers to access by providing access to grants, financial aid and counseling, instruction and services in various locations in the community. Under the oversight of NMHED, we ensure that institution provide counselling and advising, academic accommodations and other support services to ensure needs of traditionally underrepresented students are met. Programs are committed to the policies of equal opportunity and affirmative action for employees and will actively recruit applicants from traditionally underrepresented groups and seek to develop a diverse faculty and staff. Providers disseminate anti-discrimination policies through employee and student handbooks and other official materials. Provide all activities in ADA accessible facilities. Disseminate program fliers and information in multiple languages. Coordinate and offer cultural sensitivity, ADA and related training for program faculty and staff. (Page 288) Title I

Veterans

Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (VA VR&E). This program provides veterans with SBE and service members with assistance to help with job training, employment accommodations, resume development and job seeking skills coaching. Other services include entrepreneurship, independent living services for those severely disabled and unable to work. NMDWS has a Memorandum of Understanding with the VA VR&E program to assist whose veterans with individualized career services and career planning. One DVOP specialist is designated as an Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) to facilitate the VA VR&E referrals to DVOP specialists in the Workforce Connection Centers. In Albuquerque, the ISC coordinated with the LVER in the Workforce Connection Center in Albuquerque to organize two (2) employer Meet-and-Greet events for VA VR&E participants. In 2017, 182 veterans were referred to VRE, 70 obtained suitable employment, with an average wage of $18.38, and a rehabilitated rate of 81.5 percent. (Page 116) Title I

Veteran’s staff works closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and private sector partners who provide training or education benefits to prepare veterans with job opportunities. The DVOP positions provide outreach assistance to veterans, particularly those who have a disability and need intensive services to remove barriers to employment. A full range of available employment and training services to veterans include job search, job development, resume writing, dress for success, and interviewing skills. LVER staff conducts outreach to employers to encourage job development for all veterans and to establish a network of employers and service providers for veterans seeking assistance through the workforce system; make referrals to vocational and training institutions; and work to capitalize on resources, such as the WIOA training dollars with veterans’ preference. LVERs are also team members in the Business Services sections of the Workforce Connection Centers, meeting with and assisting employers with posting job orders, organization of job fairs, and identifying job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. (Page 187) Title I

The State intends to use Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists to provide individualized career services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) or are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP Specialist employment services. The State intends to use Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) to perform only the duties which are related to outreach to the employer community and for capacity building within the state’s employment service delivery system to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for job seeking veterans. (Page 457) Title IV

NMDWS ensures that the New Mexico Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant staff of DVOP specialists and LVER staff are properly integrated at the local Workforce Connection Centers (WCC). DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WCC. They are included among the WCC partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by WCC that provide online and/or in-person workforce development or related support service as part of the workforce development system. Although the DVOP specialists and LVERs are integrated in WCC, the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 prohibit DVOPs and LVERs from performing non-veteran related duties that detract from their ability to perform their statutorily-defined duties related to meeting the employment needs of eligible veterans. (Page 461-462) Title IV

(3) DVOP specialists are out-stationed to VA Medical Center’s Supportive Employment Programs (Work and Compensated Therapy); Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, Supportive Services to Veterans and Families and veteran per diem grant recipient’s, wounded warrior military treatment locations, veterans’ court and correctional facilities (minimum level). A DVOP specialist is designated as the Intensive Services Coordinator and located at the VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program office. DVOP specialists’ supports and attends the Stand Down events and other community homeless events as part of their outreach. Additionally, they schedule and conduct outreach to Native American veterans located on tribal lands. (4) LVERs are team members in the WCC Business Section to meet with and assist employers with posting job orders. They assist with the organization of job fairs and meet with employers to identify job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. They work closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and the private sector that provides training or education benefits to prepare veterans with careers or job opportunities. (Page 462) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The Division is involved in a Vocational Technical Assistance Center project targeted at five economically disadvantaged communities (mostly Hispanic and Native American) in Albuquerque (87102, 87105, 87106, 87108 and 87121) to address barriers to employment regarding individuals with Mental Health Conditions and /or Persons with Substance Abuse Disorders. This project is a collaboration between the Division, Rehabilitation Service Administration, U.S. Department of Education, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, and the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation. The goal is to expand VR services to this target population and expand and strengthen partnerships with local social service and community development agencies, correctional agencies, community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), school systems, employers, community leaders, and other relevant stakeholders. This project will involve the Division in development of knowledge (training) in working with this target population and will design strategies to provide technical assistance and coordination of activities to maximize community service and alliance building. This project has the support of twenty local partnerships to implement comprehensive support services to address barriers in employment to this target population. (Page 293) Title IV

The Division does not target specific disability groups to provide supported employment services. However, long— term support funding by the state is currently available for those individuals who are either developmentally disabled or who have significant disabling mental illness. Provision of Supported Employment as it relates to Mental Health Service. The Department of Human Services provides administrative support to and houses the Behavioral Health Collaborative to provide a long—term funding mechanism for Behavioral Health recipients. Behavioral Health Services and funding is allocated through the Collaborative to provide comprehensive and vocational services to individuals with significant disabling mental illness. Both mechanisms mentioned above are used to fund long—term supported employment services and extended services. (Page 305-306) Title IV

Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. In the past years, the infrastructure providing mental health in the state was shaken and a team from Arizona was brought in to provide services. This outside entity remained in the state for a short time before leaving. Since then the agencies which once provided services had returned and have worked on trying to develop a viable system again. During the transition periods, much of what was provided in Psychosocial Rehabilitation services was discontinued or changed, losing the supported employment and other job services. BAS has been available to help with participants of NMDVR who work are part of the Behavioral Health System. (Page 311) Title IV

During the past four years, work continued toward intra—agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. (Page 327) Title IV

Project E3 provides technical assistance (TA} to State VR agencies and their partners to address barriers to VR participation and competitive integrated employment of historically underserved groups of individuals with disabilities who are economically disadvantaged. This RSA/Southern U. of Baton Rouge project concentrates on five specific zip codes in Albuquerque: 87102, 87105, 87106, 87108, and 87121. This project will focus on ways to breakdown employment barriers for people w/ Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders in these zip codes. Both DVR and Community Providers will be collaborating on this project. (Page 356-357) Title IV

Continue to seek long-term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. (Page 360) Title IV

The agency currently does not have a cooperative agreement with the agency responsible for providing mental health services, but the agency does provide training to staff on how to better serve individuals with mental illness and on the resources available. The agency will develop a cooperative agreement with state agencies that provide mental health services. (Page 392) Title IV
The agency will work cooperatively with the Department of Health, with the Medical Assistance Division, with the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division, and with the Behavioral Health Services Division. The agency will designate specific liaisons and points of contact for each of these entities, will provide information as appropriate, and will enter into a cooperative agreement with the Department of Health. (Page 409) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Employment Services are provided as part of the one-stop delivery system. Currently, each local workforce development area has at least one comprehensive workforce development center that includes, at a minimum, three partners: WIOA Adult and Dislocated Worker services, Wagner- Peyser Employment Services, and access to Unemployment Insurance services. Each Employment Services field office is assigned a site manager who ensures the workforce centers are universally accessible, customer centered, and training is job-driven. This includes providing easy access to and assistance with workforce related activities, such as looking for a job, exploring work preparation and career development services, as well as seamless referral to WIOA employment, on-the-job-training, and occupational training programs. (Page 108) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Getting Started with My Workforce Connection - 05/23/2019

~~“The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions is changing the way you access job seeking services and Unemployment Insurance benefits with a more secure and simplified login process. As of May 15, both existing and new users for the New Mexico Workforce Connection Online System (www.jobs.state.nm.us ) and the New Mexico Unemployment Insurance (UI) Tax & Claims System will be prompted to create a new single account. In order to create your new account, you will need to have a valid and accessible email address that you do not share with anyone else. Your email address will be used for account management and security purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services – Field Services - 03/01/2019

~~“There are 16 field offices of the New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services located throughout the state. Each is staffed by an accredited Veterans’ Service Officer (VSO) to assist veterans and their dependents with filing for their federal and state benefits. Most VSO’s also have regularly-scheduled outreach visits to smaller surrounding communities.”

Systems
  • Other

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability - 01/01/2019

~~“OBJECTIVES• Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public• Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers• Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community with needed services and supports • Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Services Offered by the Albuquerque Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~~“VA’s Albuquerque Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in New Mexico. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) Program - 08/28/2018

~~“The Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) program covers disabled working individuals who, because of earnings, do not qualify for Medicaid under any other programs. Individuals must meet the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) criteria for disability without regard to "substantial gainful activity".

The program also covers those individuals with a recent attachment to the work force. An individual is considered to have recent attachment to the work force if he/she has enough earnings in a quarter to meet the SSA’s definition of a qualifying quarter or has lost SSI and Medicaid due to the initial receipt of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, until Medicare entitlement. Apply at any ISD office and request to apply for Medicaid category 074”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workforce Partners - 05/02/2019

~~This page has links and information about various statewide Partner Programs

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

“The Governor and the State Workforce Development Board have been assigned broad authority under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to provide policy and guidance to local boards, local one-stop delivery systems, and one-stop partner programs. Members of the board are appointed by the Governor and serve as the Governor's employer-driven workforce development adviser for programs and policies under WIOA. The board performs functions that include strategic planning, policy guidance, capacity building, and leadership and oversight of the state system operations.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 05/01/2019

~~“For the  two  Medicaid  waivers  providing  noninstitutional  care  to  people  with  developmental disabilities, the FY20 general fund appropriation to the department is sufficient to add more than 330 slots, the largest increase since at least FY07. However, with nearly 5,000 people awaiting services and estimates indicating it can take as long as 13 and one-half years before a client begins receiving services, more work remains. The long wait poses a hardship for families and can end up costing the state more in the long run if a client’s conditions worsen or if a client becomes less responsive to rehabilitation. Because of this, the Legislature also appropriated $1.5 million with language requiring the department to develop a new Medicaid waiver to provide supportive services to people on the wait list. ”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Money Follows the Person - 10/01/2012

~~“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to

•  increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services,• [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice,• strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions• put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Phablet

Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,096,829
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.82%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,583
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.72%
Change from
2018 to 2019
58,712
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
3.44%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.14%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 2,096,829
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 165,583
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 58,712
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 776,150
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 167,869
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 161,116
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 251,190
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 7,766
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 150,848
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 26,564
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,266
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 11,100
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 28,712

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 63,154

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,193
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,667
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 5,717
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 115
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 210
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 100,032
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 60
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 76

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,859,461
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $7,808,918
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $61,293,385
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,459
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 806
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 64.70

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.93%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.14%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.79%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 95.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 40.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 75.47%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.46%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 59

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment (Page 360) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~NMDVR has been collaborating with other NM state agency partners in supporting and funding “Partners for Employment”. This innovative state—wide contract brings together a variety of both in—state and out of state vocational experts to develop and implement the Discovery process for individuals with the most significant disabling conditions. This process, as well as other non—traditional career development paths, is intended to support and encourage vocational strategies which result in successful employment outcomes for participants. The majority of individuals served as a result of this collaboration are receiving direct training and support by nationally known experts employed by Marc Gold and Associates. In the last several months, NMDVR has participated in and been intimately involved in agency training provided by Marc Gold and Associates. In turn, NMDVR counselors are working directly with employment teams who have made the commitment to support NMDVR participants toward meeting their specific vocational objectives. (Page 348) Title IV

Since this collaboration 154 field staff have been trained in the Discovery process for non— traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 341) Title IV

The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. As of state Performance Year 2018, 10 FTE are submitted for legislative approval process as part of the three-year expansion plan. (Page 354) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:
o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;
o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers; (Page 120) Title IV
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~The New Mexico Aging and Disability Resource Center maintains a database with over 3,700 national, state and local resources to assist those in need in New Mexico. Its Resource Directory lists 40 providers serving Deming, the main city in Luna County. These provide financial, care-giving, nutrition and health services. For Gallup, the major city in McKinley County, the database lists 102 service providers, offering an even broader array of services. (Page 474) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note—taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. Commission high school clients will also be supported by the CREC contract. (Pages 422-423 431-432) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~Workforce Connection Center staff are active in the School to Work Transition Alliance helping to develop better ways to reach out and accommodate individuals (Page 183) Title I
In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. (Page 298) Title IV

Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. The Division continues to be involved nationally with Transition Services for students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. (Page 298) Title IV

The integrated continuum of services is to be flexible enough to meet the needs of all IDEA eligible students to qualify for DVR services within the available resources, maximize opportunity for students and eliminate limitations and obstacles. Currently Public Education Department is working with Regional Educational Cooperative Memberships to establish intergovernmental agreements. The MOU further outlines: A. Assure that all students with disabilities as defined by the IDEA and its implementing regulations receive appropriate services; B. Coordinate services to students with disabilities so as to maximize learner outcomes and provide for a successful transition to appropriate employment as specified in student Individualized Education Programs (IEPs); C. Formalize referral procedures with appropriate agency(ies) to ensure students with disabilities are provided with opportunities for services; D. Coordinate services delivery and follow—up/along with the education/rehabilitation services continuum; E. Establish joint trainings to provide staff development and other training activities for Local Educational Agency (LEA) transition specialists and other individuals involved in transition planning. (Page 300) Title IV

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. (Page 301) Title IV

The Division has determined that 13 new counselor positions will be necessary to adequately meet the growing population needs, and provide the appropriate support to our Transition students. Therefore, expanding the Vocational Counselor positions and increasing to 89 caseloads is ideal. Furthermore, efforts in restructuring of approved agency positions has successfully added 2-Program Managers. Other staffing initiatives have included collaborative efforts in development of contracts with the Central Regional Educational Cooperatives, which have resulted in 21 Vocational Transition Specialists available to support outreach efforts to Transition age population across the state. (Page 314) Title IV

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School—to—Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as statewide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 327) Title IV

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school—to—work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services. DVR counselors continue to attend Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) and are working collaboratively with CREC VTS to attend IEP’s. VTS and NM DVR staff are providing PRE-ETS services throughout the state. These services include Guidance to employment, Self-Advocacy, Work Readiness, and Guidance to Post-Secondary education and Work Experience. VTS have referred 151 students as potential DVR participants to DVR offices across the state. (Page 362) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high—growth industries. In 2017, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (NMDVR) opened a satellite office within the Bernalillo County Workforce Connection Center. The purpose of this NMDVR office is to help individuals with disabilities find employment. This office will consist of two Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, and a Vocational Rehabilitation Technician. This unit will also be supported by the NMDVR Business Specialist. The goal of this co-location will be to allow individuals with disabilities to be jointly served between the various workforce partners and NMDVR. NMDVR can provide technical assistance to both workforce partners and Job Seekers with disabilities on issues regarding disabilities. (Page 352) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The Board also reviews, evaluates and reports annually on the performance of all workforce development activities administered by state agencies involved with workforce development. Key areas of focus include developing linkages with the public education and higher education agencies to ensure coordination of vocational education, apprenticeship, adult education and literacy, employment training programs and vocational rehabilitation programs with other workforce development and training programs. Any problems identified by the State Board will be included in the annual report on strategic plan implementation and the measures that will be taken to address those problems. (Page 89) Title I

WIOA places a keen emphasis on work-based experiences across target groups, particularly youth, individuals with barriers to employment, and individuals with disabilities, as a means to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. WIOA also provides enhanced access and flexibility for work-based training options, such as Registered Apprenticeship, on-the-job (OJT), customized, and incumbent worker training, transitional jobs, and internships. Registered Apprenticeship should be used more often as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job-driven strategy for employers and industries. OJT continues to be a key method of delivering training services to adults and dislocated workers, and states and local areas have the flexibility under WIOA to increase the reimbursement level to up to 75 percent. (Page 94) Title I

Under WIOA, vocational rehabilitation programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a local board youth provider on finalizing a memorandum of understanding to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, an NMDVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. (Page 119) Title I

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the New Mexico Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately the Vocational Rehabilitation programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the Registered Apprenticeship programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing:

o the facilitation of a working group made up of the State Apprenticeship Agency, the Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and the Adult Education program to determine and target which industries, occupations, and employers are best suited for expanding Registered Apprenticeship programs in New Mexico;

o case management services and the development of “how-to” aids to assist staff in getting clients registered as WIOA Title I participants, as appropriate, to assist staff in navigating interactions with potential apprenticeship sites with the goal of facilitating formal agreements and assurances around that braiding of funds across programs and employers;

o regular technical assistance and best practices sharing across all partner programs to increase awareness of Registered Apprenticeship and opportunities for individuals with disabilities;

o coordinated marketing and outreach strategies as a means of identifying participants across all programs who are appropriate candidates for Registered Apprenticeship;

o ways the Vocational Rehabilitation programs can assist disabled veterans with guidance and services to maintain their employment through Registered Apprenticeship programs;

o training initiatives such as TechHire, and New Mexico Career Solutions (a career readiness tool) and internships, as New Mexico has a portal for getting out-of-school youth engaged in searching for job opportunities; and

o agreements through memoranda of understanding with partners and contracts with service providers to guide and govern resources for youth with disabilities, such as vocational training and initiatives to obtain high school equivalency. (Page 119-120) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions also administers Wagner-Peyser Employment Services, which it does from the state level through its Employment Services Division, along with the administration of Trade Adjustment Assistance, Work Opportunity Tax Credit, Rapid Response, and Veterans programs. NMDWS receives funding from USDOL to hire and oversee state merit staff responsible for direct delivery of the Wagner Peyser employment services and the other related services to jobseekers and employers. Merit staff is located throughout 18 field offices and the programs are co-located with the WIOA programs in every local board area. (Page 151) Title III

In accordance with requirements from the Social Security Administration, there are two essential contacts. All of the benefits advisers work with the local SSA offices and specifically with the Area Work Incentive Coordinator (AWIC). Together they find solutions on how the help all, including Jackson Class members not terminate working due to a glitch in the process. This includes developing individualized 1619(b) thresholds, over payments which could be mediated by use of work incentives, and proper use of the Ticket to Work. NMDVR has four Memorandum of Understanding on how the Ticket to Work will be used with local Employment Networks (ENs). This includes who has the Ticket at any point and making use of partnership plus as a viable service to participants, once they are closed by NMDVR. Lastly, although not a requirement, NMDVR has been instrumental in the New Mexico Ticket Partners a group made on NMDVR staff (Benefits Advisement and Ticket Coordinator), ENs, the SSA Work Incentive Coordinator (WIPA), Disability Rights NM (DRNM) Protection and Advocacy for Beneficiaries on Social Security (PABSS), Workforce, Veterans services, and other job development services who may be interested in becoming of connecting with the Ticket to Work. Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) works with self-employment working on how earnings from different types of business structures could affect SSA calculation of benefits as well at the accounting system the participants choices for their business. (Page 293-294; Page 296) Title IV

Benefits Advisement Services (BAS) have been asked to provide training to all state and nonprofit providers of supported employment, usually at the area meetings. They also assist in cases on a one on one process to help the providers and beneficiaries of SSDB to develop reports, work incentive plans, and complete SSA paperwork. (Page 306) Title IV
Partners for Employment is identified as the statewide entity to oversee and manage a variety of Supported Employment Programs. This program is intended to serve and support individuals with a variety of disabling conditions. The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR coordinates with SSA to implement the Ticket to Work Program and obtain employment outcomes. Two units within the agency provide the required services within the agency: 1) Ticket to Work/Security Services and the Benefits Advisement Services.

The TTW services works with cost reimbursement; placing and removing the participants from “in use” status; instructing field staff on what is needed for a participant to move through the rehab process; providing technical assistance to field staff; advocating when a problem arises in the process of in use and medical continuing disability protection (CDR); attending SSA training and quarterly meetings; provide documentation to SSA about Ticket related issues, attends Ticket to Work Partners meeting; and assist with MOU in the community for Partnership Plus. Four MOUs with local/national Employment Networks (ENs). (Page 326-327)

Benefits Advisors work with participants one on one, helping them move through the stages of change regarding employment while on Public Benefits. They serve people 14 to full retirement age. BAS are required to complete a Community Partners Work Incentive Coordinator certificate and choose a specialty as well. Specialties include transition issues, tax help, A Better Life Experience (ABLE), Money Smart, and Self Employment. Some Benefits Advisors have taken on two specialties. (Page 327) Title IV

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 392) Title IV

Establishing a firm and reassuring foundation of monthly income and medical insurance is important to the fundamental job—readiness of each consumer, so the Commission contracted with New Mexico Legal Aid to provide assistance to consumers that needed help with guidance and counseling with respect to SSI and SSDI work incentives. A great deal of emphasis is placed on consumers possessing skills that will help them overcome their vision loss, and the Commission encourages attendance at the Orientation Center. All interested consumers are taken on a tour of the center by their counselor. Those who choose not to attend the center are provided training in their own communities by the Commission’s Independent Living Teachers. Counselors spend a great deal of time and effort assisting the consumer to identify their own career goal, and counselors ask that consumers research identified career goals to determine whether a contemplated career is a good fit. (Page 441) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~In addition, the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a federal tax credit administered at the state level that is available to employers that hire workers in designated target groups that have barriers to employment. Employers can potentially get a tax credit ranging from $1,200 to $9,600 depending on the target group. The tax credit is designed to help job seekers gain on-the-job experience, move towards economic self-sufficiency, and at the same time help reduce employers’ federal tax liability. WOTC target groups include qualified TANF recipients, qualified veterans, qualified ex-felons, designated community residents, vocational rehabilitation referrals, qualified food stamp recipients, qualified social security income recipients, and long-term family assistance recipients. (Page 110) Title I

Data Collection

The division was involved with Pepnet2 national grant, where the division worked closely with Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; Work Force Connections; and New Mexico School of the Deaf (NMSD) to establish a goal on being able to share data collection and increasing expectations to reduce systemic barriers and close the education employment gaps for deaf individuals. Last Year the grant reestablished through The National Deaf Center, and as of today, this committee is still working on establishing a data collection system. It is the plan of the Division to continue to be an active member of this committee to help provide resources, strategies, and opportunities for dialog at local, state and national level for Deaf individuals, families and professionals in order to reduce systemic barriers and close the education and employment gaps for deaf individuals. (Page 349) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtained employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. NMDVR sponsored ACRE training for community partners: • In collaboration with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Partners for Employment is offering a limited number of scholarships for private job developers to take the ACRE-certified Supported Employment Online Course offered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). (Page 331) Title IV

NMDVR is promoting Section 511 of WIOA, which limits the use of subminimum wage for employers that hold FLSA 14c certificates. The intention of Section 511 of WIOA is that individuals with disabilities, especially youth with disabilities, must be afforded a full opportunity to prepare for, obtain, maintain, advance in, or reenter competitive employment. In 2017 NMDVR arranged and met with three employers with 14c certificates and their disabled subminimum wage employees at five work sites throughout the state. NMDVR collaborated with Adelante in two sites in Albuquerque (the Document Shredding Center and the Fulfillment Center) and their site in Los Lunas (Bargain Square). In addition, NMDVR collaborated with CARC in Carlsbad and Zee Empowerment in Gallup. A mobile team of NMDVR vocational rehabilitation counselors met with disabled subminimum wage employees at each site and provided vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services to promote employment in competitive employment in integrated settings. A total of 288 disabled subminimum wage employees were served, in which 54 of them were referred to NMDVR, and 7 obtain employment via NMDVR assistance. NMDVR will continue to provide disabled subminimum wage employees with vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services at these sites a minimum of once a year and twice a year for those hired after July 22, 2016 as per compliance with Section 511 of WIOA. (Page 356) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA Grievance and Complaint Resolution — This policy will ensure that no individual will be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in the administration of or in connection with any such program or activity because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief or, for any beneficiary, because of the beneficiary’s citizenship status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or for participation in any Title I financially assisted program or activity. The policy establishes procedures for processing complaints and grievances, which apply to all levels of the New Mexico workforce system. This policy covers equal opportunity requirements, discrimination grievances, local and state complaints; and criminal fraud and abuse complaints. (Page 147) Title I

Below are some examples of how the local boards are trying to make the Workforce Connection Centers more assessable to individuals with disabilities, as follows. o Installation of automatic, push button doors o Assistive devices, such as TTY machines o Lift tables and other products for people with disabilities o Computers with enhanced keyboard for clients that have visual problems o Community Outreach Program for the Deaf provides interpreter services o Local policies regarding Reasonable Accommodation, Disability Related Non-Discrimination and EEOC complaints (Page 183) Title I

At the state level, NMHED is committed to removing barriers to access by providing access to grants, financial aid and counseling, instruction and services in various locations in the community. Under the oversight of NMHED, we ensure that institution provide counselling and advising, academic accommodations and other support services to ensure needs of traditionally underrepresented students are met. Programs are committed to the policies of equal opportunity and affirmative action for employees and will actively recruit applicants from traditionally underrepresented groups and seek to develop a diverse faculty and staff. Providers disseminate anti-discrimination policies through employee and student handbooks and other official materials. Provide all activities in ADA accessible facilities. Disseminate program fliers and information in multiple languages. Coordinate and offer cultural sensitivity, ADA and related training for program faculty and staff. (Page 288) Title I

Veterans

Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (VA VR&E). This program provides veterans with SBE and service members with assistance to help with job training, employment accommodations, resume development and job seeking skills coaching. Other services include entrepreneurship, independent living services for those severely disabled and unable to work. NMDWS has a Memorandum of Understanding with the VA VR&E program to assist whose veterans with individualized career services and career planning. One DVOP specialist is designated as an Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC) to facilitate the VA VR&E referrals to DVOP specialists in the Workforce Connection Centers. In Albuquerque, the ISC coordinated with the LVER in the Workforce Connection Center in Albuquerque to organize two (2) employer Meet-and-Greet events for VA VR&E participants. In 2017, 182 veterans were referred to VRE, 70 obtained suitable employment, with an average wage of $18.38, and a rehabilitated rate of 81.5 percent. (Page 116) Title I

Veteran’s staff works closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and private sector partners who provide training or education benefits to prepare veterans with job opportunities. The DVOP positions provide outreach assistance to veterans, particularly those who have a disability and need intensive services to remove barriers to employment. A full range of available employment and training services to veterans include job search, job development, resume writing, dress for success, and interviewing skills. LVER staff conducts outreach to employers to encourage job development for all veterans and to establish a network of employers and service providers for veterans seeking assistance through the workforce system; make referrals to vocational and training institutions; and work to capitalize on resources, such as the WIOA training dollars with veterans’ preference. LVERs are also team members in the Business Services sections of the Workforce Connection Centers, meeting with and assisting employers with posting job orders, organization of job fairs, and identifying job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. (Page 187) Title I

The State intends to use Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists to provide individualized career services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) or are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP Specialist employment services. The State intends to use Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVERs) to perform only the duties which are related to outreach to the employer community and for capacity building within the state’s employment service delivery system to ensure easier access to the appropriate employment and training services for job seeking veterans. (Page 457) Title IV

NMDWS ensures that the New Mexico Jobs for Veterans’ State Grant staff of DVOP specialists and LVER staff are properly integrated at the local Workforce Connection Centers (WCC). DVOP specialists and LVERs are an essential part of and fully integrated into the WCC. They are included among the WCC partner staff, which consists of all staff employed by programs or activities operated by WCC that provide online and/or in-person workforce development or related support service as part of the workforce development system. Although the DVOP specialists and LVERs are integrated in WCC, the VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 prohibit DVOPs and LVERs from performing non-veteran related duties that detract from their ability to perform their statutorily-defined duties related to meeting the employment needs of eligible veterans. (Page 461-462) Title IV

(3) DVOP specialists are out-stationed to VA Medical Center’s Supportive Employment Programs (Work and Compensated Therapy); Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, Supportive Services to Veterans and Families and veteran per diem grant recipient’s, wounded warrior military treatment locations, veterans’ court and correctional facilities (minimum level). A DVOP specialist is designated as the Intensive Services Coordinator and located at the VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program office. DVOP specialists’ supports and attends the Stand Down events and other community homeless events as part of their outreach. Additionally, they schedule and conduct outreach to Native American veterans located on tribal lands. (4) LVERs are team members in the WCC Business Section to meet with and assist employers with posting job orders. They assist with the organization of job fairs and meet with employers to identify job vacancies and skills needed for in-demand, high-demand or high-wage careers. They work closely with WIOA partners, institutions of higher learning, other governmental, non-profit agencies and the private sector that provides training or education benefits to prepare veterans with careers or job opportunities. (Page 462) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The Division is involved in a Vocational Technical Assistance Center project targeted at five economically disadvantaged communities (mostly Hispanic and Native American) in Albuquerque (87102, 87105, 87106, 87108 and 87121) to address barriers to employment regarding individuals with Mental Health Conditions and /or Persons with Substance Abuse Disorders. This project is a collaboration between the Division, Rehabilitation Service Administration, U.S. Department of Education, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, and the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation. The goal is to expand VR services to this target population and expand and strengthen partnerships with local social service and community development agencies, correctional agencies, community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), school systems, employers, community leaders, and other relevant stakeholders. This project will involve the Division in development of knowledge (training) in working with this target population and will design strategies to provide technical assistance and coordination of activities to maximize community service and alliance building. This project has the support of twenty local partnerships to implement comprehensive support services to address barriers in employment to this target population. (Page 293) Title IV

The Division does not target specific disability groups to provide supported employment services. However, long— term support funding by the state is currently available for those individuals who are either developmentally disabled or who have significant disabling mental illness. Provision of Supported Employment as it relates to Mental Health Service. The Department of Human Services provides administrative support to and houses the Behavioral Health Collaborative to provide a long—term funding mechanism for Behavioral Health recipients. Behavioral Health Services and funding is allocated through the Collaborative to provide comprehensive and vocational services to individuals with significant disabling mental illness. Both mechanisms mentioned above are used to fund long—term supported employment services and extended services. (Page 305-306) Title IV

Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. In the past years, the infrastructure providing mental health in the state was shaken and a team from Arizona was brought in to provide services. This outside entity remained in the state for a short time before leaving. Since then the agencies which once provided services had returned and have worked on trying to develop a viable system again. During the transition periods, much of what was provided in Psychosocial Rehabilitation services was discontinued or changed, losing the supported employment and other job services. BAS has been available to help with participants of NMDVR who work are part of the Behavioral Health System. (Page 311) Title IV

During the past four years, work continued toward intra—agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. (Page 327) Title IV

Project E3 provides technical assistance (TA} to State VR agencies and their partners to address barriers to VR participation and competitive integrated employment of historically underserved groups of individuals with disabilities who are economically disadvantaged. This RSA/Southern U. of Baton Rouge project concentrates on five specific zip codes in Albuquerque: 87102, 87105, 87106, 87108, and 87121. This project will focus on ways to breakdown employment barriers for people w/ Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders in these zip codes. Both DVR and Community Providers will be collaborating on this project. (Page 356-357) Title IV

Continue to seek long-term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. (Page 360) Title IV

The agency currently does not have a cooperative agreement with the agency responsible for providing mental health services, but the agency does provide training to staff on how to better serve individuals with mental illness and on the resources available. The agency will develop a cooperative agreement with state agencies that provide mental health services. (Page 392) Title IV
The agency will work cooperatively with the Department of Health, with the Medical Assistance Division, with the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division, and with the Behavioral Health Services Division. The agency will designate specific liaisons and points of contact for each of these entities, will provide information as appropriate, and will enter into a cooperative agreement with the Department of Health. (Page 409) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Employment Services are provided as part of the one-stop delivery system. Currently, each local workforce development area has at least one comprehensive workforce development center that includes, at a minimum, three partners: WIOA Adult and Dislocated Worker services, Wagner- Peyser Employment Services, and access to Unemployment Insurance services. Each Employment Services field office is assigned a site manager who ensures the workforce centers are universally accessible, customer centered, and training is job-driven. This includes providing easy access to and assistance with workforce related activities, such as looking for a job, exploring work preparation and career development services, as well as seamless referral to WIOA employment, on-the-job-training, and occupational training programs. (Page 108) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 49

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

The New Mexico Department of Veterans Services 2020 Annual Report - 02/14/2020

“Employment Help for Job-Seeking Veterans

DVS has formed a strong partnership with the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) to help veterans with employment and training opportunities….

The JVSG also utilizes the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) to assist eligible veterans with significant barriers to employment. The grant also provides job readiness skills, job training referrals, and community-based resource referrals.  LVERs and DVOPs are assigned to 12 workforce connections centers permanently, and nine workforce connections centers on an out-station basis.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

New Mexico Draft Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Combined State Plan Program Years 2020-2023 - 02/07/2020

“The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individuals Plans for Employment. Although the navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment related needs of People with Disabilities at local One-Stops. The result is that One-stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with DVR Counselors throughout the state and DVR is currently co-located at the Albuquerque one-stop and is fully integrated in the one-stop’s daily operation. DVR plans to co-locate in Farmington one-stop office by the end of SFY 20.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Commission for the Blind Combined State Plan - 01/13/2020

“The New Mexico Commission for the Blind is herein providing our Combined State Plan submission.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

New Mexico Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division - 01/01/2020

“The Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DDSD) oversees three home and community based Medicaid waiver programs. These include the Developmental Disabilities Waiver (Traditional Waiver), the Medically Fragile Waiver (Traditional Waiver), and the Mi Via Self-Directed Waiver. Our Intake and Eligibility Bureau manages the Central Registry for individuals waiting for services. DDSD also provides several State General Funded Services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Annual Review 2018 - 10/25/2019

“DVR Staff & Central Regional Educational Cooperative (CREC)

The NMDVR works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition services and provide Pre-Employment Transition Services (PRE-ETS). Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to state public/charter high schools throughout the state and are working in collaboration with CREC Vocational Transition Specialist (VTS) to provide (PRE-ETS) services…

Employer Engagement

DVR is increasing employment opportunities and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities including through encouraging meaningful input by employers and vocational rehabilitation services providers on successful and prospective employment and placement strategies…

Promoting Section 511 of WIOA

DVR is engaged in the 511 process by meeting with employees with disabilities who make subminimum wage at various work sites that hold FLSA 14c certificates throughout the state.

This process involves a mobile team of counselors that provide vocational guidance and counseling and information and referral services in promotion of the opportunity to prepare for and obtain competitive, integrated employment through DVR.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Getting Started with My Workforce Connection - 05/23/2019

~~“The New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions is changing the way you access job seeking services and Unemployment Insurance benefits with a more secure and simplified login process. As of May 15, both existing and new users for the New Mexico Workforce Connection Online System (www.jobs.state.nm.us ) and the New Mexico Unemployment Insurance (UI) Tax & Claims System will be prompted to create a new single account. In order to create your new account, you will need to have a valid and accessible email address that you do not share with anyone else. Your email address will be used for account management and security purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services – Field Services - 03/01/2019

~~“There are 16 field offices of the New Mexico Department of Veterans’ Services located throughout the state. Each is staffed by an accredited Veterans’ Service Officer (VSO) to assist veterans and their dependents with filing for their federal and state benefits. Most VSO’s also have regularly-scheduled outreach visits to smaller surrounding communities.”

Systems
  • Other

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability - 01/01/2019

~~“OBJECTIVES• Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public• Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers• Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community with needed services and supports • Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Services Offered by the Albuquerque Regional Office - 11/21/2018

~~“VA’s Albuquerque Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in New Mexico. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs”

Systems
  • Other

Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) Program - 08/28/2018

~~“The Working Disabled Individuals (WDI) program covers disabled working individuals who, because of earnings, do not qualify for Medicaid under any other programs. Individuals must meet the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) criteria for disability without regard to "substantial gainful activity".

The program also covers those individuals with a recent attachment to the work force. An individual is considered to have recent attachment to the work force if he/she has enough earnings in a quarter to meet the SSA’s definition of a qualifying quarter or has lost SSI and Medicaid due to the initial receipt of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, until Medicare entitlement. Apply at any ISD office and request to apply for Medicaid category 074”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workforce Partners - 05/02/2019

~~This page has links and information about various statewide Partner Programs

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

“The Governor and the State Workforce Development Board have been assigned broad authority under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to provide policy and guidance to local boards, local one-stop delivery systems, and one-stop partner programs. Members of the board are appointed by the Governor and serve as the Governor's employer-driven workforce development adviser for programs and policies under WIOA. The board performs functions that include strategic planning, policy guidance, capacity building, and leadership and oversight of the state system operations.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for Managers and Supervisors - 11/19/2019

“Objectives for ADA Fundamentals for Supervisors course:

Recognize when an employee’s ADA rights may be impacted by the employer’s decisions, and take actions that respect those rights and comply with requirements under the law Respond appropriately to employees who may need a reasonable accommodation for a disability; follow the appropriate process Create and supervise a working environment that is welcoming and accessible for all employees​ Ensure that the employee is not discriminated or retaliated against by anyone as a result of having the accommodation”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration - 02/07/2020

“…The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is approving New Mexico's request to amend its section 1115(a) demonstration entitled, "New Mexico Centennial Care 2.0 1 I 15 Medicaid Demonstration (Project Number I I -V/00285/6)(demonstration), in accordance with section 1115 of the Act…

VII. Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB)

Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan.

Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement. “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Medically Fragile Renewal Waiver - 01/29/2020

“Habilitation Services. The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Supports Waiver - 01/07/2020

“New Mexico’s Supports Waiver (SW) is designed to provide an option for support to individuals on the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities (DD) waiver Wait List; providing support services to participants and their families, to enable participants to work toward self-determination, independence, productivity, integration, and inclusion in all facets of home and community life across their lifespan.  The services provided are intended to build on each participant's current natural and generic community support structures. The program is operated by the New Mexico (NM) Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) with oversight by the NM Human Services Department (HSD).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 05/01/2019

~~“For the  two  Medicaid  waivers  providing  noninstitutional  care  to  people  with  developmental disabilities, the FY20 general fund appropriation to the department is sufficient to add more than 330 slots, the largest increase since at least FY07. However, with nearly 5,000 people awaiting services and estimates indicating it can take as long as 13 and one-half years before a client begins receiving services, more work remains. The long wait poses a hardship for families and can end up costing the state more in the long run if a client’s conditions worsen or if a client becomes less responsive to rehabilitation. Because of this, the Legislature also appropriated $1.5 million with language requiring the department to develop a new Medicaid waiver to provide supportive services to people on the wait list. ”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Money Follows the Person - 10/01/2012

~~“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to

•  increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services,• [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice,• strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions• put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
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  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

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Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.07%
Change from
2018 to 2019
2,096,829
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.82%
Change from
2018 to 2019
165,583
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.72%
Change from
2018 to 2019
58,712
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
6.15%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
3.44%
Change from
2018 to 2019
74.14%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 2,096,829
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 165,583
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 58,712
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 776,150
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 167,869
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 161,116
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 251,190
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 7,766
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 150,848
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 26,564
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,266
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 11,100
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 28,712

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 63,154

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,193
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,667
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 5,717
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 115
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 210
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 23.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 100,032
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002).