North Carolina

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State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
10,488,084
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
680,459
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.42%
Change from
2018 to 2019
243,128
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.48%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.73%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.28%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.41%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 10,273,419 10,383,620 10,488,084
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 689,612 680,863 680,459
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 232,875 239,666 243,128
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,225,322 4,291,999 4,334,273
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.77% 35.20% 35.73%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.01% 77.19% 77.41%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60% 3.90% 3.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.80% 20.60% 20.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70% 13.10% 12.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 648,579 652,890 647,620
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 694,716 698,279 711,905
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 955,491 956,190 959,032
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 308,091 305,180 307,957
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 56,263 63,100 62,411
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 20,228 23,213 23,544
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,896 14,367 19,790
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,039 457
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 28,046 34,276 29,862
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 17,154 16,904 18,883

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 8,592 9,023 9,206
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 4.20% 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 320,583 314,113 311,730

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,386 19,475 22,773
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 91,748 65,153 68,579
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 104,082 73,708 77,889
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.60% 26.40% 29.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.10% 8.30% 6.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,946 5,216 4,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,395 15,318 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.15 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 90 1,062 1,644
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 49 389 700
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00% 37.00% 43.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.50 3.87 6.97

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 28.00% 25.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,507 11,525 11,562
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 471,750 467,320 466,920
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,186 1,234 1,301
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,194 1,482 1,433

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,029,000 $19,469,121 $21,556,297
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,307,000 $15,979,861 $12,386,109
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $122,559,000 $125,470,761 $124,881,442
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $188,651,000 $213,112,906 $319,889,110
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 15.00% 18.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 12,766 9,750 10,272
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,486 2,435 2,176
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 6,120 6,187 6,415
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.60 29.36 30.42

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.78% 66.80% 66.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.87% 13.98% 14.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.89% 1.89% 1.81%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.14% 85.35% 85.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.39% 27.27% 27.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.73% 62.51% 62.83%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.98% 78.14% 77.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.34% 35.24% 35.82%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 45 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 3 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 49 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,000 2,573 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 452 511 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,453 3,085 0

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

The continued growth of the statewide network of supported employment service providers has resulted from collaboration between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services and entities such as the North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities, the North Carolina International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services, NCCDD and the Mental Health Consumers’ Organization. In addition, the North Carolina Association for Persons Supporting Employment First (NCAPSE) provides a forum for focusing on supported employment standards and expanded choices for individuals with the most significant disabilities in the state. (Page 198) Title I

Customized Employment

~~In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The DVRS VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because DVRS will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to DVRS when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools DVRS utilizes for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through it’s continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DVRS will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Services for the Blind (DSB) VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because the DSB VR program will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to the Division when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools utilized for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through its continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DSB will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 328- 329) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

School to Work Transition

~~DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the Spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 183) Title I

Finally, DVRS casework policies require that transition services must promote or facilitate the achievement of the employment outcome identified in the student’s individualized plan for employment. In order to plan effectively for the transition needs of students with disabilities in collaboration with other agencies and organizations, DVRS rehabilitation counselors are expected to be active participants addressing the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting transition issues when possible. Counselors are expected to participate both directly in IEP meetings and indirectly by other means in planning for the needs of VR consumers. A copy of the transition portion of the IEP is required to be maintained in the case record. Prior to developing the IPE, the VR counselor reviews the Individual Transition Plan (ITP) component for the Individual Education Plan and records any relevant ITP objectives as part of the IPE. The intent of this review is to coordinate educational programming and vocational programming for the benefit of the VR consumer. (Page 185) Title I

Additionally, the Division’s policy stipulates that the development of the IPE with a student must be based on interests, aptitudes, capabilities, strengths and informed choice. The job choice on the IPE for a student in transition may indicate a family of jobs rather than a specific job code, for example, Health Care Worker, Office Work, and Protective Services such as police, firefighter, or security guard. DVRS policy does require career exploration to be provided and documented in order to determine a more specific goal, and this process and expectation has been further emphasized by recent policy revisions concerning development of the IPE within 90 days of the VR eligibility determination. Amended job choices, including amendments at closure, must be accompanied by documentation reflecting the process and services that had an impact on the final job choice, including job shadowing, job sampling, guidance and counseling. Moreover, DVRS casework policy stipulates that the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment must be completed as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, by the time each student determined to be eligible for VR services leaves the school setting. This includes students with disabilities who are eligible for VR services including eligible students served by the school under an IEP.(Page 185) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school.

Within the current formal interagency agreement between DVRS and DPI, mutual interagency responsibilities include:
• Mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities.
• Designation of an individual from Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions to serve as liaison with each other to represent the services of the two agencies.
• Exchange of information deemed pertinent and of mutual concern regarding service delivery.
• Interagency cooperation in transition planning for students with disabilities.
• A mutual system to be developed and maintained to ensure that appropriate referrals are made to each party. (Page 186) Title I

The current interagency agreement between DVRS and the state education agency stipulates that transition planning for students with disabilities will be a cooperative effort. Furthermore, the agreements specifically require mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities. The sharing of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) at the local level is strongly encouraged. DVRS VR counselors are required to review a student’s transition component of the IEP and incorporate, as appropriate, a description of relevant objectives in the IPE. Furthermore, a comprehensive evaluation will be completed by the State agency on each eligible individual, to the degree necessary, to determine the vocational goal and scope of VR services to be included in the IPE. The agreements state that the student with the disability is expected to fully participate in the development of the plan and any plan amendments. The agreements specify that the DVRS VR counselors will provide the individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. Additionally, the agreement requires that the VR counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. (Page 189) Title I

As part of the agreement, DVRS Rehabilitation Counselors will provide individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. The counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. The VR counselor will provide each eligible individual an IPE Handbook wherein there is an appeals process outlined. Information pertaining to the Client Assistance Program (CAP) is included in the handbook. The VR counselor agrees not to close an individual’s record as having achieved a successful employment outcome until the person exits school and is determined that the individual has successfully completed the IPE. (Page 190-191) Title I

On—going support provided during extended services must include a minimum of twice—monthly monitoring at the work site to assess job stability unless under special circumstances, especially at the request of the individual, the IPE provides for off—site monitoring and based upon that assessment, the coordination or provision of specific services at or away from the work site, that are needed to maintain employment stability. If off—site monitoring is determined to be appropriate, it must, at a minimum, consist of two (2) face—to—face meetings with the client and one employer contact monthly. These activities apply to all supported employment clients and not only those whose services are provided through funds reserved pursuant to section 603(d), for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

Currently, NC’s Capacity Building Plan is focused on improving student involvement in the individualized education program (IEP) process so that planning is more meaningful and associated with a student’s post-school goals. The state is continuing to work on a Transition Toolkit for teachers and anticipates the development of toolkits for parents, students, and agencies that will be individualized at the local level. DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 250) Title IV

DSB currently offers a wide variety of services to students with visual impairments or blindness in transition to the world of work. Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor. The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. A formal cooperative agreement exists with the NC Department of Public Instruction, which consists of 115 local education agencies (LEA’s), 128 charter schools, 1 regional school and 2 education entities. The emphasis of the Memorandum of Agreement with DPI is on students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired, being served by local education agencies (LEA’s) and the schools who are of transition age (14 to 21) and who need VR services to become employed. This agreement acknowledges the role of DSB in providing these services and encourages local LEA’s and schools to develop working relationships with the staff who cover their corresponding areas and encourages referring students, sharing information and facilitating joint involvement in IEP meetings. DSB shares information about the transition program and provides technical assistance and consultation to DPI, LEA’s, and schools regarding accommodations and assistive technology that will help facilitate the education and VR of students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired. (Page 289) Title IV

Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor (this is not required for the receipt of Pre-Employment Transition Services). The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. (Page 291) Title IV

DSB has also enlarged the transition rehabilitation services presently offered for students 14-21 years of age in North Carolina who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired by adding specific Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS): (1) Student Counseling on Transition/Higher Ed Training Opportunities- Required Student Workplace Readiness Training; (2) Student Self-Advocacy Training; (3) Student Job Exploration Counseling; (4) Student Job Exploration Counseling Materials; and Student Work Based Learning Experience Maintenance. These services are provided to all students with visual impairments, blindness, or deaf-blindness whether they are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 294) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~North Carolina has a strong career pathway strategy in place that expanded on the work done over the last decade by the K-12 and community college systems. The current strategy includes a certification process by the NCWorks Commission that requires eight key element be in place to ensure pathways are comprehensive with multiple entry and exit ramps for in-demand occupations. Specific strategies to continue to strengthen and use career pathways are listed below.
o Continue to support and promote the development of NCWorks Certified Career Pathways for critical industry clusters.
o Require workforce development partners use the career pathways to target resources towards helping individuals gain the skills and experience needed for in-demand occupations. 
o Provide programs that link low-skilled adults and individuals with barriers to employment to career pathways and job-ready skills along with basic skills. (Page 36) Title I

Support collaborative efforts under the vocational rehabilitation program to provide individuals with disabilities the rehabilitative services, training, and supports needed to obtain or maintain employment, including utilization of career pathways. 
The vocational rehabilitation programs will incorporate, to the maximum extent possible, career pathways within their services to individuals with disabilities through approaches to include increase emphasis and reference of career pathways during comprehensive assessment of individuals’ skills, interests and aptitudes and during counseling and guidance sessions with individuals. 
Program leadership will promote to staff and service recipients the use of established resources highlighting information about career pathways and in-demand occupations; increase emphasis on established career pathways and career growth when developing employment goals and individualized plans for employment with services and training that directly support the employment objectives; remain actively engaged with workforce partners in the collaborative development of career pathways and identify particular issues or challenges individuals with disabilities may encounter when adopting a career within an established career pathway or enhancements that may be particularly favorable for the populations served by the state’s vocational rehabilitation programs. (Page 47) Title I

OJT is a viable and compatible part of North Carolina’s Integrated Services Delivery services. Local workforce development board OJT policy is critical for consistency, institutionalizing services the local board seeks to deliver, and managing and leveraging OJT funds. Local OJT policy also provides guidance on how to comply with federal and state OJT requirements and leverage other hiring. (Page 62) Title I

DVRS staff plan to expand the role of employers in vocational evaluation and career development services. DVRS will be enhancing policies around internships and OJT services so that the service procedures are consistent with employer practices while still preparing the individual for competitive employment. DVRS plans to work towards a service definition that is complementary to other internship and OJT programs available in the state through our workforce system partners. (Page 65) Title I

Provision of Transition Services through Coordination with Employers

While youth and students with disabilities have access to the same VR services as adults, there are some VR services reserved for or targeted to transition-aged youth for the purposes of assisting them with leaving high school and preparing for competitive employment. The division plans to focus on program development in the coming year in order to meet the 15% required spending allocation for Pre- Employment Transition Services (PETS) to students with disabilities. A number of areas of program development are focused on increased engagement with employers in order to implement PETS. These include: summer internships for students and youth with disabilities including on-the-job supports, increased utilization of OJT for students and youth, and increasing the number of Project Search © sites. (Pages 65-66) Title I

DVRS will work on enhancing OJT utilization for students and youth with disabilities as well by engaging business in the development of young talent. DVRS plans to streamline OJT processes, revise policies so that they are complementary to similar OJT programs, and improve marketing and tracking materials and processes so that the materials are engaging to both student/youth participants and potential business as well as easy to complete and accessible. (Page 66) Title I

By enhancing and incorporating new programs that promote and support work-based experiences, DVRS will continue its commitment to students in pursuit of a high school diploma through the Occupational Course of Study (OCS), a pathway established by the NC Board of Education for students with IEPs to achieve a high school diploma by completing occupational coursework and work experiences. DVRS has recently revised policies for In-School Work Adjustment services to students with significant or most significant disabilities. The service is coordinated through school-based agreements to incentivize a student’s participation in school-coordinated work experiences by providing guidance and counseling as well as an incentive payment to students for improvements in work behaviors and attitudes. The Division continues to offer internship and OJT services to students, but hopes to increase utilization and improve feasibility for students, schools, and partnering businesses through policy and procedure revisions and collaboration with workforce system partners. Other PETS programs/services under consideration are intended to address students’ expectations around pursuing employment and to improve their preparedness for participating in additional rehabilitation services, such as training and placement. (Page 184) Title I

Beyond increasing consumers’ participation in career-oriented post-secondary education/training, some of the other strategies that DVRS has established under this goal are to develop and build quality relationships with businesses that offer strong salaries and benefits and to continue offering the internship services, which, compared to an OJT experience, are geared more toward individuals who have completed their specialized training and need work experience to get their careers established. This service has been very well received by staff and consumers and we expect to continue the service. Another strategy that DVRS is employing to increase the earning potential of individuals who have entrepreneurial skills is through the support the Division has made available through a dedicated Small Business Specialist on staff who helps support staff and consumers in their assessment of this option as a fit and when it is mutually determined as such, coordination of local resources and ongoing supports for the consumer pursuing this option. (Pages 251-252) Title IV

Objective 1.1.1. The total number of individuals exiting the VR program in employment will exceed that of the prior year: One of the strategies for achieving this increase is for the DVRS VR program to utilize on-the-job training (OJT) without supports. Wage subsidies for OJT are funded at a reduced amount relative to when additional funding for these services was available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and both greater utilization of OJT and number of corresponding employment outcomes through OJT was achieved. A full wage subsidy and making the process more convenient for employers would increase OJT utilization and outcomes. (Page 266-267) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers): o disabilities; o homelessness; o unemployed for at least 27 weeks; o criminal background (released within the last 12 months); o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and o between 18—24 years old. Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~A separate data file exchange process is maintained for uploading VR participant information to the SSA portal for the SSA Ticket-to-Work program. This file exchange process isn’t fully automated and is limited to establishing VR participant in-use status and eligibility for agency cost reimbursement. An interface with Department of Commerce, Division of Employment Security provides quarterly State unemployment insurance wage records and related information to establish whether a former VR participant is working at the level of substantial gainful activity for agency cost-reimbursement under the Ticket-to-Work program. (Page 83) Title I

Major service gaps or barriers DVRS experiences when fulfilling this need most generally in terms of: (a) consumers’ needs for VR services, but lack of motivation to become employed, some of which is driven by disincentives to work, including the potential loss of SSI, SSDI or other public benefits; and(b) the lack of resources, including time, additional counselor positions, and expertise required for better counseling and guidance. The lack of resources was said to be in part due to counselor vacancies, lack of support staff, and attention to non-counseling related activities, such as focusing on meeting performance measures and processing paperwork.

Recommended solutions for DVRS to increase its capacity for counseling and guidance and help further motivate consumers to enter or reenter the workforce, particularly those receiving SSI or SSDI benefits included increasing VR counseling capacity through: (a) smaller caseloads; (b) paperwork reduction; (c) a decreased focus on performance measures and increase attention to holistic counseling; (d) hiring additional counselors and support staff; and increasing the quality of VR counselors through training and higher salaries. These were said to attract and retain high quality counselors and allow the counselors more one-on-one time with the consumer to provide counseling and guidance, including motivational counseling. The most frequently mentioned solution for increasing client motivation for our consumers receiving public benefits, such as SSI or SSDI, was to increase benefits counseling services. (Page 225) Title IV

Through NC DVR's participation in the RSA- funded Technical Assistance Project "E3TC" Empower Educate Employ Targeted Communities, the need for an expansion of the certified Work Incentive and Planning Assistance (WIPA) counselors network was identified as an area where NC DVRS and NC DSB will plan to utilize innovation and expansion funds to help accomplish this during the 2018 and 2019 program years. (Page 258) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~DVRS plans to increase the quantity and improve the quality of business partnerships in the future with the expectation that an increased number and depth in business relationships will result in increased opportunities to assist individuals with disabilities with vocational evaluation and career development, job seeker preparation, and job development and job placement. DVRS plans to identify methods for capturing information on employment relationships within our case management system in order to map out the presence of business partnerships and identify opportunities for growth and means for leveraging peer-to-peer marketing of VR business services.  (Page 65) Title I

DVRS will continue to explore unique business partnerships that benefit the unique training and recruitment needs of students and youth with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities. DVRS plans to continue partnering on Project Search © sites where there is a need and willingness by community partners. This model places business in the middle of the training and employment of young people by hosting student interns at the business and seeking placement opportunities within the business where they may exist. Project Search © host businesses can not only support the students enrolled in projects on their site, but can also be business advocates for people with disabilities in their industries. (Page 66) Title I

The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

With regard to the need for more employers to hire and accommodate people with disabilities, barriers included: (a) lack of funding to educate business on the hidden workforce available; and (b) lack of employer knowledge of available accommodations that can be made. Solutions proposed included: (a) continued partnerships with agencies that specialize in providing services for individuals with disabilities; and (b) for other workforce agencies to train staff, educate employers, and promote hiring of individuals with disabilities to employers. With regard to the need for transportation and other Support Services, the barrier was mainly limited funding and lack of coordination. The proposed solutions were to leverage additional funding sources and improve coordination of services. Lastly, the barrier regarding the need for training and resources related to assistive technology for NCWorks Career Centers was a lack of funding and the solution proposed was to leverage resources to purchase, build infrastructure, and install technology that assist individuals with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV

Data Collection

In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The Education Opportunities for Students with Disabilities report to the North Carolina General Assembly for 2016 establishes WIOA as foundational federal legislation upon which the state policies and practices concerning system needs are established and aligned. Specific elements of the Unified State Plan and Opportunities Act that have been incorporated include the earmarked Title IV funding, representing roughly $16 million, for pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities who are eligible or ‘potentially eligible’ for the VR program; the restrictions on subminimum wage employment so that individuals with even the most significant disabilities are encouraged and permitted to pursue competitive integrated employment; the expansion of the triennial statewide comprehensive needs assessment under Title IV to focus on the vocational rehabilitation needs of youth with disabilities; and performance measures aligned with the WIOA Performance Accountability measures for youth as statewide indicators of North Carolina’s success. (Page 52) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school. (Page 186) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Cooperative agreements or memorandum of agreements have been established with all local area workforce boards. The agreements provide for the following strategies:  Provision of inter-component staff training and technical assistance with regard to the availability and benefits of, and information on eligibility standards for vocational rehabilitation services; and the promotion of equal, effective, and meaningful participation by individuals with disabilities receiving workforce development system services in all of the states NCWorks Career Centers in the state through the promotion of accessibility; the use of non-discriminatory policies and procedures; the provision of reasonable accommodations; auxiliary aids and services, and rehabilitation technology for persons with disabilities. (Page 57) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) currently utilizes a dual customer approach by providing services to both businesses and individuals with disabilities. The division emphasizes the definition and marketing of business services to ensure the dual customer approach is recognized and implemented. Business services include recruitment, hiring, consultation on Section 503 compliance, sensitivity/diversity training, accessibility consultation, internships, on-the-job training (OJT), education on tax incentives, and follow-up and job retention services. (Page 64) Title I

Both physical and programmatic accessibility are essential for all individuals to participate in services offered by the NCWorks Career Centers and the collaborating community partners. With employment as the ultimate objective, accessibility to facilities and programs offered as legislated by the Americans with Disabilities Act is essential to support individuals with significant barriers to employment to achieve employment. The physical accessibility of facilities is systematically addressed across the state. The State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. NCWorks Career Centers also utilize the North Carolina Department of Commerce Division of Workforce Solutions Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance Review Checklist to ensure access to the entire range of services at each location. As a part of the certification process to become an NCWorks Career Center, each site is required to obtain a letter of ADA compliance from the host agency. ADA compliance is monitored and reviewed on an annual basis by the NC Department of Commerce and the host agency. Sites are required to maintain and update accessibility as ADA regulations are revised and NCWorks Career Center Certifications are renewed. (Page 109) Title I

Career Center Certification Accessibility Criteria: o Adequate handicapped parking with compliant curb ramp(s) connected to the accessibility route into the Center(s). o Handicapped parking must be clearly marked. o Entrance and exit must be accessible and free of obstacles with appropriate signage. o Pedestrian routes inside the host agency facility must be accessible and free of obstacles. o Entrance and exit doors are required to be equipped with hardware that is usable with one hand without tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist. o Furniture inside the Center must be arranged to allow wheelchair access. o Computer and desk workstations must be wheelchair accessible. o Restrooms must be appropriately accessible. o Auxiliary aids and services must be available upon request as are interpreter services for ESL customers. o Emergency drills are to be conducted annually and staff is to be provided with host agency procedures. (Page 110) Title I

During program year 2016 Career Center staff will receive training to follow established procedures to ensure inclusion and programmatic accessibility to center services. This training, comprised of eight half—day sessions across the state, will allow staff to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. (Page 110) Title I

Assistive Technology services and devices are provided to eligible individuals statewide who require them. Rehabilitation technology and assistive technology services are sponsored and provided to the degree necessary to complete the rehabilitation program. Included are services and devices which can supplement and enhance an individual’s functions such as adapted computer access, augmentative communication, specialized seating and mobility, vehicle modifications, and services which can have an impact on the environment, such as accessibility, job re-design, work site modification and residence modification. Application of the available engineering and assistive technology services and technologies is important when making determinations of eligibility particularly for individuals with significant and most significant disabilities. Rehabilitation engineering evaluations and services are not subject to an individual’s financial eligibility; however, devices, equipment and modifications recommended by the engineer are subject to financial eligibility. (Page 179) Title I

E. The Department of Health and Human Services through the DSB will provide technical consultation and assistance to both the LEA and to the DPI regarding the accessibility of hardware and software for use by students with visual impairments, modifications that can be made to better facilitate the education and vocational rehabilitation of students with visual impairments. Orientation and mobility services for students will be addressed on a student-by-student basis at the local level. (Page 293) Title IV

Veterans

The Department of Commerce provides a Veteran Services Program across the state to assist veterans with employment. The Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) assist veterans with overcoming barriers through intensive, targeted services. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVERs) reach out to employers to advocate for hiring Veterans. Recent changes to the federal policies concerning the roles of these staff that serve veterans have been made to ensure that eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive the best combination of services, according to their needs. The agency determined that to accomplish this refocusing, Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists will serve only those veterans and eligible spouses most in need of the intensive services to address significant barriers to employment. As a result, DVOP specialists will serve fewer veterans and eligible spouses, but will be able to provide more intensive services. The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers):

o disabilities;

o homelessness;

o unemployed for at least 27 weeks;

o criminal background (released within the last 12 months);

o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and

o between 18—24 years old.

Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Since 2015 DVRS has progressively increased their collaborative efforts with NCATP and other AgrAbility partners to provide assistive technologies and related services to farmers and farmworkers within the state. There have also been joint outreach efforts to Veterans with disabilities who may be interested in pursuing agriculturally-oriented occupations. (Page 180) Title I In addition, DVRS represents the agency on the “Governor’s Working Group on Service Members, Veterans, and their Families,” which is a collaborative monthly meeting that serves as a resource clearinghouse for addressing issues of returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan and other service members.

Outreach efforts between DVRS, the Veterans Administration, and other military operations have occurred to ensure that veterans and their family members are aware of services available to them through DVRS. An agreement between DVRS and Veterans Administration’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program was implemented in late 2014, which is intended to maximize mutual services for Veterans and ensure a more streamlined referrals process between the two agencies. (Page 199) Title I

Goal 4.3. DSB will identify ways by which DSB can assist veterans with disabilities to become able to obtain, maintain or regain employment. Strategy 4.3.1. DSB will meet with officials working with veterans who are visually impaired, blind or deaf blind to educate them regarding services that are available to veterans with disabilities through DSB. (Page 339) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The North Carolina Division of Vocational Services (DVRS) has developed a cooperative agreement with both NC Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and NC Division of Medical Assistance (DMA) for the purpose of establishing cooperative guidelines to ensure individuals with disabilities have equal access to employment services, a continuum of employment services, and independent community living. The relationship among the divisions continues to improve services for both individuals with mental illness and substance abuse disorders and individuals with developmental disabilities has been enhanced over the past several years through changes in personnel at DMHDDSAS as well as a change in their focus towards a recovery oriented system of care which incorporates employment as a goal for consumers. Due to continuously changing staff, ongoing efforts are required to maintain an effective working relationship between both divisions. (Page 196) Title I

DMHDDSA has also developed a state definition for supported employment and long term vocational support using the IPS model of supported employment as well as increased the hourly rate to meet the needs of the providers. North Carolina’s definition calls for the inclusion of Peer Support Services as a mandatory service available to individuals with services paid through funds from the local management entity. Through this definition, if an individual with mental health disabilities chooses DVRS as their supported employment provider and the person is served through the Local Management Entity/Managed Care Organization (LME/MCO) system, they will be able to receive long term vocational supports (LTVS). Each VR office will have a liaison specifically for those CRP agencies providing IPS model of SE. (Page 197) Title I

DVRS continues to partner with the DMHDDSAS in implementing individual placement and support supported employment (IPS SE) throughout the state. Currently, there are 35 IPS SE programs throughout the state and DVRS contracts with 13 of them. DVRS offers such programs the opportunity to apply to become and IPS contractor through an ongoing RFA. DVRS also works alongside the DMHDDSAS and the University of NC Chapel Hill Institute for Best Practices staff to conduct onsite fidelity reviews of the IPS SE programs, training of IPS Teams, including DVRS field staff, statewide IPS learning collaborative, provider steering committees, monthly calls with the Rockville Institute (formerly the Dartmouth Supported Employment Center), as well as the annual IPS SE Rockville Institute’s Learning Collaborative. DVRS also works with DMHDDSAS to inform providers and beneficiaries on the impact of employment on federal and state benefits and have collaborated in efforts to increase capacity of benefits counseling experts in the state. (Page 204) Title IV

• The development of effective collaborative efforts with the NC DHHS-Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) to provide consistent funding for extended supported employment addressed the need for VR Program participants to receive follow-along services, even after their case was successfully closed. (Page 235) Title IV

The North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) is partnering with the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and other divisions and departments in developing competitive, integrated employment opportunities. DVRS establishes and maintains contracts or agreements with over 120 private for profit and non-profit VR service providers providing an array of services to DVRS consumers. One hundred two (102) private-non-profit VR service providers have established performance-based contracts with the Division, where the organizations are administered funds when an individual receiving services within their program has achieved designated goals or "milestones" on their way toward their ultimate goal of competitive employment. Almost all supported employment and work adjustment services provided through community rehabilitation programs were transitioned from a fee for services hourly rate payment system to a milestone payment system. Additionally, performance-based cooperative agreements engaging non-profit organizations encompass brain injury support services, multiple (currently 14) Project SEARCH™ sites and the provision of Pre Employment Transition Services. This system and its implementation were developed in collaboration with the community rehabilitation provider community through representation via the CRP-DVRS steering subcommittee and other means of stakeholder input. (Page 245) Title IV

DSB has reached out to the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services to begin discussions regarding how our agencies might work together to better serve the needs of North Carolinians with multiple disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

Medicaid Managed Care Policy Paper North Carolina’s Design for State-Funded Services Under Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 12/30/2019

“This policy paper details the Department’s vision for the delivery of State-funded behavioral health, iintellectual and developmental disability (I/DD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) services I/DD, as well as the continuation of critical “local health functions” under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and covers the following areas:

Provision of State-funded Services under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans, including eligibility, available services, care management, provider networks, and handling of complaints and appeals; Continuing the TCLI principles through Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and extending the functions of in-reach, transition, and diversion to additional populations; Engagement and coordination of local health functions in the context of Medicaid Transformation; and Accountability for State-funded Services, TCLI functions, and local health functions.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

2019 NC APSE Fall Conference - 10/09/2019

~~“Conference Theme: Turning the Page

The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers.Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for national certification and IPS ongoing trainings.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “Left behind” population, specifically hourly wage workers in the restaurant, retail and service industries; variable income workers including farmers, fishers, foresters, the self-employed, and temporary workers; as well as traditionally underserved communities including minority groups, those with limited English proficiency, rural populations, young adults, and those who find the FFE coverage unaffordable.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are Access East (Greenville), Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (Charlotte), Council on Aging of Buncombe County (Asheville), Cumberland HealthNet (Fayetteville), and HealthNet Gaston (Gastonia). They will partner with State Unemployment Offices (NC Works), County Depts. of Social Services and Public Health, Temporary Staffing Agencies, NC Small Business and Technology Center, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations, Restaurant associations, artist groups, seasonal workforce trades, and other hourly/low-wage industries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mark Van ArnamPhone: (704) 785-0839Email: markv@legalaidnc.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CAP/DA Renewal (3.5) - 07/01/2019

~~“Habilitation Services.The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services. Services for Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness.The state assures that federal financial participation (FFP) will not be claimed in expenditures for waiver services including, but not limited to, day treatment or partial hospitalization, psychosocial rehabilitation services, and clinic services provided as home and community-based services to individuals with chronic mental illnesses if these individuals, in the absence of a waiver, would be placed in an IMD and are: (1) age22 to 64; (2) age 65 and older and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR §440.140; or(3) age 21 and under and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR § 440.160.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities - 06/22/2019

~~“Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1)Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;(2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes—

(i)Instruction;(ii)Related services;(iii)Community experiences;(iv)The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and(v)If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

(b)Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Eligible Training Provider Guidelines - 06/17/2019

~~“WIOA  seeks  to  promote  a  training  environment  that  fosters  customer  choice, performance  accountability  and  continuous  improvement  in  the  attainment  of skills,  credentials,  certificates,  and  diplomas  that  lead  to  employment  in occupations in demand in the local economy. Such an environment will enhance quality of  life  for  customers.  WIOA sets   forth  the  requirements  and  general processes by which training providers and programs can be included on the state Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) by validating that all listed providers and their programs meet minimum state standards.Action: Effective immediately, Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) should utilize the attached guidelines in the review and approval of training providers and their programs of study. In addition, all WDBs should create or update existing policy to ensure compliance with this policy statement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

North Carolina’s Care Management Strategy for Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 05/29/2019

~~“"The first priority of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (the Department) is the health and well-being of the individuals we serve. As North Carolina transitions its Medicaid and NC Health Choice programs from a predominantly fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system to managed care, the Department is focused on building robust and effective models for managing beneficiaries’ comprehensive needs through care management. Over a five-year period, the majority of Medicaid and NC Health Choice beneficiaries will transition to one of two types of prepaid health plans (PHPs), customized to the populations they serve.  More about Medicaid plans can be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina for Military Employment - 05/26/2019

~~“Between 2015 and 2018, 78,000 service members will transition out of the military through NC’s DoD installations, adding strength to the 778,000 veterans already living in North Carolina. North Carolina’s businesses strive to support these veterans and service members by leveraging their skills to fill critical talent requirements, but often lack the resources needed to identify and hire qualified military candidates.Solution: North Carolina for Military Employment (NC4ME) is a comprehensive public-private partnership designed to make NC the number one state for military employment. Established by the Governor in 2015, NC4ME leverages existing workforce development resources and technology to implement an employer-centric strategy that:• Educates NC’s business leaders on the value of hiring a military workforce,• Shows small businesses and human resource professionals how to hire military personnel, and• Connects military talent to open jobs, education, and training opportunities in North Carolina.” 

Systems
  • Other

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (MCOs)These organizations (currently Trillium Health Resources, Cardinal Innovations, Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Vaya Health, Partners Behavioral Health, Sandhills Center, and Eastpointe) manage both state-funded and Medicaid-funded behavioral health services under contracts with DHHS. Included in the services they manage are employment training services such as Adult Developmental Vocational Program (ADVP), Supported Employment (SE), Long-Term Vocational Supports (LTVS), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS). SE, LTVS, and IPS are community-based services and have varying eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“In 2019, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) and Disability Rights North Carolina signed a memorandum of understanding to phase out the use of segregated work adjustment training in the Vocational Rehabilitation program by October 1, 2021, with the specific and mutual goals of advancing integrated work training and competitive integrated employment for per-sons with disabilities. This commitment is a significant step taken by the State towards improving the employment outcomes of people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities - 04/01/2019

~~“An effort 10 years in the making came to fruition when the North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) witnessed Governor Roy Cooper sign an Executive Order declaring North Carolina as an “Employment First” state.  For North Carolinians, this means that gainful employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome of publicly-funded services for all citizens with disabilities - regardless of disability – in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations to achieve and maintain employment.

The expectations of an Employment First state are to emphasize the importance of employment services focusing on skills and an individual’s goals and contributions. It does not mean that employment is the only outcome for all; rather, that employment is the expectation, not the exception.

Congratulations, North Carolina, and hats off to those who worked hard to make us an Employment First State!

And this month, Governor Roy Cooper appointed new members to NCCDD, and we cannot wait to work with them as we keep moving forward towards achieving our Five Year Plan goals.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

House Bill 984 Oversight IDD Employment/Education Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“AN ACT TO CREATE A POSITION WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 3 HUMAN SERVICES TO OVERSEE ADMINISTRATION AND COORDINATION OF 4 EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH 5 INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, AS RECOMMENDED BY 6 THE LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION COMMITTEE ON INTELLECTUAL 7 AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES.

Establishment of the Position. – There is established within the Department of Health 14 and Human Services the position of Director of Education and Employment Opportunities for 15 Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Director shall have 16 professional, administrative, technical, and clerical personnel as may be necessary to assist in 17 carrying out his or her duties. The Director shall oversee the interagency coordination of 18 education and employment programs and services for individuals with intellectual and 19 developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No, 92: Employment First for North Carolinians with Disabilities - 03/29/2019

Employment First is the policy of State Agencies.  This policy reflects the state's goals to be a leader in reruitintg workers with disabilities and to create an inclusive job climate for workers with disabilities. Competitive, integrated employment is the preferred mode of employment for all North Carolinians with disabilities regardless of level of disabiity.  North Carolinianswith disabilities should be ablle to work a job of their choosihg, with reasonable support and accomodations provide to achieve and maintain employment

Employment First principles will apply to all indviduals with intellectual and developmental, physical, sensory, mental health, and substance use disorder disabilities ..

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Medicaid Managed Care Policy Paper North Carolina’s Design for State-Funded Services Under Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 12/30/2019

“This policy paper details the Department’s vision for the delivery of State-funded behavioral health, iintellectual and developmental disability (I/DD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) services I/DD, as well as the continuation of critical “local health functions” under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and covers the following areas:

Provision of State-funded Services under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans, including eligibility, available services, care management, provider networks, and handling of complaints and appeals; Continuing the TCLI principles through Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and extending the functions of in-reach, transition, and diversion to additional populations; Engagement and coordination of local health functions in the context of Medicaid Transformation; and Accountability for State-funded Services, TCLI functions, and local health functions.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities - 06/22/2019

~~“Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1)Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;(2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes—

(i)Instruction;(ii)Related services;(iii)Community experiences;(iv)The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and(v)If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

(b)Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Eligible Training Provider Guidelines - 06/17/2019

~~“WIOA  seeks  to  promote  a  training  environment  that  fosters  customer  choice, performance  accountability  and  continuous  improvement  in  the  attainment  of skills,  credentials,  certificates,  and  diplomas  that  lead  to  employment  in occupations in demand in the local economy. Such an environment will enhance quality of  life  for  customers.  WIOA sets   forth  the  requirements  and  general processes by which training providers and programs can be included on the state Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) by validating that all listed providers and their programs meet minimum state standards.Action: Effective immediately, Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) should utilize the attached guidelines in the review and approval of training providers and their programs of study. In addition, all WDBs should create or update existing policy to ensure compliance with this policy statement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“In 2019, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) and Disability Rights North Carolina signed a memorandum of understanding to phase out the use of segregated work adjustment training in the Vocational Rehabilitation program by October 1, 2021, with the specific and mutual goals of advancing integrated work training and competitive integrated employment for per-sons with disabilities. This commitment is a significant step taken by the State towards improving the employment outcomes of people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Analysis of NC 2-1-1 No Wrong Door Callers - 05/04/2019

~~“Findings suggest that many older adults and people with disabilities in North Carolina face daily struggles to meet their most basic needs, such as housing, food, and utilities. Unmet basic needs can result in a need for higher levels of care, including long-term supports and services. Additional follow-up and analysis of callers’ needs would allow analysts to determine whether the assistance provided through NC 2-1-1 for basic needs has an impact on the ability of No Wrong Door callers to access additional services, particularly long-term supports and services.”

Systems
  • Other

Veteran’s Preference - 04/09/2019

~~“State law requires that employment preference be given for having served in the Armed Forces  of  the  United  States  on  active  duty  (for  reasons  other  than  training)  during periods of war or any other campaign, expedition, or engagement for which a campaign badge or medal is authorized by the United States Department of Defense. The  preference  to  be  accorded  eligible  veterans  shall  apply  in  initial  employment,  subsequent employment, promotions, reassignments, horizontal transfers and reduction-in-force situations”

Systems
  • Other

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) for AMH/ASAYP630 - 01/07/2019

~~“…agencies providing IPS should integrate Employment First practices into their policies, procedures, and agency mission and values. Employment First principles include that competitive employment is the first and preferred outcome for individuals with mental health and co-occurring diagnoses, that employment opportunities are integrated in the community, pay at least minimum wage, and are not set aside jobs for individuals with disabilities. Agencies shall ensure that IPS-service information is evident through marketing flyers and posters in lobbies and service areas. The agency as a whole tracks employment as an outcome for all individuals served within the Agency, not just within the IPS team.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans - 11/06/2018

~~“The NCWorks Veterans Portal is part of Governor Cooper’s NC Job Ready strategy to prepare North Carolinians for the jobs of today and tomorrow. NC Job Ready has three core principles: skills and education attainment, employer leadership to remain relevant to evolving industry needs, and local innovation to take great ideas and apply them statewide.

The NCWorks Veterans Portal features tabs that provide quick access to employment services, job fairs, education/training options, helpful tips and other resources. The portal incorporates veterans’ Military Occupation Codes in an easy-to-use job search tool so that users can find job postings that match their prior experience and training from any of the five branches of the armed services. Veterans who already have NCWorks Online accounts will use those same login credentials on this new portal. The site also helps veterans find their nearest NCWorks Career Center, where they can access free services in person and talk with professionals who specialize in helping veterans. In addition, a tab for employers helps businesses recruit candidates with military experience.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

NCWorks Veterans Portal - 10/24/2018

~~“Home to nearly 800,000 veterans and several major military installations, North Carolina has a distinguished history in serving the U.S. military veterans, and their families. This collection of resources provides services for veterans, transitioning service members, and eligible spouses to obtain employment.”

Systems
  • Other

Exceptional Children - 10/15/2018

~~“The mission of the Exceptional Children Division is to ensure that students with disabilities develop intellectually, physically, emotionally, and vocationally through the provision of an appropriate individualized education program in the least restrictive environment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

North Carolina for Military Employment - 05/26/2019

~~“Between 2015 and 2018, 78,000 service members will transition out of the military through NC’s DoD installations, adding strength to the 778,000 veterans already living in North Carolina. North Carolina’s businesses strive to support these veterans and service members by leveraging their skills to fill critical talent requirements, but often lack the resources needed to identify and hire qualified military candidates.Solution: North Carolina for Military Employment (NC4ME) is a comprehensive public-private partnership designed to make NC the number one state for military employment. Established by the Governor in 2015, NC4ME leverages existing workforce development resources and technology to implement an employer-centric strategy that:• Educates NC’s business leaders on the value of hiring a military workforce,• Shows small businesses and human resource professionals how to hire military personnel, and• Connects military talent to open jobs, education, and training opportunities in North Carolina.” 

Systems
  • Other

NC Department of Commerce Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser Act and Agricultural Outreach Plan Program Years 2012-2017 - 07/01/2012

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

~~“Our VisionChildren, youth and families are healthy, safe and successful at home, in school and in their communities…..

The Youth in Transition sub-committee is currently transitioning to a Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Young Adults in Transition. More information to come.Meetings: 4th Thursday 11 am to 3 pm at 2400 Perimeter Park Dr. MorrisvilleCo-Chairs: Kristen Hassmiller Lich & Amy HorganContact: nccoptransition@gmail.com  

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disability:IN North Carolina

~~“Disability:IN includes a network of over 160 corporations devoted to expanding opportunities for people with disabilities across enterprises.

Visit www.disabilityin.org  to see the programs and services that are offered nationally and internationally by Disability:IN.  Disability:IN North Carolina is one of 50 affiliates that provide a collective voice of positive change for people with disabilities in business. Disability:IN North Carolina provides a collective voice for groups of business leaders, human resource executives, supply chain and other professionals to join forces to increase disability inclusion and equality.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Community Rehabilitation Services

~~“Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) offer a range of employment-related and support services to Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) consumers with specialized needs.We directly administer two CRPs:WorkSource East in Goldsboro and WorkSource West in Morganton.Services include:• Vocational evaluation• Community-based assessment• Job development• Job coachingIndividual or group-supported employment and work-adjustment activities are designed to improve:• Work skills• Work behaviors• Emotional/physical tolerancesWe can extend services to people with disabilities through partnerships with independent community rehabilitation programs across the state." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Education Savings Account Program - 01/01/2018

“Expands school choice for eligible students with disabilities in kindergarten through 12th grade.

− For students attending a registered nonpublic school or home school

− For tuition and required fees and certain other expenses related to educating a child with a disability

− Allows parents quarterly access to funds on a debit card (subject to program requirements)”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 NC APSE Fall Conference - 10/09/2019

~~“Conference Theme: Turning the Page

The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers.Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for national certification and IPS ongoing trainings.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “Left behind” population, specifically hourly wage workers in the restaurant, retail and service industries; variable income workers including farmers, fishers, foresters, the self-employed, and temporary workers; as well as traditionally underserved communities including minority groups, those with limited English proficiency, rural populations, young adults, and those who find the FFE coverage unaffordable.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are Access East (Greenville), Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (Charlotte), Council on Aging of Buncombe County (Asheville), Cumberland HealthNet (Fayetteville), and HealthNet Gaston (Gastonia). They will partner with State Unemployment Offices (NC Works), County Depts. of Social Services and Public Health, Temporary Staffing Agencies, NC Small Business and Technology Center, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations, Restaurant associations, artist groups, seasonal workforce trades, and other hourly/low-wage industries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mark Van ArnamPhone: (704) 785-0839Email: markv@legalaidnc.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (MCOs)These organizations (currently Trillium Health Resources, Cardinal Innovations, Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Vaya Health, Partners Behavioral Health, Sandhills Center, and Eastpointe) manage both state-funded and Medicaid-funded behavioral health services under contracts with DHHS. Included in the services they manage are employment training services such as Adult Developmental Vocational Program (ADVP), Supported Employment (SE), Long-Term Vocational Supports (LTVS), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS). SE, LTVS, and IPS are community-based services and have varying eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Signature Employment Grant - 01/01/2019

~~“Supporting innovative solutions with potential for public or private replication. Success is ideas that spark new models to increase employment for people with disabilities. For our 2019 grant request for proposals, we have a special interest in projects that use benefit planning, workforce incentives, and part-time employment to help people with disabilities obtain employment or re-enter the job market following injury.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Signature Employment Grant - 01/01/2018

~~“Supporting innovative solutions with potential for public or private replication. Success is ideas that spark new models to increase employment for people with disabilities. For our 2019 grant request for proposals, we have a special interest in projects that use benefit planning, workforce incentives, and part-time employment to help people with disabilities obtain employment or re-enter the job market following injury.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE White Papers and Conference Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Whole Foods Market to Pay $65,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Suit - 11/08/2018

~~“Whole Foods Market Group, Inc.,  doing business as Whole Foods Market, headquartered in Austin, Texas, will pay  $65,000 and provide other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit  brought by the U.S. Equal Employment  Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.  The EEOC had charged that Whole Foods Market  violated federal law by failing to accommodate and firing an employee because  of her disability.   

According  to the EEOC's lawsuit, Whole Foods hired Diane Butler in 2005 as a cashier for  a facility in Raleigh, N.C. Butler has polycystic kidney disease, a genetic  disease causing uncontrolled growth of cysts in the kidney, eventually leading  to kidney failure. In 2009, while working for Whole Foods, Butler had a kidney  transplant. The EEOC said that in December 2015, Butler missed work on two  occasions because she had been hospitalized and needed to visit the doctor  because of her kidney. The EEOC further alleged that although Butler informed  Whole Foods that she needed time off due to her kidney impairment, the company  nonetheless fired Butler because of her absences.

Such  alleged conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which  protects employees from discrimination based on a disability and requires  employers to provide employees with disabilities with reasonable accommodations  unless it would be an undue hardship.”

Systems
  • Other

DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative".   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

CAP/DA Renewal (3.5) - 07/01/2019

~~“Habilitation Services.The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services. Services for Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness.The state assures that federal financial participation (FFP) will not be claimed in expenditures for waiver services including, but not limited to, day treatment or partial hospitalization, psychosocial rehabilitation services, and clinic services provided as home and community-based services to individuals with chronic mental illnesses if these individuals, in the absence of a waiver, would be placed in an IMD and are: (1) age22 to 64; (2) age 65 and older and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR §440.140; or(3) age 21 and under and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR § 440.160.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina’s Care Management Strategy for Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 05/29/2019

~~“"The first priority of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (the Department) is the health and well-being of the individuals we serve. As North Carolina transitions its Medicaid and NC Health Choice programs from a predominantly fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system to managed care, the Department is focused on building robust and effective models for managing beneficiaries’ comprehensive needs through care management. Over a five-year period, the majority of Medicaid and NC Health Choice beneficiaries will transition to one of two types of prepaid health plans (PHPs), customized to the populations they serve.  More about Medicaid plans can be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina’s Medicaid Managed Care Quality Strategy - 04/18/2019

~~“This Quality Strategy focuses on measuring quality performance and outcomes in the early years of managed care, affecting the populations that will transition to managed care immediately (outlined above); it will expand to capture additional populations asthey are brought into managed care over time. During the transition, North Carolina will continue to operate LME-MCOs, which will provide behavioral health and I/DD services to populations excluded or delayed from mandatory enrollment in PHPs at launch. LME-MCOs will continue to administer the Innovations and TBI waivers, and the fee-for-service Medicaid program will continue to run the CAP/C and CAP/DA waivers. During this time of transition, the quality measures and requirements for each of these special programs and for LME-MCOs will remain in place, and all State Medicaid programs will be focused on the unifying Aims outlined in the section that follows.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Original Base Waiver Number: NC.0423 Draft ID:NC.025.03.00 - 01/01/2019

~~“This waiver is requested in order to provide home and community-based waiver services to individuals who, but for the provision of such services, would require the following level(s) of care, the costs of which would be reimbursed under the approved Medicaid State plan… intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) (as defined in 42 CFR §440.150)”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina Receives 1115 Waiver Approval, a Major Milestone for Medicaid and NC Health Care System - 10/24/2018

~~“North Carolina today received federal approval to implement the transition to Medicaid managed care and integrate physical health, behavioral health and pharmacy benefits. Receiving approval from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) of the amended 1115 Demonstration Waiver application submitted by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services in 2017 is a major milestone in implementing North Carolina’s Medicaid Transformation and in moving the state’s health care system toward further integration and coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Transformation and the 1115 Waiver - 04/26/2017

~~This is a Power Point Presentation from the “NC Tide Spring Conference’.  It has information on the current “Medicaid Landscape’ both across the country and specifically in North Carolina.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Managed Care in North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
10,488,084
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
680,459
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.42%
Change from
2018 to 2019
243,128
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.48%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.73%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.28%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.41%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 10,273,419 10,383,620 10,488,084
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 689,612 680,863 680,459
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 232,875 239,666 243,128
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,225,322 4,291,999 4,334,273
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.77% 35.20% 35.73%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.01% 77.19% 77.41%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60% 3.90% 3.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.80% 20.60% 20.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70% 13.10% 12.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 648,579 652,890 647,620
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 694,716 698,279 711,905
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 955,491 956,190 959,032
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 308,091 305,180 307,957
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 56,263 63,100 62,411
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 20,228 23,213 23,544
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,896 14,367 19,790
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,039 457
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 28,046 34,276 29,862
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 17,154 16,904 18,883

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 8,592 9,023 9,206
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 4.20% 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 320,583 314,113 311,730

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,386 19,475 22,773
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 91,748 65,153 68,579
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 104,082 73,708 77,889
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.60% 26.40% 29.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.10% 8.30% 6.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,946 5,216 4,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,395 15,318 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.15 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 90 1,062 1,644
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 49 389 700
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00% 37.00% 43.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.50 3.87 6.97

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 28.00% 25.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,507 11,525 11,562
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 471,750 467,320 466,920
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,186 1,234 1,301
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,194 1,482 1,433

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,029,000 $19,469,121 $21,556,297
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,307,000 $15,979,861 $12,386,109
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $122,559,000 $125,470,761 $124,881,442
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $188,651,000 $213,112,906 $319,889,110
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 15.00% 18.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 12,766 9,750 10,272
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,486 2,435 2,176
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 6,120 6,187 6,415
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.60 29.36 30.42

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.78% 66.80% 66.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.87% 13.98% 14.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.89% 1.89% 1.81%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.14% 85.35% 85.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.39% 27.27% 27.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.73% 62.51% 62.83%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.98% 78.14% 77.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.34% 35.24% 35.82%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 45 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 3 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 49 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,000 2,573 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 452 511 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,453 3,085 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

The continued growth of the statewide network of supported employment service providers has resulted from collaboration between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services and entities such as the North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities, the North Carolina International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services, NCCDD and the Mental Health Consumers’ Organization. In addition, the North Carolina Association for Persons Supporting Employment First (NCAPSE) provides a forum for focusing on supported employment standards and expanded choices for individuals with the most significant disabilities in the state. (Page 198) Title I

Customized Employment

~~In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The DVRS VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because DVRS will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to DVRS when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools DVRS utilizes for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through it’s continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DVRS will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Services for the Blind (DSB) VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because the DSB VR program will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to the Division when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools utilized for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through its continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DSB will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 328- 329) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

School to Work Transition

~~DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the Spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 183) Title I

Finally, DVRS casework policies require that transition services must promote or facilitate the achievement of the employment outcome identified in the student’s individualized plan for employment. In order to plan effectively for the transition needs of students with disabilities in collaboration with other agencies and organizations, DVRS rehabilitation counselors are expected to be active participants addressing the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting transition issues when possible. Counselors are expected to participate both directly in IEP meetings and indirectly by other means in planning for the needs of VR consumers. A copy of the transition portion of the IEP is required to be maintained in the case record. Prior to developing the IPE, the VR counselor reviews the Individual Transition Plan (ITP) component for the Individual Education Plan and records any relevant ITP objectives as part of the IPE. The intent of this review is to coordinate educational programming and vocational programming for the benefit of the VR consumer. (Page 185) Title I

Additionally, the Division’s policy stipulates that the development of the IPE with a student must be based on interests, aptitudes, capabilities, strengths and informed choice. The job choice on the IPE for a student in transition may indicate a family of jobs rather than a specific job code, for example, Health Care Worker, Office Work, and Protective Services such as police, firefighter, or security guard. DVRS policy does require career exploration to be provided and documented in order to determine a more specific goal, and this process and expectation has been further emphasized by recent policy revisions concerning development of the IPE within 90 days of the VR eligibility determination. Amended job choices, including amendments at closure, must be accompanied by documentation reflecting the process and services that had an impact on the final job choice, including job shadowing, job sampling, guidance and counseling. Moreover, DVRS casework policy stipulates that the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment must be completed as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, by the time each student determined to be eligible for VR services leaves the school setting. This includes students with disabilities who are eligible for VR services including eligible students served by the school under an IEP.(Page 185) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school.

Within the current formal interagency agreement between DVRS and DPI, mutual interagency responsibilities include:
• Mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities.
• Designation of an individual from Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions to serve as liaison with each other to represent the services of the two agencies.
• Exchange of information deemed pertinent and of mutual concern regarding service delivery.
• Interagency cooperation in transition planning for students with disabilities.
• A mutual system to be developed and maintained to ensure that appropriate referrals are made to each party. (Page 186) Title I

The current interagency agreement between DVRS and the state education agency stipulates that transition planning for students with disabilities will be a cooperative effort. Furthermore, the agreements specifically require mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities. The sharing of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) at the local level is strongly encouraged. DVRS VR counselors are required to review a student’s transition component of the IEP and incorporate, as appropriate, a description of relevant objectives in the IPE. Furthermore, a comprehensive evaluation will be completed by the State agency on each eligible individual, to the degree necessary, to determine the vocational goal and scope of VR services to be included in the IPE. The agreements state that the student with the disability is expected to fully participate in the development of the plan and any plan amendments. The agreements specify that the DVRS VR counselors will provide the individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. Additionally, the agreement requires that the VR counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. (Page 189) Title I

As part of the agreement, DVRS Rehabilitation Counselors will provide individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. The counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. The VR counselor will provide each eligible individual an IPE Handbook wherein there is an appeals process outlined. Information pertaining to the Client Assistance Program (CAP) is included in the handbook. The VR counselor agrees not to close an individual’s record as having achieved a successful employment outcome until the person exits school and is determined that the individual has successfully completed the IPE. (Page 190-191) Title I

On—going support provided during extended services must include a minimum of twice—monthly monitoring at the work site to assess job stability unless under special circumstances, especially at the request of the individual, the IPE provides for off—site monitoring and based upon that assessment, the coordination or provision of specific services at or away from the work site, that are needed to maintain employment stability. If off—site monitoring is determined to be appropriate, it must, at a minimum, consist of two (2) face—to—face meetings with the client and one employer contact monthly. These activities apply to all supported employment clients and not only those whose services are provided through funds reserved pursuant to section 603(d), for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

Currently, NC’s Capacity Building Plan is focused on improving student involvement in the individualized education program (IEP) process so that planning is more meaningful and associated with a student’s post-school goals. The state is continuing to work on a Transition Toolkit for teachers and anticipates the development of toolkits for parents, students, and agencies that will be individualized at the local level. DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 250) Title IV

DSB currently offers a wide variety of services to students with visual impairments or blindness in transition to the world of work. Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor. The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. A formal cooperative agreement exists with the NC Department of Public Instruction, which consists of 115 local education agencies (LEA’s), 128 charter schools, 1 regional school and 2 education entities. The emphasis of the Memorandum of Agreement with DPI is on students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired, being served by local education agencies (LEA’s) and the schools who are of transition age (14 to 21) and who need VR services to become employed. This agreement acknowledges the role of DSB in providing these services and encourages local LEA’s and schools to develop working relationships with the staff who cover their corresponding areas and encourages referring students, sharing information and facilitating joint involvement in IEP meetings. DSB shares information about the transition program and provides technical assistance and consultation to DPI, LEA’s, and schools regarding accommodations and assistive technology that will help facilitate the education and VR of students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired. (Page 289) Title IV

Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor (this is not required for the receipt of Pre-Employment Transition Services). The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. (Page 291) Title IV

DSB has also enlarged the transition rehabilitation services presently offered for students 14-21 years of age in North Carolina who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired by adding specific Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS): (1) Student Counseling on Transition/Higher Ed Training Opportunities- Required Student Workplace Readiness Training; (2) Student Self-Advocacy Training; (3) Student Job Exploration Counseling; (4) Student Job Exploration Counseling Materials; and Student Work Based Learning Experience Maintenance. These services are provided to all students with visual impairments, blindness, or deaf-blindness whether they are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 294) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~North Carolina has a strong career pathway strategy in place that expanded on the work done over the last decade by the K-12 and community college systems. The current strategy includes a certification process by the NCWorks Commission that requires eight key element be in place to ensure pathways are comprehensive with multiple entry and exit ramps for in-demand occupations. Specific strategies to continue to strengthen and use career pathways are listed below.
o Continue to support and promote the development of NCWorks Certified Career Pathways for critical industry clusters.
o Require workforce development partners use the career pathways to target resources towards helping individuals gain the skills and experience needed for in-demand occupations. 
o Provide programs that link low-skilled adults and individuals with barriers to employment to career pathways and job-ready skills along with basic skills. (Page 36) Title I

Support collaborative efforts under the vocational rehabilitation program to provide individuals with disabilities the rehabilitative services, training, and supports needed to obtain or maintain employment, including utilization of career pathways. 
The vocational rehabilitation programs will incorporate, to the maximum extent possible, career pathways within their services to individuals with disabilities through approaches to include increase emphasis and reference of career pathways during comprehensive assessment of individuals’ skills, interests and aptitudes and during counseling and guidance sessions with individuals. 
Program leadership will promote to staff and service recipients the use of established resources highlighting information about career pathways and in-demand occupations; increase emphasis on established career pathways and career growth when developing employment goals and individualized plans for employment with services and training that directly support the employment objectives; remain actively engaged with workforce partners in the collaborative development of career pathways and identify particular issues or challenges individuals with disabilities may encounter when adopting a career within an established career pathway or enhancements that may be particularly favorable for the populations served by the state’s vocational rehabilitation programs. (Page 47) Title I

OJT is a viable and compatible part of North Carolina’s Integrated Services Delivery services. Local workforce development board OJT policy is critical for consistency, institutionalizing services the local board seeks to deliver, and managing and leveraging OJT funds. Local OJT policy also provides guidance on how to comply with federal and state OJT requirements and leverage other hiring. (Page 62) Title I

DVRS staff plan to expand the role of employers in vocational evaluation and career development services. DVRS will be enhancing policies around internships and OJT services so that the service procedures are consistent with employer practices while still preparing the individual for competitive employment. DVRS plans to work towards a service definition that is complementary to other internship and OJT programs available in the state through our workforce system partners. (Page 65) Title I

Provision of Transition Services through Coordination with Employers

While youth and students with disabilities have access to the same VR services as adults, there are some VR services reserved for or targeted to transition-aged youth for the purposes of assisting them with leaving high school and preparing for competitive employment. The division plans to focus on program development in the coming year in order to meet the 15% required spending allocation for Pre- Employment Transition Services (PETS) to students with disabilities. A number of areas of program development are focused on increased engagement with employers in order to implement PETS. These include: summer internships for students and youth with disabilities including on-the-job supports, increased utilization of OJT for students and youth, and increasing the number of Project Search © sites. (Pages 65-66) Title I

DVRS will work on enhancing OJT utilization for students and youth with disabilities as well by engaging business in the development of young talent. DVRS plans to streamline OJT processes, revise policies so that they are complementary to similar OJT programs, and improve marketing and tracking materials and processes so that the materials are engaging to both student/youth participants and potential business as well as easy to complete and accessible. (Page 66) Title I

By enhancing and incorporating new programs that promote and support work-based experiences, DVRS will continue its commitment to students in pursuit of a high school diploma through the Occupational Course of Study (OCS), a pathway established by the NC Board of Education for students with IEPs to achieve a high school diploma by completing occupational coursework and work experiences. DVRS has recently revised policies for In-School Work Adjustment services to students with significant or most significant disabilities. The service is coordinated through school-based agreements to incentivize a student’s participation in school-coordinated work experiences by providing guidance and counseling as well as an incentive payment to students for improvements in work behaviors and attitudes. The Division continues to offer internship and OJT services to students, but hopes to increase utilization and improve feasibility for students, schools, and partnering businesses through policy and procedure revisions and collaboration with workforce system partners. Other PETS programs/services under consideration are intended to address students’ expectations around pursuing employment and to improve their preparedness for participating in additional rehabilitation services, such as training and placement. (Page 184) Title I

Beyond increasing consumers’ participation in career-oriented post-secondary education/training, some of the other strategies that DVRS has established under this goal are to develop and build quality relationships with businesses that offer strong salaries and benefits and to continue offering the internship services, which, compared to an OJT experience, are geared more toward individuals who have completed their specialized training and need work experience to get their careers established. This service has been very well received by staff and consumers and we expect to continue the service. Another strategy that DVRS is employing to increase the earning potential of individuals who have entrepreneurial skills is through the support the Division has made available through a dedicated Small Business Specialist on staff who helps support staff and consumers in their assessment of this option as a fit and when it is mutually determined as such, coordination of local resources and ongoing supports for the consumer pursuing this option. (Pages 251-252) Title IV

Objective 1.1.1. The total number of individuals exiting the VR program in employment will exceed that of the prior year: One of the strategies for achieving this increase is for the DVRS VR program to utilize on-the-job training (OJT) without supports. Wage subsidies for OJT are funded at a reduced amount relative to when additional funding for these services was available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and both greater utilization of OJT and number of corresponding employment outcomes through OJT was achieved. A full wage subsidy and making the process more convenient for employers would increase OJT utilization and outcomes. (Page 266-267) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers): o disabilities; o homelessness; o unemployed for at least 27 weeks; o criminal background (released within the last 12 months); o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and o between 18—24 years old. Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~A separate data file exchange process is maintained for uploading VR participant information to the SSA portal for the SSA Ticket-to-Work program. This file exchange process isn’t fully automated and is limited to establishing VR participant in-use status and eligibility for agency cost reimbursement. An interface with Department of Commerce, Division of Employment Security provides quarterly State unemployment insurance wage records and related information to establish whether a former VR participant is working at the level of substantial gainful activity for agency cost-reimbursement under the Ticket-to-Work program. (Page 83) Title I

Major service gaps or barriers DVRS experiences when fulfilling this need most generally in terms of: (a) consumers’ needs for VR services, but lack of motivation to become employed, some of which is driven by disincentives to work, including the potential loss of SSI, SSDI or other public benefits; and(b) the lack of resources, including time, additional counselor positions, and expertise required for better counseling and guidance. The lack of resources was said to be in part due to counselor vacancies, lack of support staff, and attention to non-counseling related activities, such as focusing on meeting performance measures and processing paperwork.

Recommended solutions for DVRS to increase its capacity for counseling and guidance and help further motivate consumers to enter or reenter the workforce, particularly those receiving SSI or SSDI benefits included increasing VR counseling capacity through: (a) smaller caseloads; (b) paperwork reduction; (c) a decreased focus on performance measures and increase attention to holistic counseling; (d) hiring additional counselors and support staff; and increasing the quality of VR counselors through training and higher salaries. These were said to attract and retain high quality counselors and allow the counselors more one-on-one time with the consumer to provide counseling and guidance, including motivational counseling. The most frequently mentioned solution for increasing client motivation for our consumers receiving public benefits, such as SSI or SSDI, was to increase benefits counseling services. (Page 225) Title IV

Through NC DVR's participation in the RSA- funded Technical Assistance Project "E3TC" Empower Educate Employ Targeted Communities, the need for an expansion of the certified Work Incentive and Planning Assistance (WIPA) counselors network was identified as an area where NC DVRS and NC DSB will plan to utilize innovation and expansion funds to help accomplish this during the 2018 and 2019 program years. (Page 258) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~DVRS plans to increase the quantity and improve the quality of business partnerships in the future with the expectation that an increased number and depth in business relationships will result in increased opportunities to assist individuals with disabilities with vocational evaluation and career development, job seeker preparation, and job development and job placement. DVRS plans to identify methods for capturing information on employment relationships within our case management system in order to map out the presence of business partnerships and identify opportunities for growth and means for leveraging peer-to-peer marketing of VR business services.  (Page 65) Title I

DVRS will continue to explore unique business partnerships that benefit the unique training and recruitment needs of students and youth with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities. DVRS plans to continue partnering on Project Search © sites where there is a need and willingness by community partners. This model places business in the middle of the training and employment of young people by hosting student interns at the business and seeking placement opportunities within the business where they may exist. Project Search © host businesses can not only support the students enrolled in projects on their site, but can also be business advocates for people with disabilities in their industries. (Page 66) Title I

The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

With regard to the need for more employers to hire and accommodate people with disabilities, barriers included: (a) lack of funding to educate business on the hidden workforce available; and (b) lack of employer knowledge of available accommodations that can be made. Solutions proposed included: (a) continued partnerships with agencies that specialize in providing services for individuals with disabilities; and (b) for other workforce agencies to train staff, educate employers, and promote hiring of individuals with disabilities to employers. With regard to the need for transportation and other Support Services, the barrier was mainly limited funding and lack of coordination. The proposed solutions were to leverage additional funding sources and improve coordination of services. Lastly, the barrier regarding the need for training and resources related to assistive technology for NCWorks Career Centers was a lack of funding and the solution proposed was to leverage resources to purchase, build infrastructure, and install technology that assist individuals with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV

Data Collection

In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The Education Opportunities for Students with Disabilities report to the North Carolina General Assembly for 2016 establishes WIOA as foundational federal legislation upon which the state policies and practices concerning system needs are established and aligned. Specific elements of the Unified State Plan and Opportunities Act that have been incorporated include the earmarked Title IV funding, representing roughly $16 million, for pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities who are eligible or ‘potentially eligible’ for the VR program; the restrictions on subminimum wage employment so that individuals with even the most significant disabilities are encouraged and permitted to pursue competitive integrated employment; the expansion of the triennial statewide comprehensive needs assessment under Title IV to focus on the vocational rehabilitation needs of youth with disabilities; and performance measures aligned with the WIOA Performance Accountability measures for youth as statewide indicators of North Carolina’s success. (Page 52) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school. (Page 186) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Cooperative agreements or memorandum of agreements have been established with all local area workforce boards. The agreements provide for the following strategies:  Provision of inter-component staff training and technical assistance with regard to the availability and benefits of, and information on eligibility standards for vocational rehabilitation services; and the promotion of equal, effective, and meaningful participation by individuals with disabilities receiving workforce development system services in all of the states NCWorks Career Centers in the state through the promotion of accessibility; the use of non-discriminatory policies and procedures; the provision of reasonable accommodations; auxiliary aids and services, and rehabilitation technology for persons with disabilities. (Page 57) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) currently utilizes a dual customer approach by providing services to both businesses and individuals with disabilities. The division emphasizes the definition and marketing of business services to ensure the dual customer approach is recognized and implemented. Business services include recruitment, hiring, consultation on Section 503 compliance, sensitivity/diversity training, accessibility consultation, internships, on-the-job training (OJT), education on tax incentives, and follow-up and job retention services. (Page 64) Title I

Both physical and programmatic accessibility are essential for all individuals to participate in services offered by the NCWorks Career Centers and the collaborating community partners. With employment as the ultimate objective, accessibility to facilities and programs offered as legislated by the Americans with Disabilities Act is essential to support individuals with significant barriers to employment to achieve employment. The physical accessibility of facilities is systematically addressed across the state. The State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. NCWorks Career Centers also utilize the North Carolina Department of Commerce Division of Workforce Solutions Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance Review Checklist to ensure access to the entire range of services at each location. As a part of the certification process to become an NCWorks Career Center, each site is required to obtain a letter of ADA compliance from the host agency. ADA compliance is monitored and reviewed on an annual basis by the NC Department of Commerce and the host agency. Sites are required to maintain and update accessibility as ADA regulations are revised and NCWorks Career Center Certifications are renewed. (Page 109) Title I

Career Center Certification Accessibility Criteria: o Adequate handicapped parking with compliant curb ramp(s) connected to the accessibility route into the Center(s). o Handicapped parking must be clearly marked. o Entrance and exit must be accessible and free of obstacles with appropriate signage. o Pedestrian routes inside the host agency facility must be accessible and free of obstacles. o Entrance and exit doors are required to be equipped with hardware that is usable with one hand without tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist. o Furniture inside the Center must be arranged to allow wheelchair access. o Computer and desk workstations must be wheelchair accessible. o Restrooms must be appropriately accessible. o Auxiliary aids and services must be available upon request as are interpreter services for ESL customers. o Emergency drills are to be conducted annually and staff is to be provided with host agency procedures. (Page 110) Title I

During program year 2016 Career Center staff will receive training to follow established procedures to ensure inclusion and programmatic accessibility to center services. This training, comprised of eight half—day sessions across the state, will allow staff to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. (Page 110) Title I

Assistive Technology services and devices are provided to eligible individuals statewide who require them. Rehabilitation technology and assistive technology services are sponsored and provided to the degree necessary to complete the rehabilitation program. Included are services and devices which can supplement and enhance an individual’s functions such as adapted computer access, augmentative communication, specialized seating and mobility, vehicle modifications, and services which can have an impact on the environment, such as accessibility, job re-design, work site modification and residence modification. Application of the available engineering and assistive technology services and technologies is important when making determinations of eligibility particularly for individuals with significant and most significant disabilities. Rehabilitation engineering evaluations and services are not subject to an individual’s financial eligibility; however, devices, equipment and modifications recommended by the engineer are subject to financial eligibility. (Page 179) Title I

E. The Department of Health and Human Services through the DSB will provide technical consultation and assistance to both the LEA and to the DPI regarding the accessibility of hardware and software for use by students with visual impairments, modifications that can be made to better facilitate the education and vocational rehabilitation of students with visual impairments. Orientation and mobility services for students will be addressed on a student-by-student basis at the local level. (Page 293) Title IV

Veterans

The Department of Commerce provides a Veteran Services Program across the state to assist veterans with employment. The Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) assist veterans with overcoming barriers through intensive, targeted services. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVERs) reach out to employers to advocate for hiring Veterans. Recent changes to the federal policies concerning the roles of these staff that serve veterans have been made to ensure that eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive the best combination of services, according to their needs. The agency determined that to accomplish this refocusing, Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists will serve only those veterans and eligible spouses most in need of the intensive services to address significant barriers to employment. As a result, DVOP specialists will serve fewer veterans and eligible spouses, but will be able to provide more intensive services. The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers):

o disabilities;

o homelessness;

o unemployed for at least 27 weeks;

o criminal background (released within the last 12 months);

o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and

o between 18—24 years old.

Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Since 2015 DVRS has progressively increased their collaborative efforts with NCATP and other AgrAbility partners to provide assistive technologies and related services to farmers and farmworkers within the state. There have also been joint outreach efforts to Veterans with disabilities who may be interested in pursuing agriculturally-oriented occupations. (Page 180) Title I In addition, DVRS represents the agency on the “Governor’s Working Group on Service Members, Veterans, and their Families,” which is a collaborative monthly meeting that serves as a resource clearinghouse for addressing issues of returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan and other service members.

Outreach efforts between DVRS, the Veterans Administration, and other military operations have occurred to ensure that veterans and their family members are aware of services available to them through DVRS. An agreement between DVRS and Veterans Administration’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program was implemented in late 2014, which is intended to maximize mutual services for Veterans and ensure a more streamlined referrals process between the two agencies. (Page 199) Title I

Goal 4.3. DSB will identify ways by which DSB can assist veterans with disabilities to become able to obtain, maintain or regain employment. Strategy 4.3.1. DSB will meet with officials working with veterans who are visually impaired, blind or deaf blind to educate them regarding services that are available to veterans with disabilities through DSB. (Page 339) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The North Carolina Division of Vocational Services (DVRS) has developed a cooperative agreement with both NC Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and NC Division of Medical Assistance (DMA) for the purpose of establishing cooperative guidelines to ensure individuals with disabilities have equal access to employment services, a continuum of employment services, and independent community living. The relationship among the divisions continues to improve services for both individuals with mental illness and substance abuse disorders and individuals with developmental disabilities has been enhanced over the past several years through changes in personnel at DMHDDSAS as well as a change in their focus towards a recovery oriented system of care which incorporates employment as a goal for consumers. Due to continuously changing staff, ongoing efforts are required to maintain an effective working relationship between both divisions. (Page 196) Title I

DMHDDSA has also developed a state definition for supported employment and long term vocational support using the IPS model of supported employment as well as increased the hourly rate to meet the needs of the providers. North Carolina’s definition calls for the inclusion of Peer Support Services as a mandatory service available to individuals with services paid through funds from the local management entity. Through this definition, if an individual with mental health disabilities chooses DVRS as their supported employment provider and the person is served through the Local Management Entity/Managed Care Organization (LME/MCO) system, they will be able to receive long term vocational supports (LTVS). Each VR office will have a liaison specifically for those CRP agencies providing IPS model of SE. (Page 197) Title I

DVRS continues to partner with the DMHDDSAS in implementing individual placement and support supported employment (IPS SE) throughout the state. Currently, there are 35 IPS SE programs throughout the state and DVRS contracts with 13 of them. DVRS offers such programs the opportunity to apply to become and IPS contractor through an ongoing RFA. DVRS also works alongside the DMHDDSAS and the University of NC Chapel Hill Institute for Best Practices staff to conduct onsite fidelity reviews of the IPS SE programs, training of IPS Teams, including DVRS field staff, statewide IPS learning collaborative, provider steering committees, monthly calls with the Rockville Institute (formerly the Dartmouth Supported Employment Center), as well as the annual IPS SE Rockville Institute’s Learning Collaborative. DVRS also works with DMHDDSAS to inform providers and beneficiaries on the impact of employment on federal and state benefits and have collaborated in efforts to increase capacity of benefits counseling experts in the state. (Page 204) Title IV

• The development of effective collaborative efforts with the NC DHHS-Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) to provide consistent funding for extended supported employment addressed the need for VR Program participants to receive follow-along services, even after their case was successfully closed. (Page 235) Title IV

The North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) is partnering with the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and other divisions and departments in developing competitive, integrated employment opportunities. DVRS establishes and maintains contracts or agreements with over 120 private for profit and non-profit VR service providers providing an array of services to DVRS consumers. One hundred two (102) private-non-profit VR service providers have established performance-based contracts with the Division, where the organizations are administered funds when an individual receiving services within their program has achieved designated goals or "milestones" on their way toward their ultimate goal of competitive employment. Almost all supported employment and work adjustment services provided through community rehabilitation programs were transitioned from a fee for services hourly rate payment system to a milestone payment system. Additionally, performance-based cooperative agreements engaging non-profit organizations encompass brain injury support services, multiple (currently 14) Project SEARCH™ sites and the provision of Pre Employment Transition Services. This system and its implementation were developed in collaboration with the community rehabilitation provider community through representation via the CRP-DVRS steering subcommittee and other means of stakeholder input. (Page 245) Title IV

DSB has reached out to the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services to begin discussions regarding how our agencies might work together to better serve the needs of North Carolinians with multiple disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

Medicaid Managed Care Policy Paper North Carolina’s Design for State-Funded Services Under Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 12/30/2019

“This policy paper details the Department’s vision for the delivery of State-funded behavioral health, iintellectual and developmental disability (I/DD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) services I/DD, as well as the continuation of critical “local health functions” under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and covers the following areas:

Provision of State-funded Services under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans, including eligibility, available services, care management, provider networks, and handling of complaints and appeals; Continuing the TCLI principles through Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and extending the functions of in-reach, transition, and diversion to additional populations; Engagement and coordination of local health functions in the context of Medicaid Transformation; and Accountability for State-funded Services, TCLI functions, and local health functions.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

2019 NC APSE Fall Conference - 10/09/2019

~~“Conference Theme: Turning the Page

The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers.Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for national certification and IPS ongoing trainings.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “Left behind” population, specifically hourly wage workers in the restaurant, retail and service industries; variable income workers including farmers, fishers, foresters, the self-employed, and temporary workers; as well as traditionally underserved communities including minority groups, those with limited English proficiency, rural populations, young adults, and those who find the FFE coverage unaffordable.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are Access East (Greenville), Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (Charlotte), Council on Aging of Buncombe County (Asheville), Cumberland HealthNet (Fayetteville), and HealthNet Gaston (Gastonia). They will partner with State Unemployment Offices (NC Works), County Depts. of Social Services and Public Health, Temporary Staffing Agencies, NC Small Business and Technology Center, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations, Restaurant associations, artist groups, seasonal workforce trades, and other hourly/low-wage industries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mark Van ArnamPhone: (704) 785-0839Email: markv@legalaidnc.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CAP/DA Renewal (3.5) - 07/01/2019

~~“Habilitation Services.The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services. Services for Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness.The state assures that federal financial participation (FFP) will not be claimed in expenditures for waiver services including, but not limited to, day treatment or partial hospitalization, psychosocial rehabilitation services, and clinic services provided as home and community-based services to individuals with chronic mental illnesses if these individuals, in the absence of a waiver, would be placed in an IMD and are: (1) age22 to 64; (2) age 65 and older and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR §440.140; or(3) age 21 and under and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR § 440.160.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities - 06/22/2019

~~“Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1)Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;(2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes—

(i)Instruction;(ii)Related services;(iii)Community experiences;(iv)The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and(v)If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

(b)Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Eligible Training Provider Guidelines - 06/17/2019

~~“WIOA  seeks  to  promote  a  training  environment  that  fosters  customer  choice, performance  accountability  and  continuous  improvement  in  the  attainment  of skills,  credentials,  certificates,  and  diplomas  that  lead  to  employment  in occupations in demand in the local economy. Such an environment will enhance quality of  life  for  customers.  WIOA sets   forth  the  requirements  and  general processes by which training providers and programs can be included on the state Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) by validating that all listed providers and their programs meet minimum state standards.Action: Effective immediately, Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) should utilize the attached guidelines in the review and approval of training providers and their programs of study. In addition, all WDBs should create or update existing policy to ensure compliance with this policy statement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

North Carolina’s Care Management Strategy for Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 05/29/2019

~~“"The first priority of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (the Department) is the health and well-being of the individuals we serve. As North Carolina transitions its Medicaid and NC Health Choice programs from a predominantly fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system to managed care, the Department is focused on building robust and effective models for managing beneficiaries’ comprehensive needs through care management. Over a five-year period, the majority of Medicaid and NC Health Choice beneficiaries will transition to one of two types of prepaid health plans (PHPs), customized to the populations they serve.  More about Medicaid plans can be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina for Military Employment - 05/26/2019

~~“Between 2015 and 2018, 78,000 service members will transition out of the military through NC’s DoD installations, adding strength to the 778,000 veterans already living in North Carolina. North Carolina’s businesses strive to support these veterans and service members by leveraging their skills to fill critical talent requirements, but often lack the resources needed to identify and hire qualified military candidates.Solution: North Carolina for Military Employment (NC4ME) is a comprehensive public-private partnership designed to make NC the number one state for military employment. Established by the Governor in 2015, NC4ME leverages existing workforce development resources and technology to implement an employer-centric strategy that:• Educates NC’s business leaders on the value of hiring a military workforce,• Shows small businesses and human resource professionals how to hire military personnel, and• Connects military talent to open jobs, education, and training opportunities in North Carolina.” 

Systems
  • Other

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (MCOs)These organizations (currently Trillium Health Resources, Cardinal Innovations, Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Vaya Health, Partners Behavioral Health, Sandhills Center, and Eastpointe) manage both state-funded and Medicaid-funded behavioral health services under contracts with DHHS. Included in the services they manage are employment training services such as Adult Developmental Vocational Program (ADVP), Supported Employment (SE), Long-Term Vocational Supports (LTVS), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS). SE, LTVS, and IPS are community-based services and have varying eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“In 2019, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) and Disability Rights North Carolina signed a memorandum of understanding to phase out the use of segregated work adjustment training in the Vocational Rehabilitation program by October 1, 2021, with the specific and mutual goals of advancing integrated work training and competitive integrated employment for per-sons with disabilities. This commitment is a significant step taken by the State towards improving the employment outcomes of people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities - 04/01/2019

~~“An effort 10 years in the making came to fruition when the North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) witnessed Governor Roy Cooper sign an Executive Order declaring North Carolina as an “Employment First” state.  For North Carolinians, this means that gainful employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome of publicly-funded services for all citizens with disabilities - regardless of disability – in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations to achieve and maintain employment.

The expectations of an Employment First state are to emphasize the importance of employment services focusing on skills and an individual’s goals and contributions. It does not mean that employment is the only outcome for all; rather, that employment is the expectation, not the exception.

Congratulations, North Carolina, and hats off to those who worked hard to make us an Employment First State!

And this month, Governor Roy Cooper appointed new members to NCCDD, and we cannot wait to work with them as we keep moving forward towards achieving our Five Year Plan goals.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

House Bill 984 Oversight IDD Employment/Education Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“AN ACT TO CREATE A POSITION WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 3 HUMAN SERVICES TO OVERSEE ADMINISTRATION AND COORDINATION OF 4 EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH 5 INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, AS RECOMMENDED BY 6 THE LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION COMMITTEE ON INTELLECTUAL 7 AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES.

Establishment of the Position. – There is established within the Department of Health 14 and Human Services the position of Director of Education and Employment Opportunities for 15 Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Director shall have 16 professional, administrative, technical, and clerical personnel as may be necessary to assist in 17 carrying out his or her duties. The Director shall oversee the interagency coordination of 18 education and employment programs and services for individuals with intellectual and 19 developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No, 92: Employment First for North Carolinians with Disabilities - 03/29/2019

Employment First is the policy of State Agencies.  This policy reflects the state's goals to be a leader in reruitintg workers with disabilities and to create an inclusive job climate for workers with disabilities. Competitive, integrated employment is the preferred mode of employment for all North Carolinians with disabilities regardless of level of disabiity.  North Carolinianswith disabilities should be ablle to work a job of their choosihg, with reasonable support and accomodations provide to achieve and maintain employment

Employment First principles will apply to all indviduals with intellectual and developmental, physical, sensory, mental health, and substance use disorder disabilities ..

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Medicaid Managed Care Policy Paper North Carolina’s Design for State-Funded Services Under Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 12/30/2019

“This policy paper details the Department’s vision for the delivery of State-funded behavioral health, iintellectual and developmental disability (I/DD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) services I/DD, as well as the continuation of critical “local health functions” under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and covers the following areas:

Provision of State-funded Services under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans, including eligibility, available services, care management, provider networks, and handling of complaints and appeals; Continuing the TCLI principles through Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and extending the functions of in-reach, transition, and diversion to additional populations; Engagement and coordination of local health functions in the context of Medicaid Transformation; and Accountability for State-funded Services, TCLI functions, and local health functions.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities - 06/22/2019

~~“Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1)Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;(2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes—

(i)Instruction;(ii)Related services;(iii)Community experiences;(iv)The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and(v)If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

(b)Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Eligible Training Provider Guidelines - 06/17/2019

~~“WIOA  seeks  to  promote  a  training  environment  that  fosters  customer  choice, performance  accountability  and  continuous  improvement  in  the  attainment  of skills,  credentials,  certificates,  and  diplomas  that  lead  to  employment  in occupations in demand in the local economy. Such an environment will enhance quality of  life  for  customers.  WIOA sets   forth  the  requirements  and  general processes by which training providers and programs can be included on the state Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) by validating that all listed providers and their programs meet minimum state standards.Action: Effective immediately, Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) should utilize the attached guidelines in the review and approval of training providers and their programs of study. In addition, all WDBs should create or update existing policy to ensure compliance with this policy statement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“In 2019, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) and Disability Rights North Carolina signed a memorandum of understanding to phase out the use of segregated work adjustment training in the Vocational Rehabilitation program by October 1, 2021, with the specific and mutual goals of advancing integrated work training and competitive integrated employment for per-sons with disabilities. This commitment is a significant step taken by the State towards improving the employment outcomes of people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Analysis of NC 2-1-1 No Wrong Door Callers - 05/04/2019

~~“Findings suggest that many older adults and people with disabilities in North Carolina face daily struggles to meet their most basic needs, such as housing, food, and utilities. Unmet basic needs can result in a need for higher levels of care, including long-term supports and services. Additional follow-up and analysis of callers’ needs would allow analysts to determine whether the assistance provided through NC 2-1-1 for basic needs has an impact on the ability of No Wrong Door callers to access additional services, particularly long-term supports and services.”

Systems
  • Other

Veteran’s Preference - 04/09/2019

~~“State law requires that employment preference be given for having served in the Armed Forces  of  the  United  States  on  active  duty  (for  reasons  other  than  training)  during periods of war or any other campaign, expedition, or engagement for which a campaign badge or medal is authorized by the United States Department of Defense. The  preference  to  be  accorded  eligible  veterans  shall  apply  in  initial  employment,  subsequent employment, promotions, reassignments, horizontal transfers and reduction-in-force situations”

Systems
  • Other

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) for AMH/ASAYP630 - 01/07/2019

~~“…agencies providing IPS should integrate Employment First practices into their policies, procedures, and agency mission and values. Employment First principles include that competitive employment is the first and preferred outcome for individuals with mental health and co-occurring diagnoses, that employment opportunities are integrated in the community, pay at least minimum wage, and are not set aside jobs for individuals with disabilities. Agencies shall ensure that IPS-service information is evident through marketing flyers and posters in lobbies and service areas. The agency as a whole tracks employment as an outcome for all individuals served within the Agency, not just within the IPS team.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans - 11/06/2018

~~“The NCWorks Veterans Portal is part of Governor Cooper’s NC Job Ready strategy to prepare North Carolinians for the jobs of today and tomorrow. NC Job Ready has three core principles: skills and education attainment, employer leadership to remain relevant to evolving industry needs, and local innovation to take great ideas and apply them statewide.

The NCWorks Veterans Portal features tabs that provide quick access to employment services, job fairs, education/training options, helpful tips and other resources. The portal incorporates veterans’ Military Occupation Codes in an easy-to-use job search tool so that users can find job postings that match their prior experience and training from any of the five branches of the armed services. Veterans who already have NCWorks Online accounts will use those same login credentials on this new portal. The site also helps veterans find their nearest NCWorks Career Center, where they can access free services in person and talk with professionals who specialize in helping veterans. In addition, a tab for employers helps businesses recruit candidates with military experience.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

NCWorks Veterans Portal - 10/24/2018

~~“Home to nearly 800,000 veterans and several major military installations, North Carolina has a distinguished history in serving the U.S. military veterans, and their families. This collection of resources provides services for veterans, transitioning service members, and eligible spouses to obtain employment.”

Systems
  • Other

Exceptional Children - 10/15/2018

~~“The mission of the Exceptional Children Division is to ensure that students with disabilities develop intellectually, physically, emotionally, and vocationally through the provision of an appropriate individualized education program in the least restrictive environment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

North Carolina for Military Employment - 05/26/2019

~~“Between 2015 and 2018, 78,000 service members will transition out of the military through NC’s DoD installations, adding strength to the 778,000 veterans already living in North Carolina. North Carolina’s businesses strive to support these veterans and service members by leveraging their skills to fill critical talent requirements, but often lack the resources needed to identify and hire qualified military candidates.Solution: North Carolina for Military Employment (NC4ME) is a comprehensive public-private partnership designed to make NC the number one state for military employment. Established by the Governor in 2015, NC4ME leverages existing workforce development resources and technology to implement an employer-centric strategy that:• Educates NC’s business leaders on the value of hiring a military workforce,• Shows small businesses and human resource professionals how to hire military personnel, and• Connects military talent to open jobs, education, and training opportunities in North Carolina.” 

Systems
  • Other

NC Department of Commerce Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser Act and Agricultural Outreach Plan Program Years 2012-2017 - 07/01/2012

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

~~“Our VisionChildren, youth and families are healthy, safe and successful at home, in school and in their communities…..

The Youth in Transition sub-committee is currently transitioning to a Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Young Adults in Transition. More information to come.Meetings: 4th Thursday 11 am to 3 pm at 2400 Perimeter Park Dr. MorrisvilleCo-Chairs: Kristen Hassmiller Lich & Amy HorganContact: nccoptransition@gmail.com  

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disability:IN North Carolina

~~“Disability:IN includes a network of over 160 corporations devoted to expanding opportunities for people with disabilities across enterprises.

Visit www.disabilityin.org  to see the programs and services that are offered nationally and internationally by Disability:IN.  Disability:IN North Carolina is one of 50 affiliates that provide a collective voice of positive change for people with disabilities in business. Disability:IN North Carolina provides a collective voice for groups of business leaders, human resource executives, supply chain and other professionals to join forces to increase disability inclusion and equality.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Community Rehabilitation Services

~~“Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) offer a range of employment-related and support services to Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) consumers with specialized needs.We directly administer two CRPs:WorkSource East in Goldsboro and WorkSource West in Morganton.Services include:• Vocational evaluation• Community-based assessment• Job development• Job coachingIndividual or group-supported employment and work-adjustment activities are designed to improve:• Work skills• Work behaviors• Emotional/physical tolerancesWe can extend services to people with disabilities through partnerships with independent community rehabilitation programs across the state." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Education Savings Account Program - 01/01/2018

“Expands school choice for eligible students with disabilities in kindergarten through 12th grade.

− For students attending a registered nonpublic school or home school

− For tuition and required fees and certain other expenses related to educating a child with a disability

− Allows parents quarterly access to funds on a debit card (subject to program requirements)”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 NC APSE Fall Conference - 10/09/2019

~~“Conference Theme: Turning the Page

The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers.Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for national certification and IPS ongoing trainings.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “Left behind” population, specifically hourly wage workers in the restaurant, retail and service industries; variable income workers including farmers, fishers, foresters, the self-employed, and temporary workers; as well as traditionally underserved communities including minority groups, those with limited English proficiency, rural populations, young adults, and those who find the FFE coverage unaffordable.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are Access East (Greenville), Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (Charlotte), Council on Aging of Buncombe County (Asheville), Cumberland HealthNet (Fayetteville), and HealthNet Gaston (Gastonia). They will partner with State Unemployment Offices (NC Works), County Depts. of Social Services and Public Health, Temporary Staffing Agencies, NC Small Business and Technology Center, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations, Restaurant associations, artist groups, seasonal workforce trades, and other hourly/low-wage industries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mark Van ArnamPhone: (704) 785-0839Email: markv@legalaidnc.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (MCOs)These organizations (currently Trillium Health Resources, Cardinal Innovations, Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Vaya Health, Partners Behavioral Health, Sandhills Center, and Eastpointe) manage both state-funded and Medicaid-funded behavioral health services under contracts with DHHS. Included in the services they manage are employment training services such as Adult Developmental Vocational Program (ADVP), Supported Employment (SE), Long-Term Vocational Supports (LTVS), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS). SE, LTVS, and IPS are community-based services and have varying eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Signature Employment Grant - 01/01/2019

~~“Supporting innovative solutions with potential for public or private replication. Success is ideas that spark new models to increase employment for people with disabilities. For our 2019 grant request for proposals, we have a special interest in projects that use benefit planning, workforce incentives, and part-time employment to help people with disabilities obtain employment or re-enter the job market following injury.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Signature Employment Grant - 01/01/2018

~~“Supporting innovative solutions with potential for public or private replication. Success is ideas that spark new models to increase employment for people with disabilities. For our 2019 grant request for proposals, we have a special interest in projects that use benefit planning, workforce incentives, and part-time employment to help people with disabilities obtain employment or re-enter the job market following injury.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE White Papers and Conference Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Whole Foods Market to Pay $65,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Suit - 11/08/2018

~~“Whole Foods Market Group, Inc.,  doing business as Whole Foods Market, headquartered in Austin, Texas, will pay  $65,000 and provide other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit  brought by the U.S. Equal Employment  Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.  The EEOC had charged that Whole Foods Market  violated federal law by failing to accommodate and firing an employee because  of her disability.   

According  to the EEOC's lawsuit, Whole Foods hired Diane Butler in 2005 as a cashier for  a facility in Raleigh, N.C. Butler has polycystic kidney disease, a genetic  disease causing uncontrolled growth of cysts in the kidney, eventually leading  to kidney failure. In 2009, while working for Whole Foods, Butler had a kidney  transplant. The EEOC said that in December 2015, Butler missed work on two  occasions because she had been hospitalized and needed to visit the doctor  because of her kidney. The EEOC further alleged that although Butler informed  Whole Foods that she needed time off due to her kidney impairment, the company  nonetheless fired Butler because of her absences.

Such  alleged conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which  protects employees from discrimination based on a disability and requires  employers to provide employees with disabilities with reasonable accommodations  unless it would be an undue hardship.”

Systems
  • Other

DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative".   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

CAP/DA Renewal (3.5) - 07/01/2019

~~“Habilitation Services.The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services. Services for Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness.The state assures that federal financial participation (FFP) will not be claimed in expenditures for waiver services including, but not limited to, day treatment or partial hospitalization, psychosocial rehabilitation services, and clinic services provided as home and community-based services to individuals with chronic mental illnesses if these individuals, in the absence of a waiver, would be placed in an IMD and are: (1) age22 to 64; (2) age 65 and older and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR §440.140; or(3) age 21 and under and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR § 440.160.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina’s Care Management Strategy for Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 05/29/2019

~~“"The first priority of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (the Department) is the health and well-being of the individuals we serve. As North Carolina transitions its Medicaid and NC Health Choice programs from a predominantly fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system to managed care, the Department is focused on building robust and effective models for managing beneficiaries’ comprehensive needs through care management. Over a five-year period, the majority of Medicaid and NC Health Choice beneficiaries will transition to one of two types of prepaid health plans (PHPs), customized to the populations they serve.  More about Medicaid plans can be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina’s Medicaid Managed Care Quality Strategy - 04/18/2019

~~“This Quality Strategy focuses on measuring quality performance and outcomes in the early years of managed care, affecting the populations that will transition to managed care immediately (outlined above); it will expand to capture additional populations asthey are brought into managed care over time. During the transition, North Carolina will continue to operate LME-MCOs, which will provide behavioral health and I/DD services to populations excluded or delayed from mandatory enrollment in PHPs at launch. LME-MCOs will continue to administer the Innovations and TBI waivers, and the fee-for-service Medicaid program will continue to run the CAP/C and CAP/DA waivers. During this time of transition, the quality measures and requirements for each of these special programs and for LME-MCOs will remain in place, and all State Medicaid programs will be focused on the unifying Aims outlined in the section that follows.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Original Base Waiver Number: NC.0423 Draft ID:NC.025.03.00 - 01/01/2019

~~“This waiver is requested in order to provide home and community-based waiver services to individuals who, but for the provision of such services, would require the following level(s) of care, the costs of which would be reimbursed under the approved Medicaid State plan… intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) (as defined in 42 CFR §440.150)”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina Receives 1115 Waiver Approval, a Major Milestone for Medicaid and NC Health Care System - 10/24/2018

~~“North Carolina today received federal approval to implement the transition to Medicaid managed care and integrate physical health, behavioral health and pharmacy benefits. Receiving approval from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) of the amended 1115 Demonstration Waiver application submitted by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services in 2017 is a major milestone in implementing North Carolina’s Medicaid Transformation and in moving the state’s health care system toward further integration and coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Transformation and the 1115 Waiver - 04/26/2017

~~This is a Power Point Presentation from the “NC Tide Spring Conference’.  It has information on the current “Medicaid Landscape’ both across the country and specifically in North Carolina.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Managed Care in North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
10,488,084
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
680,459
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.42%
Change from
2018 to 2019
243,128
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.48%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.73%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.28%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.41%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 10,273,419 10,383,620 10,488,084
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 689,612 680,863 680,459
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 232,875 239,666 243,128
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,225,322 4,291,999 4,334,273
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.77% 35.20% 35.73%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.01% 77.19% 77.41%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60% 3.90% 3.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.80% 20.60% 20.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.70% 13.10% 12.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 648,579 652,890 647,620
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 694,716 698,279 711,905
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 955,491 956,190 959,032
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 308,091 305,180 307,957
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 56,263 63,100 62,411
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 20,228 23,213 23,544
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,896 14,367 19,790
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,039 457
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 28,046 34,276 29,862
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 17,154 16,904 18,883

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 8,592 9,023 9,206
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 4.20% 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 320,583 314,113 311,730

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 20,386 19,475 22,773
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 91,748 65,153 68,579
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 104,082 73,708 77,889
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.60% 26.40% 29.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.10% 8.30% 6.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,946 5,216 4,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,395 15,318 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.15 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 90 1,062 1,644
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 49 389 700
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00% 37.00% 43.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.50 3.87 6.97

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 22.00% 28.00% 25.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,507 11,525 11,562
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 471,750 467,320 466,920
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,186 1,234 1,301
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,194 1,482 1,433

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,029,000 $19,469,121 $21,556,297
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,307,000 $15,979,861 $12,386,109
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $122,559,000 $125,470,761 $124,881,442
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $188,651,000 $213,112,906 $319,889,110
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 15.00% 18.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 12,766 9,750 10,272
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,486 2,435 2,176
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 6,120 6,187 6,415
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 28.60 29.36 30.42

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.78% 66.80% 66.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.87% 13.98% 14.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.89% 1.89% 1.81%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.14% 85.35% 85.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.39% 27.27% 27.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 71.73% 62.51% 62.83%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.98% 78.14% 77.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.34% 35.24% 35.82%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 45 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 3 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 46 49 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,000 2,573 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 452 511 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3,453 3,085 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

The continued growth of the statewide network of supported employment service providers has resulted from collaboration between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services and entities such as the North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities, the North Carolina International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services, NCCDD and the Mental Health Consumers’ Organization. In addition, the North Carolina Association for Persons Supporting Employment First (NCAPSE) provides a forum for focusing on supported employment standards and expanded choices for individuals with the most significant disabilities in the state. (Page 198) Title I

Customized Employment

~~In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The DVRS VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because DVRS will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to DVRS when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools DVRS utilizes for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through it’s continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DVRS will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Services for the Blind (DSB) VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because the DSB VR program will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to the Division when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools utilized for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through its continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DSB will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 328- 329) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

School to Work Transition

~~DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the Spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 183) Title I

Finally, DVRS casework policies require that transition services must promote or facilitate the achievement of the employment outcome identified in the student’s individualized plan for employment. In order to plan effectively for the transition needs of students with disabilities in collaboration with other agencies and organizations, DVRS rehabilitation counselors are expected to be active participants addressing the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting transition issues when possible. Counselors are expected to participate both directly in IEP meetings and indirectly by other means in planning for the needs of VR consumers. A copy of the transition portion of the IEP is required to be maintained in the case record. Prior to developing the IPE, the VR counselor reviews the Individual Transition Plan (ITP) component for the Individual Education Plan and records any relevant ITP objectives as part of the IPE. The intent of this review is to coordinate educational programming and vocational programming for the benefit of the VR consumer. (Page 185) Title I

Additionally, the Division’s policy stipulates that the development of the IPE with a student must be based on interests, aptitudes, capabilities, strengths and informed choice. The job choice on the IPE for a student in transition may indicate a family of jobs rather than a specific job code, for example, Health Care Worker, Office Work, and Protective Services such as police, firefighter, or security guard. DVRS policy does require career exploration to be provided and documented in order to determine a more specific goal, and this process and expectation has been further emphasized by recent policy revisions concerning development of the IPE within 90 days of the VR eligibility determination. Amended job choices, including amendments at closure, must be accompanied by documentation reflecting the process and services that had an impact on the final job choice, including job shadowing, job sampling, guidance and counseling. Moreover, DVRS casework policy stipulates that the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment must be completed as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, by the time each student determined to be eligible for VR services leaves the school setting. This includes students with disabilities who are eligible for VR services including eligible students served by the school under an IEP.(Page 185) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school.

Within the current formal interagency agreement between DVRS and DPI, mutual interagency responsibilities include:
• Mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities.
• Designation of an individual from Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions to serve as liaison with each other to represent the services of the two agencies.
• Exchange of information deemed pertinent and of mutual concern regarding service delivery.
• Interagency cooperation in transition planning for students with disabilities.
• A mutual system to be developed and maintained to ensure that appropriate referrals are made to each party. (Page 186) Title I

The current interagency agreement between DVRS and the state education agency stipulates that transition planning for students with disabilities will be a cooperative effort. Furthermore, the agreements specifically require mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities. The sharing of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) at the local level is strongly encouraged. DVRS VR counselors are required to review a student’s transition component of the IEP and incorporate, as appropriate, a description of relevant objectives in the IPE. Furthermore, a comprehensive evaluation will be completed by the State agency on each eligible individual, to the degree necessary, to determine the vocational goal and scope of VR services to be included in the IPE. The agreements state that the student with the disability is expected to fully participate in the development of the plan and any plan amendments. The agreements specify that the DVRS VR counselors will provide the individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. Additionally, the agreement requires that the VR counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. (Page 189) Title I

As part of the agreement, DVRS Rehabilitation Counselors will provide individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. The counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. The VR counselor will provide each eligible individual an IPE Handbook wherein there is an appeals process outlined. Information pertaining to the Client Assistance Program (CAP) is included in the handbook. The VR counselor agrees not to close an individual’s record as having achieved a successful employment outcome until the person exits school and is determined that the individual has successfully completed the IPE. (Page 190-191) Title I

On—going support provided during extended services must include a minimum of twice—monthly monitoring at the work site to assess job stability unless under special circumstances, especially at the request of the individual, the IPE provides for off—site monitoring and based upon that assessment, the coordination or provision of specific services at or away from the work site, that are needed to maintain employment stability. If off—site monitoring is determined to be appropriate, it must, at a minimum, consist of two (2) face—to—face meetings with the client and one employer contact monthly. These activities apply to all supported employment clients and not only those whose services are provided through funds reserved pursuant to section 603(d), for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

Currently, NC’s Capacity Building Plan is focused on improving student involvement in the individualized education program (IEP) process so that planning is more meaningful and associated with a student’s post-school goals. The state is continuing to work on a Transition Toolkit for teachers and anticipates the development of toolkits for parents, students, and agencies that will be individualized at the local level. DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 250) Title IV

DSB currently offers a wide variety of services to students with visual impairments or blindness in transition to the world of work. Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor. The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. A formal cooperative agreement exists with the NC Department of Public Instruction, which consists of 115 local education agencies (LEA’s), 128 charter schools, 1 regional school and 2 education entities. The emphasis of the Memorandum of Agreement with DPI is on students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired, being served by local education agencies (LEA’s) and the schools who are of transition age (14 to 21) and who need VR services to become employed. This agreement acknowledges the role of DSB in providing these services and encourages local LEA’s and schools to develop working relationships with the staff who cover their corresponding areas and encourages referring students, sharing information and facilitating joint involvement in IEP meetings. DSB shares information about the transition program and provides technical assistance and consultation to DPI, LEA’s, and schools regarding accommodations and assistive technology that will help facilitate the education and VR of students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired. (Page 289) Title IV

Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor (this is not required for the receipt of Pre-Employment Transition Services). The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. (Page 291) Title IV

DSB has also enlarged the transition rehabilitation services presently offered for students 14-21 years of age in North Carolina who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired by adding specific Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS): (1) Student Counseling on Transition/Higher Ed Training Opportunities- Required Student Workplace Readiness Training; (2) Student Self-Advocacy Training; (3) Student Job Exploration Counseling; (4) Student Job Exploration Counseling Materials; and Student Work Based Learning Experience Maintenance. These services are provided to all students with visual impairments, blindness, or deaf-blindness whether they are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 294) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~North Carolina has a strong career pathway strategy in place that expanded on the work done over the last decade by the K-12 and community college systems. The current strategy includes a certification process by the NCWorks Commission that requires eight key element be in place to ensure pathways are comprehensive with multiple entry and exit ramps for in-demand occupations. Specific strategies to continue to strengthen and use career pathways are listed below.
o Continue to support and promote the development of NCWorks Certified Career Pathways for critical industry clusters.
o Require workforce development partners use the career pathways to target resources towards helping individuals gain the skills and experience needed for in-demand occupations. 
o Provide programs that link low-skilled adults and individuals with barriers to employment to career pathways and job-ready skills along with basic skills. (Page 36) Title I

Support collaborative efforts under the vocational rehabilitation program to provide individuals with disabilities the rehabilitative services, training, and supports needed to obtain or maintain employment, including utilization of career pathways. 
The vocational rehabilitation programs will incorporate, to the maximum extent possible, career pathways within their services to individuals with disabilities through approaches to include increase emphasis and reference of career pathways during comprehensive assessment of individuals’ skills, interests and aptitudes and during counseling and guidance sessions with individuals. 
Program leadership will promote to staff and service recipients the use of established resources highlighting information about career pathways and in-demand occupations; increase emphasis on established career pathways and career growth when developing employment goals and individualized plans for employment with services and training that directly support the employment objectives; remain actively engaged with workforce partners in the collaborative development of career pathways and identify particular issues or challenges individuals with disabilities may encounter when adopting a career within an established career pathway or enhancements that may be particularly favorable for the populations served by the state’s vocational rehabilitation programs. (Page 47) Title I

OJT is a viable and compatible part of North Carolina’s Integrated Services Delivery services. Local workforce development board OJT policy is critical for consistency, institutionalizing services the local board seeks to deliver, and managing and leveraging OJT funds. Local OJT policy also provides guidance on how to comply with federal and state OJT requirements and leverage other hiring. (Page 62) Title I

DVRS staff plan to expand the role of employers in vocational evaluation and career development services. DVRS will be enhancing policies around internships and OJT services so that the service procedures are consistent with employer practices while still preparing the individual for competitive employment. DVRS plans to work towards a service definition that is complementary to other internship and OJT programs available in the state through our workforce system partners. (Page 65) Title I

Provision of Transition Services through Coordination with Employers

While youth and students with disabilities have access to the same VR services as adults, there are some VR services reserved for or targeted to transition-aged youth for the purposes of assisting them with leaving high school and preparing for competitive employment. The division plans to focus on program development in the coming year in order to meet the 15% required spending allocation for Pre- Employment Transition Services (PETS) to students with disabilities. A number of areas of program development are focused on increased engagement with employers in order to implement PETS. These include: summer internships for students and youth with disabilities including on-the-job supports, increased utilization of OJT for students and youth, and increasing the number of Project Search © sites. (Pages 65-66) Title I

DVRS will work on enhancing OJT utilization for students and youth with disabilities as well by engaging business in the development of young talent. DVRS plans to streamline OJT processes, revise policies so that they are complementary to similar OJT programs, and improve marketing and tracking materials and processes so that the materials are engaging to both student/youth participants and potential business as well as easy to complete and accessible. (Page 66) Title I

By enhancing and incorporating new programs that promote and support work-based experiences, DVRS will continue its commitment to students in pursuit of a high school diploma through the Occupational Course of Study (OCS), a pathway established by the NC Board of Education for students with IEPs to achieve a high school diploma by completing occupational coursework and work experiences. DVRS has recently revised policies for In-School Work Adjustment services to students with significant or most significant disabilities. The service is coordinated through school-based agreements to incentivize a student’s participation in school-coordinated work experiences by providing guidance and counseling as well as an incentive payment to students for improvements in work behaviors and attitudes. The Division continues to offer internship and OJT services to students, but hopes to increase utilization and improve feasibility for students, schools, and partnering businesses through policy and procedure revisions and collaboration with workforce system partners. Other PETS programs/services under consideration are intended to address students’ expectations around pursuing employment and to improve their preparedness for participating in additional rehabilitation services, such as training and placement. (Page 184) Title I

Beyond increasing consumers’ participation in career-oriented post-secondary education/training, some of the other strategies that DVRS has established under this goal are to develop and build quality relationships with businesses that offer strong salaries and benefits and to continue offering the internship services, which, compared to an OJT experience, are geared more toward individuals who have completed their specialized training and need work experience to get their careers established. This service has been very well received by staff and consumers and we expect to continue the service. Another strategy that DVRS is employing to increase the earning potential of individuals who have entrepreneurial skills is through the support the Division has made available through a dedicated Small Business Specialist on staff who helps support staff and consumers in their assessment of this option as a fit and when it is mutually determined as such, coordination of local resources and ongoing supports for the consumer pursuing this option. (Pages 251-252) Title IV

Objective 1.1.1. The total number of individuals exiting the VR program in employment will exceed that of the prior year: One of the strategies for achieving this increase is for the DVRS VR program to utilize on-the-job training (OJT) without supports. Wage subsidies for OJT are funded at a reduced amount relative to when additional funding for these services was available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and both greater utilization of OJT and number of corresponding employment outcomes through OJT was achieved. A full wage subsidy and making the process more convenient for employers would increase OJT utilization and outcomes. (Page 266-267) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers): o disabilities; o homelessness; o unemployed for at least 27 weeks; o criminal background (released within the last 12 months); o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and o between 18—24 years old. Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~A separate data file exchange process is maintained for uploading VR participant information to the SSA portal for the SSA Ticket-to-Work program. This file exchange process isn’t fully automated and is limited to establishing VR participant in-use status and eligibility for agency cost reimbursement. An interface with Department of Commerce, Division of Employment Security provides quarterly State unemployment insurance wage records and related information to establish whether a former VR participant is working at the level of substantial gainful activity for agency cost-reimbursement under the Ticket-to-Work program. (Page 83) Title I

Major service gaps or barriers DVRS experiences when fulfilling this need most generally in terms of: (a) consumers’ needs for VR services, but lack of motivation to become employed, some of which is driven by disincentives to work, including the potential loss of SSI, SSDI or other public benefits; and(b) the lack of resources, including time, additional counselor positions, and expertise required for better counseling and guidance. The lack of resources was said to be in part due to counselor vacancies, lack of support staff, and attention to non-counseling related activities, such as focusing on meeting performance measures and processing paperwork.

Recommended solutions for DVRS to increase its capacity for counseling and guidance and help further motivate consumers to enter or reenter the workforce, particularly those receiving SSI or SSDI benefits included increasing VR counseling capacity through: (a) smaller caseloads; (b) paperwork reduction; (c) a decreased focus on performance measures and increase attention to holistic counseling; (d) hiring additional counselors and support staff; and increasing the quality of VR counselors through training and higher salaries. These were said to attract and retain high quality counselors and allow the counselors more one-on-one time with the consumer to provide counseling and guidance, including motivational counseling. The most frequently mentioned solution for increasing client motivation for our consumers receiving public benefits, such as SSI or SSDI, was to increase benefits counseling services. (Page 225) Title IV

Through NC DVR's participation in the RSA- funded Technical Assistance Project "E3TC" Empower Educate Employ Targeted Communities, the need for an expansion of the certified Work Incentive and Planning Assistance (WIPA) counselors network was identified as an area where NC DVRS and NC DSB will plan to utilize innovation and expansion funds to help accomplish this during the 2018 and 2019 program years. (Page 258) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~DVRS plans to increase the quantity and improve the quality of business partnerships in the future with the expectation that an increased number and depth in business relationships will result in increased opportunities to assist individuals with disabilities with vocational evaluation and career development, job seeker preparation, and job development and job placement. DVRS plans to identify methods for capturing information on employment relationships within our case management system in order to map out the presence of business partnerships and identify opportunities for growth and means for leveraging peer-to-peer marketing of VR business services.  (Page 65) Title I

DVRS will continue to explore unique business partnerships that benefit the unique training and recruitment needs of students and youth with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities. DVRS plans to continue partnering on Project Search © sites where there is a need and willingness by community partners. This model places business in the middle of the training and employment of young people by hosting student interns at the business and seeking placement opportunities within the business where they may exist. Project Search © host businesses can not only support the students enrolled in projects on their site, but can also be business advocates for people with disabilities in their industries. (Page 66) Title I

The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

With regard to the need for more employers to hire and accommodate people with disabilities, barriers included: (a) lack of funding to educate business on the hidden workforce available; and (b) lack of employer knowledge of available accommodations that can be made. Solutions proposed included: (a) continued partnerships with agencies that specialize in providing services for individuals with disabilities; and (b) for other workforce agencies to train staff, educate employers, and promote hiring of individuals with disabilities to employers. With regard to the need for transportation and other Support Services, the barrier was mainly limited funding and lack of coordination. The proposed solutions were to leverage additional funding sources and improve coordination of services. Lastly, the barrier regarding the need for training and resources related to assistive technology for NCWorks Career Centers was a lack of funding and the solution proposed was to leverage resources to purchase, build infrastructure, and install technology that assist individuals with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV

Data Collection

In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The Education Opportunities for Students with Disabilities report to the North Carolina General Assembly for 2016 establishes WIOA as foundational federal legislation upon which the state policies and practices concerning system needs are established and aligned. Specific elements of the Unified State Plan and Opportunities Act that have been incorporated include the earmarked Title IV funding, representing roughly $16 million, for pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities who are eligible or ‘potentially eligible’ for the VR program; the restrictions on subminimum wage employment so that individuals with even the most significant disabilities are encouraged and permitted to pursue competitive integrated employment; the expansion of the triennial statewide comprehensive needs assessment under Title IV to focus on the vocational rehabilitation needs of youth with disabilities; and performance measures aligned with the WIOA Performance Accountability measures for youth as statewide indicators of North Carolina’s success. (Page 52) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school. (Page 186) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Cooperative agreements or memorandum of agreements have been established with all local area workforce boards. The agreements provide for the following strategies:  Provision of inter-component staff training and technical assistance with regard to the availability and benefits of, and information on eligibility standards for vocational rehabilitation services; and the promotion of equal, effective, and meaningful participation by individuals with disabilities receiving workforce development system services in all of the states NCWorks Career Centers in the state through the promotion of accessibility; the use of non-discriminatory policies and procedures; the provision of reasonable accommodations; auxiliary aids and services, and rehabilitation technology for persons with disabilities. (Page 57) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) currently utilizes a dual customer approach by providing services to both businesses and individuals with disabilities. The division emphasizes the definition and marketing of business services to ensure the dual customer approach is recognized and implemented. Business services include recruitment, hiring, consultation on Section 503 compliance, sensitivity/diversity training, accessibility consultation, internships, on-the-job training (OJT), education on tax incentives, and follow-up and job retention services. (Page 64) Title I

Both physical and programmatic accessibility are essential for all individuals to participate in services offered by the NCWorks Career Centers and the collaborating community partners. With employment as the ultimate objective, accessibility to facilities and programs offered as legislated by the Americans with Disabilities Act is essential to support individuals with significant barriers to employment to achieve employment. The physical accessibility of facilities is systematically addressed across the state. The State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. NCWorks Career Centers also utilize the North Carolina Department of Commerce Division of Workforce Solutions Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance Review Checklist to ensure access to the entire range of services at each location. As a part of the certification process to become an NCWorks Career Center, each site is required to obtain a letter of ADA compliance from the host agency. ADA compliance is monitored and reviewed on an annual basis by the NC Department of Commerce and the host agency. Sites are required to maintain and update accessibility as ADA regulations are revised and NCWorks Career Center Certifications are renewed. (Page 109) Title I

Career Center Certification Accessibility Criteria: o Adequate handicapped parking with compliant curb ramp(s) connected to the accessibility route into the Center(s). o Handicapped parking must be clearly marked. o Entrance and exit must be accessible and free of obstacles with appropriate signage. o Pedestrian routes inside the host agency facility must be accessible and free of obstacles. o Entrance and exit doors are required to be equipped with hardware that is usable with one hand without tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist. o Furniture inside the Center must be arranged to allow wheelchair access. o Computer and desk workstations must be wheelchair accessible. o Restrooms must be appropriately accessible. o Auxiliary aids and services must be available upon request as are interpreter services for ESL customers. o Emergency drills are to be conducted annually and staff is to be provided with host agency procedures. (Page 110) Title I

During program year 2016 Career Center staff will receive training to follow established procedures to ensure inclusion and programmatic accessibility to center services. This training, comprised of eight half—day sessions across the state, will allow staff to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. (Page 110) Title I

Assistive Technology services and devices are provided to eligible individuals statewide who require them. Rehabilitation technology and assistive technology services are sponsored and provided to the degree necessary to complete the rehabilitation program. Included are services and devices which can supplement and enhance an individual’s functions such as adapted computer access, augmentative communication, specialized seating and mobility, vehicle modifications, and services which can have an impact on the environment, such as accessibility, job re-design, work site modification and residence modification. Application of the available engineering and assistive technology services and technologies is important when making determinations of eligibility particularly for individuals with significant and most significant disabilities. Rehabilitation engineering evaluations and services are not subject to an individual’s financial eligibility; however, devices, equipment and modifications recommended by the engineer are subject to financial eligibility. (Page 179) Title I

E. The Department of Health and Human Services through the DSB will provide technical consultation and assistance to both the LEA and to the DPI regarding the accessibility of hardware and software for use by students with visual impairments, modifications that can be made to better facilitate the education and vocational rehabilitation of students with visual impairments. Orientation and mobility services for students will be addressed on a student-by-student basis at the local level. (Page 293) Title IV

Veterans

The Department of Commerce provides a Veteran Services Program across the state to assist veterans with employment. The Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) assist veterans with overcoming barriers through intensive, targeted services. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVERs) reach out to employers to advocate for hiring Veterans. Recent changes to the federal policies concerning the roles of these staff that serve veterans have been made to ensure that eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive the best combination of services, according to their needs. The agency determined that to accomplish this refocusing, Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists will serve only those veterans and eligible spouses most in need of the intensive services to address significant barriers to employment. As a result, DVOP specialists will serve fewer veterans and eligible spouses, but will be able to provide more intensive services. The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers):

o disabilities;

o homelessness;

o unemployed for at least 27 weeks;

o criminal background (released within the last 12 months);

o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and

o between 18—24 years old.

Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Since 2015 DVRS has progressively increased their collaborative efforts with NCATP and other AgrAbility partners to provide assistive technologies and related services to farmers and farmworkers within the state. There have also been joint outreach efforts to Veterans with disabilities who may be interested in pursuing agriculturally-oriented occupations. (Page 180) Title I In addition, DVRS represents the agency on the “Governor’s Working Group on Service Members, Veterans, and their Families,” which is a collaborative monthly meeting that serves as a resource clearinghouse for addressing issues of returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan and other service members.

Outreach efforts between DVRS, the Veterans Administration, and other military operations have occurred to ensure that veterans and their family members are aware of services available to them through DVRS. An agreement between DVRS and Veterans Administration’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program was implemented in late 2014, which is intended to maximize mutual services for Veterans and ensure a more streamlined referrals process between the two agencies. (Page 199) Title I

Goal 4.3. DSB will identify ways by which DSB can assist veterans with disabilities to become able to obtain, maintain or regain employment. Strategy 4.3.1. DSB will meet with officials working with veterans who are visually impaired, blind or deaf blind to educate them regarding services that are available to veterans with disabilities through DSB. (Page 339) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The North Carolina Division of Vocational Services (DVRS) has developed a cooperative agreement with both NC Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and NC Division of Medical Assistance (DMA) for the purpose of establishing cooperative guidelines to ensure individuals with disabilities have equal access to employment services, a continuum of employment services, and independent community living. The relationship among the divisions continues to improve services for both individuals with mental illness and substance abuse disorders and individuals with developmental disabilities has been enhanced over the past several years through changes in personnel at DMHDDSAS as well as a change in their focus towards a recovery oriented system of care which incorporates employment as a goal for consumers. Due to continuously changing staff, ongoing efforts are required to maintain an effective working relationship between both divisions. (Page 196) Title I

DMHDDSA has also developed a state definition for supported employment and long term vocational support using the IPS model of supported employment as well as increased the hourly rate to meet the needs of the providers. North Carolina’s definition calls for the inclusion of Peer Support Services as a mandatory service available to individuals with services paid through funds from the local management entity. Through this definition, if an individual with mental health disabilities chooses DVRS as their supported employment provider and the person is served through the Local Management Entity/Managed Care Organization (LME/MCO) system, they will be able to receive long term vocational supports (LTVS). Each VR office will have a liaison specifically for those CRP agencies providing IPS model of SE. (Page 197) Title I

DVRS continues to partner with the DMHDDSAS in implementing individual placement and support supported employment (IPS SE) throughout the state. Currently, there are 35 IPS SE programs throughout the state and DVRS contracts with 13 of them. DVRS offers such programs the opportunity to apply to become and IPS contractor through an ongoing RFA. DVRS also works alongside the DMHDDSAS and the University of NC Chapel Hill Institute for Best Practices staff to conduct onsite fidelity reviews of the IPS SE programs, training of IPS Teams, including DVRS field staff, statewide IPS learning collaborative, provider steering committees, monthly calls with the Rockville Institute (formerly the Dartmouth Supported Employment Center), as well as the annual IPS SE Rockville Institute’s Learning Collaborative. DVRS also works with DMHDDSAS to inform providers and beneficiaries on the impact of employment on federal and state benefits and have collaborated in efforts to increase capacity of benefits counseling experts in the state. (Page 204) Title IV

• The development of effective collaborative efforts with the NC DHHS-Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) to provide consistent funding for extended supported employment addressed the need for VR Program participants to receive follow-along services, even after their case was successfully closed. (Page 235) Title IV

The North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) is partnering with the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and other divisions and departments in developing competitive, integrated employment opportunities. DVRS establishes and maintains contracts or agreements with over 120 private for profit and non-profit VR service providers providing an array of services to DVRS consumers. One hundred two (102) private-non-profit VR service providers have established performance-based contracts with the Division, where the organizations are administered funds when an individual receiving services within their program has achieved designated goals or "milestones" on their way toward their ultimate goal of competitive employment. Almost all supported employment and work adjustment services provided through community rehabilitation programs were transitioned from a fee for services hourly rate payment system to a milestone payment system. Additionally, performance-based cooperative agreements engaging non-profit organizations encompass brain injury support services, multiple (currently 14) Project SEARCH™ sites and the provision of Pre Employment Transition Services. This system and its implementation were developed in collaboration with the community rehabilitation provider community through representation via the CRP-DVRS steering subcommittee and other means of stakeholder input. (Page 245) Title IV

DSB has reached out to the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services to begin discussions regarding how our agencies might work together to better serve the needs of North Carolinians with multiple disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

Medicaid Managed Care Policy Paper North Carolina’s Design for State-Funded Services Under Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 12/30/2019

“This policy paper details the Department’s vision for the delivery of State-funded behavioral health, iintellectual and developmental disability (I/DD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) services I/DD, as well as the continuation of critical “local health functions” under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and covers the following areas:

Provision of State-funded Services under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans, including eligibility, available services, care management, provider networks, and handling of complaints and appeals; Continuing the TCLI principles through Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and extending the functions of in-reach, transition, and diversion to additional populations; Engagement and coordination of local health functions in the context of Medicaid Transformation; and Accountability for State-funded Services, TCLI functions, and local health functions.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

2019 NC APSE Fall Conference - 10/09/2019

~~“Conference Theme: Turning the Page

The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers.Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for national certification and IPS ongoing trainings.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “Left behind” population, specifically hourly wage workers in the restaurant, retail and service industries; variable income workers including farmers, fishers, foresters, the self-employed, and temporary workers; as well as traditionally underserved communities including minority groups, those with limited English proficiency, rural populations, young adults, and those who find the FFE coverage unaffordable.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are Access East (Greenville), Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (Charlotte), Council on Aging of Buncombe County (Asheville), Cumberland HealthNet (Fayetteville), and HealthNet Gaston (Gastonia). They will partner with State Unemployment Offices (NC Works), County Depts. of Social Services and Public Health, Temporary Staffing Agencies, NC Small Business and Technology Center, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations, Restaurant associations, artist groups, seasonal workforce trades, and other hourly/low-wage industries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mark Van ArnamPhone: (704) 785-0839Email: markv@legalaidnc.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CAP/DA Renewal (3.5) - 07/01/2019

~~“Habilitation Services.The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services. Services for Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness.The state assures that federal financial participation (FFP) will not be claimed in expenditures for waiver services including, but not limited to, day treatment or partial hospitalization, psychosocial rehabilitation services, and clinic services provided as home and community-based services to individuals with chronic mental illnesses if these individuals, in the absence of a waiver, would be placed in an IMD and are: (1) age22 to 64; (2) age 65 and older and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR §440.140; or(3) age 21 and under and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR § 440.160.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities - 06/22/2019

~~“Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1)Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;(2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes—

(i)Instruction;(ii)Related services;(iii)Community experiences;(iv)The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and(v)If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

(b)Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Eligible Training Provider Guidelines - 06/17/2019

~~“WIOA  seeks  to  promote  a  training  environment  that  fosters  customer  choice, performance  accountability  and  continuous  improvement  in  the  attainment  of skills,  credentials,  certificates,  and  diplomas  that  lead  to  employment  in occupations in demand in the local economy. Such an environment will enhance quality of  life  for  customers.  WIOA sets   forth  the  requirements  and  general processes by which training providers and programs can be included on the state Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) by validating that all listed providers and their programs meet minimum state standards.Action: Effective immediately, Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) should utilize the attached guidelines in the review and approval of training providers and their programs of study. In addition, all WDBs should create or update existing policy to ensure compliance with this policy statement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

North Carolina’s Care Management Strategy for Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 05/29/2019

~~“"The first priority of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (the Department) is the health and well-being of the individuals we serve. As North Carolina transitions its Medicaid and NC Health Choice programs from a predominantly fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system to managed care, the Department is focused on building robust and effective models for managing beneficiaries’ comprehensive needs through care management. Over a five-year period, the majority of Medicaid and NC Health Choice beneficiaries will transition to one of two types of prepaid health plans (PHPs), customized to the populations they serve.  More about Medicaid plans can be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina for Military Employment - 05/26/2019

~~“Between 2015 and 2018, 78,000 service members will transition out of the military through NC’s DoD installations, adding strength to the 778,000 veterans already living in North Carolina. North Carolina’s businesses strive to support these veterans and service members by leveraging their skills to fill critical talent requirements, but often lack the resources needed to identify and hire qualified military candidates.Solution: North Carolina for Military Employment (NC4ME) is a comprehensive public-private partnership designed to make NC the number one state for military employment. Established by the Governor in 2015, NC4ME leverages existing workforce development resources and technology to implement an employer-centric strategy that:• Educates NC’s business leaders on the value of hiring a military workforce,• Shows small businesses and human resource professionals how to hire military personnel, and• Connects military talent to open jobs, education, and training opportunities in North Carolina.” 

Systems
  • Other

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (MCOs)These organizations (currently Trillium Health Resources, Cardinal Innovations, Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Vaya Health, Partners Behavioral Health, Sandhills Center, and Eastpointe) manage both state-funded and Medicaid-funded behavioral health services under contracts with DHHS. Included in the services they manage are employment training services such as Adult Developmental Vocational Program (ADVP), Supported Employment (SE), Long-Term Vocational Supports (LTVS), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS). SE, LTVS, and IPS are community-based services and have varying eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“In 2019, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) and Disability Rights North Carolina signed a memorandum of understanding to phase out the use of segregated work adjustment training in the Vocational Rehabilitation program by October 1, 2021, with the specific and mutual goals of advancing integrated work training and competitive integrated employment for per-sons with disabilities. This commitment is a significant step taken by the State towards improving the employment outcomes of people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities - 04/01/2019

~~“An effort 10 years in the making came to fruition when the North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) witnessed Governor Roy Cooper sign an Executive Order declaring North Carolina as an “Employment First” state.  For North Carolinians, this means that gainful employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome of publicly-funded services for all citizens with disabilities - regardless of disability – in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations to achieve and maintain employment.

The expectations of an Employment First state are to emphasize the importance of employment services focusing on skills and an individual’s goals and contributions. It does not mean that employment is the only outcome for all; rather, that employment is the expectation, not the exception.

Congratulations, North Carolina, and hats off to those who worked hard to make us an Employment First State!

And this month, Governor Roy Cooper appointed new members to NCCDD, and we cannot wait to work with them as we keep moving forward towards achieving our Five Year Plan goals.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

House Bill 984 Oversight IDD Employment/Education Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“AN ACT TO CREATE A POSITION WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 3 HUMAN SERVICES TO OVERSEE ADMINISTRATION AND COORDINATION OF 4 EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH 5 INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, AS RECOMMENDED BY 6 THE LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION COMMITTEE ON INTELLECTUAL 7 AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES.

Establishment of the Position. – There is established within the Department of Health 14 and Human Services the position of Director of Education and Employment Opportunities for 15 Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Director shall have 16 professional, administrative, technical, and clerical personnel as may be necessary to assist in 17 carrying out his or her duties. The Director shall oversee the interagency coordination of 18 education and employment programs and services for individuals with intellectual and 19 developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No, 92: Employment First for North Carolinians with Disabilities - 03/29/2019

Employment First is the policy of State Agencies.  This policy reflects the state's goals to be a leader in reruitintg workers with disabilities and to create an inclusive job climate for workers with disabilities. Competitive, integrated employment is the preferred mode of employment for all North Carolinians with disabilities regardless of level of disabiity.  North Carolinianswith disabilities should be ablle to work a job of their choosihg, with reasonable support and accomodations provide to achieve and maintain employment

Employment First principles will apply to all indviduals with intellectual and developmental, physical, sensory, mental health, and substance use disorder disabilities ..

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Medicaid Managed Care Policy Paper North Carolina’s Design for State-Funded Services Under Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 12/30/2019

“This policy paper details the Department’s vision for the delivery of State-funded behavioral health, iintellectual and developmental disability (I/DD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) services I/DD, as well as the continuation of critical “local health functions” under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and covers the following areas:

Provision of State-funded Services under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans, including eligibility, available services, care management, provider networks, and handling of complaints and appeals; Continuing the TCLI principles through Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and extending the functions of in-reach, transition, and diversion to additional populations; Engagement and coordination of local health functions in the context of Medicaid Transformation; and Accountability for State-funded Services, TCLI functions, and local health functions.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities - 06/22/2019

~~“Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1)Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;(2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes—

(i)Instruction;(ii)Related services;(iii)Community experiences;(iv)The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and(v)If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

(b)Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Eligible Training Provider Guidelines - 06/17/2019

~~“WIOA  seeks  to  promote  a  training  environment  that  fosters  customer  choice, performance  accountability  and  continuous  improvement  in  the  attainment  of skills,  credentials,  certificates,  and  diplomas  that  lead  to  employment  in occupations in demand in the local economy. Such an environment will enhance quality of  life  for  customers.  WIOA sets   forth  the  requirements  and  general processes by which training providers and programs can be included on the state Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) by validating that all listed providers and their programs meet minimum state standards.Action: Effective immediately, Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) should utilize the attached guidelines in the review and approval of training providers and their programs of study. In addition, all WDBs should create or update existing policy to ensure compliance with this policy statement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“In 2019, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) and Disability Rights North Carolina signed a memorandum of understanding to phase out the use of segregated work adjustment training in the Vocational Rehabilitation program by October 1, 2021, with the specific and mutual goals of advancing integrated work training and competitive integrated employment for per-sons with disabilities. This commitment is a significant step taken by the State towards improving the employment outcomes of people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Analysis of NC 2-1-1 No Wrong Door Callers - 05/04/2019

~~“Findings suggest that many older adults and people with disabilities in North Carolina face daily struggles to meet their most basic needs, such as housing, food, and utilities. Unmet basic needs can result in a need for higher levels of care, including long-term supports and services. Additional follow-up and analysis of callers’ needs would allow analysts to determine whether the assistance provided through NC 2-1-1 for basic needs has an impact on the ability of No Wrong Door callers to access additional services, particularly long-term supports and services.”

Systems
  • Other

Veteran’s Preference - 04/09/2019

~~“State law requires that employment preference be given for having served in the Armed Forces  of  the  United  States  on  active  duty  (for  reasons  other  than  training)  during periods of war or any other campaign, expedition, or engagement for which a campaign badge or medal is authorized by the United States Department of Defense. The  preference  to  be  accorded  eligible  veterans  shall  apply  in  initial  employment,  subsequent employment, promotions, reassignments, horizontal transfers and reduction-in-force situations”

Systems
  • Other

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) for AMH/ASAYP630 - 01/07/2019

~~“…agencies providing IPS should integrate Employment First practices into their policies, procedures, and agency mission and values. Employment First principles include that competitive employment is the first and preferred outcome for individuals with mental health and co-occurring diagnoses, that employment opportunities are integrated in the community, pay at least minimum wage, and are not set aside jobs for individuals with disabilities. Agencies shall ensure that IPS-service information is evident through marketing flyers and posters in lobbies and service areas. The agency as a whole tracks employment as an outcome for all individuals served within the Agency, not just within the IPS team.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans - 11/06/2018

~~“The NCWorks Veterans Portal is part of Governor Cooper’s NC Job Ready strategy to prepare North Carolinians for the jobs of today and tomorrow. NC Job Ready has three core principles: skills and education attainment, employer leadership to remain relevant to evolving industry needs, and local innovation to take great ideas and apply them statewide.

The NCWorks Veterans Portal features tabs that provide quick access to employment services, job fairs, education/training options, helpful tips and other resources. The portal incorporates veterans’ Military Occupation Codes in an easy-to-use job search tool so that users can find job postings that match their prior experience and training from any of the five branches of the armed services. Veterans who already have NCWorks Online accounts will use those same login credentials on this new portal. The site also helps veterans find their nearest NCWorks Career Center, where they can access free services in person and talk with professionals who specialize in helping veterans. In addition, a tab for employers helps businesses recruit candidates with military experience.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

NCWorks Veterans Portal - 10/24/2018

~~“Home to nearly 800,000 veterans and several major military installations, North Carolina has a distinguished history in serving the U.S. military veterans, and their families. This collection of resources provides services for veterans, transitioning service members, and eligible spouses to obtain employment.”

Systems
  • Other

Exceptional Children - 10/15/2018

~~“The mission of the Exceptional Children Division is to ensure that students with disabilities develop intellectually, physically, emotionally, and vocationally through the provision of an appropriate individualized education program in the least restrictive environment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

North Carolina for Military Employment - 05/26/2019

~~“Between 2015 and 2018, 78,000 service members will transition out of the military through NC’s DoD installations, adding strength to the 778,000 veterans already living in North Carolina. North Carolina’s businesses strive to support these veterans and service members by leveraging their skills to fill critical talent requirements, but often lack the resources needed to identify and hire qualified military candidates.Solution: North Carolina for Military Employment (NC4ME) is a comprehensive public-private partnership designed to make NC the number one state for military employment. Established by the Governor in 2015, NC4ME leverages existing workforce development resources and technology to implement an employer-centric strategy that:• Educates NC’s business leaders on the value of hiring a military workforce,• Shows small businesses and human resource professionals how to hire military personnel, and• Connects military talent to open jobs, education, and training opportunities in North Carolina.” 

Systems
  • Other

NC Department of Commerce Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser Act and Agricultural Outreach Plan Program Years 2012-2017 - 07/01/2012

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

~~“Our VisionChildren, youth and families are healthy, safe and successful at home, in school and in their communities…..

The Youth in Transition sub-committee is currently transitioning to a Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Young Adults in Transition. More information to come.Meetings: 4th Thursday 11 am to 3 pm at 2400 Perimeter Park Dr. MorrisvilleCo-Chairs: Kristen Hassmiller Lich & Amy HorganContact: nccoptransition@gmail.com  

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disability:IN North Carolina

~~“Disability:IN includes a network of over 160 corporations devoted to expanding opportunities for people with disabilities across enterprises.

Visit www.disabilityin.org  to see the programs and services that are offered nationally and internationally by Disability:IN.  Disability:IN North Carolina is one of 50 affiliates that provide a collective voice of positive change for people with disabilities in business. Disability:IN North Carolina provides a collective voice for groups of business leaders, human resource executives, supply chain and other professionals to join forces to increase disability inclusion and equality.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Community Rehabilitation Services

~~“Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) offer a range of employment-related and support services to Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) consumers with specialized needs.We directly administer two CRPs:WorkSource East in Goldsboro and WorkSource West in Morganton.Services include:• Vocational evaluation• Community-based assessment• Job development• Job coachingIndividual or group-supported employment and work-adjustment activities are designed to improve:• Work skills• Work behaviors• Emotional/physical tolerancesWe can extend services to people with disabilities through partnerships with independent community rehabilitation programs across the state." 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Education Savings Account Program - 01/01/2018

“Expands school choice for eligible students with disabilities in kindergarten through 12th grade.

− For students attending a registered nonpublic school or home school

− For tuition and required fees and certain other expenses related to educating a child with a disability

− Allows parents quarterly access to funds on a debit card (subject to program requirements)”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 NC APSE Fall Conference - 10/09/2019

~~“Conference Theme: Turning the Page

The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers.Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for national certification and IPS ongoing trainings.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “Left behind” population, specifically hourly wage workers in the restaurant, retail and service industries; variable income workers including farmers, fishers, foresters, the self-employed, and temporary workers; as well as traditionally underserved communities including minority groups, those with limited English proficiency, rural populations, young adults, and those who find the FFE coverage unaffordable.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are Access East (Greenville), Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (Charlotte), Council on Aging of Buncombe County (Asheville), Cumberland HealthNet (Fayetteville), and HealthNet Gaston (Gastonia). They will partner with State Unemployment Offices (NC Works), County Depts. of Social Services and Public Health, Temporary Staffing Agencies, NC Small Business and Technology Center, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations, Restaurant associations, artist groups, seasonal workforce trades, and other hourly/low-wage industries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mark Van ArnamPhone: (704) 785-0839Email: markv@legalaidnc.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (MCOs)These organizations (currently Trillium Health Resources, Cardinal Innovations, Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Vaya Health, Partners Behavioral Health, Sandhills Center, and Eastpointe) manage both state-funded and Medicaid-funded behavioral health services under contracts with DHHS. Included in the services they manage are employment training services such as Adult Developmental Vocational Program (ADVP), Supported Employment (SE), Long-Term Vocational Supports (LTVS), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS). SE, LTVS, and IPS are community-based services and have varying eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Signature Employment Grant - 01/01/2019

~~“Supporting innovative solutions with potential for public or private replication. Success is ideas that spark new models to increase employment for people with disabilities. For our 2019 grant request for proposals, we have a special interest in projects that use benefit planning, workforce incentives, and part-time employment to help people with disabilities obtain employment or re-enter the job market following injury.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Signature Employment Grant - 01/01/2018

~~“Supporting innovative solutions with potential for public or private replication. Success is ideas that spark new models to increase employment for people with disabilities. For our 2019 grant request for proposals, we have a special interest in projects that use benefit planning, workforce incentives, and part-time employment to help people with disabilities obtain employment or re-enter the job market following injury.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE White Papers and Conference Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Whole Foods Market to Pay $65,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Suit - 11/08/2018

~~“Whole Foods Market Group, Inc.,  doing business as Whole Foods Market, headquartered in Austin, Texas, will pay  $65,000 and provide other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit  brought by the U.S. Equal Employment  Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.  The EEOC had charged that Whole Foods Market  violated federal law by failing to accommodate and firing an employee because  of her disability.   

According  to the EEOC's lawsuit, Whole Foods hired Diane Butler in 2005 as a cashier for  a facility in Raleigh, N.C. Butler has polycystic kidney disease, a genetic  disease causing uncontrolled growth of cysts in the kidney, eventually leading  to kidney failure. In 2009, while working for Whole Foods, Butler had a kidney  transplant. The EEOC said that in December 2015, Butler missed work on two  occasions because she had been hospitalized and needed to visit the doctor  because of her kidney. The EEOC further alleged that although Butler informed  Whole Foods that she needed time off due to her kidney impairment, the company  nonetheless fired Butler because of her absences.

Such  alleged conduct violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which  protects employees from discrimination based on a disability and requires  employers to provide employees with disabilities with reasonable accommodations  unless it would be an undue hardship.”

Systems
  • Other

DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative".   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

CAP/DA Renewal (3.5) - 07/01/2019

~~“Habilitation Services.The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services. Services for Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness.The state assures that federal financial participation (FFP) will not be claimed in expenditures for waiver services including, but not limited to, day treatment or partial hospitalization, psychosocial rehabilitation services, and clinic services provided as home and community-based services to individuals with chronic mental illnesses if these individuals, in the absence of a waiver, would be placed in an IMD and are: (1) age22 to 64; (2) age 65 and older and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR §440.140; or(3) age 21 and under and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR § 440.160.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina’s Care Management Strategy for Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 05/29/2019

~~“"The first priority of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (the Department) is the health and well-being of the individuals we serve. As North Carolina transitions its Medicaid and NC Health Choice programs from a predominantly fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system to managed care, the Department is focused on building robust and effective models for managing beneficiaries’ comprehensive needs through care management. Over a five-year period, the majority of Medicaid and NC Health Choice beneficiaries will transition to one of two types of prepaid health plans (PHPs), customized to the populations they serve.  More about Medicaid plans can be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina’s Medicaid Managed Care Quality Strategy - 04/18/2019

~~“This Quality Strategy focuses on measuring quality performance and outcomes in the early years of managed care, affecting the populations that will transition to managed care immediately (outlined above); it will expand to capture additional populations asthey are brought into managed care over time. During the transition, North Carolina will continue to operate LME-MCOs, which will provide behavioral health and I/DD services to populations excluded or delayed from mandatory enrollment in PHPs at launch. LME-MCOs will continue to administer the Innovations and TBI waivers, and the fee-for-service Medicaid program will continue to run the CAP/C and CAP/DA waivers. During this time of transition, the quality measures and requirements for each of these special programs and for LME-MCOs will remain in place, and all State Medicaid programs will be focused on the unifying Aims outlined in the section that follows.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a §1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services Waiver Original Base Waiver Number: NC.0423 Draft ID:NC.025.03.00 - 01/01/2019

~~“This waiver is requested in order to provide home and community-based waiver services to individuals who, but for the provision of such services, would require the following level(s) of care, the costs of which would be reimbursed under the approved Medicaid State plan… intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) (as defined in 42 CFR §440.150)”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina Receives 1115 Waiver Approval, a Major Milestone for Medicaid and NC Health Care System - 10/24/2018

~~“North Carolina today received federal approval to implement the transition to Medicaid managed care and integrate physical health, behavioral health and pharmacy benefits. Receiving approval from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) of the amended 1115 Demonstration Waiver application submitted by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services in 2017 is a major milestone in implementing North Carolina’s Medicaid Transformation and in moving the state’s health care system toward further integration and coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Transformation and the 1115 Waiver - 04/26/2017

~~This is a Power Point Presentation from the “NC Tide Spring Conference’.  It has information on the current “Medicaid Landscape’ both across the country and specifically in North Carolina.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Managed Care in North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Phablet

Snapshot

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1%
Change from
2018 to 2019
10,488,084
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.06%
Change from
2018 to 2019
680,459
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.42%
Change from
2018 to 2019
243,128
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.48%
Change from
2018 to 2019
35.73%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.28%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.41%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 10,488,084
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 680,459
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 243,128
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,334,273
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.73%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.41%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 647,620
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 711,905
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 959,032
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 307,957
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 62,411
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 23,544
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 19,790
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 457
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 29,862
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 18,883

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 9,206
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 311,730

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 22,773
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 68,579
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 77,889
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 29.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,728
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,644
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 700
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 43.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 6.97

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,562
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 466,920
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 1,301
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,433

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $21,556,297
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $12,386,109
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $124,881,442
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $319,889,110
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 10,272
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,176
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 6,415
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.42

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.85%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.02%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.81%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 85.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.01%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 62.83%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 77.70%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.82%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

The continued growth of the statewide network of supported employment service providers has resulted from collaboration between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services and entities such as the North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities, the North Carolina International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services, NCCDD and the Mental Health Consumers’ Organization. In addition, the North Carolina Association for Persons Supporting Employment First (NCAPSE) provides a forum for focusing on supported employment standards and expanded choices for individuals with the most significant disabilities in the state. (Page 198) Title I

Customized Employment

~~In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The DVRS VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because DVRS will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to DVRS when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools DVRS utilizes for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through it’s continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DVRS will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Services for the Blind (DSB) VR program is collaborating with community rehabilitation programs and other agencies and organizations to provide extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. Because the DSB VR program will only utilize community rehabilitation programs that give written commitment that they will provide extended services compliant with Federal regulations as supported employment vendors, many of those community rehabilitation programs providing SE services also provide extended services under their service contract at no additional cost to the Division when other resources for extended services are not available. The Request for Application (RFA) is one of the key tools utilized for contract and program development, in which the entity submitting the application has completed much of the foundational work in leveraging and braiding resources from other public and private funds. And, through its continued participation on interagency committees and collaboration efforts, DSB will continue to work with community rehabilitation programs, LME/MCOs, and other organizations to leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 328- 329) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

School to Work Transition

~~DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the Spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 183) Title I

Finally, DVRS casework policies require that transition services must promote or facilitate the achievement of the employment outcome identified in the student’s individualized plan for employment. In order to plan effectively for the transition needs of students with disabilities in collaboration with other agencies and organizations, DVRS rehabilitation counselors are expected to be active participants addressing the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting transition issues when possible. Counselors are expected to participate both directly in IEP meetings and indirectly by other means in planning for the needs of VR consumers. A copy of the transition portion of the IEP is required to be maintained in the case record. Prior to developing the IPE, the VR counselor reviews the Individual Transition Plan (ITP) component for the Individual Education Plan and records any relevant ITP objectives as part of the IPE. The intent of this review is to coordinate educational programming and vocational programming for the benefit of the VR consumer. (Page 185) Title I

Additionally, the Division’s policy stipulates that the development of the IPE with a student must be based on interests, aptitudes, capabilities, strengths and informed choice. The job choice on the IPE for a student in transition may indicate a family of jobs rather than a specific job code, for example, Health Care Worker, Office Work, and Protective Services such as police, firefighter, or security guard. DVRS policy does require career exploration to be provided and documented in order to determine a more specific goal, and this process and expectation has been further emphasized by recent policy revisions concerning development of the IPE within 90 days of the VR eligibility determination. Amended job choices, including amendments at closure, must be accompanied by documentation reflecting the process and services that had an impact on the final job choice, including job shadowing, job sampling, guidance and counseling. Moreover, DVRS casework policy stipulates that the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment must be completed as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, by the time each student determined to be eligible for VR services leaves the school setting. This includes students with disabilities who are eligible for VR services including eligible students served by the school under an IEP.(Page 185) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school.

Within the current formal interagency agreement between DVRS and DPI, mutual interagency responsibilities include:
• Mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities.
• Designation of an individual from Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions to serve as liaison with each other to represent the services of the two agencies.
• Exchange of information deemed pertinent and of mutual concern regarding service delivery.
• Interagency cooperation in transition planning for students with disabilities.
• A mutual system to be developed and maintained to ensure that appropriate referrals are made to each party. (Page 186) Title I

The current interagency agreement between DVRS and the state education agency stipulates that transition planning for students with disabilities will be a cooperative effort. Furthermore, the agreements specifically require mutual participation of appropriate personnel in the development of the transition component of the Individualized Education Program and the Individualized Plan for Employment for students with disabilities. The sharing of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) at the local level is strongly encouraged. DVRS VR counselors are required to review a student’s transition component of the IEP and incorporate, as appropriate, a description of relevant objectives in the IPE. Furthermore, a comprehensive evaluation will be completed by the State agency on each eligible individual, to the degree necessary, to determine the vocational goal and scope of VR services to be included in the IPE. The agreements state that the student with the disability is expected to fully participate in the development of the plan and any plan amendments. The agreements specify that the DVRS VR counselors will provide the individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. Additionally, the agreement requires that the VR counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. (Page 189) Title I

As part of the agreement, DVRS Rehabilitation Counselors will provide individuals with information sufficient to make an informed choice among alternative goals, objectives, services, entities providing such services and methods to procure such services. The counselor is to review the IPE with the individual or his/her representative at least once each year. The VR counselor will provide each eligible individual an IPE Handbook wherein there is an appeals process outlined. Information pertaining to the Client Assistance Program (CAP) is included in the handbook. The VR counselor agrees not to close an individual’s record as having achieved a successful employment outcome until the person exits school and is determined that the individual has successfully completed the IPE. (Page 190-191) Title I

On—going support provided during extended services must include a minimum of twice—monthly monitoring at the work site to assess job stability unless under special circumstances, especially at the request of the individual, the IPE provides for off—site monitoring and based upon that assessment, the coordination or provision of specific services at or away from the work site, that are needed to maintain employment stability. If off—site monitoring is determined to be appropriate, it must, at a minimum, consist of two (2) face—to—face meetings with the client and one employer contact monthly. These activities apply to all supported employment clients and not only those whose services are provided through funds reserved pursuant to section 603(d), for youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title IV

Currently, NC’s Capacity Building Plan is focused on improving student involvement in the individualized education program (IEP) process so that planning is more meaningful and associated with a student’s post-school goals. The state is continuing to work on a Transition Toolkit for teachers and anticipates the development of toolkits for parents, students, and agencies that will be individualized at the local level. DPI consultants are providing transition training to LEAs to promote student-led IEPs, and NC DVR plans to provide training to VR counselors and LEA representatives in the spring of 2016 to focus on the role of the VR Counselor in the IEP process. (Page 250) Title IV

DSB currently offers a wide variety of services to students with visual impairments or blindness in transition to the world of work. Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor. The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. A formal cooperative agreement exists with the NC Department of Public Instruction, which consists of 115 local education agencies (LEA’s), 128 charter schools, 1 regional school and 2 education entities. The emphasis of the Memorandum of Agreement with DPI is on students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired, being served by local education agencies (LEA’s) and the schools who are of transition age (14 to 21) and who need VR services to become employed. This agreement acknowledges the role of DSB in providing these services and encourages local LEA’s and schools to develop working relationships with the staff who cover their corresponding areas and encourages referring students, sharing information and facilitating joint involvement in IEP meetings. DSB shares information about the transition program and provides technical assistance and consultation to DPI, LEA’s, and schools regarding accommodations and assistive technology that will help facilitate the education and VR of students who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired. (Page 289) Title IV

Each student served by the DSB VR program must have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) approved by a qualified DSB rehabilitation counselor (this is not required for the receipt of Pre-Employment Transition Services). The IPE incorporates transitional elements of the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP), along with the student’s plans for transitioning from secondary school to employment. DSB transition staff and VR counselors are expected to participate in student IEP meetings pertaining to transition matters. Local school systems provide students services that are within its legal responsibility and customary practice. These services are provided without cost to the Division. DSB provides transitional and supportive services that are not available through the local school systems. All costs for services for which a student is found eligible is paid for through DSB VR case service funds. (Page 291) Title IV

DSB has also enlarged the transition rehabilitation services presently offered for students 14-21 years of age in North Carolina who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired by adding specific Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS): (1) Student Counseling on Transition/Higher Ed Training Opportunities- Required Student Workplace Readiness Training; (2) Student Self-Advocacy Training; (3) Student Job Exploration Counseling; (4) Student Job Exploration Counseling Materials; and Student Work Based Learning Experience Maintenance. These services are provided to all students with visual impairments, blindness, or deaf-blindness whether they are eligible or potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 294) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~North Carolina has a strong career pathway strategy in place that expanded on the work done over the last decade by the K-12 and community college systems. The current strategy includes a certification process by the NCWorks Commission that requires eight key element be in place to ensure pathways are comprehensive with multiple entry and exit ramps for in-demand occupations. Specific strategies to continue to strengthen and use career pathways are listed below.
o Continue to support and promote the development of NCWorks Certified Career Pathways for critical industry clusters.
o Require workforce development partners use the career pathways to target resources towards helping individuals gain the skills and experience needed for in-demand occupations. 
o Provide programs that link low-skilled adults and individuals with barriers to employment to career pathways and job-ready skills along with basic skills. (Page 36) Title I

Support collaborative efforts under the vocational rehabilitation program to provide individuals with disabilities the rehabilitative services, training, and supports needed to obtain or maintain employment, including utilization of career pathways. 
The vocational rehabilitation programs will incorporate, to the maximum extent possible, career pathways within their services to individuals with disabilities through approaches to include increase emphasis and reference of career pathways during comprehensive assessment of individuals’ skills, interests and aptitudes and during counseling and guidance sessions with individuals. 
Program leadership will promote to staff and service recipients the use of established resources highlighting information about career pathways and in-demand occupations; increase emphasis on established career pathways and career growth when developing employment goals and individualized plans for employment with services and training that directly support the employment objectives; remain actively engaged with workforce partners in the collaborative development of career pathways and identify particular issues or challenges individuals with disabilities may encounter when adopting a career within an established career pathway or enhancements that may be particularly favorable for the populations served by the state’s vocational rehabilitation programs. (Page 47) Title I

OJT is a viable and compatible part of North Carolina’s Integrated Services Delivery services. Local workforce development board OJT policy is critical for consistency, institutionalizing services the local board seeks to deliver, and managing and leveraging OJT funds. Local OJT policy also provides guidance on how to comply with federal and state OJT requirements and leverage other hiring. (Page 62) Title I

DVRS staff plan to expand the role of employers in vocational evaluation and career development services. DVRS will be enhancing policies around internships and OJT services so that the service procedures are consistent with employer practices while still preparing the individual for competitive employment. DVRS plans to work towards a service definition that is complementary to other internship and OJT programs available in the state through our workforce system partners. (Page 65) Title I

Provision of Transition Services through Coordination with Employers

While youth and students with disabilities have access to the same VR services as adults, there are some VR services reserved for or targeted to transition-aged youth for the purposes of assisting them with leaving high school and preparing for competitive employment. The division plans to focus on program development in the coming year in order to meet the 15% required spending allocation for Pre- Employment Transition Services (PETS) to students with disabilities. A number of areas of program development are focused on increased engagement with employers in order to implement PETS. These include: summer internships for students and youth with disabilities including on-the-job supports, increased utilization of OJT for students and youth, and increasing the number of Project Search © sites. (Pages 65-66) Title I

DVRS will work on enhancing OJT utilization for students and youth with disabilities as well by engaging business in the development of young talent. DVRS plans to streamline OJT processes, revise policies so that they are complementary to similar OJT programs, and improve marketing and tracking materials and processes so that the materials are engaging to both student/youth participants and potential business as well as easy to complete and accessible. (Page 66) Title I

By enhancing and incorporating new programs that promote and support work-based experiences, DVRS will continue its commitment to students in pursuit of a high school diploma through the Occupational Course of Study (OCS), a pathway established by the NC Board of Education for students with IEPs to achieve a high school diploma by completing occupational coursework and work experiences. DVRS has recently revised policies for In-School Work Adjustment services to students with significant or most significant disabilities. The service is coordinated through school-based agreements to incentivize a student’s participation in school-coordinated work experiences by providing guidance and counseling as well as an incentive payment to students for improvements in work behaviors and attitudes. The Division continues to offer internship and OJT services to students, but hopes to increase utilization and improve feasibility for students, schools, and partnering businesses through policy and procedure revisions and collaboration with workforce system partners. Other PETS programs/services under consideration are intended to address students’ expectations around pursuing employment and to improve their preparedness for participating in additional rehabilitation services, such as training and placement. (Page 184) Title I

Beyond increasing consumers’ participation in career-oriented post-secondary education/training, some of the other strategies that DVRS has established under this goal are to develop and build quality relationships with businesses that offer strong salaries and benefits and to continue offering the internship services, which, compared to an OJT experience, are geared more toward individuals who have completed their specialized training and need work experience to get their careers established. This service has been very well received by staff and consumers and we expect to continue the service. Another strategy that DVRS is employing to increase the earning potential of individuals who have entrepreneurial skills is through the support the Division has made available through a dedicated Small Business Specialist on staff who helps support staff and consumers in their assessment of this option as a fit and when it is mutually determined as such, coordination of local resources and ongoing supports for the consumer pursuing this option. (Pages 251-252) Title IV

Objective 1.1.1. The total number of individuals exiting the VR program in employment will exceed that of the prior year: One of the strategies for achieving this increase is for the DVRS VR program to utilize on-the-job training (OJT) without supports. Wage subsidies for OJT are funded at a reduced amount relative to when additional funding for these services was available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and both greater utilization of OJT and number of corresponding employment outcomes through OJT was achieved. A full wage subsidy and making the process more convenient for employers would increase OJT utilization and outcomes. (Page 266-267) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers): o disabilities; o homelessness; o unemployed for at least 27 weeks; o criminal background (released within the last 12 months); o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and o between 18—24 years old. Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~A separate data file exchange process is maintained for uploading VR participant information to the SSA portal for the SSA Ticket-to-Work program. This file exchange process isn’t fully automated and is limited to establishing VR participant in-use status and eligibility for agency cost reimbursement. An interface with Department of Commerce, Division of Employment Security provides quarterly State unemployment insurance wage records and related information to establish whether a former VR participant is working at the level of substantial gainful activity for agency cost-reimbursement under the Ticket-to-Work program. (Page 83) Title I

Major service gaps or barriers DVRS experiences when fulfilling this need most generally in terms of: (a) consumers’ needs for VR services, but lack of motivation to become employed, some of which is driven by disincentives to work, including the potential loss of SSI, SSDI or other public benefits; and(b) the lack of resources, including time, additional counselor positions, and expertise required for better counseling and guidance. The lack of resources was said to be in part due to counselor vacancies, lack of support staff, and attention to non-counseling related activities, such as focusing on meeting performance measures and processing paperwork.

Recommended solutions for DVRS to increase its capacity for counseling and guidance and help further motivate consumers to enter or reenter the workforce, particularly those receiving SSI or SSDI benefits included increasing VR counseling capacity through: (a) smaller caseloads; (b) paperwork reduction; (c) a decreased focus on performance measures and increase attention to holistic counseling; (d) hiring additional counselors and support staff; and increasing the quality of VR counselors through training and higher salaries. These were said to attract and retain high quality counselors and allow the counselors more one-on-one time with the consumer to provide counseling and guidance, including motivational counseling. The most frequently mentioned solution for increasing client motivation for our consumers receiving public benefits, such as SSI or SSDI, was to increase benefits counseling services. (Page 225) Title IV

Through NC DVR's participation in the RSA- funded Technical Assistance Project "E3TC" Empower Educate Employ Targeted Communities, the need for an expansion of the certified Work Incentive and Planning Assistance (WIPA) counselors network was identified as an area where NC DVRS and NC DSB will plan to utilize innovation and expansion funds to help accomplish this during the 2018 and 2019 program years. (Page 258) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~DVRS plans to increase the quantity and improve the quality of business partnerships in the future with the expectation that an increased number and depth in business relationships will result in increased opportunities to assist individuals with disabilities with vocational evaluation and career development, job seeker preparation, and job development and job placement. DVRS plans to identify methods for capturing information on employment relationships within our case management system in order to map out the presence of business partnerships and identify opportunities for growth and means for leveraging peer-to-peer marketing of VR business services.  (Page 65) Title I

DVRS will continue to explore unique business partnerships that benefit the unique training and recruitment needs of students and youth with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities. DVRS plans to continue partnering on Project Search © sites where there is a need and willingness by community partners. This model places business in the middle of the training and employment of young people by hosting student interns at the business and seeking placement opportunities within the business where they may exist. Project Search © host businesses can not only support the students enrolled in projects on their site, but can also be business advocates for people with disabilities in their industries. (Page 66) Title I

The established CRP-DVRS steering committee continues to review the provision of supported employment services in North Carolina to ensure that funding is optimally utilized so that adequate funding will be available for ongoing extended services. The steering committee continues to address the issues that surround long term support funding such as inconsistencies in the levels of disability-type funding and shortages as well as looks at other best practices that can be incorporated into the NC service delivery system. In recent years, NC DMHDDSAS has partnered with DVRS to implement an ODEP grant for technical assistance. The goal of this grant was to assist NC in establishing an employment first policy, implement a plan for employer engagement, and develop a unified workforce plan. Executive leadership from DVRS met with other executive leaders from DMHDDSAS, DMA, the Department of Commerce, NCCCS, and DPI to develop the initial objectives and plan for an employment first initiative. DVRS mounted the employer engagement work group that focused on the use of technology, specifically iPads to address barriers to employment. A national subject matter expert met with select DVR and CRP staff who learned to use the iPad and related apps as well as how to speak with employers on meeting their business needs. (Pages 197-198) Title I

With regard to the need for more employers to hire and accommodate people with disabilities, barriers included: (a) lack of funding to educate business on the hidden workforce available; and (b) lack of employer knowledge of available accommodations that can be made. Solutions proposed included: (a) continued partnerships with agencies that specialize in providing services for individuals with disabilities; and (b) for other workforce agencies to train staff, educate employers, and promote hiring of individuals with disabilities to employers. With regard to the need for transportation and other Support Services, the barrier was mainly limited funding and lack of coordination. The proposed solutions were to leverage additional funding sources and improve coordination of services. Lastly, the barrier regarding the need for training and resources related to assistive technology for NCWorks Career Centers was a lack of funding and the solution proposed was to leverage resources to purchase, build infrastructure, and install technology that assist individuals with disabilities. (Page 233) Title IV

Data Collection

In March 2017, DVRS and DSB jointly entered an intensive technical assistance agreement with WINTAC to receive technical assistance with implementation and performance enhancement in the areas of the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services, Customized Employment and related services; Extend the provision of services to unreached youth with disabilities in Juvenile Development Centers; linking individual staff performance with corporately collected Common Performance Measures; and Improving systems integration with the NCWorks Career Centers across the state. (Page 252) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~The Education Opportunities for Students with Disabilities report to the North Carolina General Assembly for 2016 establishes WIOA as foundational federal legislation upon which the state policies and practices concerning system needs are established and aligned. Specific elements of the Unified State Plan and Opportunities Act that have been incorporated include the earmarked Title IV funding, representing roughly $16 million, for pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities who are eligible or ‘potentially eligible’ for the VR program; the restrictions on subminimum wage employment so that individuals with even the most significant disabilities are encouraged and permitted to pursue competitive integrated employment; the expansion of the triennial statewide comprehensive needs assessment under Title IV to focus on the vocational rehabilitation needs of youth with disabilities; and performance measures aligned with the WIOA Performance Accountability measures for youth as statewide indicators of North Carolina’s success. (Page 52) Title I

In order to ensure effective facilitation of the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, DVRS maintains both a joint formal agreement with the Exceptional Children and Career Technical Education Divisions of DPI and also maintains 99 separately held TPCAs with local education agencies (LEA’s) or school programs. The agreement with DPI will be revised upon issuance of the final regulations for Title IV to account for new mandates concerning PETS, serving the “potentially eligible,” Section 511 impacts on contracted services between schools and programs operated under a subminimum wage certificate, and a number of other new requirements. Additionally, in that the agreement is not only with the Exceptional Children’s division of the SEA, but also the Career and Technical Education division, NC DVR hopes to leverage partnerships that create more opportunity for students with disabilities to advance along a career pathway and to participate in work-based experiences beginning in high school. (Page 186) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Cooperative agreements or memorandum of agreements have been established with all local area workforce boards. The agreements provide for the following strategies:  Provision of inter-component staff training and technical assistance with regard to the availability and benefits of, and information on eligibility standards for vocational rehabilitation services; and the promotion of equal, effective, and meaningful participation by individuals with disabilities receiving workforce development system services in all of the states NCWorks Career Centers in the state through the promotion of accessibility; the use of non-discriminatory policies and procedures; the provision of reasonable accommodations; auxiliary aids and services, and rehabilitation technology for persons with disabilities. (Page 57) Title I

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) currently utilizes a dual customer approach by providing services to both businesses and individuals with disabilities. The division emphasizes the definition and marketing of business services to ensure the dual customer approach is recognized and implemented. Business services include recruitment, hiring, consultation on Section 503 compliance, sensitivity/diversity training, accessibility consultation, internships, on-the-job training (OJT), education on tax incentives, and follow-up and job retention services. (Page 64) Title I

Both physical and programmatic accessibility are essential for all individuals to participate in services offered by the NCWorks Career Centers and the collaborating community partners. With employment as the ultimate objective, accessibility to facilities and programs offered as legislated by the Americans with Disabilities Act is essential to support individuals with significant barriers to employment to achieve employment. The physical accessibility of facilities is systematically addressed across the state. The State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. NCWorks Career Centers also utilize the North Carolina Department of Commerce Division of Workforce Solutions Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance Review Checklist to ensure access to the entire range of services at each location. As a part of the certification process to become an NCWorks Career Center, each site is required to obtain a letter of ADA compliance from the host agency. ADA compliance is monitored and reviewed on an annual basis by the NC Department of Commerce and the host agency. Sites are required to maintain and update accessibility as ADA regulations are revised and NCWorks Career Center Certifications are renewed. (Page 109) Title I

Career Center Certification Accessibility Criteria: o Adequate handicapped parking with compliant curb ramp(s) connected to the accessibility route into the Center(s). o Handicapped parking must be clearly marked. o Entrance and exit must be accessible and free of obstacles with appropriate signage. o Pedestrian routes inside the host agency facility must be accessible and free of obstacles. o Entrance and exit doors are required to be equipped with hardware that is usable with one hand without tight grasping, pinching or twisting of the wrist. o Furniture inside the Center must be arranged to allow wheelchair access. o Computer and desk workstations must be wheelchair accessible. o Restrooms must be appropriately accessible. o Auxiliary aids and services must be available upon request as are interpreter services for ESL customers. o Emergency drills are to be conducted annually and staff is to be provided with host agency procedures. (Page 110) Title I

During program year 2016 Career Center staff will receive training to follow established procedures to ensure inclusion and programmatic accessibility to center services. This training, comprised of eight half—day sessions across the state, will allow staff to better understand the different types of disabilities, how to handle issues of disclosure and disability identification with sensitivity at program intake, and how to determine the most effective mix of services and referrals to make when a disability is identified. These trainings will be presented by subject matter experts and include such topics as: federal, state, and local disability policies; identifying barriers/hidden disabilities; disability awareness and etiquette; website accessibility; providing reasonable accommodations; assistive technology accommodations and resources; Section 503 for federal contractors; and simulation training. (Page 110) Title I

Assistive Technology services and devices are provided to eligible individuals statewide who require them. Rehabilitation technology and assistive technology services are sponsored and provided to the degree necessary to complete the rehabilitation program. Included are services and devices which can supplement and enhance an individual’s functions such as adapted computer access, augmentative communication, specialized seating and mobility, vehicle modifications, and services which can have an impact on the environment, such as accessibility, job re-design, work site modification and residence modification. Application of the available engineering and assistive technology services and technologies is important when making determinations of eligibility particularly for individuals with significant and most significant disabilities. Rehabilitation engineering evaluations and services are not subject to an individual’s financial eligibility; however, devices, equipment and modifications recommended by the engineer are subject to financial eligibility. (Page 179) Title I

E. The Department of Health and Human Services through the DSB will provide technical consultation and assistance to both the LEA and to the DPI regarding the accessibility of hardware and software for use by students with visual impairments, modifications that can be made to better facilitate the education and vocational rehabilitation of students with visual impairments. Orientation and mobility services for students will be addressed on a student-by-student basis at the local level. (Page 293) Title IV

Veterans

The Department of Commerce provides a Veteran Services Program across the state to assist veterans with employment. The Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs) assist veterans with overcoming barriers through intensive, targeted services. Local Veteran Employment Representatives (LVERs) reach out to employers to advocate for hiring Veterans. Recent changes to the federal policies concerning the roles of these staff that serve veterans have been made to ensure that eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive the best combination of services, according to their needs. The agency determined that to accomplish this refocusing, Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists will serve only those veterans and eligible spouses most in need of the intensive services to address significant barriers to employment. As a result, DVOP specialists will serve fewer veterans and eligible spouses, but will be able to provide more intensive services. The current referral process is to have the veteran complete a questionnaire upon their arrival in the NCWorks Career Center. They are asked to check if they have any of the following (barriers):

o disabilities;

o homelessness;

o unemployed for at least 27 weeks;

o criminal background (released within the last 12 months);

o no high school diploma or GED; o low income; and

o between 18—24 years old.

Veterans with any of these barriers are then referred to a DVOP, or in the limited locations without a DVOP, the veteran will be given a priority of service and will be assisted by another career center staff. Included in career counseling conversations with veterans, staff inform veterans of the Registered Apprenticeship program and the eligibility and utilization of GI Bill Benefits for the apprenticeship program. (Page 108) Title I

Since 2015 DVRS has progressively increased their collaborative efforts with NCATP and other AgrAbility partners to provide assistive technologies and related services to farmers and farmworkers within the state. There have also been joint outreach efforts to Veterans with disabilities who may be interested in pursuing agriculturally-oriented occupations. (Page 180) Title I In addition, DVRS represents the agency on the “Governor’s Working Group on Service Members, Veterans, and their Families,” which is a collaborative monthly meeting that serves as a resource clearinghouse for addressing issues of returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan and other service members.

Outreach efforts between DVRS, the Veterans Administration, and other military operations have occurred to ensure that veterans and their family members are aware of services available to them through DVRS. An agreement between DVRS and Veterans Administration’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program was implemented in late 2014, which is intended to maximize mutual services for Veterans and ensure a more streamlined referrals process between the two agencies. (Page 199) Title I

Goal 4.3. DSB will identify ways by which DSB can assist veterans with disabilities to become able to obtain, maintain or regain employment. Strategy 4.3.1. DSB will meet with officials working with veterans who are visually impaired, blind or deaf blind to educate them regarding services that are available to veterans with disabilities through DSB. (Page 339) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The North Carolina Division of Vocational Services (DVRS) has developed a cooperative agreement with both NC Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and NC Division of Medical Assistance (DMA) for the purpose of establishing cooperative guidelines to ensure individuals with disabilities have equal access to employment services, a continuum of employment services, and independent community living. The relationship among the divisions continues to improve services for both individuals with mental illness and substance abuse disorders and individuals with developmental disabilities has been enhanced over the past several years through changes in personnel at DMHDDSAS as well as a change in their focus towards a recovery oriented system of care which incorporates employment as a goal for consumers. Due to continuously changing staff, ongoing efforts are required to maintain an effective working relationship between both divisions. (Page 196) Title I

DMHDDSA has also developed a state definition for supported employment and long term vocational support using the IPS model of supported employment as well as increased the hourly rate to meet the needs of the providers. North Carolina’s definition calls for the inclusion of Peer Support Services as a mandatory service available to individuals with services paid through funds from the local management entity. Through this definition, if an individual with mental health disabilities chooses DVRS as their supported employment provider and the person is served through the Local Management Entity/Managed Care Organization (LME/MCO) system, they will be able to receive long term vocational supports (LTVS). Each VR office will have a liaison specifically for those CRP agencies providing IPS model of SE. (Page 197) Title I

DVRS continues to partner with the DMHDDSAS in implementing individual placement and support supported employment (IPS SE) throughout the state. Currently, there are 35 IPS SE programs throughout the state and DVRS contracts with 13 of them. DVRS offers such programs the opportunity to apply to become and IPS contractor through an ongoing RFA. DVRS also works alongside the DMHDDSAS and the University of NC Chapel Hill Institute for Best Practices staff to conduct onsite fidelity reviews of the IPS SE programs, training of IPS Teams, including DVRS field staff, statewide IPS learning collaborative, provider steering committees, monthly calls with the Rockville Institute (formerly the Dartmouth Supported Employment Center), as well as the annual IPS SE Rockville Institute’s Learning Collaborative. DVRS also works with DMHDDSAS to inform providers and beneficiaries on the impact of employment on federal and state benefits and have collaborated in efforts to increase capacity of benefits counseling experts in the state. (Page 204) Title IV

• The development of effective collaborative efforts with the NC DHHS-Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) to provide consistent funding for extended supported employment addressed the need for VR Program participants to receive follow-along services, even after their case was successfully closed. (Page 235) Title IV

The North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) is partnering with the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (DMHDDSAS) and other divisions and departments in developing competitive, integrated employment opportunities. DVRS establishes and maintains contracts or agreements with over 120 private for profit and non-profit VR service providers providing an array of services to DVRS consumers. One hundred two (102) private-non-profit VR service providers have established performance-based contracts with the Division, where the organizations are administered funds when an individual receiving services within their program has achieved designated goals or "milestones" on their way toward their ultimate goal of competitive employment. Almost all supported employment and work adjustment services provided through community rehabilitation programs were transitioned from a fee for services hourly rate payment system to a milestone payment system. Additionally, performance-based cooperative agreements engaging non-profit organizations encompass brain injury support services, multiple (currently 14) Project SEARCH™ sites and the provision of Pre Employment Transition Services. This system and its implementation were developed in collaboration with the community rehabilitation provider community through representation via the CRP-DVRS steering subcommittee and other means of stakeholder input. (Page 245) Title IV

DSB has reached out to the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services to begin discussions regarding how our agencies might work together to better serve the needs of North Carolinians with multiple disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 68

Medicaid Managed Care Policy Paper North Carolina’s Design for State-Funded Services Under Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 12/30/2019

“This policy paper details the Department’s vision for the delivery of State-funded behavioral health, iintellectual and developmental disability (I/DD), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) services I/DD, as well as the continuation of critical “local health functions” under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and covers the following areas:

Provision of State-funded Services under Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans, including eligibility, available services, care management, provider networks, and handling of complaints and appeals; Continuing the TCLI principles through Behavioral Health I/DD Tailored Plans and extending the functions of in-reach, transition, and diversion to additional populations; Engagement and coordination of local health functions in the context of Medicaid Transformation; and Accountability for State-funded Services, TCLI functions, and local health functions.
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Data Sharing

2019 NC APSE Fall Conference - 10/09/2019

~~“Conference Theme: Turning the Page

The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers.Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for national certification and IPS ongoing trainings.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of North Carolina, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “Left behind” population, specifically hourly wage workers in the restaurant, retail and service industries; variable income workers including farmers, fishers, foresters, the self-employed, and temporary workers; as well as traditionally underserved communities including minority groups, those with limited English proficiency, rural populations, young adults, and those who find the FFE coverage unaffordable.  The Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are Access East (Greenville), Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (Charlotte), Council on Aging of Buncombe County (Asheville), Cumberland HealthNet (Fayetteville), and HealthNet Gaston (Gastonia). They will partner with State Unemployment Offices (NC Works), County Depts. of Social Services and Public Health, Temporary Staffing Agencies, NC Small Business and Technology Center, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations, Restaurant associations, artist groups, seasonal workforce trades, and other hourly/low-wage industries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mark Van ArnamPhone: (704) 785-0839Email: markv@legalaidnc.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

CAP/DA Renewal (3.5) - 07/01/2019

~~“Habilitation Services.The state assures that prevocational, educational, or supported employment services, or a combination of these services, if provided as habilitation services under the waiver are: (1) not otherwise available to the individual through a local educational agency under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and, (2) furnished as part of expanded habilitation services. Services for Individuals with Chronic Mental Illness.The state assures that federal financial participation (FFP) will not be claimed in expenditures for waiver services including, but not limited to, day treatment or partial hospitalization, psychosocial rehabilitation services, and clinic services provided as home and community-based services to individuals with chronic mental illnesses if these individuals, in the absence of a waiver, would be placed in an IMD and are: (1) age22 to 64; (2) age 65 and older and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR §440.140; or(3) age 21 and under and the state has not included the optional Medicaid benefit cited in 42 CFR § 440.160.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities - 06/22/2019

~~“Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1)Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation;(2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes—

(i)Instruction;(ii)Related services;(iii)Community experiences;(iv)The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and(v)If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

(b)Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Eligible Training Provider Guidelines - 06/17/2019

~~“WIOA  seeks  to  promote  a  training  environment  that  fosters  customer  choice, performance  accountability  and  continuous  improvement  in  the  attainment  of skills,  credentials,  certificates,  and  diplomas  that  lead  to  employment  in occupations in demand in the local economy. Such an environment will enhance quality of  life  for  customers.  WIOA sets   forth  the  requirements  and  general processes by which training providers and programs can be included on the state Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) by validating that all listed providers and their programs meet minimum state standards.Action: Effective immediately, Workforce Development Boards (WDBs) should utilize the attached guidelines in the review and approval of training providers and their programs of study. In addition, all WDBs should create or update existing policy to ensure compliance with this policy statement.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • WIOA

North Carolina’s Care Management Strategy for Behavioral Health and Intellectual/Developmental Disability Tailored Plans - 05/29/2019

~~“"The first priority of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (the Department) is the health and well-being of the individuals we serve. As North Carolina transitions its Medicaid and NC Health Choice programs from a predominantly fee-for-service (FFS) delivery system to managed care, the Department is focused on building robust and effective models for managing beneficiaries’ comprehensive needs through care management. Over a five-year period, the majority of Medicaid and NC Health Choice beneficiaries will transition to one of two types of prepaid health plans (PHPs), customized to the populations they serve.  More about Medicaid plans can be found by accessing the weblink."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina for Military Employment - 05/26/2019

~~“Between 2015 and 2018, 78,000 service members will transition out of the military through NC’s DoD installations, adding strength to the 778,000 veterans already living in North Carolina. North Carolina’s businesses strive to support these veterans and service members by leveraging their skills to fill critical talent requirements, but often lack the resources needed to identify and hire qualified military candidates.Solution: North Carolina for Military Employment (NC4ME) is a comprehensive public-private partnership designed to make NC the number one state for military employment. Established by the Governor in 2015, NC4ME leverages existing workforce development resources and technology to implement an employer-centric strategy that:• Educates NC’s business leaders on the value of hiring a military workforce,• Shows small businesses and human resource professionals how to hire military personnel, and• Connects military talent to open jobs, education, and training opportunities in North Carolina.” 

Systems
  • Other

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“Local Management Entities/Managed Care Organizations (MCOs)These organizations (currently Trillium Health Resources, Cardinal Innovations, Alliance Behavioral Healthcare, Vaya Health, Partners Behavioral Health, Sandhills Center, and Eastpointe) manage both state-funded and Medicaid-funded behavioral health services under contracts with DHHS. Included in the services they manage are employment training services such as Adult Developmental Vocational Program (ADVP), Supported Employment (SE), Long-Term Vocational Supports (LTVS), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS). SE, LTVS, and IPS are community-based services and have varying eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Moving into the Economic Mainstream - 05/10/2019

~~“In 2019, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) and Disability Rights North Carolina signed a memorandum of understanding to phase out the use of segregated work adjustment training in the Vocational Rehabilitation program by October 1, 2021, with the specific and mutual goals of advancing integrated work training and competitive integrated employment for per-sons with disabilities. This commitment is a significant step taken by the State towards improving the employment outcomes of people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities - 04/01/2019

~~“An effort 10 years in the making came to fruition when the North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) witnessed Governor Roy Cooper sign an Executive Order declaring North Carolina as an “Employment First” state.  For North Carolinians, this means that gainful employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome of publicly-funded services for all citizens with disabilities - regardless of disability – in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations to achieve and maintain employment.

The expectations of an Employment First state are to emphasize the importance of employment services focusing on skills and an individual’s goals and contributions. It does not mean that employment is the only outcome for all; rather, that employment is the expectation, not the exception.

Congratulations, North Carolina, and hats off to those who worked hard to make us an Employment First State!

And this month, Governor Roy Cooper appointed new members to NCCDD, and we cannot wait to work with them as we keep moving forward towards achieving our Five Year Plan goals.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

House Bill 984 Oversight IDD Employment/Education Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“AN ACT TO CREATE A POSITION WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 3 HUMAN SERVICES TO OVERSEE ADMINISTRATION AND COORDINATION OF 4 EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH 5 INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, AS RECOMMENDED BY 6 THE LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH COMMISSION COMMITTEE ON INTELLECTUAL 7 AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES.

Establishment of the Position. – There is established within the Department of Health 14 and Human Services the position of Director of Education and Employment Opportunities for 15 Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Director shall have 16 professional, administrative, technical, and clerical personnel as may be necessary to assist in 17 carrying out his or her duties. The Director shall oversee the interagency coordination of 18 education and employment programs and services for individuals with intellectual and 19 developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No, 92: Employment First for North Carolinians with Disabilities - 03/29/2019

Employment First is the policy of State Agencies.  This policy reflects the state's goals to be a leader in reruitintg workers with disabilities and to create an inclusive job climate for workers with disabilities. Competitive, integrated employment is the preferred mode of employment for all North Carolinians with disabilities regardless of level of disabiity.  North Carolinianswith disabilities should be ablle to work a job of their choosihg, with reasonable support and accomodations provide to achieve and maintain employment

Employment First principles will apply to all indviduals with intellectual and developmental, physical, sensory, mental health, and substance use disorder disabilities ..

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation