Northern Mariana Islands [Territory]

States - Big Screen

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Northern Mariana Islands VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,216
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 56,562 56,882 57,216
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32 31 28
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60% 3.50% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234 235 258

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76 70 87
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104 117 149
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129 155 189
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90% 45.20% 46.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 0 0 1
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 0 826 866
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16% 83.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04% 2.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12% 60.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17% 12.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02% 48.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40% 61.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85% 36.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element

Customized Employment

~~The integration of workforce development programs is focused at an earlier stage such as from elementary to high school and subsequently to the adult service delivery programs. The CNMI is poised to embracing the opportunities in developing its workforce development system into a system of education, skilled, and competitive workforce development and eco-system. Development of promising career pathways is an integral workforce development strategy and initiative that will bring the CNMIs human capital development to the levels of competitiveness locally, regionally, and globally. In addition, job-driven training (e.g., work experience, OJT, internship, etc.) and customized training will help individuals to better meet the needs of employers and thus increase opportunities for job placement. (Page 7) Title I

Objective 5.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will train its staff on supported employment, customized employment, and/or other best practice employment model to increase knowledge, skills, and abilities to better serve clients with most significant disabilities. (Page 176) Title IV

1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES
m. Support the personnel development of VR professionals and paraprofessionals especially in the areas of marketing the VR program, engaging employers, supported employment, customized employment, pre-employment transition services, work incentives counseling and benefits planning, etc. (Pages 179-180) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Whereas, the authorizing and funding legislation of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, which is Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act calls for improved planning, coordination and collaboration between the Department of Labor-Workforce Investment Agency Division, Adult Education, and Vocational Rehabilitation, unified planning and increased services to youth in need, including students with disabilities, this MOU will help to foster a regular and sustained partnership among the aforementioned parties that involve: (1) unified planning; (2) data sharing; (3) leveraging of resources; (4) identifying duplication of services and streamlining processes; and (5) providing for an array of services necessary for consumers to achieve their employment goals in accordance with the provisions of law and regulations that govern each respective program’s activities.

With this MOU, the CNMI WIOA Core Programs jointly agree to:
4) Leverage resources by sharing cost of training of mutual/co-enrolled consumers, as appropriate; (Page 118) Title I

o CNMI WIOA Core Programs through the State Workforce Development Board for leveraging of resource and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA. (Page 147) Title I

o Workforce Investment Agency (WIOA Title I Program) for leveraging of resources and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA.  (Page 149) Title I

CNMI OVR partners with the Council on Developmental Disabilities by engaging in activities that promote and improve our public VR program; identify and address the employment and other needs of people with disabilities; strengthen partnerships among the local Disability Network Partners (OVR, CDD, Northern Marianas Protection & Advocacy Systems, Inc., University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Transition Coalition, employers, community rehabilitation programs, etc.); advocate that people with disabilities receive timely and quality services from community providers; educate the public on the mandates of federal and local statutes as they pertain to people with disabilities; leveraging of resources and expertise on similar State Plan goals/objectives for the benefit of VR consumers and potential applicants; among other things.

Collaboration with the CDD takes on the following form:
• Regular communications throughout the year.
• Involvement in mutual councils and boards, such as the Council on Developmental Disabilities, the State Rehabilitation Council, the Special Education State Advisory Panel, the Ayuda Network, the Consumer Advisory Committee of the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, the Statewide Independent Living Council, etc.
• Involvement in mutual coalitions, for instance, the Transition Coalition and the Disability Network Partners.
• Attendance and participation at each respective programs’ public hearing or forum to help inform the State Plan development.
• Leveraging of resources and expertise in areas of employment, advocacy, and systems change resulting in competitive, integrated, and timely services.• Information and referral related to employment.  (Pages 158-159) Title IV

o OVR and the WIOA program should target a set number of co-enrolled individuals with disabilities to share funding for training and employment services. The concept of shared or braided funding is viewed positively by both organizations, but it was difficult to identify any concrete examples of this in CNMI. (Page 168) Title IV

Goal 4. Continue to collaborate with the Title I-WIOA Partner to prepare mutual clients for competitive integrated employment.
Objective 4.1: In PYs 2016-2019, VR professionals will enhance communication with WIOA case workers to identify opportunities to leverage resources and expertise for the provision of training services to mutual clients leading toward competitive integrated employment.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.  (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Where specifically School-to-Work Transition is concerned, the CNMI Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Public School System-Special Education Program (PSS-SPED), in FY 2015, re-evaluated their existing Interagency Cooperative Agreement (ICA) and made necessary revisions per the requirements of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014. Section 8 of the ICA talks about Pre-Employment Transition Services: “The Rehabilitation Act of 2014, as amended (under Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act signed into law by President Obama on July 22, 2014) requires OVR to provide eligible students with disabilities under IDEA or Section 504, ages 16-21 years, with pre-employment transition services (PETS), such as: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning opportunities, Counseling on post-secondary educational opportunities, Workplace readiness training, and Instructions in self-advocacy. PSS-SPED will provide assistance to OVR in the coordination with employers on transition services including PETS for students with disabilities” (p. 3). (Page 149) Title IV

VR staff are essentially a resource for schools and families to help educate students about supports needed for a smooth transition from school to work, further training, education and/or independent living. To achieve this objective the following general activities are completed:

• Consulting with and educating schools, parents, students, and other agencies about VR services.

• Conducting outreach that includes VR orientation presentations, dissemination of VR brochures, and technical assistance with transition IEP planning.

• Participation in transition fairs, job fairs, and other activities targeting parents and students to increase appropriate referrals.

• Conducting early identification and assessment of student needs for transition services.

• Bringing the VR program to the school campuses through continued co-location efforts.

• Communicating relevant VR policy which may impact a student’s application or eligibility for VR services. (Pages 150-151) Title IV

As an extension of the 2015 Interagency Agreement between the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Public School System-Special Education Program, the School to Work Transition Guide (SWTG) was developed to ensure a smooth transition process. This guide suggests best practices that can be used as a tool to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process. This document varies depending upon the stakeholder’s needs at the time of use.

The Agencies and Programs involved in the development of this guide agreed to the following core values:

• Transition is Essential: Transition is important for all students, regardless of disability. Transition provides the focus and early planning for all youth with disabilities to move towards achieving their goals.

• Individualization: Transition services are not the same for all students. Services are person-specific and developed with the young adult, their family, and those who know them well based on their interests, abilities, and needs.

• Outcome Focused: Transition services are specific outcomes driven activities designed to help students achieve their goals of training/education, employment, and independent living.

• Achieve More Together: Working together, as equal partners, creates a seamless transition from school to work. All can assist the student and their families identify their needs and develop plans to meet these needs. Everyone has something to contribute and leveraging of funds and staff leads to exceptional outcomes.

• Student and Family Involvement: Students and their families are actively involved in the entire transition process including service decisions. They are full and meaningful partners in the process.

• Identification of Roles and Process: Identifying the roles of every partner and the processes needed, sets clear expectations between partners about areas of focus and expertise, responsibilities, and where to go for assistance beyond the individual programs scope of practice. Knowing where to go for the right answers allows for smooth discussions about possibilities.

• Increase Understanding: Share information so all partners are aware of available resources to help in transitioning. (Page 151) Title IV

Section 12 - Financial Responsibility of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement States: When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with OVR, the cost of services necessary for both the student's education and for the student to become employed, will be delineated between PSS-SPED in terms of what will work with PSS-SPED representative in determining which is needed to complete high school coursework and which services pertain to fulfilling the IPE. When another adult service provider agency has been identified by the IEP team (that can pay part or all of the cost of a specific service or device), a representative of that agency shall be invited and included in the IEP meeting where the responsibility for payment is negotiated. Arrangements to share the cost of a given service or device will be fully reflected and explained in the IEP or the IPE, or both. (Note: OVR is a secondary source of financial assistance. (Pages 152-153) Title IV

Section 8: Services Prior to Referral Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, may be provided by OVR to students with disabilities beginning at age 16 (or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate), who have not yet applied for VR services. Consultation to students and families, technical assistance to schools, and participation in IEP meetings when invited. OVR will collaborate with PSS-SPED to provide any or all of the five pre-employment transition services required activities described in the next section to students with disabilities (ages 16-21, or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate).

E. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.

There are no private non—profits providing VR services in the CNMI. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

All delegable functions (determination of eligibility, IPE development, IPE amendment, annual review of the IPE, and closures) are performed by staff who are qualified VR professionals who meet WIOA standards. Currently, all work is signed off by the CNMI OVR Director who has a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) until such time CNMI OVR hires a full-time Case Service Manager with similar credentials. To ensure progress of CNMI OVR’s professional and/or paraprofessional staff development, VR counselors’ transcripts, student records, and grades are submitted to the OVR director or designee for periodic review to determine progress. (Page 164) Title IV

There is general consensus among community partners/stakeholders that students with disabilities will better prepare for the 21st century workforce through the provision of transition career services and pre-employment transition services. Curriculum on work readiness provided either in a classroom setting or community-based by private community rehabilitation programs/vendors should focus on helping the students to enhance their skills including soft skills and communication skills thereby boosting self confidence for increased positive outcomes throughout the employment process.

Our VR Transition Counselor is in regular contact with the school personnel through co-location presence as well as attendance at IEP meetings. To also 0better improve experiences and outcomes, employers must be supported with information and instructions as well as educated on innovative strategies with regards to how best to communicate or interact with students with varying disabilities and meet their unique needs. (Pages 169-170) Title IV

Objective 2.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will determine eligibility and develop IPEs in partnership with consumers and prior to high school graduation with a 90% targeted success rate. (Note: The IPE will be developed in consideration of the student’s IEP.)  (Page 174) Title IV

Objective 2.7: In PYs 2016-2019, to ensure seamless transition, VR professionals must ensure the development of the IPE prior to graduation and in consideration of the student’s IEP.
Extent achieved: Objective met, ongoing.

Strategies:
o In PY 2016, eight out of eight (100%) student IPEs were developed prior to graduation from high school.
o In PY 2017, from July 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018, one out of two (50%) student IPEs was developed prior to graduation from high school.
o VR Counselors to ensure regular case reviews and effective monitoring and feedback are completed. (Page 191) Title IV

Objective 5.2: In PYs 2016-2019, continue to support client’s need for supported employment job coaching to assist him/her to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the OJT is completed.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.

Strategies:
o OVR continues to provide job coaching services in the context of an approved IPE to consumers with most significant disabilities who need assistance to be successful in their training program or in maintaining their employment. (Page 197) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~Core partners will strengthen the career pathways process by improving the delivery and transitional navigation into the workforce. Career pathways will provide the CNMI workforce with the skills, education, work-based training opportunities, resources, support, and accommodations needed to gain employment. (Page 36) Title I

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation agrees to:
•Process the OVR application of interested individuals with disabilities in a timely manner but no later than 60 days after date of application;
•Refer clients who may benefit from additional training and employment services to DOL-WIA Division;
•Refer clients who may need to acquire basic skills, workplace success training, and follow-up services such as educational and career pathway goal settings to the Adult Education State Office;
•Request and obtain from WIOA Core Programs appropriate documents that will help OVR to facilitate the application and IPE development processes in a timely manner (signed releases required);
•Provide vocational rehabilitation counseling and guidance, career planning and development, training (work experience and/or OJT), job search, placement assistance, and other services required to achieve consumer’s vocational objective consistent with an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
•Facilitate supported employment services to include job coaching for mutual consumers considered most significantly disabled;
•Assess the need for assistive technology to enable consumers to participate in training and employment activities;
•Provide guidance and information on disability employment matters;
•Participate in shared funding of mutual OVR and WIOA cases and ensure such participation occurs with regularity;
•Encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA Core Programs to self-disclose that they have a disability so that the programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common; and
•Identify any duplication of services and streamline program processes as necessary. (Page 103) Title I

o OVR and the WIOA program should continue to use OJT as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in CNMI. The use of OJTs was mentioned as potentially very beneficial for individuals living in Tinian and Rota due to the lack of any training providers. (Page 168) Title IV

Objective 4.2: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the CNMI, as well as share funding for training and employment services.  (Page 175) Title IV

The CNMI OVR will distribute Title VI Funds for Supported Employment (SE) Services at the WIOA-mandated requirement of 2.5% for administrative costs (e.g. indirect cost) and the balance for the provision and delivery of services to individuals with the most significant disabilities. Fifty percent (50%) of Title VI funds for SE services will be reserved for youth with the most significant disabilities who are between 14 and 24 years old. Services leading towards competitive integrated employment will include, but are not limited to, the following: job training (work experience and OJT); job search and placement assistance; modifications that may be required by VR clients at employment sites; transportation; and other employment-related services. (Page 177) Title IV

Objective 5.6: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support clients’ needs for supported employment job coaching to assist them to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the training (e.g. OJT) is completed. (Page 178) Title I

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation will work closely with the WIOA Core Program Partners and the State Workforce Development Board to help develop and promote an all-inclusive workforce for the CNMI. Collaboration and coordination with partners will be emphasized. Increasing employer engagement will be key as we recognize the importance of also serving employers in the dual customer approach to provide them with the services and supports they will need to be able to promote a diverse workforce to include individuals with disabilities as well as those experiencing other barriers to employment. Best practice strategies or evidence-based approaches for assisting our clientele to achieve competitive integrated employment will be utilized to the maximum extent possible. Regular communication especially regarding cost-sharing of workforce development activities and development of infrastructure that will promote improved access to programs and services as well as evaluations of program performance will be expected. Sharing of data among the WIOA Core Programs will be critical to maintaining most effective partnerships for greater outcomes for all involved. (Page 37) Title I

The CNMI OVR will continue its efforts to maintain or develop cooperative arrangements or agreements with various local, State, and Federal agencies and entities for referrals, training, services, facilities utilization, potential cost-sharing, and advocacy activities. These agencies include:

o State Rehabilitation Council for information/referral; outreach to increase education/awareness; collaboration/coordination and support for activities sponsored by the Disability Network Partners including the Transition Coalition; program review and evaluation including guidance on effective strategies to improve services and overall VR agency performance; employer engagement through Council-sponsored Employer Forum during all general membership meetings; etc. (Page 144) Title IV

o Disability Network Partners for ongoing discussions about issues affecting the disability community in the CNMI, information sharing, cost-sharing on disability awareness as well as employer engagement activities and training opportunities, referrals, technical assistance, etc. (Page 147) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate VR services for consumers with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management, Rotary Club, and other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness,
o Partner with the State workforce development board and Disability Network Partners to work with employers to identify opportunities for competitive integrated employment,
o Participate in job/career fairs sponsored by various partners within our community, including but not limited to Public School System co-op education and training program, Northern Marianas College, and those sponsored by employers both in the public and private sectors,
o Gather feedback from employers via formal survey instrument or informally through regular every day discussions/conversations, (Pages 155-156) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate Transition services, including Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) for students with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs, and what opportunities could be available to PreETS, especially with regards to Work-Based Learning Experiences (WBLE) and transitioning students,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management Rotary Club, and/or other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness, (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.)  (Page 174) Title IV
1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.
d. Engage employers in identifying OJT and/or job placements for VR consumers. (Page 179) Title IV

c. Maintain and strengthen relationships with the Northern Marianas Trades Institute for continued referrals of VR clients to NMTI for training preparation in the workforce in conjunction with OJT placement in the public or private sectors and to provide guidance/technical assistance to the trades school in the area of reasonable accommodations and effective communications with individuals with varying disabilities. (Page 184) Title IV

Data Collection

The CNMI Title 1 program is transitioning its data collection system and reporting processes from the Pacific Workforce Case Management System to the Virtual Online System/Virtual One-Stop System created by Geographical Solutions that would implement a single employment and career system identified as the "Micronesia One-Stop System." The CNMI's version of the system will be called hiremarianas, an off-shoot of the hireguam case management system. This should help resolve past errors and bring the programs up to date with data collection and reporting. (Page 51) Title IV

o OVR should encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA program to self-disclose that they have a disability so that both programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common. This will help with reporting for the common performance measures as well. (Page 168) Title IV

OVR should encourage the pursuit of postsecondary education by assisting individuals to obtain part-time employment while they go to school and utilizing OVR resources for this purpose. This will help address the financial need of individuals and will help OVR achieve their common performance measures associated with credential attainment and skills gains. (Page 169) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.) (Page 174) Title IV

OVR and SRC ensure that the VR Portion of the Unified State Plan goals and priorities were developed collaboratively and in consideration of the new CSNA findings and recommendations as well as the requirements of the WIOA common performance measures. (Page 176) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The CNMI’s Policy Manual includes the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Provisions pursuant to 29 CFR Part 38: Accessibility Each program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, must be operated in a manner that makes it readily accessible to qualified individuals with a disability. A qualified individual with a disability is an individual who, with or without a reasonable accommodation for his or her disability, meets eligibility requirements. This does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by qualified individuals with disabilities. However, if a program is available in only one location, that facility must be made accessible or the program must be made available at an alternative accessible facility. An entity is not required to make structural changes in existing facilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance. If an entity finds, after consulting with the individual with a disability, that there is no method of complying other than making a significant alteration in its existing facilities, the entity may refer the qualified individual with a disability to other providers of that service that are accessible.

Program accessibility requires the provision of auxiliary aids or services, such as: qualified interpreters on-site or through video remote interpreting service; exchange of written notes; voice, text and video-based telecommunications products and systems; videotext displays; telephone handset amplifiers, assistive listening systems or other effective aids for individuals with hearing impairments. Audio recordings, Brailled materials and displays; large print materials; accessible electronic and information technology or other effective aids must be provided for individuals with visual impairments. In addition, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, including assistive technology devices or software must be provided as appropriate. (Page 74) Title I

Objective 1.7: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support the efforts of the Disability Network Partners’ ad hoc committee on accessibility. (Page 172) Title IV

Veterans

Staff shall provide information to “covered persons” on services available under the DOL job training programs and shall ensure that individuals are informed of their right to priority as Veterans or Covered Spouses for employment and training services. This information from staff must be provided to “covered persons” either verbally or in writing at each point in the program:

  1. At the point of entry; and
  2. At orientation; and
  3. At eligibility determination; and
  4. At assessment; and
  5. During program activities.

A covered person under the Jobs for Veterans Act is one of the following:

  1. Veterans. A Veteran who is an individual who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released from such service under conditions other than dishonorable; or
  2. The Spouse of a Veteran. The Spouse of: o Any Veteran who died of a service-connected disability; o A member serving on active military duty who is listed as missing in action, captured in the line of duty by a hostile force, or forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power; or o Any Veteran with a total service-connected disability rating or one who died while being evaluated for it. (Page 73) Title I

DOL-WIA Division staff will collect and enter the required veteran and covered spouse’s data elements into the HireMarianas Online Virtual Site when enrolling veterans and covered spouses into WIOA programs. The Online Virtual Site provides a descriptive marker identifying Veterans and alerts case managers to such distinction. Proof of veteran and covered spouse status must be documented and kept in the applicant’s file.The CNMI workforce development system provides Priority of Service to Veterans and certain spouses. Upon the entrance and/or registration of a veteran the CNMI workforce development system will and has been prioritizing and accelerating services to veterans and certain spouses beyond other target populations. The CNMIs small island community of workforce services and programs provides the ability to quickly refer veterans and certain spouses for additional services required. The CNMI is not a recipient of the JVSG program however it does work closely on a regional level with the region’s JVSG recipient for extension of services to the CNMIs veterans needed priority of service. (Page 73) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Northern Mariana Islands VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,216
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 56,562 56,882 57,216
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32 31 28
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60% 3.50% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234 235 258

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76 70 87
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104 117 149
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129 155 189
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90% 45.20% 46.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 0 0 1
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 0 826 866
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16% 83.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04% 2.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12% 60.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17% 12.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02% 48.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40% 61.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85% 36.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element

Customized Employment

~~The integration of workforce development programs is focused at an earlier stage such as from elementary to high school and subsequently to the adult service delivery programs. The CNMI is poised to embracing the opportunities in developing its workforce development system into a system of education, skilled, and competitive workforce development and eco-system. Development of promising career pathways is an integral workforce development strategy and initiative that will bring the CNMIs human capital development to the levels of competitiveness locally, regionally, and globally. In addition, job-driven training (e.g., work experience, OJT, internship, etc.) and customized training will help individuals to better meet the needs of employers and thus increase opportunities for job placement. (Page 7) Title I

Objective 5.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will train its staff on supported employment, customized employment, and/or other best practice employment model to increase knowledge, skills, and abilities to better serve clients with most significant disabilities. (Page 176) Title IV

1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES
m. Support the personnel development of VR professionals and paraprofessionals especially in the areas of marketing the VR program, engaging employers, supported employment, customized employment, pre-employment transition services, work incentives counseling and benefits planning, etc. (Pages 179-180) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Whereas, the authorizing and funding legislation of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, which is Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act calls for improved planning, coordination and collaboration between the Department of Labor-Workforce Investment Agency Division, Adult Education, and Vocational Rehabilitation, unified planning and increased services to youth in need, including students with disabilities, this MOU will help to foster a regular and sustained partnership among the aforementioned parties that involve: (1) unified planning; (2) data sharing; (3) leveraging of resources; (4) identifying duplication of services and streamlining processes; and (5) providing for an array of services necessary for consumers to achieve their employment goals in accordance with the provisions of law and regulations that govern each respective program’s activities.

With this MOU, the CNMI WIOA Core Programs jointly agree to:
4) Leverage resources by sharing cost of training of mutual/co-enrolled consumers, as appropriate; (Page 118) Title I

o CNMI WIOA Core Programs through the State Workforce Development Board for leveraging of resource and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA. (Page 147) Title I

o Workforce Investment Agency (WIOA Title I Program) for leveraging of resources and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA.  (Page 149) Title I

CNMI OVR partners with the Council on Developmental Disabilities by engaging in activities that promote and improve our public VR program; identify and address the employment and other needs of people with disabilities; strengthen partnerships among the local Disability Network Partners (OVR, CDD, Northern Marianas Protection & Advocacy Systems, Inc., University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Transition Coalition, employers, community rehabilitation programs, etc.); advocate that people with disabilities receive timely and quality services from community providers; educate the public on the mandates of federal and local statutes as they pertain to people with disabilities; leveraging of resources and expertise on similar State Plan goals/objectives for the benefit of VR consumers and potential applicants; among other things.

Collaboration with the CDD takes on the following form:
• Regular communications throughout the year.
• Involvement in mutual councils and boards, such as the Council on Developmental Disabilities, the State Rehabilitation Council, the Special Education State Advisory Panel, the Ayuda Network, the Consumer Advisory Committee of the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, the Statewide Independent Living Council, etc.
• Involvement in mutual coalitions, for instance, the Transition Coalition and the Disability Network Partners.
• Attendance and participation at each respective programs’ public hearing or forum to help inform the State Plan development.
• Leveraging of resources and expertise in areas of employment, advocacy, and systems change resulting in competitive, integrated, and timely services.• Information and referral related to employment.  (Pages 158-159) Title IV

o OVR and the WIOA program should target a set number of co-enrolled individuals with disabilities to share funding for training and employment services. The concept of shared or braided funding is viewed positively by both organizations, but it was difficult to identify any concrete examples of this in CNMI. (Page 168) Title IV

Goal 4. Continue to collaborate with the Title I-WIOA Partner to prepare mutual clients for competitive integrated employment.
Objective 4.1: In PYs 2016-2019, VR professionals will enhance communication with WIOA case workers to identify opportunities to leverage resources and expertise for the provision of training services to mutual clients leading toward competitive integrated employment.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.  (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Where specifically School-to-Work Transition is concerned, the CNMI Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Public School System-Special Education Program (PSS-SPED), in FY 2015, re-evaluated their existing Interagency Cooperative Agreement (ICA) and made necessary revisions per the requirements of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014. Section 8 of the ICA talks about Pre-Employment Transition Services: “The Rehabilitation Act of 2014, as amended (under Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act signed into law by President Obama on July 22, 2014) requires OVR to provide eligible students with disabilities under IDEA or Section 504, ages 16-21 years, with pre-employment transition services (PETS), such as: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning opportunities, Counseling on post-secondary educational opportunities, Workplace readiness training, and Instructions in self-advocacy. PSS-SPED will provide assistance to OVR in the coordination with employers on transition services including PETS for students with disabilities” (p. 3). (Page 149) Title IV

VR staff are essentially a resource for schools and families to help educate students about supports needed for a smooth transition from school to work, further training, education and/or independent living. To achieve this objective the following general activities are completed:

• Consulting with and educating schools, parents, students, and other agencies about VR services.

• Conducting outreach that includes VR orientation presentations, dissemination of VR brochures, and technical assistance with transition IEP planning.

• Participation in transition fairs, job fairs, and other activities targeting parents and students to increase appropriate referrals.

• Conducting early identification and assessment of student needs for transition services.

• Bringing the VR program to the school campuses through continued co-location efforts.

• Communicating relevant VR policy which may impact a student’s application or eligibility for VR services. (Pages 150-151) Title IV

As an extension of the 2015 Interagency Agreement between the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Public School System-Special Education Program, the School to Work Transition Guide (SWTG) was developed to ensure a smooth transition process. This guide suggests best practices that can be used as a tool to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process. This document varies depending upon the stakeholder’s needs at the time of use.

The Agencies and Programs involved in the development of this guide agreed to the following core values:

• Transition is Essential: Transition is important for all students, regardless of disability. Transition provides the focus and early planning for all youth with disabilities to move towards achieving their goals.

• Individualization: Transition services are not the same for all students. Services are person-specific and developed with the young adult, their family, and those who know them well based on their interests, abilities, and needs.

• Outcome Focused: Transition services are specific outcomes driven activities designed to help students achieve their goals of training/education, employment, and independent living.

• Achieve More Together: Working together, as equal partners, creates a seamless transition from school to work. All can assist the student and their families identify their needs and develop plans to meet these needs. Everyone has something to contribute and leveraging of funds and staff leads to exceptional outcomes.

• Student and Family Involvement: Students and their families are actively involved in the entire transition process including service decisions. They are full and meaningful partners in the process.

• Identification of Roles and Process: Identifying the roles of every partner and the processes needed, sets clear expectations between partners about areas of focus and expertise, responsibilities, and where to go for assistance beyond the individual programs scope of practice. Knowing where to go for the right answers allows for smooth discussions about possibilities.

• Increase Understanding: Share information so all partners are aware of available resources to help in transitioning. (Page 151) Title IV

Section 12 - Financial Responsibility of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement States: When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with OVR, the cost of services necessary for both the student's education and for the student to become employed, will be delineated between PSS-SPED in terms of what will work with PSS-SPED representative in determining which is needed to complete high school coursework and which services pertain to fulfilling the IPE. When another adult service provider agency has been identified by the IEP team (that can pay part or all of the cost of a specific service or device), a representative of that agency shall be invited and included in the IEP meeting where the responsibility for payment is negotiated. Arrangements to share the cost of a given service or device will be fully reflected and explained in the IEP or the IPE, or both. (Note: OVR is a secondary source of financial assistance. (Pages 152-153) Title IV

Section 8: Services Prior to Referral Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, may be provided by OVR to students with disabilities beginning at age 16 (or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate), who have not yet applied for VR services. Consultation to students and families, technical assistance to schools, and participation in IEP meetings when invited. OVR will collaborate with PSS-SPED to provide any or all of the five pre-employment transition services required activities described in the next section to students with disabilities (ages 16-21, or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate).

E. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.

There are no private non—profits providing VR services in the CNMI. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

All delegable functions (determination of eligibility, IPE development, IPE amendment, annual review of the IPE, and closures) are performed by staff who are qualified VR professionals who meet WIOA standards. Currently, all work is signed off by the CNMI OVR Director who has a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) until such time CNMI OVR hires a full-time Case Service Manager with similar credentials. To ensure progress of CNMI OVR’s professional and/or paraprofessional staff development, VR counselors’ transcripts, student records, and grades are submitted to the OVR director or designee for periodic review to determine progress. (Page 164) Title IV

There is general consensus among community partners/stakeholders that students with disabilities will better prepare for the 21st century workforce through the provision of transition career services and pre-employment transition services. Curriculum on work readiness provided either in a classroom setting or community-based by private community rehabilitation programs/vendors should focus on helping the students to enhance their skills including soft skills and communication skills thereby boosting self confidence for increased positive outcomes throughout the employment process.

Our VR Transition Counselor is in regular contact with the school personnel through co-location presence as well as attendance at IEP meetings. To also 0better improve experiences and outcomes, employers must be supported with information and instructions as well as educated on innovative strategies with regards to how best to communicate or interact with students with varying disabilities and meet their unique needs. (Pages 169-170) Title IV

Objective 2.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will determine eligibility and develop IPEs in partnership with consumers and prior to high school graduation with a 90% targeted success rate. (Note: The IPE will be developed in consideration of the student’s IEP.)  (Page 174) Title IV

Objective 2.7: In PYs 2016-2019, to ensure seamless transition, VR professionals must ensure the development of the IPE prior to graduation and in consideration of the student’s IEP.
Extent achieved: Objective met, ongoing.

Strategies:
o In PY 2016, eight out of eight (100%) student IPEs were developed prior to graduation from high school.
o In PY 2017, from July 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018, one out of two (50%) student IPEs was developed prior to graduation from high school.
o VR Counselors to ensure regular case reviews and effective monitoring and feedback are completed. (Page 191) Title IV

Objective 5.2: In PYs 2016-2019, continue to support client’s need for supported employment job coaching to assist him/her to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the OJT is completed.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.

Strategies:
o OVR continues to provide job coaching services in the context of an approved IPE to consumers with most significant disabilities who need assistance to be successful in their training program or in maintaining their employment. (Page 197) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~Core partners will strengthen the career pathways process by improving the delivery and transitional navigation into the workforce. Career pathways will provide the CNMI workforce with the skills, education, work-based training opportunities, resources, support, and accommodations needed to gain employment. (Page 36) Title I

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation agrees to:
•Process the OVR application of interested individuals with disabilities in a timely manner but no later than 60 days after date of application;
•Refer clients who may benefit from additional training and employment services to DOL-WIA Division;
•Refer clients who may need to acquire basic skills, workplace success training, and follow-up services such as educational and career pathway goal settings to the Adult Education State Office;
•Request and obtain from WIOA Core Programs appropriate documents that will help OVR to facilitate the application and IPE development processes in a timely manner (signed releases required);
•Provide vocational rehabilitation counseling and guidance, career planning and development, training (work experience and/or OJT), job search, placement assistance, and other services required to achieve consumer’s vocational objective consistent with an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
•Facilitate supported employment services to include job coaching for mutual consumers considered most significantly disabled;
•Assess the need for assistive technology to enable consumers to participate in training and employment activities;
•Provide guidance and information on disability employment matters;
•Participate in shared funding of mutual OVR and WIOA cases and ensure such participation occurs with regularity;
•Encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA Core Programs to self-disclose that they have a disability so that the programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common; and
•Identify any duplication of services and streamline program processes as necessary. (Page 103) Title I

o OVR and the WIOA program should continue to use OJT as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in CNMI. The use of OJTs was mentioned as potentially very beneficial for individuals living in Tinian and Rota due to the lack of any training providers. (Page 168) Title IV

Objective 4.2: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the CNMI, as well as share funding for training and employment services.  (Page 175) Title IV

The CNMI OVR will distribute Title VI Funds for Supported Employment (SE) Services at the WIOA-mandated requirement of 2.5% for administrative costs (e.g. indirect cost) and the balance for the provision and delivery of services to individuals with the most significant disabilities. Fifty percent (50%) of Title VI funds for SE services will be reserved for youth with the most significant disabilities who are between 14 and 24 years old. Services leading towards competitive integrated employment will include, but are not limited to, the following: job training (work experience and OJT); job search and placement assistance; modifications that may be required by VR clients at employment sites; transportation; and other employment-related services. (Page 177) Title IV

Objective 5.6: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support clients’ needs for supported employment job coaching to assist them to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the training (e.g. OJT) is completed. (Page 178) Title I

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation will work closely with the WIOA Core Program Partners and the State Workforce Development Board to help develop and promote an all-inclusive workforce for the CNMI. Collaboration and coordination with partners will be emphasized. Increasing employer engagement will be key as we recognize the importance of also serving employers in the dual customer approach to provide them with the services and supports they will need to be able to promote a diverse workforce to include individuals with disabilities as well as those experiencing other barriers to employment. Best practice strategies or evidence-based approaches for assisting our clientele to achieve competitive integrated employment will be utilized to the maximum extent possible. Regular communication especially regarding cost-sharing of workforce development activities and development of infrastructure that will promote improved access to programs and services as well as evaluations of program performance will be expected. Sharing of data among the WIOA Core Programs will be critical to maintaining most effective partnerships for greater outcomes for all involved. (Page 37) Title I

The CNMI OVR will continue its efforts to maintain or develop cooperative arrangements or agreements with various local, State, and Federal agencies and entities for referrals, training, services, facilities utilization, potential cost-sharing, and advocacy activities. These agencies include:

o State Rehabilitation Council for information/referral; outreach to increase education/awareness; collaboration/coordination and support for activities sponsored by the Disability Network Partners including the Transition Coalition; program review and evaluation including guidance on effective strategies to improve services and overall VR agency performance; employer engagement through Council-sponsored Employer Forum during all general membership meetings; etc. (Page 144) Title IV

o Disability Network Partners for ongoing discussions about issues affecting the disability community in the CNMI, information sharing, cost-sharing on disability awareness as well as employer engagement activities and training opportunities, referrals, technical assistance, etc. (Page 147) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate VR services for consumers with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management, Rotary Club, and other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness,
o Partner with the State workforce development board and Disability Network Partners to work with employers to identify opportunities for competitive integrated employment,
o Participate in job/career fairs sponsored by various partners within our community, including but not limited to Public School System co-op education and training program, Northern Marianas College, and those sponsored by employers both in the public and private sectors,
o Gather feedback from employers via formal survey instrument or informally through regular every day discussions/conversations, (Pages 155-156) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate Transition services, including Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) for students with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs, and what opportunities could be available to PreETS, especially with regards to Work-Based Learning Experiences (WBLE) and transitioning students,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management Rotary Club, and/or other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness, (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.)  (Page 174) Title IV
1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.
d. Engage employers in identifying OJT and/or job placements for VR consumers. (Page 179) Title IV

c. Maintain and strengthen relationships with the Northern Marianas Trades Institute for continued referrals of VR clients to NMTI for training preparation in the workforce in conjunction with OJT placement in the public or private sectors and to provide guidance/technical assistance to the trades school in the area of reasonable accommodations and effective communications with individuals with varying disabilities. (Page 184) Title IV

Data Collection

The CNMI Title 1 program is transitioning its data collection system and reporting processes from the Pacific Workforce Case Management System to the Virtual Online System/Virtual One-Stop System created by Geographical Solutions that would implement a single employment and career system identified as the "Micronesia One-Stop System." The CNMI's version of the system will be called hiremarianas, an off-shoot of the hireguam case management system. This should help resolve past errors and bring the programs up to date with data collection and reporting. (Page 51) Title IV

o OVR should encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA program to self-disclose that they have a disability so that both programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common. This will help with reporting for the common performance measures as well. (Page 168) Title IV

OVR should encourage the pursuit of postsecondary education by assisting individuals to obtain part-time employment while they go to school and utilizing OVR resources for this purpose. This will help address the financial need of individuals and will help OVR achieve their common performance measures associated with credential attainment and skills gains. (Page 169) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.) (Page 174) Title IV

OVR and SRC ensure that the VR Portion of the Unified State Plan goals and priorities were developed collaboratively and in consideration of the new CSNA findings and recommendations as well as the requirements of the WIOA common performance measures. (Page 176) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The CNMI’s Policy Manual includes the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Provisions pursuant to 29 CFR Part 38: Accessibility Each program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, must be operated in a manner that makes it readily accessible to qualified individuals with a disability. A qualified individual with a disability is an individual who, with or without a reasonable accommodation for his or her disability, meets eligibility requirements. This does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by qualified individuals with disabilities. However, if a program is available in only one location, that facility must be made accessible or the program must be made available at an alternative accessible facility. An entity is not required to make structural changes in existing facilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance. If an entity finds, after consulting with the individual with a disability, that there is no method of complying other than making a significant alteration in its existing facilities, the entity may refer the qualified individual with a disability to other providers of that service that are accessible.

Program accessibility requires the provision of auxiliary aids or services, such as: qualified interpreters on-site or through video remote interpreting service; exchange of written notes; voice, text and video-based telecommunications products and systems; videotext displays; telephone handset amplifiers, assistive listening systems or other effective aids for individuals with hearing impairments. Audio recordings, Brailled materials and displays; large print materials; accessible electronic and information technology or other effective aids must be provided for individuals with visual impairments. In addition, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, including assistive technology devices or software must be provided as appropriate. (Page 74) Title I

Objective 1.7: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support the efforts of the Disability Network Partners’ ad hoc committee on accessibility. (Page 172) Title IV

Veterans

Staff shall provide information to “covered persons” on services available under the DOL job training programs and shall ensure that individuals are informed of their right to priority as Veterans or Covered Spouses for employment and training services. This information from staff must be provided to “covered persons” either verbally or in writing at each point in the program:

  1. At the point of entry; and
  2. At orientation; and
  3. At eligibility determination; and
  4. At assessment; and
  5. During program activities.

A covered person under the Jobs for Veterans Act is one of the following:

  1. Veterans. A Veteran who is an individual who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released from such service under conditions other than dishonorable; or
  2. The Spouse of a Veteran. The Spouse of: o Any Veteran who died of a service-connected disability; o A member serving on active military duty who is listed as missing in action, captured in the line of duty by a hostile force, or forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power; or o Any Veteran with a total service-connected disability rating or one who died while being evaluated for it. (Page 73) Title I

DOL-WIA Division staff will collect and enter the required veteran and covered spouse’s data elements into the HireMarianas Online Virtual Site when enrolling veterans and covered spouses into WIOA programs. The Online Virtual Site provides a descriptive marker identifying Veterans and alerts case managers to such distinction. Proof of veteran and covered spouse status must be documented and kept in the applicant’s file.The CNMI workforce development system provides Priority of Service to Veterans and certain spouses. Upon the entrance and/or registration of a veteran the CNMI workforce development system will and has been prioritizing and accelerating services to veterans and certain spouses beyond other target populations. The CNMIs small island community of workforce services and programs provides the ability to quickly refer veterans and certain spouses for additional services required. The CNMI is not a recipient of the JVSG program however it does work closely on a regional level with the region’s JVSG recipient for extension of services to the CNMIs veterans needed priority of service. (Page 73) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Northern Mariana Islands VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,216
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 56,562 56,882 57,216
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 32 31 28
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60% 3.50% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 234 235 258

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 76 70 87
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 104 117 149
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 129 155 189
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 58.90% 45.20% 46.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 0 0 1
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 0 826 866
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 82.16% 83.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.04% 2.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.12% 60.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 10.17% 12.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.02% 48.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.40% 61.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.85% 36.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element

Customized Employment

~~The integration of workforce development programs is focused at an earlier stage such as from elementary to high school and subsequently to the adult service delivery programs. The CNMI is poised to embracing the opportunities in developing its workforce development system into a system of education, skilled, and competitive workforce development and eco-system. Development of promising career pathways is an integral workforce development strategy and initiative that will bring the CNMIs human capital development to the levels of competitiveness locally, regionally, and globally. In addition, job-driven training (e.g., work experience, OJT, internship, etc.) and customized training will help individuals to better meet the needs of employers and thus increase opportunities for job placement. (Page 7) Title I

Objective 5.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will train its staff on supported employment, customized employment, and/or other best practice employment model to increase knowledge, skills, and abilities to better serve clients with most significant disabilities. (Page 176) Title IV

1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES
m. Support the personnel development of VR professionals and paraprofessionals especially in the areas of marketing the VR program, engaging employers, supported employment, customized employment, pre-employment transition services, work incentives counseling and benefits planning, etc. (Pages 179-180) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Whereas, the authorizing and funding legislation of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, which is Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act calls for improved planning, coordination and collaboration between the Department of Labor-Workforce Investment Agency Division, Adult Education, and Vocational Rehabilitation, unified planning and increased services to youth in need, including students with disabilities, this MOU will help to foster a regular and sustained partnership among the aforementioned parties that involve: (1) unified planning; (2) data sharing; (3) leveraging of resources; (4) identifying duplication of services and streamlining processes; and (5) providing for an array of services necessary for consumers to achieve their employment goals in accordance with the provisions of law and regulations that govern each respective program’s activities.

With this MOU, the CNMI WIOA Core Programs jointly agree to:
4) Leverage resources by sharing cost of training of mutual/co-enrolled consumers, as appropriate; (Page 118) Title I

o CNMI WIOA Core Programs through the State Workforce Development Board for leveraging of resource and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA. (Page 147) Title I

o Workforce Investment Agency (WIOA Title I Program) for leveraging of resources and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA.  (Page 149) Title I

CNMI OVR partners with the Council on Developmental Disabilities by engaging in activities that promote and improve our public VR program; identify and address the employment and other needs of people with disabilities; strengthen partnerships among the local Disability Network Partners (OVR, CDD, Northern Marianas Protection & Advocacy Systems, Inc., University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Transition Coalition, employers, community rehabilitation programs, etc.); advocate that people with disabilities receive timely and quality services from community providers; educate the public on the mandates of federal and local statutes as they pertain to people with disabilities; leveraging of resources and expertise on similar State Plan goals/objectives for the benefit of VR consumers and potential applicants; among other things.

Collaboration with the CDD takes on the following form:
• Regular communications throughout the year.
• Involvement in mutual councils and boards, such as the Council on Developmental Disabilities, the State Rehabilitation Council, the Special Education State Advisory Panel, the Ayuda Network, the Consumer Advisory Committee of the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, the Statewide Independent Living Council, etc.
• Involvement in mutual coalitions, for instance, the Transition Coalition and the Disability Network Partners.
• Attendance and participation at each respective programs’ public hearing or forum to help inform the State Plan development.
• Leveraging of resources and expertise in areas of employment, advocacy, and systems change resulting in competitive, integrated, and timely services.• Information and referral related to employment.  (Pages 158-159) Title IV

o OVR and the WIOA program should target a set number of co-enrolled individuals with disabilities to share funding for training and employment services. The concept of shared or braided funding is viewed positively by both organizations, but it was difficult to identify any concrete examples of this in CNMI. (Page 168) Title IV

Goal 4. Continue to collaborate with the Title I-WIOA Partner to prepare mutual clients for competitive integrated employment.
Objective 4.1: In PYs 2016-2019, VR professionals will enhance communication with WIOA case workers to identify opportunities to leverage resources and expertise for the provision of training services to mutual clients leading toward competitive integrated employment.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.  (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Where specifically School-to-Work Transition is concerned, the CNMI Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Public School System-Special Education Program (PSS-SPED), in FY 2015, re-evaluated their existing Interagency Cooperative Agreement (ICA) and made necessary revisions per the requirements of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014. Section 8 of the ICA talks about Pre-Employment Transition Services: “The Rehabilitation Act of 2014, as amended (under Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act signed into law by President Obama on July 22, 2014) requires OVR to provide eligible students with disabilities under IDEA or Section 504, ages 16-21 years, with pre-employment transition services (PETS), such as: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning opportunities, Counseling on post-secondary educational opportunities, Workplace readiness training, and Instructions in self-advocacy. PSS-SPED will provide assistance to OVR in the coordination with employers on transition services including PETS for students with disabilities” (p. 3). (Page 149) Title IV

VR staff are essentially a resource for schools and families to help educate students about supports needed for a smooth transition from school to work, further training, education and/or independent living. To achieve this objective the following general activities are completed:

• Consulting with and educating schools, parents, students, and other agencies about VR services.

• Conducting outreach that includes VR orientation presentations, dissemination of VR brochures, and technical assistance with transition IEP planning.

• Participation in transition fairs, job fairs, and other activities targeting parents and students to increase appropriate referrals.

• Conducting early identification and assessment of student needs for transition services.

• Bringing the VR program to the school campuses through continued co-location efforts.

• Communicating relevant VR policy which may impact a student’s application or eligibility for VR services. (Pages 150-151) Title IV

As an extension of the 2015 Interagency Agreement between the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Public School System-Special Education Program, the School to Work Transition Guide (SWTG) was developed to ensure a smooth transition process. This guide suggests best practices that can be used as a tool to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process. This document varies depending upon the stakeholder’s needs at the time of use.

The Agencies and Programs involved in the development of this guide agreed to the following core values:

• Transition is Essential: Transition is important for all students, regardless of disability. Transition provides the focus and early planning for all youth with disabilities to move towards achieving their goals.

• Individualization: Transition services are not the same for all students. Services are person-specific and developed with the young adult, their family, and those who know them well based on their interests, abilities, and needs.

• Outcome Focused: Transition services are specific outcomes driven activities designed to help students achieve their goals of training/education, employment, and independent living.

• Achieve More Together: Working together, as equal partners, creates a seamless transition from school to work. All can assist the student and their families identify their needs and develop plans to meet these needs. Everyone has something to contribute and leveraging of funds and staff leads to exceptional outcomes.

• Student and Family Involvement: Students and their families are actively involved in the entire transition process including service decisions. They are full and meaningful partners in the process.

• Identification of Roles and Process: Identifying the roles of every partner and the processes needed, sets clear expectations between partners about areas of focus and expertise, responsibilities, and where to go for assistance beyond the individual programs scope of practice. Knowing where to go for the right answers allows for smooth discussions about possibilities.

• Increase Understanding: Share information so all partners are aware of available resources to help in transitioning. (Page 151) Title IV

Section 12 - Financial Responsibility of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement States: When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with OVR, the cost of services necessary for both the student's education and for the student to become employed, will be delineated between PSS-SPED in terms of what will work with PSS-SPED representative in determining which is needed to complete high school coursework and which services pertain to fulfilling the IPE. When another adult service provider agency has been identified by the IEP team (that can pay part or all of the cost of a specific service or device), a representative of that agency shall be invited and included in the IEP meeting where the responsibility for payment is negotiated. Arrangements to share the cost of a given service or device will be fully reflected and explained in the IEP or the IPE, or both. (Note: OVR is a secondary source of financial assistance. (Pages 152-153) Title IV

Section 8: Services Prior to Referral Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, may be provided by OVR to students with disabilities beginning at age 16 (or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate), who have not yet applied for VR services. Consultation to students and families, technical assistance to schools, and participation in IEP meetings when invited. OVR will collaborate with PSS-SPED to provide any or all of the five pre-employment transition services required activities described in the next section to students with disabilities (ages 16-21, or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate).

E. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.

There are no private non—profits providing VR services in the CNMI. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

All delegable functions (determination of eligibility, IPE development, IPE amendment, annual review of the IPE, and closures) are performed by staff who are qualified VR professionals who meet WIOA standards. Currently, all work is signed off by the CNMI OVR Director who has a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) until such time CNMI OVR hires a full-time Case Service Manager with similar credentials. To ensure progress of CNMI OVR’s professional and/or paraprofessional staff development, VR counselors’ transcripts, student records, and grades are submitted to the OVR director or designee for periodic review to determine progress. (Page 164) Title IV

There is general consensus among community partners/stakeholders that students with disabilities will better prepare for the 21st century workforce through the provision of transition career services and pre-employment transition services. Curriculum on work readiness provided either in a classroom setting or community-based by private community rehabilitation programs/vendors should focus on helping the students to enhance their skills including soft skills and communication skills thereby boosting self confidence for increased positive outcomes throughout the employment process.

Our VR Transition Counselor is in regular contact with the school personnel through co-location presence as well as attendance at IEP meetings. To also 0better improve experiences and outcomes, employers must be supported with information and instructions as well as educated on innovative strategies with regards to how best to communicate or interact with students with varying disabilities and meet their unique needs. (Pages 169-170) Title IV

Objective 2.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will determine eligibility and develop IPEs in partnership with consumers and prior to high school graduation with a 90% targeted success rate. (Note: The IPE will be developed in consideration of the student’s IEP.)  (Page 174) Title IV

Objective 2.7: In PYs 2016-2019, to ensure seamless transition, VR professionals must ensure the development of the IPE prior to graduation and in consideration of the student’s IEP.
Extent achieved: Objective met, ongoing.

Strategies:
o In PY 2016, eight out of eight (100%) student IPEs were developed prior to graduation from high school.
o In PY 2017, from July 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018, one out of two (50%) student IPEs was developed prior to graduation from high school.
o VR Counselors to ensure regular case reviews and effective monitoring and feedback are completed. (Page 191) Title IV

Objective 5.2: In PYs 2016-2019, continue to support client’s need for supported employment job coaching to assist him/her to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the OJT is completed.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.

Strategies:
o OVR continues to provide job coaching services in the context of an approved IPE to consumers with most significant disabilities who need assistance to be successful in their training program or in maintaining their employment. (Page 197) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~Core partners will strengthen the career pathways process by improving the delivery and transitional navigation into the workforce. Career pathways will provide the CNMI workforce with the skills, education, work-based training opportunities, resources, support, and accommodations needed to gain employment. (Page 36) Title I

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation agrees to:
•Process the OVR application of interested individuals with disabilities in a timely manner but no later than 60 days after date of application;
•Refer clients who may benefit from additional training and employment services to DOL-WIA Division;
•Refer clients who may need to acquire basic skills, workplace success training, and follow-up services such as educational and career pathway goal settings to the Adult Education State Office;
•Request and obtain from WIOA Core Programs appropriate documents that will help OVR to facilitate the application and IPE development processes in a timely manner (signed releases required);
•Provide vocational rehabilitation counseling and guidance, career planning and development, training (work experience and/or OJT), job search, placement assistance, and other services required to achieve consumer’s vocational objective consistent with an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
•Facilitate supported employment services to include job coaching for mutual consumers considered most significantly disabled;
•Assess the need for assistive technology to enable consumers to participate in training and employment activities;
•Provide guidance and information on disability employment matters;
•Participate in shared funding of mutual OVR and WIOA cases and ensure such participation occurs with regularity;
•Encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA Core Programs to self-disclose that they have a disability so that the programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common; and
•Identify any duplication of services and streamline program processes as necessary. (Page 103) Title I

o OVR and the WIOA program should continue to use OJT as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in CNMI. The use of OJTs was mentioned as potentially very beneficial for individuals living in Tinian and Rota due to the lack of any training providers. (Page 168) Title IV

Objective 4.2: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the CNMI, as well as share funding for training and employment services.  (Page 175) Title IV

The CNMI OVR will distribute Title VI Funds for Supported Employment (SE) Services at the WIOA-mandated requirement of 2.5% for administrative costs (e.g. indirect cost) and the balance for the provision and delivery of services to individuals with the most significant disabilities. Fifty percent (50%) of Title VI funds for SE services will be reserved for youth with the most significant disabilities who are between 14 and 24 years old. Services leading towards competitive integrated employment will include, but are not limited to, the following: job training (work experience and OJT); job search and placement assistance; modifications that may be required by VR clients at employment sites; transportation; and other employment-related services. (Page 177) Title IV

Objective 5.6: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support clients’ needs for supported employment job coaching to assist them to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the training (e.g. OJT) is completed. (Page 178) Title I

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation will work closely with the WIOA Core Program Partners and the State Workforce Development Board to help develop and promote an all-inclusive workforce for the CNMI. Collaboration and coordination with partners will be emphasized. Increasing employer engagement will be key as we recognize the importance of also serving employers in the dual customer approach to provide them with the services and supports they will need to be able to promote a diverse workforce to include individuals with disabilities as well as those experiencing other barriers to employment. Best practice strategies or evidence-based approaches for assisting our clientele to achieve competitive integrated employment will be utilized to the maximum extent possible. Regular communication especially regarding cost-sharing of workforce development activities and development of infrastructure that will promote improved access to programs and services as well as evaluations of program performance will be expected. Sharing of data among the WIOA Core Programs will be critical to maintaining most effective partnerships for greater outcomes for all involved. (Page 37) Title I

The CNMI OVR will continue its efforts to maintain or develop cooperative arrangements or agreements with various local, State, and Federal agencies and entities for referrals, training, services, facilities utilization, potential cost-sharing, and advocacy activities. These agencies include:

o State Rehabilitation Council for information/referral; outreach to increase education/awareness; collaboration/coordination and support for activities sponsored by the Disability Network Partners including the Transition Coalition; program review and evaluation including guidance on effective strategies to improve services and overall VR agency performance; employer engagement through Council-sponsored Employer Forum during all general membership meetings; etc. (Page 144) Title IV

o Disability Network Partners for ongoing discussions about issues affecting the disability community in the CNMI, information sharing, cost-sharing on disability awareness as well as employer engagement activities and training opportunities, referrals, technical assistance, etc. (Page 147) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate VR services for consumers with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management, Rotary Club, and other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness,
o Partner with the State workforce development board and Disability Network Partners to work with employers to identify opportunities for competitive integrated employment,
o Participate in job/career fairs sponsored by various partners within our community, including but not limited to Public School System co-op education and training program, Northern Marianas College, and those sponsored by employers both in the public and private sectors,
o Gather feedback from employers via formal survey instrument or informally through regular every day discussions/conversations, (Pages 155-156) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate Transition services, including Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) for students with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs, and what opportunities could be available to PreETS, especially with regards to Work-Based Learning Experiences (WBLE) and transitioning students,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management Rotary Club, and/or other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness, (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.)  (Page 174) Title IV
1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.
d. Engage employers in identifying OJT and/or job placements for VR consumers. (Page 179) Title IV

c. Maintain and strengthen relationships with the Northern Marianas Trades Institute for continued referrals of VR clients to NMTI for training preparation in the workforce in conjunction with OJT placement in the public or private sectors and to provide guidance/technical assistance to the trades school in the area of reasonable accommodations and effective communications with individuals with varying disabilities. (Page 184) Title IV

Data Collection

The CNMI Title 1 program is transitioning its data collection system and reporting processes from the Pacific Workforce Case Management System to the Virtual Online System/Virtual One-Stop System created by Geographical Solutions that would implement a single employment and career system identified as the "Micronesia One-Stop System." The CNMI's version of the system will be called hiremarianas, an off-shoot of the hireguam case management system. This should help resolve past errors and bring the programs up to date with data collection and reporting. (Page 51) Title IV

o OVR should encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA program to self-disclose that they have a disability so that both programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common. This will help with reporting for the common performance measures as well. (Page 168) Title IV

OVR should encourage the pursuit of postsecondary education by assisting individuals to obtain part-time employment while they go to school and utilizing OVR resources for this purpose. This will help address the financial need of individuals and will help OVR achieve their common performance measures associated with credential attainment and skills gains. (Page 169) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.) (Page 174) Title IV

OVR and SRC ensure that the VR Portion of the Unified State Plan goals and priorities were developed collaboratively and in consideration of the new CSNA findings and recommendations as well as the requirements of the WIOA common performance measures. (Page 176) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The CNMI’s Policy Manual includes the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Provisions pursuant to 29 CFR Part 38: Accessibility Each program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, must be operated in a manner that makes it readily accessible to qualified individuals with a disability. A qualified individual with a disability is an individual who, with or without a reasonable accommodation for his or her disability, meets eligibility requirements. This does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by qualified individuals with disabilities. However, if a program is available in only one location, that facility must be made accessible or the program must be made available at an alternative accessible facility. An entity is not required to make structural changes in existing facilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance. If an entity finds, after consulting with the individual with a disability, that there is no method of complying other than making a significant alteration in its existing facilities, the entity may refer the qualified individual with a disability to other providers of that service that are accessible.

Program accessibility requires the provision of auxiliary aids or services, such as: qualified interpreters on-site or through video remote interpreting service; exchange of written notes; voice, text and video-based telecommunications products and systems; videotext displays; telephone handset amplifiers, assistive listening systems or other effective aids for individuals with hearing impairments. Audio recordings, Brailled materials and displays; large print materials; accessible electronic and information technology or other effective aids must be provided for individuals with visual impairments. In addition, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, including assistive technology devices or software must be provided as appropriate. (Page 74) Title I

Objective 1.7: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support the efforts of the Disability Network Partners’ ad hoc committee on accessibility. (Page 172) Title IV

Veterans

Staff shall provide information to “covered persons” on services available under the DOL job training programs and shall ensure that individuals are informed of their right to priority as Veterans or Covered Spouses for employment and training services. This information from staff must be provided to “covered persons” either verbally or in writing at each point in the program:

  1. At the point of entry; and
  2. At orientation; and
  3. At eligibility determination; and
  4. At assessment; and
  5. During program activities.

A covered person under the Jobs for Veterans Act is one of the following:

  1. Veterans. A Veteran who is an individual who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released from such service under conditions other than dishonorable; or
  2. The Spouse of a Veteran. The Spouse of: o Any Veteran who died of a service-connected disability; o A member serving on active military duty who is listed as missing in action, captured in the line of duty by a hostile force, or forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power; or o Any Veteran with a total service-connected disability rating or one who died while being evaluated for it. (Page 73) Title I

DOL-WIA Division staff will collect and enter the required veteran and covered spouse’s data elements into the HireMarianas Online Virtual Site when enrolling veterans and covered spouses into WIOA programs. The Online Virtual Site provides a descriptive marker identifying Veterans and alerts case managers to such distinction. Proof of veteran and covered spouse status must be documented and kept in the applicant’s file.The CNMI workforce development system provides Priority of Service to Veterans and certain spouses. Upon the entrance and/or registration of a veteran the CNMI workforce development system will and has been prioritizing and accelerating services to veterans and certain spouses beyond other target populations. The CNMIs small island community of workforce services and programs provides the ability to quickly refer veterans and certain spouses for additional services required. The CNMI is not a recipient of the JVSG program however it does work closely on a regional level with the region’s JVSG recipient for extension of services to the CNMIs veterans needed priority of service. (Page 73) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phablet

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Northern Mariana Islands VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,216
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2019
Population. 57,216
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 28
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 258

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 87
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 149
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 189
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 46.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 866
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 83.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 60.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 48.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 61.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element

Customized Employment

~~The integration of workforce development programs is focused at an earlier stage such as from elementary to high school and subsequently to the adult service delivery programs. The CNMI is poised to embracing the opportunities in developing its workforce development system into a system of education, skilled, and competitive workforce development and eco-system. Development of promising career pathways is an integral workforce development strategy and initiative that will bring the CNMIs human capital development to the levels of competitiveness locally, regionally, and globally. In addition, job-driven training (e.g., work experience, OJT, internship, etc.) and customized training will help individuals to better meet the needs of employers and thus increase opportunities for job placement. (Page 7) Title I

Objective 5.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will train its staff on supported employment, customized employment, and/or other best practice employment model to increase knowledge, skills, and abilities to better serve clients with most significant disabilities. (Page 176) Title IV

1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES
m. Support the personnel development of VR professionals and paraprofessionals especially in the areas of marketing the VR program, engaging employers, supported employment, customized employment, pre-employment transition services, work incentives counseling and benefits planning, etc. (Pages 179-180) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Whereas, the authorizing and funding legislation of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, which is Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act calls for improved planning, coordination and collaboration between the Department of Labor-Workforce Investment Agency Division, Adult Education, and Vocational Rehabilitation, unified planning and increased services to youth in need, including students with disabilities, this MOU will help to foster a regular and sustained partnership among the aforementioned parties that involve: (1) unified planning; (2) data sharing; (3) leveraging of resources; (4) identifying duplication of services and streamlining processes; and (5) providing for an array of services necessary for consumers to achieve their employment goals in accordance with the provisions of law and regulations that govern each respective program’s activities.

With this MOU, the CNMI WIOA Core Programs jointly agree to:
4) Leverage resources by sharing cost of training of mutual/co-enrolled consumers, as appropriate; (Page 118) Title I

o CNMI WIOA Core Programs through the State Workforce Development Board for leveraging of resource and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA. (Page 147) Title I

o Workforce Investment Agency (WIOA Title I Program) for leveraging of resources and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA.  (Page 149) Title I

CNMI OVR partners with the Council on Developmental Disabilities by engaging in activities that promote and improve our public VR program; identify and address the employment and other needs of people with disabilities; strengthen partnerships among the local Disability Network Partners (OVR, CDD, Northern Marianas Protection & Advocacy Systems, Inc., University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Transition Coalition, employers, community rehabilitation programs, etc.); advocate that people with disabilities receive timely and quality services from community providers; educate the public on the mandates of federal and local statutes as they pertain to people with disabilities; leveraging of resources and expertise on similar State Plan goals/objectives for the benefit of VR consumers and potential applicants; among other things.

Collaboration with the CDD takes on the following form:
• Regular communications throughout the year.
• Involvement in mutual councils and boards, such as the Council on Developmental Disabilities, the State Rehabilitation Council, the Special Education State Advisory Panel, the Ayuda Network, the Consumer Advisory Committee of the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, the Statewide Independent Living Council, etc.
• Involvement in mutual coalitions, for instance, the Transition Coalition and the Disability Network Partners.
• Attendance and participation at each respective programs’ public hearing or forum to help inform the State Plan development.
• Leveraging of resources and expertise in areas of employment, advocacy, and systems change resulting in competitive, integrated, and timely services.• Information and referral related to employment.  (Pages 158-159) Title IV

o OVR and the WIOA program should target a set number of co-enrolled individuals with disabilities to share funding for training and employment services. The concept of shared or braided funding is viewed positively by both organizations, but it was difficult to identify any concrete examples of this in CNMI. (Page 168) Title IV

Goal 4. Continue to collaborate with the Title I-WIOA Partner to prepare mutual clients for competitive integrated employment.
Objective 4.1: In PYs 2016-2019, VR professionals will enhance communication with WIOA case workers to identify opportunities to leverage resources and expertise for the provision of training services to mutual clients leading toward competitive integrated employment.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.  (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Where specifically School-to-Work Transition is concerned, the CNMI Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Public School System-Special Education Program (PSS-SPED), in FY 2015, re-evaluated their existing Interagency Cooperative Agreement (ICA) and made necessary revisions per the requirements of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014. Section 8 of the ICA talks about Pre-Employment Transition Services: “The Rehabilitation Act of 2014, as amended (under Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act signed into law by President Obama on July 22, 2014) requires OVR to provide eligible students with disabilities under IDEA or Section 504, ages 16-21 years, with pre-employment transition services (PETS), such as: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning opportunities, Counseling on post-secondary educational opportunities, Workplace readiness training, and Instructions in self-advocacy. PSS-SPED will provide assistance to OVR in the coordination with employers on transition services including PETS for students with disabilities” (p. 3). (Page 149) Title IV

VR staff are essentially a resource for schools and families to help educate students about supports needed for a smooth transition from school to work, further training, education and/or independent living. To achieve this objective the following general activities are completed:

• Consulting with and educating schools, parents, students, and other agencies about VR services.

• Conducting outreach that includes VR orientation presentations, dissemination of VR brochures, and technical assistance with transition IEP planning.

• Participation in transition fairs, job fairs, and other activities targeting parents and students to increase appropriate referrals.

• Conducting early identification and assessment of student needs for transition services.

• Bringing the VR program to the school campuses through continued co-location efforts.

• Communicating relevant VR policy which may impact a student’s application or eligibility for VR services. (Pages 150-151) Title IV

As an extension of the 2015 Interagency Agreement between the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Public School System-Special Education Program, the School to Work Transition Guide (SWTG) was developed to ensure a smooth transition process. This guide suggests best practices that can be used as a tool to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process. This document varies depending upon the stakeholder’s needs at the time of use.

The Agencies and Programs involved in the development of this guide agreed to the following core values:

• Transition is Essential: Transition is important for all students, regardless of disability. Transition provides the focus and early planning for all youth with disabilities to move towards achieving their goals.

• Individualization: Transition services are not the same for all students. Services are person-specific and developed with the young adult, their family, and those who know them well based on their interests, abilities, and needs.

• Outcome Focused: Transition services are specific outcomes driven activities designed to help students achieve their goals of training/education, employment, and independent living.

• Achieve More Together: Working together, as equal partners, creates a seamless transition from school to work. All can assist the student and their families identify their needs and develop plans to meet these needs. Everyone has something to contribute and leveraging of funds and staff leads to exceptional outcomes.

• Student and Family Involvement: Students and their families are actively involved in the entire transition process including service decisions. They are full and meaningful partners in the process.

• Identification of Roles and Process: Identifying the roles of every partner and the processes needed, sets clear expectations between partners about areas of focus and expertise, responsibilities, and where to go for assistance beyond the individual programs scope of practice. Knowing where to go for the right answers allows for smooth discussions about possibilities.

• Increase Understanding: Share information so all partners are aware of available resources to help in transitioning. (Page 151) Title IV

Section 12 - Financial Responsibility of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement States: When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with OVR, the cost of services necessary for both the student's education and for the student to become employed, will be delineated between PSS-SPED in terms of what will work with PSS-SPED representative in determining which is needed to complete high school coursework and which services pertain to fulfilling the IPE. When another adult service provider agency has been identified by the IEP team (that can pay part or all of the cost of a specific service or device), a representative of that agency shall be invited and included in the IEP meeting where the responsibility for payment is negotiated. Arrangements to share the cost of a given service or device will be fully reflected and explained in the IEP or the IPE, or both. (Note: OVR is a secondary source of financial assistance. (Pages 152-153) Title IV

Section 8: Services Prior to Referral Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, may be provided by OVR to students with disabilities beginning at age 16 (or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate), who have not yet applied for VR services. Consultation to students and families, technical assistance to schools, and participation in IEP meetings when invited. OVR will collaborate with PSS-SPED to provide any or all of the five pre-employment transition services required activities described in the next section to students with disabilities (ages 16-21, or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate).

E. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.

There are no private non—profits providing VR services in the CNMI. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

All delegable functions (determination of eligibility, IPE development, IPE amendment, annual review of the IPE, and closures) are performed by staff who are qualified VR professionals who meet WIOA standards. Currently, all work is signed off by the CNMI OVR Director who has a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) until such time CNMI OVR hires a full-time Case Service Manager with similar credentials. To ensure progress of CNMI OVR’s professional and/or paraprofessional staff development, VR counselors’ transcripts, student records, and grades are submitted to the OVR director or designee for periodic review to determine progress. (Page 164) Title IV

There is general consensus among community partners/stakeholders that students with disabilities will better prepare for the 21st century workforce through the provision of transition career services and pre-employment transition services. Curriculum on work readiness provided either in a classroom setting or community-based by private community rehabilitation programs/vendors should focus on helping the students to enhance their skills including soft skills and communication skills thereby boosting self confidence for increased positive outcomes throughout the employment process.

Our VR Transition Counselor is in regular contact with the school personnel through co-location presence as well as attendance at IEP meetings. To also 0better improve experiences and outcomes, employers must be supported with information and instructions as well as educated on innovative strategies with regards to how best to communicate or interact with students with varying disabilities and meet their unique needs. (Pages 169-170) Title IV

Objective 2.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will determine eligibility and develop IPEs in partnership with consumers and prior to high school graduation with a 90% targeted success rate. (Note: The IPE will be developed in consideration of the student’s IEP.)  (Page 174) Title IV

Objective 2.7: In PYs 2016-2019, to ensure seamless transition, VR professionals must ensure the development of the IPE prior to graduation and in consideration of the student’s IEP.
Extent achieved: Objective met, ongoing.

Strategies:
o In PY 2016, eight out of eight (100%) student IPEs were developed prior to graduation from high school.
o In PY 2017, from July 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018, one out of two (50%) student IPEs was developed prior to graduation from high school.
o VR Counselors to ensure regular case reviews and effective monitoring and feedback are completed. (Page 191) Title IV

Objective 5.2: In PYs 2016-2019, continue to support client’s need for supported employment job coaching to assist him/her to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the OJT is completed.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.

Strategies:
o OVR continues to provide job coaching services in the context of an approved IPE to consumers with most significant disabilities who need assistance to be successful in their training program or in maintaining their employment. (Page 197) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~Core partners will strengthen the career pathways process by improving the delivery and transitional navigation into the workforce. Career pathways will provide the CNMI workforce with the skills, education, work-based training opportunities, resources, support, and accommodations needed to gain employment. (Page 36) Title I

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation agrees to:
•Process the OVR application of interested individuals with disabilities in a timely manner but no later than 60 days after date of application;
•Refer clients who may benefit from additional training and employment services to DOL-WIA Division;
•Refer clients who may need to acquire basic skills, workplace success training, and follow-up services such as educational and career pathway goal settings to the Adult Education State Office;
•Request and obtain from WIOA Core Programs appropriate documents that will help OVR to facilitate the application and IPE development processes in a timely manner (signed releases required);
•Provide vocational rehabilitation counseling and guidance, career planning and development, training (work experience and/or OJT), job search, placement assistance, and other services required to achieve consumer’s vocational objective consistent with an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
•Facilitate supported employment services to include job coaching for mutual consumers considered most significantly disabled;
•Assess the need for assistive technology to enable consumers to participate in training and employment activities;
•Provide guidance and information on disability employment matters;
•Participate in shared funding of mutual OVR and WIOA cases and ensure such participation occurs with regularity;
•Encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA Core Programs to self-disclose that they have a disability so that the programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common; and
•Identify any duplication of services and streamline program processes as necessary. (Page 103) Title I

o OVR and the WIOA program should continue to use OJT as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in CNMI. The use of OJTs was mentioned as potentially very beneficial for individuals living in Tinian and Rota due to the lack of any training providers. (Page 168) Title IV

Objective 4.2: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the CNMI, as well as share funding for training and employment services.  (Page 175) Title IV

The CNMI OVR will distribute Title VI Funds for Supported Employment (SE) Services at the WIOA-mandated requirement of 2.5% for administrative costs (e.g. indirect cost) and the balance for the provision and delivery of services to individuals with the most significant disabilities. Fifty percent (50%) of Title VI funds for SE services will be reserved for youth with the most significant disabilities who are between 14 and 24 years old. Services leading towards competitive integrated employment will include, but are not limited to, the following: job training (work experience and OJT); job search and placement assistance; modifications that may be required by VR clients at employment sites; transportation; and other employment-related services. (Page 177) Title IV

Objective 5.6: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support clients’ needs for supported employment job coaching to assist them to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the training (e.g. OJT) is completed. (Page 178) Title I

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation will work closely with the WIOA Core Program Partners and the State Workforce Development Board to help develop and promote an all-inclusive workforce for the CNMI. Collaboration and coordination with partners will be emphasized. Increasing employer engagement will be key as we recognize the importance of also serving employers in the dual customer approach to provide them with the services and supports they will need to be able to promote a diverse workforce to include individuals with disabilities as well as those experiencing other barriers to employment. Best practice strategies or evidence-based approaches for assisting our clientele to achieve competitive integrated employment will be utilized to the maximum extent possible. Regular communication especially regarding cost-sharing of workforce development activities and development of infrastructure that will promote improved access to programs and services as well as evaluations of program performance will be expected. Sharing of data among the WIOA Core Programs will be critical to maintaining most effective partnerships for greater outcomes for all involved. (Page 37) Title I

The CNMI OVR will continue its efforts to maintain or develop cooperative arrangements or agreements with various local, State, and Federal agencies and entities for referrals, training, services, facilities utilization, potential cost-sharing, and advocacy activities. These agencies include:

o State Rehabilitation Council for information/referral; outreach to increase education/awareness; collaboration/coordination and support for activities sponsored by the Disability Network Partners including the Transition Coalition; program review and evaluation including guidance on effective strategies to improve services and overall VR agency performance; employer engagement through Council-sponsored Employer Forum during all general membership meetings; etc. (Page 144) Title IV

o Disability Network Partners for ongoing discussions about issues affecting the disability community in the CNMI, information sharing, cost-sharing on disability awareness as well as employer engagement activities and training opportunities, referrals, technical assistance, etc. (Page 147) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate VR services for consumers with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management, Rotary Club, and other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness,
o Partner with the State workforce development board and Disability Network Partners to work with employers to identify opportunities for competitive integrated employment,
o Participate in job/career fairs sponsored by various partners within our community, including but not limited to Public School System co-op education and training program, Northern Marianas College, and those sponsored by employers both in the public and private sectors,
o Gather feedback from employers via formal survey instrument or informally through regular every day discussions/conversations, (Pages 155-156) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate Transition services, including Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) for students with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs, and what opportunities could be available to PreETS, especially with regards to Work-Based Learning Experiences (WBLE) and transitioning students,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management Rotary Club, and/or other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness, (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.)  (Page 174) Title IV
1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.
d. Engage employers in identifying OJT and/or job placements for VR consumers. (Page 179) Title IV

c. Maintain and strengthen relationships with the Northern Marianas Trades Institute for continued referrals of VR clients to NMTI for training preparation in the workforce in conjunction with OJT placement in the public or private sectors and to provide guidance/technical assistance to the trades school in the area of reasonable accommodations and effective communications with individuals with varying disabilities. (Page 184) Title IV

Data Collection

The CNMI Title 1 program is transitioning its data collection system and reporting processes from the Pacific Workforce Case Management System to the Virtual Online System/Virtual One-Stop System created by Geographical Solutions that would implement a single employment and career system identified as the "Micronesia One-Stop System." The CNMI's version of the system will be called hiremarianas, an off-shoot of the hireguam case management system. This should help resolve past errors and bring the programs up to date with data collection and reporting. (Page 51) Title IV

o OVR should encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA program to self-disclose that they have a disability so that both programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common. This will help with reporting for the common performance measures as well. (Page 168) Title IV

OVR should encourage the pursuit of postsecondary education by assisting individuals to obtain part-time employment while they go to school and utilizing OVR resources for this purpose. This will help address the financial need of individuals and will help OVR achieve their common performance measures associated with credential attainment and skills gains. (Page 169) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.) (Page 174) Title IV

OVR and SRC ensure that the VR Portion of the Unified State Plan goals and priorities were developed collaboratively and in consideration of the new CSNA findings and recommendations as well as the requirements of the WIOA common performance measures. (Page 176) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The CNMI’s Policy Manual includes the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Provisions pursuant to 29 CFR Part 38: Accessibility Each program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, must be operated in a manner that makes it readily accessible to qualified individuals with a disability. A qualified individual with a disability is an individual who, with or without a reasonable accommodation for his or her disability, meets eligibility requirements. This does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by qualified individuals with disabilities. However, if a program is available in only one location, that facility must be made accessible or the program must be made available at an alternative accessible facility. An entity is not required to make structural changes in existing facilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance. If an entity finds, after consulting with the individual with a disability, that there is no method of complying other than making a significant alteration in its existing facilities, the entity may refer the qualified individual with a disability to other providers of that service that are accessible.

Program accessibility requires the provision of auxiliary aids or services, such as: qualified interpreters on-site or through video remote interpreting service; exchange of written notes; voice, text and video-based telecommunications products and systems; videotext displays; telephone handset amplifiers, assistive listening systems or other effective aids for individuals with hearing impairments. Audio recordings, Brailled materials and displays; large print materials; accessible electronic and information technology or other effective aids must be provided for individuals with visual impairments. In addition, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, including assistive technology devices or software must be provided as appropriate. (Page 74) Title I

Objective 1.7: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support the efforts of the Disability Network Partners’ ad hoc committee on accessibility. (Page 172) Title IV

Veterans

Staff shall provide information to “covered persons” on services available under the DOL job training programs and shall ensure that individuals are informed of their right to priority as Veterans or Covered Spouses for employment and training services. This information from staff must be provided to “covered persons” either verbally or in writing at each point in the program:

  1. At the point of entry; and
  2. At orientation; and
  3. At eligibility determination; and
  4. At assessment; and
  5. During program activities.

A covered person under the Jobs for Veterans Act is one of the following:

  1. Veterans. A Veteran who is an individual who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released from such service under conditions other than dishonorable; or
  2. The Spouse of a Veteran. The Spouse of: o Any Veteran who died of a service-connected disability; o A member serving on active military duty who is listed as missing in action, captured in the line of duty by a hostile force, or forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power; or o Any Veteran with a total service-connected disability rating or one who died while being evaluated for it. (Page 73) Title I

DOL-WIA Division staff will collect and enter the required veteran and covered spouse’s data elements into the HireMarianas Online Virtual Site when enrolling veterans and covered spouses into WIOA programs. The Online Virtual Site provides a descriptive marker identifying Veterans and alerts case managers to such distinction. Proof of veteran and covered spouse status must be documented and kept in the applicant’s file.The CNMI workforce development system provides Priority of Service to Veterans and certain spouses. Upon the entrance and/or registration of a veteran the CNMI workforce development system will and has been prioritizing and accelerating services to veterans and certain spouses beyond other target populations. The CNMIs small island community of workforce services and programs provides the ability to quickly refer veterans and certain spouses for additional services required. The CNMI is not a recipient of the JVSG program however it does work closely on a regional level with the region’s JVSG recipient for extension of services to the CNMIs veterans needed priority of service. (Page 73) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phone

Snapshot

"In the Middle of the Sea": Where the hope for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities is as vast as the sea.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Northern Mariana Islands VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.58%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,216
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
1,905

State Data

General

2019
Population. 57,216
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 28
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 258

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 87
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 149
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 189
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 46.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 866
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 83.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 2.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 60.00%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 48.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 61.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.74%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element

Customized Employment

~~The integration of workforce development programs is focused at an earlier stage such as from elementary to high school and subsequently to the adult service delivery programs. The CNMI is poised to embracing the opportunities in developing its workforce development system into a system of education, skilled, and competitive workforce development and eco-system. Development of promising career pathways is an integral workforce development strategy and initiative that will bring the CNMIs human capital development to the levels of competitiveness locally, regionally, and globally. In addition, job-driven training (e.g., work experience, OJT, internship, etc.) and customized training will help individuals to better meet the needs of employers and thus increase opportunities for job placement. (Page 7) Title I

Objective 5.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will train its staff on supported employment, customized employment, and/or other best practice employment model to increase knowledge, skills, and abilities to better serve clients with most significant disabilities. (Page 176) Title IV

1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES
m. Support the personnel development of VR professionals and paraprofessionals especially in the areas of marketing the VR program, engaging employers, supported employment, customized employment, pre-employment transition services, work incentives counseling and benefits planning, etc. (Pages 179-180) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Whereas, the authorizing and funding legislation of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, which is Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act calls for improved planning, coordination and collaboration between the Department of Labor-Workforce Investment Agency Division, Adult Education, and Vocational Rehabilitation, unified planning and increased services to youth in need, including students with disabilities, this MOU will help to foster a regular and sustained partnership among the aforementioned parties that involve: (1) unified planning; (2) data sharing; (3) leveraging of resources; (4) identifying duplication of services and streamlining processes; and (5) providing for an array of services necessary for consumers to achieve their employment goals in accordance with the provisions of law and regulations that govern each respective program’s activities.

With this MOU, the CNMI WIOA Core Programs jointly agree to:
4) Leverage resources by sharing cost of training of mutual/co-enrolled consumers, as appropriate; (Page 118) Title I

o CNMI WIOA Core Programs through the State Workforce Development Board for leveraging of resource and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA. (Page 147) Title I

o Workforce Investment Agency (WIOA Title I Program) for leveraging of resources and expertise to provide mutual clients including students and youth with disabilities with training and employment preparation services, referrals, data sharing, collaboration/coordination with respect to the American Job Center (aka One-Stop), and other authorized activities per WIOA.  (Page 149) Title I

CNMI OVR partners with the Council on Developmental Disabilities by engaging in activities that promote and improve our public VR program; identify and address the employment and other needs of people with disabilities; strengthen partnerships among the local Disability Network Partners (OVR, CDD, Northern Marianas Protection & Advocacy Systems, Inc., University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Transition Coalition, employers, community rehabilitation programs, etc.); advocate that people with disabilities receive timely and quality services from community providers; educate the public on the mandates of federal and local statutes as they pertain to people with disabilities; leveraging of resources and expertise on similar State Plan goals/objectives for the benefit of VR consumers and potential applicants; among other things.

Collaboration with the CDD takes on the following form:
• Regular communications throughout the year.
• Involvement in mutual councils and boards, such as the Council on Developmental Disabilities, the State Rehabilitation Council, the Special Education State Advisory Panel, the Ayuda Network, the Consumer Advisory Committee of the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, the Statewide Independent Living Council, etc.
• Involvement in mutual coalitions, for instance, the Transition Coalition and the Disability Network Partners.
• Attendance and participation at each respective programs’ public hearing or forum to help inform the State Plan development.
• Leveraging of resources and expertise in areas of employment, advocacy, and systems change resulting in competitive, integrated, and timely services.• Information and referral related to employment.  (Pages 158-159) Title IV

o OVR and the WIOA program should target a set number of co-enrolled individuals with disabilities to share funding for training and employment services. The concept of shared or braided funding is viewed positively by both organizations, but it was difficult to identify any concrete examples of this in CNMI. (Page 168) Title IV

Goal 4. Continue to collaborate with the Title I-WIOA Partner to prepare mutual clients for competitive integrated employment.
Objective 4.1: In PYs 2016-2019, VR professionals will enhance communication with WIOA case workers to identify opportunities to leverage resources and expertise for the provision of training services to mutual clients leading toward competitive integrated employment.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.  (Page 193) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Where specifically School-to-Work Transition is concerned, the CNMI Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Public School System-Special Education Program (PSS-SPED), in FY 2015, re-evaluated their existing Interagency Cooperative Agreement (ICA) and made necessary revisions per the requirements of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) of 2014. Section 8 of the ICA talks about Pre-Employment Transition Services: “The Rehabilitation Act of 2014, as amended (under Title IV of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act signed into law by President Obama on July 22, 2014) requires OVR to provide eligible students with disabilities under IDEA or Section 504, ages 16-21 years, with pre-employment transition services (PETS), such as: Job exploration counseling, Work-based learning opportunities, Counseling on post-secondary educational opportunities, Workplace readiness training, and Instructions in self-advocacy. PSS-SPED will provide assistance to OVR in the coordination with employers on transition services including PETS for students with disabilities” (p. 3). (Page 149) Title IV

VR staff are essentially a resource for schools and families to help educate students about supports needed for a smooth transition from school to work, further training, education and/or independent living. To achieve this objective the following general activities are completed:

• Consulting with and educating schools, parents, students, and other agencies about VR services.

• Conducting outreach that includes VR orientation presentations, dissemination of VR brochures, and technical assistance with transition IEP planning.

• Participation in transition fairs, job fairs, and other activities targeting parents and students to increase appropriate referrals.

• Conducting early identification and assessment of student needs for transition services.

• Bringing the VR program to the school campuses through continued co-location efforts.

• Communicating relevant VR policy which may impact a student’s application or eligibility for VR services. (Pages 150-151) Title IV

As an extension of the 2015 Interagency Agreement between the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Public School System-Special Education Program, the School to Work Transition Guide (SWTG) was developed to ensure a smooth transition process. This guide suggests best practices that can be used as a tool to assist in the improvement of communication, coordination, and services for students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. It was designed to be useful for all persons and agencies (stakeholders) involved in the transition process. This document varies depending upon the stakeholder’s needs at the time of use.

The Agencies and Programs involved in the development of this guide agreed to the following core values:

• Transition is Essential: Transition is important for all students, regardless of disability. Transition provides the focus and early planning for all youth with disabilities to move towards achieving their goals.

• Individualization: Transition services are not the same for all students. Services are person-specific and developed with the young adult, their family, and those who know them well based on their interests, abilities, and needs.

• Outcome Focused: Transition services are specific outcomes driven activities designed to help students achieve their goals of training/education, employment, and independent living.

• Achieve More Together: Working together, as equal partners, creates a seamless transition from school to work. All can assist the student and their families identify their needs and develop plans to meet these needs. Everyone has something to contribute and leveraging of funds and staff leads to exceptional outcomes.

• Student and Family Involvement: Students and their families are actively involved in the entire transition process including service decisions. They are full and meaningful partners in the process.

• Identification of Roles and Process: Identifying the roles of every partner and the processes needed, sets clear expectations between partners about areas of focus and expertise, responsibilities, and where to go for assistance beyond the individual programs scope of practice. Knowing where to go for the right answers allows for smooth discussions about possibilities.

• Increase Understanding: Share information so all partners are aware of available resources to help in transitioning. (Page 151) Title IV

Section 12 - Financial Responsibility of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement States: When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with OVR, the cost of services necessary for both the student's education and for the student to become employed, will be delineated between PSS-SPED in terms of what will work with PSS-SPED representative in determining which is needed to complete high school coursework and which services pertain to fulfilling the IPE. When another adult service provider agency has been identified by the IEP team (that can pay part or all of the cost of a specific service or device), a representative of that agency shall be invited and included in the IEP meeting where the responsibility for payment is negotiated. Arrangements to share the cost of a given service or device will be fully reflected and explained in the IEP or the IPE, or both. (Note: OVR is a secondary source of financial assistance. (Pages 152-153) Title IV

Section 8: Services Prior to Referral Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, may be provided by OVR to students with disabilities beginning at age 16 (or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate), who have not yet applied for VR services. Consultation to students and families, technical assistance to schools, and participation in IEP meetings when invited. OVR will collaborate with PSS-SPED to provide any or all of the five pre-employment transition services required activities described in the next section to students with disabilities (ages 16-21, or younger, if the IEP team determines it is appropriate).

E. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(3)). Describe the manner in which the designated State agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit VR service providers.

There are no private non—profits providing VR services in the CNMI. (Pages 154-155) Title IV

All delegable functions (determination of eligibility, IPE development, IPE amendment, annual review of the IPE, and closures) are performed by staff who are qualified VR professionals who meet WIOA standards. Currently, all work is signed off by the CNMI OVR Director who has a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) until such time CNMI OVR hires a full-time Case Service Manager with similar credentials. To ensure progress of CNMI OVR’s professional and/or paraprofessional staff development, VR counselors’ transcripts, student records, and grades are submitted to the OVR director or designee for periodic review to determine progress. (Page 164) Title IV

There is general consensus among community partners/stakeholders that students with disabilities will better prepare for the 21st century workforce through the provision of transition career services and pre-employment transition services. Curriculum on work readiness provided either in a classroom setting or community-based by private community rehabilitation programs/vendors should focus on helping the students to enhance their skills including soft skills and communication skills thereby boosting self confidence for increased positive outcomes throughout the employment process.

Our VR Transition Counselor is in regular contact with the school personnel through co-location presence as well as attendance at IEP meetings. To also 0better improve experiences and outcomes, employers must be supported with information and instructions as well as educated on innovative strategies with regards to how best to communicate or interact with students with varying disabilities and meet their unique needs. (Pages 169-170) Title IV

Objective 2.5: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will determine eligibility and develop IPEs in partnership with consumers and prior to high school graduation with a 90% targeted success rate. (Note: The IPE will be developed in consideration of the student’s IEP.)  (Page 174) Title IV

Objective 2.7: In PYs 2016-2019, to ensure seamless transition, VR professionals must ensure the development of the IPE prior to graduation and in consideration of the student’s IEP.
Extent achieved: Objective met, ongoing.

Strategies:
o In PY 2016, eight out of eight (100%) student IPEs were developed prior to graduation from high school.
o In PY 2017, from July 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018, one out of two (50%) student IPEs was developed prior to graduation from high school.
o VR Counselors to ensure regular case reviews and effective monitoring and feedback are completed. (Page 191) Title IV

Objective 5.2: In PYs 2016-2019, continue to support client’s need for supported employment job coaching to assist him/her to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the OJT is completed.
Extent achieved: Ongoing.

Strategies:
o OVR continues to provide job coaching services in the context of an approved IPE to consumers with most significant disabilities who need assistance to be successful in their training program or in maintaining their employment. (Page 197) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~Core partners will strengthen the career pathways process by improving the delivery and transitional navigation into the workforce. Career pathways will provide the CNMI workforce with the skills, education, work-based training opportunities, resources, support, and accommodations needed to gain employment. (Page 36) Title I

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation agrees to:
•Process the OVR application of interested individuals with disabilities in a timely manner but no later than 60 days after date of application;
•Refer clients who may benefit from additional training and employment services to DOL-WIA Division;
•Refer clients who may need to acquire basic skills, workplace success training, and follow-up services such as educational and career pathway goal settings to the Adult Education State Office;
•Request and obtain from WIOA Core Programs appropriate documents that will help OVR to facilitate the application and IPE development processes in a timely manner (signed releases required);
•Provide vocational rehabilitation counseling and guidance, career planning and development, training (work experience and/or OJT), job search, placement assistance, and other services required to achieve consumer’s vocational objective consistent with an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
•Facilitate supported employment services to include job coaching for mutual consumers considered most significantly disabled;
•Assess the need for assistive technology to enable consumers to participate in training and employment activities;
•Provide guidance and information on disability employment matters;
•Participate in shared funding of mutual OVR and WIOA cases and ensure such participation occurs with regularity;
•Encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA Core Programs to self-disclose that they have a disability so that the programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common; and
•Identify any duplication of services and streamline program processes as necessary. (Page 103) Title I

o OVR and the WIOA program should continue to use OJT as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in CNMI. The use of OJTs was mentioned as potentially very beneficial for individuals living in Tinian and Rota due to the lack of any training providers. (Page 168) Title IV

Objective 4.2: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, as a strategy to provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the CNMI, as well as share funding for training and employment services.  (Page 175) Title IV

The CNMI OVR will distribute Title VI Funds for Supported Employment (SE) Services at the WIOA-mandated requirement of 2.5% for administrative costs (e.g. indirect cost) and the balance for the provision and delivery of services to individuals with the most significant disabilities. Fifty percent (50%) of Title VI funds for SE services will be reserved for youth with the most significant disabilities who are between 14 and 24 years old. Services leading towards competitive integrated employment will include, but are not limited to, the following: job training (work experience and OJT); job search and placement assistance; modifications that may be required by VR clients at employment sites; transportation; and other employment-related services. (Page 177) Title IV

Objective 5.6: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support clients’ needs for supported employment job coaching to assist them to acquire the necessary skills on the job and increase the likelihood that the job will continue when the training (e.g. OJT) is completed. (Page 178) Title I

Apprenticeship

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer / Business Engagement

~~The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation will work closely with the WIOA Core Program Partners and the State Workforce Development Board to help develop and promote an all-inclusive workforce for the CNMI. Collaboration and coordination with partners will be emphasized. Increasing employer engagement will be key as we recognize the importance of also serving employers in the dual customer approach to provide them with the services and supports they will need to be able to promote a diverse workforce to include individuals with disabilities as well as those experiencing other barriers to employment. Best practice strategies or evidence-based approaches for assisting our clientele to achieve competitive integrated employment will be utilized to the maximum extent possible. Regular communication especially regarding cost-sharing of workforce development activities and development of infrastructure that will promote improved access to programs and services as well as evaluations of program performance will be expected. Sharing of data among the WIOA Core Programs will be critical to maintaining most effective partnerships for greater outcomes for all involved. (Page 37) Title I

The CNMI OVR will continue its efforts to maintain or develop cooperative arrangements or agreements with various local, State, and Federal agencies and entities for referrals, training, services, facilities utilization, potential cost-sharing, and advocacy activities. These agencies include:

o State Rehabilitation Council for information/referral; outreach to increase education/awareness; collaboration/coordination and support for activities sponsored by the Disability Network Partners including the Transition Coalition; program review and evaluation including guidance on effective strategies to improve services and overall VR agency performance; employer engagement through Council-sponsored Employer Forum during all general membership meetings; etc. (Page 144) Title IV

o Disability Network Partners for ongoing discussions about issues affecting the disability community in the CNMI, information sharing, cost-sharing on disability awareness as well as employer engagement activities and training opportunities, referrals, technical assistance, etc. (Page 147) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate VR services for consumers with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management, Rotary Club, and other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness,
o Partner with the State workforce development board and Disability Network Partners to work with employers to identify opportunities for competitive integrated employment,
o Participate in job/career fairs sponsored by various partners within our community, including but not limited to Public School System co-op education and training program, Northern Marianas College, and those sponsored by employers both in the public and private sectors,
o Gather feedback from employers via formal survey instrument or informally through regular every day discussions/conversations, (Pages 155-156) Title IV

CNMI OVR will strengthen collaboration and coordination with employers to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate Transition services, including Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) for students with disabilities to prepare them for employment by:
o Contacting and engaging in meaningful conversations with employers individually to learn about their specific business culture and needs, and what opportunities could be available to PreETS, especially with regards to Work-Based Learning Experiences (WBLE) and transitioning students,
o Attending and networking with employers at events such as the Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resource Management Rotary Club, and/or other similar venues,
o Utilize the support and expertise of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), especially those who represent business/industry/labor, to help facilitate employer engagement activities and gauge effectiveness, (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.)  (Page 174) Title IV
1. THE METHODS TO BE USED TO EXPAND AND IMPROVE SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES.
d. Engage employers in identifying OJT and/or job placements for VR consumers. (Page 179) Title IV

c. Maintain and strengthen relationships with the Northern Marianas Trades Institute for continued referrals of VR clients to NMTI for training preparation in the workforce in conjunction with OJT placement in the public or private sectors and to provide guidance/technical assistance to the trades school in the area of reasonable accommodations and effective communications with individuals with varying disabilities. (Page 184) Title IV

Data Collection

The CNMI Title 1 program is transitioning its data collection system and reporting processes from the Pacific Workforce Case Management System to the Virtual Online System/Virtual One-Stop System created by Geographical Solutions that would implement a single employment and career system identified as the "Micronesia One-Stop System." The CNMI's version of the system will be called hiremarianas, an off-shoot of the hireguam case management system. This should help resolve past errors and bring the programs up to date with data collection and reporting. (Page 51) Title IV

o OVR should encourage individuals with disabilities that they refer to the WIOA program to self-disclose that they have a disability so that both programs can get a better idea of how many clients they have in common. This will help with reporting for the common performance measures as well. (Page 168) Title IV

OVR should encourage the pursuit of postsecondary education by assisting individuals to obtain part-time employment while they go to school and utilizing OVR resources for this purpose. This will help address the financial need of individuals and will help OVR achieve their common performance measures associated with credential attainment and skills gains. (Page 169) Title IV

Objective 3.4: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR - in collaboration with the WIOA Title I Program -will target 5 and 10 OJTs, respectively, to implement as a way to help meet the employment needs of local businesses. (Note: This will provide both programs with positive outcomes and contribute to the common performance measures of effectiveness in serving employers.) (Page 174) Title IV

OVR and SRC ensure that the VR Portion of the Unified State Plan goals and priorities were developed collaboratively and in consideration of the new CSNA findings and recommendations as well as the requirements of the WIOA common performance measures. (Page 176) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

The CNMI’s Policy Manual includes the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Provisions pursuant to 29 CFR Part 38: Accessibility Each program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, must be operated in a manner that makes it readily accessible to qualified individuals with a disability. A qualified individual with a disability is an individual who, with or without a reasonable accommodation for his or her disability, meets eligibility requirements. This does not require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by qualified individuals with disabilities. However, if a program is available in only one location, that facility must be made accessible or the program must be made available at an alternative accessible facility. An entity is not required to make structural changes in existing facilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance. If an entity finds, after consulting with the individual with a disability, that there is no method of complying other than making a significant alteration in its existing facilities, the entity may refer the qualified individual with a disability to other providers of that service that are accessible.

Program accessibility requires the provision of auxiliary aids or services, such as: qualified interpreters on-site or through video remote interpreting service; exchange of written notes; voice, text and video-based telecommunications products and systems; videotext displays; telephone handset amplifiers, assistive listening systems or other effective aids for individuals with hearing impairments. Audio recordings, Brailled materials and displays; large print materials; accessible electronic and information technology or other effective aids must be provided for individuals with visual impairments. In addition, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, including assistive technology devices or software must be provided as appropriate. (Page 74) Title I

Objective 1.7: In PYs 2018-2019, OVR will continue to support the efforts of the Disability Network Partners’ ad hoc committee on accessibility. (Page 172) Title IV

Veterans

Staff shall provide information to “covered persons” on services available under the DOL job training programs and shall ensure that individuals are informed of their right to priority as Veterans or Covered Spouses for employment and training services. This information from staff must be provided to “covered persons” either verbally or in writing at each point in the program:

  1. At the point of entry; and
  2. At orientation; and
  3. At eligibility determination; and
  4. At assessment; and
  5. During program activities.

A covered person under the Jobs for Veterans Act is one of the following:

  1. Veterans. A Veteran who is an individual who served at least one day in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released from such service under conditions other than dishonorable; or
  2. The Spouse of a Veteran. The Spouse of: o Any Veteran who died of a service-connected disability; o A member serving on active military duty who is listed as missing in action, captured in the line of duty by a hostile force, or forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power; or o Any Veteran with a total service-connected disability rating or one who died while being evaluated for it. (Page 73) Title I

DOL-WIA Division staff will collect and enter the required veteran and covered spouse’s data elements into the HireMarianas Online Virtual Site when enrolling veterans and covered spouses into WIOA programs. The Online Virtual Site provides a descriptive marker identifying Veterans and alerts case managers to such distinction. Proof of veteran and covered spouse status must be documented and kept in the applicant’s file.The CNMI workforce development system provides Priority of Service to Veterans and certain spouses. Upon the entrance and/or registration of a veteran the CNMI workforce development system will and has been prioritizing and accelerating services to veterans and certain spouses beyond other target populations. The CNMIs small island community of workforce services and programs provides the ability to quickly refer veterans and certain spouses for additional services required. The CNMI is not a recipient of the JVSG program however it does work closely on a regional level with the region’s JVSG recipient for extension of services to the CNMIs veterans needed priority of service. (Page 73) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs: A Citizen-Centric Report Fiscal Year 2019 - 12/06/2019

“The CNMI Office of Veterans Affairs under the Office of the Governor maintained operation and support to all Veterans from the CNMI. The office assists those returning home after serving and family members in seeking employment, medical, and health issues in collaboration with the federal VA office.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

CNMI Office of the Governor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation: A Report to Our Citizens Fiscal Year 2019 - 10/31/2019

“The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) is a State and Federal partnership agency, placed within the Office of the Governor, that provides services to individuals with disabilities in the CNMI. The OVR was established in 1975 and serves the three major islands of the Commonwealth: Saipan, Tinian, and Rota.

OVR’s mission is to increase employment and promote independence among eligible individuals with disabilities throughout the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Center for Living Independently in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands - 01/01/2019

~~“Our MissionTo Ensure the rights of people with disabilities to live independently and fully integrated within the community.

Our VisionWe will provide a comprehensive range of services which make it possible for people with disabilities to live as independently as they choose in our community.

What We DoThe Center for Living Independently works to help the citizens in our commonwealth to live independently and fully integrate themselves within the community. We utilize many different methods to accomplish this goal.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities 2017 – 2021 State Plan Goals & Objectives - 01/01/2019

~~“Goal 2 – Service System Improvement  The Council will work with partners on at least two (2) systems change initiative and provide information, education, and skill building activities each year so that individuals and/or students with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have improved transition services from high school through post-school transition into meaningful post-school outcomes with adequate services and supports and increased opportunities in employment in the CNMI.Objective 2.1 – Employment By 2021, create more opportunities for young adults and job seekers with developmental disabilities to have meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages and exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities by working with the CNMI Disability Network Partners to educate communities, training staff, and writing one state policy by September 2021 to improve services that support fully integrated, competitive employment.Objective 2.2 – Transition By 2021, collaborate with the CNMI Transition Coalition, the CNMI Disability Network Partners and others to create or improve at least one practice designed to improve transition outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities from high school through postsecondary education/training.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Council on Developmental Disabilities “About Us” - 01/01/2019

~~“The DD Council's mission is to promote systems change to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have the same opportunities as others in the community. We shall continue to work hard to amplify the voice of individuals with disabilities and their families, because, the decisions we make here in the CNMI have a significant impact on their lives. The Council accomplishes this mission by helping to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their family members play a vital role in the design of and access to quality delivery of services, supports and other assistance and opportunities.

The Council shall work to promote the independence, productivity, integration and inclusion of those with developmental disabilities into the community. To achieve or fulfill this mission, the CNMI Council on Developmental Disabilities shall invest in people and organization that are committed to serving people with developmental disabilities and their families CNMI wide.”

Systems
  • Other

Independent Living Older Blind Program - 01/01/2019

~~“What is the ILOB Program

The Independent Living Older Blind Program is made available through Federal grants to support services for individuals age 55 or older, whose severe visual impairment makes competitive employment difficult to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

A person who has a significant disability (physical or mental impairment with one or more functional limitation) old folks    The corrected visual acuity in the better eye must fall:20/70-200 Low Vision20/200-400 BlindnessMust be 55 years old or older on the date of application”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Consumer Services - 01/01/2019

~~“What Services Do We Provide?Services might include any combination of the following:• Vocational guidance and career counseling• Restoration (physical/mental)• Vocational and other training services• Rehabilitation technology, including assistive technology services, assistive technology devices, and rehabilitation engineering equipment• Personal assistance services such as personal attendant, interpreter, reader and scribe” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Northern Marianas for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“5 Core IL ServicesGoal Description: Enhance and expand the five (5) core IL services (Information & Referral, IL Skills Training, Peer Counseling, Individual and System Advocacy, and Transition) in a manner that will maximize benefits to the greatest number of individuals with significant disabilities” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

CNMI Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program: Citizen-Centric Report FY 2019 - 10/30/2019

“The Substance Abuse, Addiction & Rehabilitation (SAAR) Program, under the Office of the Governor, operates the Hinemlu O’hala Para Enteramenti or the H.O.P.E. Recovery Center ("HOPE"). HOPE is dedicated to providing quality clinical care and social services to individuals and their families living in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

CNMI Department of Labor: Citizen-Centric Report FY2019 - 10/23/2019

“Ultimately, the Department exists to serve the Commonwealth by ensuring that all U.S. status-qualified individuals are given employment preference, applicable federal and local labor laws are understood and/or enforced, and existing and future workforce development programs, policies, and practices are further developed…

This fiscal year (FY) 2019 report (1) provides an overview of the CNMI Department of Labor, (2) presents recent accomplishments of the Department, (3) displays revenues and expenditures for major delivery areas, and (4) identifies the Department’s challenges and priorities in fulfillment of the requirements set forth by P.L.20-83.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key differences are:

    CNMI became a territory in 1978 and its Medicaid program was established in 1979. It is a 100% fee-for-service delivery system with one hospital servicing the territory. There are no deductibles or co-payments under the CNMI Medicaid program and the territory does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan. Instead, the Medicaid program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications to dual-eligibles.   CNMI operates its Medicaid program under a broad waiver granted under the authority of Section 1902(j) of the Social Security Act.  This provision allows the Secretary to waive or modify any requirement of Title XIX, in regards to CNMI’s Medicaid program, with the exception of three: the territory must adhere to the cap set under Section 1108 of the Act; the territory must adhere to the statutory Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP); Federal medical assistance payments may only be made for amounts expended for care and services described in a numbered paragraph of section 1905(a).

Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $100,139,704 in Medicaid funding to CNMI.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in CNMI, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing CNMI’s FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

CNMI was awarded $9,118,974 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. CNMI must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (Section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies