Washington

States - Big Screen

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
7,614,893
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
474,653
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
198,492
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.46%
Change from
2018 to 2019
41.82%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.25%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 7,405,743 7,535,591 7,614,893
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 480,828 478,622 474,653
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 194,948 195,251 198,492
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,187,621 3,267,432 3,307,354
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.54% 40.79% 41.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.21% 78.83% 79.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80% 4.50% 4.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.00% 17.40% 16.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.00% 9.30% 8.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 468,223 470,154 471,324
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 474,095 464,242 477,606
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 774,393 755,522 763,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 31,477 34,309 35,277
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 74,953 75,251 83,121
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,862 18,304 17,162
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 44,244 45,108 48,481
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 6,222 4,916 4,610
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,388 48,309 47,347
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 25,732 27,928 32,127

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,085 7,255 7,428
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.20% 5.40% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 176,269 171,397 165,880

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,469 17,718 13,348
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 42,933 43,760 33,170
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 80,081 80,614 58,023
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.80% 22.00% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.60% 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,638 1,713 1,740
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,765 9,476 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 118 114 145
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 80 78 99
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 68.00% 68.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.15 1.09 1.38

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 30.00% 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,975 4,956 4,801
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 280,769 277,435 272,200
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 246 431 449
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 322 413 428

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $53,995,000 $56,675,968 $59,332,663
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $2,093,000 $1,372,392 $1,135,298
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $16,000 $10,166 $7,968
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,505,000 $5,698,882 $6,658,804
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 87.00% 86.00% 85.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,218 1,518 1,645
Number of people served in facility based work. 316 198 154
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5 4 3
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 105.80 106.20 104.97

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.35% 55.21% 56.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.24% 13.13% 13.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.83% 0.86% 0.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.94% 95.22% 95.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.13% 21.79% 21.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.56% 57.13% 56.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 70.46% 72.21% 72.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.43% 35.34% 34.77%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 1 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 23 9 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 923 380 302
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 128 32 259
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,051 412 561

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~This streamlined integration requires all service providers to quickly identify needs, and then match resources to meet those needs. Increased collaboration and coordination among system partners ensures that the best of what the system has to offer comes forward with a minimum of duplication. Integration provides a flexible, interconnected set of services tailored to each customer. Customers receive a range of services via various providers and funding streams that may be braided together to meet their specific needs. (Page 35) Title I

Based on intake information, a navigator or navigation team will evaluate a customer’s need for support services, readiness to pursue education, training, employment, or a combination, and make appropriate referrals. The navigator or navigation team will follow up with the customer to ensure smooth transition, or to redirect the customer if needed. Partners will work together beyond the points of program transition to braid funding and services across organizations for the benefit of the customer. (Page 36) Title I

The key is to leverage the investment and resources of all partners toward a common goal. Rather than competing for the attention of businesses, the workforce system strategically braids together the resources of the public, philanthropic, and private sectors to create new solutions to ever—changing business challenges. (Page 46) Title I

Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. (Pages 181-182) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner—Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services. (Page 97) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~• Strengthen DSHS/DVR participation in current School-to-Work programs statewide by providing increased training and technical assistance for School-to-Work partners, including earlier DSHS/DVR input into assessment and employment planning for students.

• Contract with Centers for Independent Living to enhance and expand core independent living services, focusing on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, Centers for Independent Living have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas. Additional outreach efforts include targeted disability groups, minority groups, and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment in which youth feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies. This goal will be accomplished by enhancing youth understanding of the Independent Living philosophy, successful self-advocacy, and how engage with legislators about disability issues.  (Page 234) Title I

• Hired transition consultants to increase capacity to provide Pre-ETS services directly and through coordination and collaboration with community partners.
• Continued coordination with Center for Change in Transition Services to coordinate DSHS/DVR and school-based transition services.
• Continued school-to-work contracts with county developmental disabilities programs. (Page 290) Title I

The memorandum of understanding clarifies responsibility and coordination of roles in providing services and programs for those students who are both eligible for special education services under IDEA, and who are also eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The current agreement remains in effect until September 30, 2020, but may require amendments after federal regulations are finalized. The agreement outlines each agency’s overall role and responsibilities relating to the provision of transition services to high school students with disabilities. This agreement provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) before each student determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 316) Title IV

DSB youth and transition specialists conduct outreach and ongoing consultation statewide to teachers of the visually impaired, students, families and others in the education community. Coordination and outreach elements for pre-employment transition services are included in the agreement. (Page 316) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K—12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self—support through viable avenues. Many ES—staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource. (Page 97) Title I

State strategies under WIOA potentially enlarge the system of service providers to employers and departs further from the more limited, traditional Wagner—Peyser job order and hiring fair approaches. Innovative linkages by local boards in some workforce development areas such as facilitating employer panels that bring together industry sector employers and current and future jobseekers to discuss particular employer needs and hiring practices are very successful at generating interest in career pathways and employment outcomes and are anticipated to engage more local Wagner—Peyser and education partners. (Page 109) Title I

Finding the right program fit can occur in subsequent visits, but the customer should not be bombarded with duplicative requests for information or skills assessments. Staff must be “Navigators” who help people design individual career pathways and then assist them in finding an economically self—sustaining route forward. Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Other entities with specialized programs serving parents on TANF, Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs), MSFWs, homeless, ex-offenders, veterans, dislocated workers, persons with disabilities, and the long-term unemployed when included should increase the number of participants who have defined career pathways and who gain portable skills. All will be better informed and served as Integrated Service Delivery advances. (Page 183) Title III

These activities include: • BEdA system wide, three-day training on developing college and career pathways. This was developed to support WIOA and the state plan requirement to implement college and career readiness pathways for all basic skills students. (Page 210) Title I

Apprenticeship

There are areas where the public system and business share in the cost of developing an employee’s skills, including work—based learning (on—the—job training, incumbent worker training, apprenticeship). Business partnerships with workforce development and human services programs can increase diversity in the hiring pool and support job retention in the workplace. If employers are willing to partner with the workforce system, expend energy, and, devote resources, they can leverage their investment to create sustainable solutions to their workforce challenges. (Page 44) Title I

Youth Program Elements (Youth Only): • Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to a high school diploma or recognized equivalent or recognized post—secondary credential • Alternative secondary school services or dropout recovery services, as appropriate • Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education components (summer employment, pre—apprenticeship, internships, job shadowing, OJT (Page 65) Title I

• Increased coordination with WSATC, L&I, labor and business to support and develop pre—apprenticeship and apprenticeship opportunities and providing customized assistance or referral for assistance in the development of registered apprenticeships (Page 68) Title I

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiencies. (Page 73) Title I

Wherever possible, DSHS/DVR will integrate its customer skill development services with other one—stop partners to include project—based learning in the classroom, online coursework, industry guest lecturers, or direct workplace experience, including job shadows, mentorships, internships (paid or unpaid), clinicals, cooperative learning models, and apprenticeships. (Page77) Title I

Enrollees will be encouraged to pursue certifications and sub—grantees will facilitate on—the—job employment (OJE) opportunities that place them within view of and consideration by these industries and occupations. This can include internships; apprenticeships and registered apprenticeship opportunities based upon the individual’s personal preferences and IEP. (Page 81) Title I

Support apprenticeships, paid internships, and on-the-job training opportunities to enhance customers’ employability, in partnership with LWDBs and the business community. (Page 286) Title I

The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self-sufficiency. The DSB expects to explore bridges among the partner Department of Labor Youth programs to fully engage blind youth in integrated and competitive work experience opportunities that fit individual need. (Page 349) Title IV

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiency. (Page 359) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. (Page 93) Title I

Beyond the DOL contracting process the state manager is exploring the development of MOUs between the State and the National grantees in order to create cohesion of the program; develop formal agreements with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; potentially data sharing agreements with State entities; accessing the DSHS and or WDC Ticket to Work EN network for reimbursement for the services provided by the grantees (with the exception of Goodwill Industries which already is a EN). (Page 123) Title I

DSHS/DVR continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability, mental health, and traumatic brain injury service providers to build their capacity for providing extended support services. (Page 143) Title I

Train staff and partners on Social Security Work Incentives, Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency, and other work incentives to identify optional funding sources. (Page143) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing` a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 227) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 242) Title I

In addition to employment-related services, DSHS/DVR customers receive benefits counseling to provide guidance on programs for which they may be eligible. In comparison to the overall population of working age Washingtonians with disabilities, SSI and SSDI recipient rates for DSHS/DVR customers are higher for SSI and similar for SSDI at application and higher for both at case closure: 24% at application and 32% at closure for SSI and 23% at application and 30% at case closure for SSDI. For both SSI and SSDI, 43% of DSHS/DVR customers are receiving benefits at application and 52% at case closure. (Page 256) Title I

Social Security Administration estimates for Social Security disability recipients in Washington State show that approximately 16.3% of all residents with a disability receive SSI/SSDI benefits. For FFY2017, 20.4% of all participants served through the agency’s VR program were recipients of Social Security benefits. Of those individuals who exited with an employment outcome and had listed public assistance as their primary support at application, 75% instead were able to list earnings from their work as primary support at exit. We serve a higher proportion of individuals on SSI/SSDI, and fewer DSB participants require those benefits upon exiting the program. (Page 337) Title IV

At this point in time it is uncertain how many individuals may be enrolled /co—enrolled with DVR services. One of DVR’s goals on its newly developed State Plan is to increase access to services for those individuals with disabilities (on SSDI) who have a work history but became unemployed and exhausted their unemployment benefits. (Page 448) Title IV

Ticket to Work Employment Network. Washington State DSHS agencies (DBHR, DDA, ALTSA/HCS and DVR) are now partners as an administrative Employment Network. The SCSEP State Leadership has expressed interest in being involved with this collaboration. Goodwill Industries is currently an Employment Network and several of the State Sub—grantees are either currently or in discussions with becoming an Employment Network via their involvement with the local WDCs. (Page 449) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

Under Washington state law, the Workforce Board conducts a substantial program of assessment, research and evaluation activities that have historically included most of the core WIOA programs (Titles I, II, IV plus TANF/Workfirst), as well as additional workforce programs. This program has included an annual participant outcome evaluation using State Core Measures (very similar to WIOA measures), periodic surveys of participants, and periodic net impact studies using statistically adjusted comparison group methodology. All of these activities are conducted or contracted by Workforce Board staff, with the cooperation of program agencies and support of other state sources of participant data including Unemployment Insurance wage data, and K12 participant data from the state’s P-20 system agency, the Education Research and Data Center. (Page 131) Title I

Recognizing the challenges of developing data collection methodologies to ensure an accurate representation of the experiences of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) throughout Washington State, the results of the CRP Cost Study were delayed. Additionally, DSHS/DVR experienced a change in executive leadership in late 2016 which postponed the implementation of modifications based on the results of the study. DSHS/DVR formally communicated the results of the cost study in early 2017. The CRP Cost Study resulted in a restructure of the fees paid to CRPs. To DSHS/DVR’s knowledge, this study was the first of its kind in the nation. The methodologies and results were shared at a national level to help improve the delivery of services to customers and the businesses that provide these valuable services. (Page 225) Title IV

Analysis of customer satisfaction surveys, performance data and RSA statistics show that DSB provides very high quality services and outcomes. The RSA r-911 data provides strong evidence that DSB places emphasis on careers that provide living wages and benefits, within a competitive and integrated context. The agency wants to maintain and build on this excellence in quality of services and outcomes. (Page 335) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DSB and Washington State have long believed that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards for years. (Page 321) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low—level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created. (Page 58) Title I

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs. (Page 148) Title I

5. A training plan stating training and competency expectations for ES staff within available resources for onboarding and refresher coursework on the SWA online Learning Management System, and on parallel WDC-hosted systems and through in-person training. (EO nondiscrimination, data security, and procedures using the Management Information System are already mandatory recurrent trainings. EO and data security also require refresher training bi-annually and annually, respectively.) (Page 179) Title I

Veterans

Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP):

  1. Provide intensive services and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, transitioning service members (TSMs) and eligible spouses
  2. Case manage veterans, TSMs and eligible spouses to help overcome significant barriers to employment (SBEs) and place in living wage career positions
  3. Outreach to community events, activities and organizations to locate and assist veterans with SBEs
  4. Prioritize services to veterans in accordance with 38 USC Chapter 41
  5. Manage and document caseload activities

Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER):

  1. Conduct outreach to employers to assist veterans in gaining employment, including employer seminars, and job search workshops/groups
  2. Facilitate employment, training and placement services furnished to veterans under the local service delivery model
  3. Coordinate with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans
  4. Inform Federal contractors on process to recruit and retain veterans
  5. Coordinate and participate with partner agencies and entities, internal and external, on business outreach
  6. Coordinate, plan and orchestrate hiring events to promote the hiring of veterans (Page 78) Title III

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 95) Title I

Alignment and coordination across federal, state and local programs for veteran employment and training is mandated by the Jobs for Veterans Act and regulated by 20 CFR 1010, as well as joint DOL VETS and ETA formally issued guidance and WorkSource system policy. Locally operated DOL programs, including Wagner—Peyser and TAA under the direct oversight of ES management, and other programs identified in the regulation must provide Priority of Service to covered persons as mandated. Qualified disabled veterans may receive a referral to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist if they meet at least one of the DOL VETS disability or disadvantaged veteran criteria. (Page 98) Title I

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 100) Title I

Work Opportunity Tax Credit:

o Employers can reduce their federal business taxes by up to $2,400 for more eligible hires. Up to $9,000 over two years for each qualifying welfare recipient; $5,600 for most military veterans and up to $9,600 for hiring veterans who have a service—related disability.

o Eligible workers, people who are on or who received public assistance within 18 months of being hired; needy or disabled veterans; felons hired within a year after leaving prison and those participating in work release; people in state or federal vocational rehabilitation programs that have an employment plan for employment within two years of being hired; adults under 40 who receive food stamps in the six months before being hired; anyone who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for any month in the 60 days before being hired. (Page 111) Title I

This policy communicates a system-wide policy and procedure for core and partner programs included in the WIOA state plan for identifying and referring veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP, which is operated by the Employment Security Department (ESD), provides intensive case management and services, job referrals, and job readiness activities to disabled veterans and other veterans with significant barriers to employment. Common Assurance No. 11 in WIOA Unified and Combined State Plan Requirements directs states to provide assurances to the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education that “(s)ervice providers have a referral process in place for directing Veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) to DVOP services, when appropriate.” (Page 148) Title I

Disabled veterans may receive assistance and intensive services from WorkSource staff and partners, The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), the VA/VR&E Program, a local DVOP, or any combination of these. Disabled veterans are identified during the veteran validation process at WorkSource and are referred to the appropriate level of service based upon the veteran’s interests, abilities, skills, needs, and SBE status. Also, through a close partnership with the VA, DVOPs assist veterans who are seeking entry into new careers and have received vocational rehabilitation assistance from the VA/VR&E program in alignment with at least one of their 5 Tracks to Employment to obtain workplace skills. Local DVOP staff work in partnership with VA/VR&E case managers to jointly build career plans that aid the veteran in obtaining suitable work based upon their abilities. This partnership is supported by the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a DVOP out-stationed at the VA/VR&E Regional Offices in Seattle. Washington State also coordinates to provision of intensive services for VR&E clients with VA/VR&E case managers stationed at the Portland, OR and Boise, ID Regional Offices. ESD and the Regional VA/VR&E office in Seattle are planning a cross-agency Lean event to assess and improve services being provided to VR&E clients. (Page 409) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery - Mental Health (DBHR-MH), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR-MR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 143) Title I

Participate in an interagency service committee which supports initiatives and increased employment outcomes for persons living with developmental disabilities, mental health disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and traumatic brain injuries. (Page 143) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 227) Title I

• DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers.
• DSHS/DVR is represented as a member of the Washington State Behavioral Health Advisory Council. (Page 228) Title I

Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 239) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR also contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 242) Title I

DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several mental health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 242) Title I

Customers and service providers most frequently identified Placement into a Job, Assistance Searching for a Job, and Job Coaching as needed services. DSHS/DVR staff most frequently identified Vocational Counseling & Guidance and Mental Health Counseling and Treatment as needed services, though the top three customer-identified needs were also selected by a majority of DSHS/DVR staff. (Page 257) Title I

DSHS estimates that 75% of individuals with disabilities in their service systems have a mental health service need, compared to 50% of customers served by DSHS/DVR. (Page. 259) Title I

DSB has active collaboration with the Division of Behavioral Health, but as DSB is not part of the Department of Social and Health Services family of agencies, we do not yet have a formalized agreement with either agency. We will work towards that goal as part of this state plan. DSB will negotiate an agreement with the Department of Social and Health Services Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery in order to formalize collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports. (Page 324) Title IV

Needs assessments are conducted by several entities, including but not limited to health districts, United Way agencies, mental health providers, healthcare providers, workforce development councils, and area agencies on aging. From their different perspectives, these needs assessments can help pinpoint specific unmet needs and offer an opportunity to discuss solutions for meeting those needs. An example of this can be found online at United Way of King County WA Snapshot. It reviews several key indicators of basic need: requests for basic need assistance (including utility and rent, food, and financial), employment security and the unemployment rate, and home foreclosures. Their assessment website links to best practices where specific organizations successfully addressing the issues can be found. (Page 453) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Use state employment and local offices to orient UI claimants to the services offered across all programs. Ensure all those that administer programs that can touch a UI claimant have the basic understanding of eligibility requirements including being able and available for all suitable work and making an active search for work. Work closer with training programs, community and technical colleges, Labor and Industries (apprenticeships and other back to work programs), Human Services (WorkFirst and DVR), The Washington Labor Council, along with various other programs and co—enrolling where a good fit is determined. This can be done by reaching out to claimants and assessing their needs. (Page 78) Title I

PARTNER PROGRAMS UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE Staff working with claimants and employers will have a basic understanding of UI eligibility requirements and will follow through to make sure only those meeting the qualifications the employer is looking for and is a good match will be referred. Follow up from the employers and claimants will be necessary to ensure those that are not following through as directed are referred to the claims center for adjudication of any issues that arise maintaining program integrity and a high—quality service to the employers. (Page 110) Title I

Other unemployed, lower-skilled individuals seeking training who may not qualify for weekly UI benefits might qualify for WIOA Adult services or state retraining resources such as Worker Retraining funds, federal training funds tied to Department of Agriculture BFET programs, or special grants such as HHS Healthcare Careers for All. Although these other programs do not provide weekly subsistence benefits they can provide for training costs and some support services such as transportation etc. (Page 181) Title II

In the first 5 weeks of receiving benefits, UI claimants may be called in for mandatory reemployment services. Individuals who may be unemployed and not aware of services, or those who have abandoned searching for work, are also sought out through regular staff outreach or public service announcements. The online marketing of job fairs, employer hiring events and free workshops through websites and social media is also motivating customers to participate in services. UI claimants not selected for RESEA may freely pursue any self-service, facilitated self-help, or staff-assisted services which are supported by W-P funds, or any career services also supported by WIOA Title 1 Adult or Dislocated Worker funds for those eligible. (Page 183) Title I

Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are: currently employed, to retain or advance in employment; previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment; students nearing completion of academic programs; individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits; and other underserved populations. (Page 281) Title I

As reflected in our strategic plan, we are actively searching for additional ways to integrate our unemployment insurance program with labor exchange programs, and increasing visibility of UI in one-stop centers across the state. We have a strong Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessments (RESEA) program centered in the one-stops, and are pursuing full integration of our new UI benefits and job-matching computer systems in one customer portal in order to provide job-seekers with a seamless experience as they search for employment and collect unemployment benefits. (Page 435) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 77

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Seattle Council Bill 119220: Subminimum Wages - 04/13/2018

“AN ORDINANCE relating to the Office of Labor Standards; amending Section 14.19.025 of the Seattle Municipal Code to remove the authority to pay a subminimum wage to people with disabilities as set forth in RCW 49.46.060(2).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Washington House Bill 1299 - 06/11/2015

Transportation appropriations bill for the 2015–2017 biennium. Includes $7.5 million for the state’s Paratransit/Special Needs Grant Program, which awards funds to nonprofits to improve transit services for people who can’t provide their own transportation due to age, disability or income; program goals include enhanced access to employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 2063 - 05/01/2015

"AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience [ABLE] program; and creating new sections."

"The legislature finds that the federal achieving a better life experience act of 2014 (P.L. 113-295) encourages and assists individuals and families in saving private moneys for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Washington RCW 28A.155.220: High School Transition Services - 04/15/2015

“The office of the superintendent of public instruction must establish interagency agreements with the department of social and health services, the department of services for the blind, and any other state agency that provides high school transition services for special education students. Such interagency agreements shall not interfere with existing individualized education programs, nor override any individualized education program team's decision-making power. The purpose of the interagency agreements is to foster effective collaboration among the multiple agencies providing transition services for individualized education program-eligible special education students from the beginning of transition planning, as soon as educationally and developmentally appropriate, through age twenty-one, or through high school graduation, whichever occurs first. Interagency agreements are also intended to streamline services and programs, promote efficiencies, and establish a uniform focus on improved outcomes related to self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

WA County Services for Working Age Adults Policy 4.11 - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

WA State Governor’s Executive Order 13-02 - Employment of people with disabilities - 03/22/2013

Executive Order 13-02 includes several directives including a Disability Employment Challenge that establishes a goal of five percent of Washington state government’s workforce being comprised of persons living with a disability. A Disability Employment Task Force has been established to help state agencies with the recruitment and retention of persons with disabilities.    
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 28

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Washington Veterans Employee Resource Group (VERG) - 04/12/2019

~~“The VERG exists to help integrate the experience, values, and knowledge of both veterans and service members in state employment.  This Employee Resource Group supports former and active military personnel and their families through a system of comprehensive activities and developmental opportunities. The Veteran Employee Resource Group (VERG) has partnered with JBLM ACAP and increased the number of transitioning Service Members who are gaining state employment, supporting the Veteran’s Fellowship Program, supporting NW Edge and site visits with State Agencies and co-sponsoring hiring events – 18 State Agencies were represented at Career Day!”

Systems
  • Other

RETAIN – Washington - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information about the RETAIN program in the state of Washington.  This includes the Lead Agency, the amount of the grant, the population served and the partner agencies.

Systems
  • Other

Veterans Employment resources - 01/18/2019

~~“Veterans can enter their prior military experience and explore comparable civilian careers at My Next Move.

We’re proud to partner with the Department of Defense’s Military OneSource, which provides 24/7 access to support for military personnel and their spouses throughout their service and for up to 12 months after separation. Scroll through the site to view different categories of resources, including Education & Employment, Family & Relationships and more!

Washington’s Veterans Military Crosswalk is an easy-to-use tool for translating your military skills to job openings in Washington state. Service men and women simply enter their current Military Occupation Code and the website finds jobs that match their skills and experience. The website also works on mobile devices.”.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

19- 01 FINAL REPORT: Employment and Community Inclusion Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 01/10/2019

~~“DDA and DVR both offer employment services to persons with developmental disabilities. The agencies have different terminology, data and case management systems, and processes for serving clients. In some parts of the state, DDA and DVR offices do not have procedures to coordinate employment services. Clients, families, DDA case managers, and DVR counselors reported that poor coordination had resulted in confusion and inefficiencies. 

DDA and DVR have taken steps to address this issue, independent of this audit. A new memorandum of understanding was signed by DVR and DDA in August 2018 that aims to improve coordination of services across the state.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State DSHS/DVR 2016-2020 State Plan: the Supported Employment Program (Draft)

The cooperative agreements, program goals, funding distribution, and supported employment services described in this section represent the coordinated efforts of DSHS/DVR, its State collaborators, and its service delivery partners to ensure that all Washingtonians with disabilities can access the support services needed to obtain and maintain employment, maximize independence, and experience improved quality of life.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Project Search

 

“The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

 

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Social Security Administration - Mental Health Treatment Study - 10/01/2006

 

“The Mental Health Treatment Study (MHTS) evaluated the impact that better access to treatment and employment support services would have on outcomes such as medical recovery, functioning, employment, and benefit receipt for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a primary impairment of schizophrenia or affective disorder. We examined the advantages and disadvantages of providing these SSDI beneficiaries access to high quality services designed to improve their employment outcomes.  The services included systematic medication management, the services of a nurse-care coordinator to coordinate participants’ physical and mental health therapies, and the services of a supported employment specialist trained in the individual placement and support model.  We also paid for out-of-pocket mental health expenses and other expenses necessary to help participants return to work.” [Study included Vancouver, WA]

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Washington Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) Program

“The Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based, supported employment. BEST provides consumers with meaningful choice and control of employment and support services. It uses peer counselors, reduces unemployment, and supports the recovery and resiliency of individuals with serious mental illness, including co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WA Division of Developmental Disabilities, Jobs by 21 Partnership Project Report for FY 2009

“The Jobs by 21 Partnership Project was funded by the Washington State Legislature for the 2007–2009 biennium. The Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) was authorized to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s counties, school districts, employers, families, students with developmental disabilities, and adult service agencies. The focus of the collaborative relationships between Partnership Projects stakeholders was to obtain “Jobs by 21” for young adults with developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) – WA Individualized Learning Plan Research and Demonstration Project

“The ODEP study launched in the 2008-09 school year and targeted for completion in 2012-13, is the first longitudinal research and demonstration project designed to understand the effectiveness of ILPs. It looks at ILPs in 14 (rural, urban and suburban) schools in four states (LA, NM, SC, and WA). The research is built around core features included in the Guideposts for Success."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

 

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”

By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Yakima County Veterans Resource Guide - 04/12/2019

~~This document has information about many organizations in the Yakima County area that provide services to veterans including employment training.

Systems
  • Other

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Guide to Transition Assessment in Washington State - 12/01/2007

Age-appropriate transition assessment is the primary component in the process of secondary transition planning. The transition assessments are the framework through which information is gathered to guide the development of a student’s program in order to successfully move the student from the public school to a post–high school setting. While the transition assessments can include formal or commercial assessments, they can also include interviews, observation, and surveys. Perhaps more important than the type of assessment used is that the process is a systematic method used to collect and organize information regarding the student’s interests, skills, strengths, temperaments and areas of need. This process should begin early and be quite broad during the middle school years, but becomes increasingly more specific as the student moves closer to graduation. The goal of transition assessment is to assist the student in achieving her or his vocational potential; therefore, the goal of the person responsible for the age-appropriate transition assessments is to accurately determine that potential as closely as possible. This becomes more likely by looking at the student’s interests, aptitudes, and preparation opportunities from a global concept and gathering that information in a systematic way.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT)

“The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through technology and education. It promotes awareness and accessibility—in both the classroom and the workplace—to maximize the potential of individuals with disabilities and make our communities more vibrant, diverse, and inclusive.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment

“Customized Employment is a unique approach to providing job development and job retention services through an individualized process that fits each person's particular needs. Services are provided by qualified staff who are ACRE Certified (The Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators) through the Rehabilitation Services Commission. All Customized Employment Services are funded through the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (ORSC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens

“Parents, teachers, and mentors encourage teens with disabilities to participate in work-based learning experiences in this video presentation. It can be used as training for training these stakeholders so that they can more effectively promote work-based learning for young people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Highline Community College Employment Professional Certificate Program

~~“We have been in partnership with Highline College for over 10 years in providing a program … to establish a certification path for employment professionals. These professionals provide employment support to individuals with developmental disabilities, and play an integral role in assisting people to become contributing members of their  community.The program offers high quality training taught by skilled professionals, intended to build on the skills of the participants, offer opportunities for networking with others, and serve as a building block for future leaders in supported employment.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

WiSe Washington Initiative for Supported Employment

“We provide training to agencies, employers, school districts and other groups interested in equitable employment for people with developmental disabilities. Here you will find the On Demand training, links to our Webinar offerings, and other local training opportunities!”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Overview - Long-term Services and Supports Program Administration - 01/17/2019

~~“Long-term care (LTC) programs provide services for the aged and disabled in need of institutional care. Some individuals who receive LTC services are able to continue living in their home or in an alternate living facility (ALF) on a Home and Community based (HCB) Waiver authorized by Home and Community Services (HCS) or the Development Disabilities Administration (DDA). LTSS programs that are not considered “institutional” programs are Medicaid Personal Care (MPC) and Community First Choice (CFC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Overview - 08/02/2018

~~“The Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) offers five Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waivers:•Basic Plus•Children's Intensive In-home Behavioral Supports (CIIBS)•Community Protection        •Core•Individual and Family Services (IFS).

Each of the five waivers provides an array of services tailored to the specific populations they serve. Waiver services provide additional support when Medicaid state plan services and other supports are not sufficient.  For more information about the waiver program, go to the Services and Information Request form, contact your Case Resource Manager, Social Worker, or regional DDA office.

For detailed information about all DDA services, please visit the Informing Families Website.

DDA received approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the 5 year renewals of the following 4 waivers:  Basic Plus, Core, Community Protection (CP) and Children’s Intensive In-home Behavioral Support (CIIBS).  DDA also received approval of the Individual and Family Services (IFS) waiver amendment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington Community First Choice - 07/01/2015

“​Community first choice (CFC) is a Washington apple health state plan benefit authorized under Section 1915(k) of the Social Security Act. CFC enables the agency and its contracted entities to deliver person-centered home and community based long-term services and supports (LTSS) to Medicaid-eligible people who meet the institutional level of care.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”   By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Washington Medicaid State Plan

The Washington Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Washington administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Washington may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA COPES Waiver (0049.R08.00)

 

“Provides adult day health, home health aide, personal care, adult day care, client support training, community transition, environmental mods, home delivered meals, nurse delegation, personal emergency response, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and physical and other disabilities ages 18-64.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Basic Plus Waiver 0409.R03

~~“Provides community inclusion, individual supported employment/group supported employment, personal care, prevocational services, respite, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, specialized psychiatric services, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion bed services, behavioral health stabilization services-positive behavior support and consultation, chemical extermination of bed bugs, community guide, emergency assistance, environmental adaptations, individualized technical assistance, occupational therapy, physical therapy, positive behavior support and consultation, risk assessment, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, speech, hearing and language services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation, wellness education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 – no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA - Community Protection Waiver (0411.R03.00)

~~“Provides individual supported employment/group supported employment, prevocational services, residential habilitation, behavioral health stabilization services - specialized psychiatric services, specialized psychiatric services, behavioral health stabilization services - behavioral health crisis diversion beds, behavioral health stabilization services - positive behavior support and consultation, chemical extermination of bed bugs, community transition, environmental adaptations, individualized technical assistance, occupational therapy, physical therapy, positive behavior support and consultation, risk assessment, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, speech, hearing, and language services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 18 – no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
7,614,893
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
474,653
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
198,492
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.46%
Change from
2018 to 2019
41.82%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.25%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 7,405,743 7,535,591 7,614,893
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 480,828 478,622 474,653
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 194,948 195,251 198,492
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,187,621 3,267,432 3,307,354
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.54% 40.79% 41.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.21% 78.83% 79.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80% 4.50% 4.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.00% 17.40% 16.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.00% 9.30% 8.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 468,223 470,154 471,324
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 474,095 464,242 477,606
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 774,393 755,522 763,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 31,477 34,309 35,277
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 74,953 75,251 83,121
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,862 18,304 17,162
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 44,244 45,108 48,481
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 6,222 4,916 4,610
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,388 48,309 47,347
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 25,732 27,928 32,127

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,085 7,255 7,428
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.20% 5.40% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 176,269 171,397 165,880

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,469 17,718 13,348
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 42,933 43,760 33,170
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 80,081 80,614 58,023
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.80% 22.00% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.60% 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,638 1,713 1,740
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,765 9,476 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 118 114 145
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 80 78 99
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 68.00% 68.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.15 1.09 1.38

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 30.00% 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,975 4,956 4,801
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 280,769 277,435 272,200
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 246 431 449
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 322 413 428

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $53,995,000 $56,675,968 $59,332,663
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $2,093,000 $1,372,392 $1,135,298
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $16,000 $10,166 $7,968
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,505,000 $5,698,882 $6,658,804
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 87.00% 86.00% 85.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,218 1,518 1,645
Number of people served in facility based work. 316 198 154
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5 4 3
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 105.80 106.20 104.97

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.35% 55.21% 56.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.24% 13.13% 13.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.83% 0.86% 0.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.94% 95.22% 95.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.13% 21.79% 21.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.56% 57.13% 56.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 70.46% 72.21% 72.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.43% 35.34% 34.77%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 1 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 23 9 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 923 380 302
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 128 32 259
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,051 412 561

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~This streamlined integration requires all service providers to quickly identify needs, and then match resources to meet those needs. Increased collaboration and coordination among system partners ensures that the best of what the system has to offer comes forward with a minimum of duplication. Integration provides a flexible, interconnected set of services tailored to each customer. Customers receive a range of services via various providers and funding streams that may be braided together to meet their specific needs. (Page 35) Title I

Based on intake information, a navigator or navigation team will evaluate a customer’s need for support services, readiness to pursue education, training, employment, or a combination, and make appropriate referrals. The navigator or navigation team will follow up with the customer to ensure smooth transition, or to redirect the customer if needed. Partners will work together beyond the points of program transition to braid funding and services across organizations for the benefit of the customer. (Page 36) Title I

The key is to leverage the investment and resources of all partners toward a common goal. Rather than competing for the attention of businesses, the workforce system strategically braids together the resources of the public, philanthropic, and private sectors to create new solutions to ever—changing business challenges. (Page 46) Title I

Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. (Pages 181-182) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner—Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services. (Page 97) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~• Strengthen DSHS/DVR participation in current School-to-Work programs statewide by providing increased training and technical assistance for School-to-Work partners, including earlier DSHS/DVR input into assessment and employment planning for students.

• Contract with Centers for Independent Living to enhance and expand core independent living services, focusing on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, Centers for Independent Living have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas. Additional outreach efforts include targeted disability groups, minority groups, and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment in which youth feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies. This goal will be accomplished by enhancing youth understanding of the Independent Living philosophy, successful self-advocacy, and how engage with legislators about disability issues.  (Page 234) Title I

• Hired transition consultants to increase capacity to provide Pre-ETS services directly and through coordination and collaboration with community partners.
• Continued coordination with Center for Change in Transition Services to coordinate DSHS/DVR and school-based transition services.
• Continued school-to-work contracts with county developmental disabilities programs. (Page 290) Title I

The memorandum of understanding clarifies responsibility and coordination of roles in providing services and programs for those students who are both eligible for special education services under IDEA, and who are also eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The current agreement remains in effect until September 30, 2020, but may require amendments after federal regulations are finalized. The agreement outlines each agency’s overall role and responsibilities relating to the provision of transition services to high school students with disabilities. This agreement provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) before each student determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 316) Title IV

DSB youth and transition specialists conduct outreach and ongoing consultation statewide to teachers of the visually impaired, students, families and others in the education community. Coordination and outreach elements for pre-employment transition services are included in the agreement. (Page 316) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K—12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self—support through viable avenues. Many ES—staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource. (Page 97) Title I

State strategies under WIOA potentially enlarge the system of service providers to employers and departs further from the more limited, traditional Wagner—Peyser job order and hiring fair approaches. Innovative linkages by local boards in some workforce development areas such as facilitating employer panels that bring together industry sector employers and current and future jobseekers to discuss particular employer needs and hiring practices are very successful at generating interest in career pathways and employment outcomes and are anticipated to engage more local Wagner—Peyser and education partners. (Page 109) Title I

Finding the right program fit can occur in subsequent visits, but the customer should not be bombarded with duplicative requests for information or skills assessments. Staff must be “Navigators” who help people design individual career pathways and then assist them in finding an economically self—sustaining route forward. Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Other entities with specialized programs serving parents on TANF, Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs), MSFWs, homeless, ex-offenders, veterans, dislocated workers, persons with disabilities, and the long-term unemployed when included should increase the number of participants who have defined career pathways and who gain portable skills. All will be better informed and served as Integrated Service Delivery advances. (Page 183) Title III

These activities include: • BEdA system wide, three-day training on developing college and career pathways. This was developed to support WIOA and the state plan requirement to implement college and career readiness pathways for all basic skills students. (Page 210) Title I

Apprenticeship

There are areas where the public system and business share in the cost of developing an employee’s skills, including work—based learning (on—the—job training, incumbent worker training, apprenticeship). Business partnerships with workforce development and human services programs can increase diversity in the hiring pool and support job retention in the workplace. If employers are willing to partner with the workforce system, expend energy, and, devote resources, they can leverage their investment to create sustainable solutions to their workforce challenges. (Page 44) Title I

Youth Program Elements (Youth Only): • Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to a high school diploma or recognized equivalent or recognized post—secondary credential • Alternative secondary school services or dropout recovery services, as appropriate • Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education components (summer employment, pre—apprenticeship, internships, job shadowing, OJT (Page 65) Title I

• Increased coordination with WSATC, L&I, labor and business to support and develop pre—apprenticeship and apprenticeship opportunities and providing customized assistance or referral for assistance in the development of registered apprenticeships (Page 68) Title I

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiencies. (Page 73) Title I

Wherever possible, DSHS/DVR will integrate its customer skill development services with other one—stop partners to include project—based learning in the classroom, online coursework, industry guest lecturers, or direct workplace experience, including job shadows, mentorships, internships (paid or unpaid), clinicals, cooperative learning models, and apprenticeships. (Page77) Title I

Enrollees will be encouraged to pursue certifications and sub—grantees will facilitate on—the—job employment (OJE) opportunities that place them within view of and consideration by these industries and occupations. This can include internships; apprenticeships and registered apprenticeship opportunities based upon the individual’s personal preferences and IEP. (Page 81) Title I

Support apprenticeships, paid internships, and on-the-job training opportunities to enhance customers’ employability, in partnership with LWDBs and the business community. (Page 286) Title I

The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self-sufficiency. The DSB expects to explore bridges among the partner Department of Labor Youth programs to fully engage blind youth in integrated and competitive work experience opportunities that fit individual need. (Page 349) Title IV

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiency. (Page 359) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. (Page 93) Title I

Beyond the DOL contracting process the state manager is exploring the development of MOUs between the State and the National grantees in order to create cohesion of the program; develop formal agreements with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; potentially data sharing agreements with State entities; accessing the DSHS and or WDC Ticket to Work EN network for reimbursement for the services provided by the grantees (with the exception of Goodwill Industries which already is a EN). (Page 123) Title I

DSHS/DVR continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability, mental health, and traumatic brain injury service providers to build their capacity for providing extended support services. (Page 143) Title I

Train staff and partners on Social Security Work Incentives, Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency, and other work incentives to identify optional funding sources. (Page143) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing` a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 227) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 242) Title I

In addition to employment-related services, DSHS/DVR customers receive benefits counseling to provide guidance on programs for which they may be eligible. In comparison to the overall population of working age Washingtonians with disabilities, SSI and SSDI recipient rates for DSHS/DVR customers are higher for SSI and similar for SSDI at application and higher for both at case closure: 24% at application and 32% at closure for SSI and 23% at application and 30% at case closure for SSDI. For both SSI and SSDI, 43% of DSHS/DVR customers are receiving benefits at application and 52% at case closure. (Page 256) Title I

Social Security Administration estimates for Social Security disability recipients in Washington State show that approximately 16.3% of all residents with a disability receive SSI/SSDI benefits. For FFY2017, 20.4% of all participants served through the agency’s VR program were recipients of Social Security benefits. Of those individuals who exited with an employment outcome and had listed public assistance as their primary support at application, 75% instead were able to list earnings from their work as primary support at exit. We serve a higher proportion of individuals on SSI/SSDI, and fewer DSB participants require those benefits upon exiting the program. (Page 337) Title IV

At this point in time it is uncertain how many individuals may be enrolled /co—enrolled with DVR services. One of DVR’s goals on its newly developed State Plan is to increase access to services for those individuals with disabilities (on SSDI) who have a work history but became unemployed and exhausted their unemployment benefits. (Page 448) Title IV

Ticket to Work Employment Network. Washington State DSHS agencies (DBHR, DDA, ALTSA/HCS and DVR) are now partners as an administrative Employment Network. The SCSEP State Leadership has expressed interest in being involved with this collaboration. Goodwill Industries is currently an Employment Network and several of the State Sub—grantees are either currently or in discussions with becoming an Employment Network via their involvement with the local WDCs. (Page 449) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

Under Washington state law, the Workforce Board conducts a substantial program of assessment, research and evaluation activities that have historically included most of the core WIOA programs (Titles I, II, IV plus TANF/Workfirst), as well as additional workforce programs. This program has included an annual participant outcome evaluation using State Core Measures (very similar to WIOA measures), periodic surveys of participants, and periodic net impact studies using statistically adjusted comparison group methodology. All of these activities are conducted or contracted by Workforce Board staff, with the cooperation of program agencies and support of other state sources of participant data including Unemployment Insurance wage data, and K12 participant data from the state’s P-20 system agency, the Education Research and Data Center. (Page 131) Title I

Recognizing the challenges of developing data collection methodologies to ensure an accurate representation of the experiences of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) throughout Washington State, the results of the CRP Cost Study were delayed. Additionally, DSHS/DVR experienced a change in executive leadership in late 2016 which postponed the implementation of modifications based on the results of the study. DSHS/DVR formally communicated the results of the cost study in early 2017. The CRP Cost Study resulted in a restructure of the fees paid to CRPs. To DSHS/DVR’s knowledge, this study was the first of its kind in the nation. The methodologies and results were shared at a national level to help improve the delivery of services to customers and the businesses that provide these valuable services. (Page 225) Title IV

Analysis of customer satisfaction surveys, performance data and RSA statistics show that DSB provides very high quality services and outcomes. The RSA r-911 data provides strong evidence that DSB places emphasis on careers that provide living wages and benefits, within a competitive and integrated context. The agency wants to maintain and build on this excellence in quality of services and outcomes. (Page 335) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DSB and Washington State have long believed that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards for years. (Page 321) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low—level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created. (Page 58) Title I

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs. (Page 148) Title I

5. A training plan stating training and competency expectations for ES staff within available resources for onboarding and refresher coursework on the SWA online Learning Management System, and on parallel WDC-hosted systems and through in-person training. (EO nondiscrimination, data security, and procedures using the Management Information System are already mandatory recurrent trainings. EO and data security also require refresher training bi-annually and annually, respectively.) (Page 179) Title I

Veterans

Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP):

  1. Provide intensive services and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, transitioning service members (TSMs) and eligible spouses
  2. Case manage veterans, TSMs and eligible spouses to help overcome significant barriers to employment (SBEs) and place in living wage career positions
  3. Outreach to community events, activities and organizations to locate and assist veterans with SBEs
  4. Prioritize services to veterans in accordance with 38 USC Chapter 41
  5. Manage and document caseload activities

Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER):

  1. Conduct outreach to employers to assist veterans in gaining employment, including employer seminars, and job search workshops/groups
  2. Facilitate employment, training and placement services furnished to veterans under the local service delivery model
  3. Coordinate with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans
  4. Inform Federal contractors on process to recruit and retain veterans
  5. Coordinate and participate with partner agencies and entities, internal and external, on business outreach
  6. Coordinate, plan and orchestrate hiring events to promote the hiring of veterans (Page 78) Title III

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 95) Title I

Alignment and coordination across federal, state and local programs for veteran employment and training is mandated by the Jobs for Veterans Act and regulated by 20 CFR 1010, as well as joint DOL VETS and ETA formally issued guidance and WorkSource system policy. Locally operated DOL programs, including Wagner—Peyser and TAA under the direct oversight of ES management, and other programs identified in the regulation must provide Priority of Service to covered persons as mandated. Qualified disabled veterans may receive a referral to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist if they meet at least one of the DOL VETS disability or disadvantaged veteran criteria. (Page 98) Title I

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 100) Title I

Work Opportunity Tax Credit:

o Employers can reduce their federal business taxes by up to $2,400 for more eligible hires. Up to $9,000 over two years for each qualifying welfare recipient; $5,600 for most military veterans and up to $9,600 for hiring veterans who have a service—related disability.

o Eligible workers, people who are on or who received public assistance within 18 months of being hired; needy or disabled veterans; felons hired within a year after leaving prison and those participating in work release; people in state or federal vocational rehabilitation programs that have an employment plan for employment within two years of being hired; adults under 40 who receive food stamps in the six months before being hired; anyone who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for any month in the 60 days before being hired. (Page 111) Title I

This policy communicates a system-wide policy and procedure for core and partner programs included in the WIOA state plan for identifying and referring veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP, which is operated by the Employment Security Department (ESD), provides intensive case management and services, job referrals, and job readiness activities to disabled veterans and other veterans with significant barriers to employment. Common Assurance No. 11 in WIOA Unified and Combined State Plan Requirements directs states to provide assurances to the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education that “(s)ervice providers have a referral process in place for directing Veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) to DVOP services, when appropriate.” (Page 148) Title I

Disabled veterans may receive assistance and intensive services from WorkSource staff and partners, The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), the VA/VR&E Program, a local DVOP, or any combination of these. Disabled veterans are identified during the veteran validation process at WorkSource and are referred to the appropriate level of service based upon the veteran’s interests, abilities, skills, needs, and SBE status. Also, through a close partnership with the VA, DVOPs assist veterans who are seeking entry into new careers and have received vocational rehabilitation assistance from the VA/VR&E program in alignment with at least one of their 5 Tracks to Employment to obtain workplace skills. Local DVOP staff work in partnership with VA/VR&E case managers to jointly build career plans that aid the veteran in obtaining suitable work based upon their abilities. This partnership is supported by the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a DVOP out-stationed at the VA/VR&E Regional Offices in Seattle. Washington State also coordinates to provision of intensive services for VR&E clients with VA/VR&E case managers stationed at the Portland, OR and Boise, ID Regional Offices. ESD and the Regional VA/VR&E office in Seattle are planning a cross-agency Lean event to assess and improve services being provided to VR&E clients. (Page 409) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery - Mental Health (DBHR-MH), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR-MR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 143) Title I

Participate in an interagency service committee which supports initiatives and increased employment outcomes for persons living with developmental disabilities, mental health disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and traumatic brain injuries. (Page 143) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 227) Title I

• DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers.
• DSHS/DVR is represented as a member of the Washington State Behavioral Health Advisory Council. (Page 228) Title I

Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 239) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR also contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 242) Title I

DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several mental health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 242) Title I

Customers and service providers most frequently identified Placement into a Job, Assistance Searching for a Job, and Job Coaching as needed services. DSHS/DVR staff most frequently identified Vocational Counseling & Guidance and Mental Health Counseling and Treatment as needed services, though the top three customer-identified needs were also selected by a majority of DSHS/DVR staff. (Page 257) Title I

DSHS estimates that 75% of individuals with disabilities in their service systems have a mental health service need, compared to 50% of customers served by DSHS/DVR. (Page. 259) Title I

DSB has active collaboration with the Division of Behavioral Health, but as DSB is not part of the Department of Social and Health Services family of agencies, we do not yet have a formalized agreement with either agency. We will work towards that goal as part of this state plan. DSB will negotiate an agreement with the Department of Social and Health Services Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery in order to formalize collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports. (Page 324) Title IV

Needs assessments are conducted by several entities, including but not limited to health districts, United Way agencies, mental health providers, healthcare providers, workforce development councils, and area agencies on aging. From their different perspectives, these needs assessments can help pinpoint specific unmet needs and offer an opportunity to discuss solutions for meeting those needs. An example of this can be found online at United Way of King County WA Snapshot. It reviews several key indicators of basic need: requests for basic need assistance (including utility and rent, food, and financial), employment security and the unemployment rate, and home foreclosures. Their assessment website links to best practices where specific organizations successfully addressing the issues can be found. (Page 453) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Use state employment and local offices to orient UI claimants to the services offered across all programs. Ensure all those that administer programs that can touch a UI claimant have the basic understanding of eligibility requirements including being able and available for all suitable work and making an active search for work. Work closer with training programs, community and technical colleges, Labor and Industries (apprenticeships and other back to work programs), Human Services (WorkFirst and DVR), The Washington Labor Council, along with various other programs and co—enrolling where a good fit is determined. This can be done by reaching out to claimants and assessing their needs. (Page 78) Title I

PARTNER PROGRAMS UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE Staff working with claimants and employers will have a basic understanding of UI eligibility requirements and will follow through to make sure only those meeting the qualifications the employer is looking for and is a good match will be referred. Follow up from the employers and claimants will be necessary to ensure those that are not following through as directed are referred to the claims center for adjudication of any issues that arise maintaining program integrity and a high—quality service to the employers. (Page 110) Title I

Other unemployed, lower-skilled individuals seeking training who may not qualify for weekly UI benefits might qualify for WIOA Adult services or state retraining resources such as Worker Retraining funds, federal training funds tied to Department of Agriculture BFET programs, or special grants such as HHS Healthcare Careers for All. Although these other programs do not provide weekly subsistence benefits they can provide for training costs and some support services such as transportation etc. (Page 181) Title II

In the first 5 weeks of receiving benefits, UI claimants may be called in for mandatory reemployment services. Individuals who may be unemployed and not aware of services, or those who have abandoned searching for work, are also sought out through regular staff outreach or public service announcements. The online marketing of job fairs, employer hiring events and free workshops through websites and social media is also motivating customers to participate in services. UI claimants not selected for RESEA may freely pursue any self-service, facilitated self-help, or staff-assisted services which are supported by W-P funds, or any career services also supported by WIOA Title 1 Adult or Dislocated Worker funds for those eligible. (Page 183) Title I

Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are: currently employed, to retain or advance in employment; previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment; students nearing completion of academic programs; individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits; and other underserved populations. (Page 281) Title I

As reflected in our strategic plan, we are actively searching for additional ways to integrate our unemployment insurance program with labor exchange programs, and increasing visibility of UI in one-stop centers across the state. We have a strong Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessments (RESEA) program centered in the one-stops, and are pursuing full integration of our new UI benefits and job-matching computer systems in one customer portal in order to provide job-seekers with a seamless experience as they search for employment and collect unemployment benefits. (Page 435) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 77

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Seattle Council Bill 119220: Subminimum Wages - 04/13/2018

“AN ORDINANCE relating to the Office of Labor Standards; amending Section 14.19.025 of the Seattle Municipal Code to remove the authority to pay a subminimum wage to people with disabilities as set forth in RCW 49.46.060(2).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Washington House Bill 1299 - 06/11/2015

Transportation appropriations bill for the 2015–2017 biennium. Includes $7.5 million for the state’s Paratransit/Special Needs Grant Program, which awards funds to nonprofits to improve transit services for people who can’t provide their own transportation due to age, disability or income; program goals include enhanced access to employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 2063 - 05/01/2015

"AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience [ABLE] program; and creating new sections."

"The legislature finds that the federal achieving a better life experience act of 2014 (P.L. 113-295) encourages and assists individuals and families in saving private moneys for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Washington RCW 28A.155.220: High School Transition Services - 04/15/2015

“The office of the superintendent of public instruction must establish interagency agreements with the department of social and health services, the department of services for the blind, and any other state agency that provides high school transition services for special education students. Such interagency agreements shall not interfere with existing individualized education programs, nor override any individualized education program team's decision-making power. The purpose of the interagency agreements is to foster effective collaboration among the multiple agencies providing transition services for individualized education program-eligible special education students from the beginning of transition planning, as soon as educationally and developmentally appropriate, through age twenty-one, or through high school graduation, whichever occurs first. Interagency agreements are also intended to streamline services and programs, promote efficiencies, and establish a uniform focus on improved outcomes related to self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

WA County Services for Working Age Adults Policy 4.11 - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

WA State Governor’s Executive Order 13-02 - Employment of people with disabilities - 03/22/2013

Executive Order 13-02 includes several directives including a Disability Employment Challenge that establishes a goal of five percent of Washington state government’s workforce being comprised of persons living with a disability. A Disability Employment Task Force has been established to help state agencies with the recruitment and retention of persons with disabilities.    
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 28

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Washington Veterans Employee Resource Group (VERG) - 04/12/2019

~~“The VERG exists to help integrate the experience, values, and knowledge of both veterans and service members in state employment.  This Employee Resource Group supports former and active military personnel and their families through a system of comprehensive activities and developmental opportunities. The Veteran Employee Resource Group (VERG) has partnered with JBLM ACAP and increased the number of transitioning Service Members who are gaining state employment, supporting the Veteran’s Fellowship Program, supporting NW Edge and site visits with State Agencies and co-sponsoring hiring events – 18 State Agencies were represented at Career Day!”

Systems
  • Other

RETAIN – Washington - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information about the RETAIN program in the state of Washington.  This includes the Lead Agency, the amount of the grant, the population served and the partner agencies.

Systems
  • Other

Veterans Employment resources - 01/18/2019

~~“Veterans can enter their prior military experience and explore comparable civilian careers at My Next Move.

We’re proud to partner with the Department of Defense’s Military OneSource, which provides 24/7 access to support for military personnel and their spouses throughout their service and for up to 12 months after separation. Scroll through the site to view different categories of resources, including Education & Employment, Family & Relationships and more!

Washington’s Veterans Military Crosswalk is an easy-to-use tool for translating your military skills to job openings in Washington state. Service men and women simply enter their current Military Occupation Code and the website finds jobs that match their skills and experience. The website also works on mobile devices.”.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

19- 01 FINAL REPORT: Employment and Community Inclusion Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 01/10/2019

~~“DDA and DVR both offer employment services to persons with developmental disabilities. The agencies have different terminology, data and case management systems, and processes for serving clients. In some parts of the state, DDA and DVR offices do not have procedures to coordinate employment services. Clients, families, DDA case managers, and DVR counselors reported that poor coordination had resulted in confusion and inefficiencies. 

DDA and DVR have taken steps to address this issue, independent of this audit. A new memorandum of understanding was signed by DVR and DDA in August 2018 that aims to improve coordination of services across the state.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State DSHS/DVR 2016-2020 State Plan: the Supported Employment Program (Draft)

The cooperative agreements, program goals, funding distribution, and supported employment services described in this section represent the coordinated efforts of DSHS/DVR, its State collaborators, and its service delivery partners to ensure that all Washingtonians with disabilities can access the support services needed to obtain and maintain employment, maximize independence, and experience improved quality of life.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Project Search

 

“The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

 

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Social Security Administration - Mental Health Treatment Study - 10/01/2006

 

“The Mental Health Treatment Study (MHTS) evaluated the impact that better access to treatment and employment support services would have on outcomes such as medical recovery, functioning, employment, and benefit receipt for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a primary impairment of schizophrenia or affective disorder. We examined the advantages and disadvantages of providing these SSDI beneficiaries access to high quality services designed to improve their employment outcomes.  The services included systematic medication management, the services of a nurse-care coordinator to coordinate participants’ physical and mental health therapies, and the services of a supported employment specialist trained in the individual placement and support model.  We also paid for out-of-pocket mental health expenses and other expenses necessary to help participants return to work.” [Study included Vancouver, WA]

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Washington Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) Program

“The Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based, supported employment. BEST provides consumers with meaningful choice and control of employment and support services. It uses peer counselors, reduces unemployment, and supports the recovery and resiliency of individuals with serious mental illness, including co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WA Division of Developmental Disabilities, Jobs by 21 Partnership Project Report for FY 2009

“The Jobs by 21 Partnership Project was funded by the Washington State Legislature for the 2007–2009 biennium. The Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) was authorized to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s counties, school districts, employers, families, students with developmental disabilities, and adult service agencies. The focus of the collaborative relationships between Partnership Projects stakeholders was to obtain “Jobs by 21” for young adults with developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) – WA Individualized Learning Plan Research and Demonstration Project

“The ODEP study launched in the 2008-09 school year and targeted for completion in 2012-13, is the first longitudinal research and demonstration project designed to understand the effectiveness of ILPs. It looks at ILPs in 14 (rural, urban and suburban) schools in four states (LA, NM, SC, and WA). The research is built around core features included in the Guideposts for Success."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

 

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”

By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Yakima County Veterans Resource Guide - 04/12/2019

~~This document has information about many organizations in the Yakima County area that provide services to veterans including employment training.

Systems
  • Other

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Guide to Transition Assessment in Washington State - 12/01/2007

Age-appropriate transition assessment is the primary component in the process of secondary transition planning. The transition assessments are the framework through which information is gathered to guide the development of a student’s program in order to successfully move the student from the public school to a post–high school setting. While the transition assessments can include formal or commercial assessments, they can also include interviews, observation, and surveys. Perhaps more important than the type of assessment used is that the process is a systematic method used to collect and organize information regarding the student’s interests, skills, strengths, temperaments and areas of need. This process should begin early and be quite broad during the middle school years, but becomes increasingly more specific as the student moves closer to graduation. The goal of transition assessment is to assist the student in achieving her or his vocational potential; therefore, the goal of the person responsible for the age-appropriate transition assessments is to accurately determine that potential as closely as possible. This becomes more likely by looking at the student’s interests, aptitudes, and preparation opportunities from a global concept and gathering that information in a systematic way.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT)

“The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through technology and education. It promotes awareness and accessibility—in both the classroom and the workplace—to maximize the potential of individuals with disabilities and make our communities more vibrant, diverse, and inclusive.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment

“Customized Employment is a unique approach to providing job development and job retention services through an individualized process that fits each person's particular needs. Services are provided by qualified staff who are ACRE Certified (The Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators) through the Rehabilitation Services Commission. All Customized Employment Services are funded through the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (ORSC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens

“Parents, teachers, and mentors encourage teens with disabilities to participate in work-based learning experiences in this video presentation. It can be used as training for training these stakeholders so that they can more effectively promote work-based learning for young people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Highline Community College Employment Professional Certificate Program

~~“We have been in partnership with Highline College for over 10 years in providing a program … to establish a certification path for employment professionals. These professionals provide employment support to individuals with developmental disabilities, and play an integral role in assisting people to become contributing members of their  community.The program offers high quality training taught by skilled professionals, intended to build on the skills of the participants, offer opportunities for networking with others, and serve as a building block for future leaders in supported employment.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

WiSe Washington Initiative for Supported Employment

“We provide training to agencies, employers, school districts and other groups interested in equitable employment for people with developmental disabilities. Here you will find the On Demand training, links to our Webinar offerings, and other local training opportunities!”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Overview - Long-term Services and Supports Program Administration - 01/17/2019

~~“Long-term care (LTC) programs provide services for the aged and disabled in need of institutional care. Some individuals who receive LTC services are able to continue living in their home or in an alternate living facility (ALF) on a Home and Community based (HCB) Waiver authorized by Home and Community Services (HCS) or the Development Disabilities Administration (DDA). LTSS programs that are not considered “institutional” programs are Medicaid Personal Care (MPC) and Community First Choice (CFC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Overview - 08/02/2018

~~“The Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) offers five Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waivers:•Basic Plus•Children's Intensive In-home Behavioral Supports (CIIBS)•Community Protection        •Core•Individual and Family Services (IFS).

Each of the five waivers provides an array of services tailored to the specific populations they serve. Waiver services provide additional support when Medicaid state plan services and other supports are not sufficient.  For more information about the waiver program, go to the Services and Information Request form, contact your Case Resource Manager, Social Worker, or regional DDA office.

For detailed information about all DDA services, please visit the Informing Families Website.

DDA received approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the 5 year renewals of the following 4 waivers:  Basic Plus, Core, Community Protection (CP) and Children’s Intensive In-home Behavioral Support (CIIBS).  DDA also received approval of the Individual and Family Services (IFS) waiver amendment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington Community First Choice - 07/01/2015

“​Community first choice (CFC) is a Washington apple health state plan benefit authorized under Section 1915(k) of the Social Security Act. CFC enables the agency and its contracted entities to deliver person-centered home and community based long-term services and supports (LTSS) to Medicaid-eligible people who meet the institutional level of care.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”   By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Washington Medicaid State Plan

The Washington Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Washington administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Washington may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA COPES Waiver (0049.R08.00)

 

“Provides adult day health, home health aide, personal care, adult day care, client support training, community transition, environmental mods, home delivered meals, nurse delegation, personal emergency response, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and physical and other disabilities ages 18-64.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Basic Plus Waiver 0409.R03

~~“Provides community inclusion, individual supported employment/group supported employment, personal care, prevocational services, respite, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, specialized psychiatric services, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion bed services, behavioral health stabilization services-positive behavior support and consultation, chemical extermination of bed bugs, community guide, emergency assistance, environmental adaptations, individualized technical assistance, occupational therapy, physical therapy, positive behavior support and consultation, risk assessment, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, speech, hearing and language services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation, wellness education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 – no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA - Community Protection Waiver (0411.R03.00)

~~“Provides individual supported employment/group supported employment, prevocational services, residential habilitation, behavioral health stabilization services - specialized psychiatric services, specialized psychiatric services, behavioral health stabilization services - behavioral health crisis diversion beds, behavioral health stabilization services - positive behavior support and consultation, chemical extermination of bed bugs, community transition, environmental adaptations, individualized technical assistance, occupational therapy, physical therapy, positive behavior support and consultation, risk assessment, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, speech, hearing, and language services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 18 – no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
7,614,893
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
474,653
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
198,492
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.46%
Change from
2018 to 2019
41.82%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.25%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 7,405,743 7,535,591 7,614,893
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 480,828 478,622 474,653
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 194,948 195,251 198,492
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,187,621 3,267,432 3,307,354
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.54% 40.79% 41.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.21% 78.83% 79.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80% 4.50% 4.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.00% 17.40% 16.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.00% 9.30% 8.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 468,223 470,154 471,324
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 474,095 464,242 477,606
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 774,393 755,522 763,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 31,477 34,309 35,277
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 74,953 75,251 83,121
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,862 18,304 17,162
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 44,244 45,108 48,481
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 6,222 4,916 4,610
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,388 48,309 47,347
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 25,732 27,928 32,127

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,085 7,255 7,428
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.20% 5.40% 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 176,269 171,397 165,880

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 17,469 17,718 13,348
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 42,933 43,760 33,170
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 80,081 80,614 58,023
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.80% 22.00% 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.50% 1.60% 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,638 1,713 1,740
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,765 9,476 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 118 114 145
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 80 78 99
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 68.00% 68.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.15 1.09 1.38

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 30.00% 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,975 4,956 4,801
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 280,769 277,435 272,200
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 246 431 449
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 322 413 428

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $53,995,000 $56,675,968 $59,332,663
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $2,093,000 $1,372,392 $1,135,298
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $16,000 $10,166 $7,968
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,505,000 $5,698,882 $6,658,804
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 87.00% 86.00% 85.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,218 1,518 1,645
Number of people served in facility based work. 316 198 154
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5 4 3
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 105.80 106.20 104.97

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 54.35% 55.21% 56.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.24% 13.13% 13.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.83% 0.86% 0.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.94% 95.22% 95.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.13% 21.79% 21.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.56% 57.13% 56.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 70.46% 72.21% 72.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.43% 35.34% 34.77%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3 1 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 23 9 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 923 380 302
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 128 32 259
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,051 412 561

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~This streamlined integration requires all service providers to quickly identify needs, and then match resources to meet those needs. Increased collaboration and coordination among system partners ensures that the best of what the system has to offer comes forward with a minimum of duplication. Integration provides a flexible, interconnected set of services tailored to each customer. Customers receive a range of services via various providers and funding streams that may be braided together to meet their specific needs. (Page 35) Title I

Based on intake information, a navigator or navigation team will evaluate a customer’s need for support services, readiness to pursue education, training, employment, or a combination, and make appropriate referrals. The navigator or navigation team will follow up with the customer to ensure smooth transition, or to redirect the customer if needed. Partners will work together beyond the points of program transition to braid funding and services across organizations for the benefit of the customer. (Page 36) Title I

The key is to leverage the investment and resources of all partners toward a common goal. Rather than competing for the attention of businesses, the workforce system strategically braids together the resources of the public, philanthropic, and private sectors to create new solutions to ever—changing business challenges. (Page 46) Title I

Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. (Pages 181-182) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner—Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services. (Page 97) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~• Strengthen DSHS/DVR participation in current School-to-Work programs statewide by providing increased training and technical assistance for School-to-Work partners, including earlier DSHS/DVR input into assessment and employment planning for students.

• Contract with Centers for Independent Living to enhance and expand core independent living services, focusing on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, Centers for Independent Living have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas. Additional outreach efforts include targeted disability groups, minority groups, and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment in which youth feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies. This goal will be accomplished by enhancing youth understanding of the Independent Living philosophy, successful self-advocacy, and how engage with legislators about disability issues.  (Page 234) Title I

• Hired transition consultants to increase capacity to provide Pre-ETS services directly and through coordination and collaboration with community partners.
• Continued coordination with Center for Change in Transition Services to coordinate DSHS/DVR and school-based transition services.
• Continued school-to-work contracts with county developmental disabilities programs. (Page 290) Title I

The memorandum of understanding clarifies responsibility and coordination of roles in providing services and programs for those students who are both eligible for special education services under IDEA, and who are also eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The current agreement remains in effect until September 30, 2020, but may require amendments after federal regulations are finalized. The agreement outlines each agency’s overall role and responsibilities relating to the provision of transition services to high school students with disabilities. This agreement provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) before each student determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 316) Title IV

DSB youth and transition specialists conduct outreach and ongoing consultation statewide to teachers of the visually impaired, students, families and others in the education community. Coordination and outreach elements for pre-employment transition services are included in the agreement. (Page 316) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K—12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self—support through viable avenues. Many ES—staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource. (Page 97) Title I

State strategies under WIOA potentially enlarge the system of service providers to employers and departs further from the more limited, traditional Wagner—Peyser job order and hiring fair approaches. Innovative linkages by local boards in some workforce development areas such as facilitating employer panels that bring together industry sector employers and current and future jobseekers to discuss particular employer needs and hiring practices are very successful at generating interest in career pathways and employment outcomes and are anticipated to engage more local Wagner—Peyser and education partners. (Page 109) Title I

Finding the right program fit can occur in subsequent visits, but the customer should not be bombarded with duplicative requests for information or skills assessments. Staff must be “Navigators” who help people design individual career pathways and then assist them in finding an economically self—sustaining route forward. Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Other entities with specialized programs serving parents on TANF, Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs), MSFWs, homeless, ex-offenders, veterans, dislocated workers, persons with disabilities, and the long-term unemployed when included should increase the number of participants who have defined career pathways and who gain portable skills. All will be better informed and served as Integrated Service Delivery advances. (Page 183) Title III

These activities include: • BEdA system wide, three-day training on developing college and career pathways. This was developed to support WIOA and the state plan requirement to implement college and career readiness pathways for all basic skills students. (Page 210) Title I

Apprenticeship

There are areas where the public system and business share in the cost of developing an employee’s skills, including work—based learning (on—the—job training, incumbent worker training, apprenticeship). Business partnerships with workforce development and human services programs can increase diversity in the hiring pool and support job retention in the workplace. If employers are willing to partner with the workforce system, expend energy, and, devote resources, they can leverage their investment to create sustainable solutions to their workforce challenges. (Page 44) Title I

Youth Program Elements (Youth Only): • Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to a high school diploma or recognized equivalent or recognized post—secondary credential • Alternative secondary school services or dropout recovery services, as appropriate • Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education components (summer employment, pre—apprenticeship, internships, job shadowing, OJT (Page 65) Title I

• Increased coordination with WSATC, L&I, labor and business to support and develop pre—apprenticeship and apprenticeship opportunities and providing customized assistance or referral for assistance in the development of registered apprenticeships (Page 68) Title I

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiencies. (Page 73) Title I

Wherever possible, DSHS/DVR will integrate its customer skill development services with other one—stop partners to include project—based learning in the classroom, online coursework, industry guest lecturers, or direct workplace experience, including job shadows, mentorships, internships (paid or unpaid), clinicals, cooperative learning models, and apprenticeships. (Page77) Title I

Enrollees will be encouraged to pursue certifications and sub—grantees will facilitate on—the—job employment (OJE) opportunities that place them within view of and consideration by these industries and occupations. This can include internships; apprenticeships and registered apprenticeship opportunities based upon the individual’s personal preferences and IEP. (Page 81) Title I

Support apprenticeships, paid internships, and on-the-job training opportunities to enhance customers’ employability, in partnership with LWDBs and the business community. (Page 286) Title I

The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self-sufficiency. The DSB expects to explore bridges among the partner Department of Labor Youth programs to fully engage blind youth in integrated and competitive work experience opportunities that fit individual need. (Page 349) Title IV

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiency. (Page 359) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. (Page 93) Title I

Beyond the DOL contracting process the state manager is exploring the development of MOUs between the State and the National grantees in order to create cohesion of the program; develop formal agreements with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; potentially data sharing agreements with State entities; accessing the DSHS and or WDC Ticket to Work EN network for reimbursement for the services provided by the grantees (with the exception of Goodwill Industries which already is a EN). (Page 123) Title I

DSHS/DVR continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability, mental health, and traumatic brain injury service providers to build their capacity for providing extended support services. (Page 143) Title I

Train staff and partners on Social Security Work Incentives, Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency, and other work incentives to identify optional funding sources. (Page143) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing` a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 227) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 242) Title I

In addition to employment-related services, DSHS/DVR customers receive benefits counseling to provide guidance on programs for which they may be eligible. In comparison to the overall population of working age Washingtonians with disabilities, SSI and SSDI recipient rates for DSHS/DVR customers are higher for SSI and similar for SSDI at application and higher for both at case closure: 24% at application and 32% at closure for SSI and 23% at application and 30% at case closure for SSDI. For both SSI and SSDI, 43% of DSHS/DVR customers are receiving benefits at application and 52% at case closure. (Page 256) Title I

Social Security Administration estimates for Social Security disability recipients in Washington State show that approximately 16.3% of all residents with a disability receive SSI/SSDI benefits. For FFY2017, 20.4% of all participants served through the agency’s VR program were recipients of Social Security benefits. Of those individuals who exited with an employment outcome and had listed public assistance as their primary support at application, 75% instead were able to list earnings from their work as primary support at exit. We serve a higher proportion of individuals on SSI/SSDI, and fewer DSB participants require those benefits upon exiting the program. (Page 337) Title IV

At this point in time it is uncertain how many individuals may be enrolled /co—enrolled with DVR services. One of DVR’s goals on its newly developed State Plan is to increase access to services for those individuals with disabilities (on SSDI) who have a work history but became unemployed and exhausted their unemployment benefits. (Page 448) Title IV

Ticket to Work Employment Network. Washington State DSHS agencies (DBHR, DDA, ALTSA/HCS and DVR) are now partners as an administrative Employment Network. The SCSEP State Leadership has expressed interest in being involved with this collaboration. Goodwill Industries is currently an Employment Network and several of the State Sub—grantees are either currently or in discussions with becoming an Employment Network via their involvement with the local WDCs. (Page 449) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

Under Washington state law, the Workforce Board conducts a substantial program of assessment, research and evaluation activities that have historically included most of the core WIOA programs (Titles I, II, IV plus TANF/Workfirst), as well as additional workforce programs. This program has included an annual participant outcome evaluation using State Core Measures (very similar to WIOA measures), periodic surveys of participants, and periodic net impact studies using statistically adjusted comparison group methodology. All of these activities are conducted or contracted by Workforce Board staff, with the cooperation of program agencies and support of other state sources of participant data including Unemployment Insurance wage data, and K12 participant data from the state’s P-20 system agency, the Education Research and Data Center. (Page 131) Title I

Recognizing the challenges of developing data collection methodologies to ensure an accurate representation of the experiences of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) throughout Washington State, the results of the CRP Cost Study were delayed. Additionally, DSHS/DVR experienced a change in executive leadership in late 2016 which postponed the implementation of modifications based on the results of the study. DSHS/DVR formally communicated the results of the cost study in early 2017. The CRP Cost Study resulted in a restructure of the fees paid to CRPs. To DSHS/DVR’s knowledge, this study was the first of its kind in the nation. The methodologies and results were shared at a national level to help improve the delivery of services to customers and the businesses that provide these valuable services. (Page 225) Title IV

Analysis of customer satisfaction surveys, performance data and RSA statistics show that DSB provides very high quality services and outcomes. The RSA r-911 data provides strong evidence that DSB places emphasis on careers that provide living wages and benefits, within a competitive and integrated context. The agency wants to maintain and build on this excellence in quality of services and outcomes. (Page 335) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DSB and Washington State have long believed that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards for years. (Page 321) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low—level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created. (Page 58) Title I

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs. (Page 148) Title I

5. A training plan stating training and competency expectations for ES staff within available resources for onboarding and refresher coursework on the SWA online Learning Management System, and on parallel WDC-hosted systems and through in-person training. (EO nondiscrimination, data security, and procedures using the Management Information System are already mandatory recurrent trainings. EO and data security also require refresher training bi-annually and annually, respectively.) (Page 179) Title I

Veterans

Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP):

  1. Provide intensive services and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, transitioning service members (TSMs) and eligible spouses
  2. Case manage veterans, TSMs and eligible spouses to help overcome significant barriers to employment (SBEs) and place in living wage career positions
  3. Outreach to community events, activities and organizations to locate and assist veterans with SBEs
  4. Prioritize services to veterans in accordance with 38 USC Chapter 41
  5. Manage and document caseload activities

Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER):

  1. Conduct outreach to employers to assist veterans in gaining employment, including employer seminars, and job search workshops/groups
  2. Facilitate employment, training and placement services furnished to veterans under the local service delivery model
  3. Coordinate with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans
  4. Inform Federal contractors on process to recruit and retain veterans
  5. Coordinate and participate with partner agencies and entities, internal and external, on business outreach
  6. Coordinate, plan and orchestrate hiring events to promote the hiring of veterans (Page 78) Title III

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 95) Title I

Alignment and coordination across federal, state and local programs for veteran employment and training is mandated by the Jobs for Veterans Act and regulated by 20 CFR 1010, as well as joint DOL VETS and ETA formally issued guidance and WorkSource system policy. Locally operated DOL programs, including Wagner—Peyser and TAA under the direct oversight of ES management, and other programs identified in the regulation must provide Priority of Service to covered persons as mandated. Qualified disabled veterans may receive a referral to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist if they meet at least one of the DOL VETS disability or disadvantaged veteran criteria. (Page 98) Title I

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 100) Title I

Work Opportunity Tax Credit:

o Employers can reduce their federal business taxes by up to $2,400 for more eligible hires. Up to $9,000 over two years for each qualifying welfare recipient; $5,600 for most military veterans and up to $9,600 for hiring veterans who have a service—related disability.

o Eligible workers, people who are on or who received public assistance within 18 months of being hired; needy or disabled veterans; felons hired within a year after leaving prison and those participating in work release; people in state or federal vocational rehabilitation programs that have an employment plan for employment within two years of being hired; adults under 40 who receive food stamps in the six months before being hired; anyone who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for any month in the 60 days before being hired. (Page 111) Title I

This policy communicates a system-wide policy and procedure for core and partner programs included in the WIOA state plan for identifying and referring veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP, which is operated by the Employment Security Department (ESD), provides intensive case management and services, job referrals, and job readiness activities to disabled veterans and other veterans with significant barriers to employment. Common Assurance No. 11 in WIOA Unified and Combined State Plan Requirements directs states to provide assurances to the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education that “(s)ervice providers have a referral process in place for directing Veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) to DVOP services, when appropriate.” (Page 148) Title I

Disabled veterans may receive assistance and intensive services from WorkSource staff and partners, The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), the VA/VR&E Program, a local DVOP, or any combination of these. Disabled veterans are identified during the veteran validation process at WorkSource and are referred to the appropriate level of service based upon the veteran’s interests, abilities, skills, needs, and SBE status. Also, through a close partnership with the VA, DVOPs assist veterans who are seeking entry into new careers and have received vocational rehabilitation assistance from the VA/VR&E program in alignment with at least one of their 5 Tracks to Employment to obtain workplace skills. Local DVOP staff work in partnership with VA/VR&E case managers to jointly build career plans that aid the veteran in obtaining suitable work based upon their abilities. This partnership is supported by the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a DVOP out-stationed at the VA/VR&E Regional Offices in Seattle. Washington State also coordinates to provision of intensive services for VR&E clients with VA/VR&E case managers stationed at the Portland, OR and Boise, ID Regional Offices. ESD and the Regional VA/VR&E office in Seattle are planning a cross-agency Lean event to assess and improve services being provided to VR&E clients. (Page 409) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery - Mental Health (DBHR-MH), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR-MR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 143) Title I

Participate in an interagency service committee which supports initiatives and increased employment outcomes for persons living with developmental disabilities, mental health disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and traumatic brain injuries. (Page 143) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 227) Title I

• DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers.
• DSHS/DVR is represented as a member of the Washington State Behavioral Health Advisory Council. (Page 228) Title I

Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 239) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR also contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 242) Title I

DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several mental health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 242) Title I

Customers and service providers most frequently identified Placement into a Job, Assistance Searching for a Job, and Job Coaching as needed services. DSHS/DVR staff most frequently identified Vocational Counseling & Guidance and Mental Health Counseling and Treatment as needed services, though the top three customer-identified needs were also selected by a majority of DSHS/DVR staff. (Page 257) Title I

DSHS estimates that 75% of individuals with disabilities in their service systems have a mental health service need, compared to 50% of customers served by DSHS/DVR. (Page. 259) Title I

DSB has active collaboration with the Division of Behavioral Health, but as DSB is not part of the Department of Social and Health Services family of agencies, we do not yet have a formalized agreement with either agency. We will work towards that goal as part of this state plan. DSB will negotiate an agreement with the Department of Social and Health Services Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery in order to formalize collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports. (Page 324) Title IV

Needs assessments are conducted by several entities, including but not limited to health districts, United Way agencies, mental health providers, healthcare providers, workforce development councils, and area agencies on aging. From their different perspectives, these needs assessments can help pinpoint specific unmet needs and offer an opportunity to discuss solutions for meeting those needs. An example of this can be found online at United Way of King County WA Snapshot. It reviews several key indicators of basic need: requests for basic need assistance (including utility and rent, food, and financial), employment security and the unemployment rate, and home foreclosures. Their assessment website links to best practices where specific organizations successfully addressing the issues can be found. (Page 453) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Use state employment and local offices to orient UI claimants to the services offered across all programs. Ensure all those that administer programs that can touch a UI claimant have the basic understanding of eligibility requirements including being able and available for all suitable work and making an active search for work. Work closer with training programs, community and technical colleges, Labor and Industries (apprenticeships and other back to work programs), Human Services (WorkFirst and DVR), The Washington Labor Council, along with various other programs and co—enrolling where a good fit is determined. This can be done by reaching out to claimants and assessing their needs. (Page 78) Title I

PARTNER PROGRAMS UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE Staff working with claimants and employers will have a basic understanding of UI eligibility requirements and will follow through to make sure only those meeting the qualifications the employer is looking for and is a good match will be referred. Follow up from the employers and claimants will be necessary to ensure those that are not following through as directed are referred to the claims center for adjudication of any issues that arise maintaining program integrity and a high—quality service to the employers. (Page 110) Title I

Other unemployed, lower-skilled individuals seeking training who may not qualify for weekly UI benefits might qualify for WIOA Adult services or state retraining resources such as Worker Retraining funds, federal training funds tied to Department of Agriculture BFET programs, or special grants such as HHS Healthcare Careers for All. Although these other programs do not provide weekly subsistence benefits they can provide for training costs and some support services such as transportation etc. (Page 181) Title II

In the first 5 weeks of receiving benefits, UI claimants may be called in for mandatory reemployment services. Individuals who may be unemployed and not aware of services, or those who have abandoned searching for work, are also sought out through regular staff outreach or public service announcements. The online marketing of job fairs, employer hiring events and free workshops through websites and social media is also motivating customers to participate in services. UI claimants not selected for RESEA may freely pursue any self-service, facilitated self-help, or staff-assisted services which are supported by W-P funds, or any career services also supported by WIOA Title 1 Adult or Dislocated Worker funds for those eligible. (Page 183) Title I

Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are: currently employed, to retain or advance in employment; previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment; students nearing completion of academic programs; individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits; and other underserved populations. (Page 281) Title I

As reflected in our strategic plan, we are actively searching for additional ways to integrate our unemployment insurance program with labor exchange programs, and increasing visibility of UI in one-stop centers across the state. We have a strong Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessments (RESEA) program centered in the one-stops, and are pursuing full integration of our new UI benefits and job-matching computer systems in one customer portal in order to provide job-seekers with a seamless experience as they search for employment and collect unemployment benefits. (Page 435) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 77

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Seattle Council Bill 119220: Subminimum Wages - 04/13/2018

“AN ORDINANCE relating to the Office of Labor Standards; amending Section 14.19.025 of the Seattle Municipal Code to remove the authority to pay a subminimum wage to people with disabilities as set forth in RCW 49.46.060(2).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Washington House Bill 1299 - 06/11/2015

Transportation appropriations bill for the 2015–2017 biennium. Includes $7.5 million for the state’s Paratransit/Special Needs Grant Program, which awards funds to nonprofits to improve transit services for people who can’t provide their own transportation due to age, disability or income; program goals include enhanced access to employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 2063 - 05/01/2015

"AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience [ABLE] program; and creating new sections."

"The legislature finds that the federal achieving a better life experience act of 2014 (P.L. 113-295) encourages and assists individuals and families in saving private moneys for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Washington RCW 28A.155.220: High School Transition Services - 04/15/2015

“The office of the superintendent of public instruction must establish interagency agreements with the department of social and health services, the department of services for the blind, and any other state agency that provides high school transition services for special education students. Such interagency agreements shall not interfere with existing individualized education programs, nor override any individualized education program team's decision-making power. The purpose of the interagency agreements is to foster effective collaboration among the multiple agencies providing transition services for individualized education program-eligible special education students from the beginning of transition planning, as soon as educationally and developmentally appropriate, through age twenty-one, or through high school graduation, whichever occurs first. Interagency agreements are also intended to streamline services and programs, promote efficiencies, and establish a uniform focus on improved outcomes related to self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

WA County Services for Working Age Adults Policy 4.11 - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

WA State Governor’s Executive Order 13-02 - Employment of people with disabilities - 03/22/2013

Executive Order 13-02 includes several directives including a Disability Employment Challenge that establishes a goal of five percent of Washington state government’s workforce being comprised of persons living with a disability. A Disability Employment Task Force has been established to help state agencies with the recruitment and retention of persons with disabilities.    
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 28

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Washington Veterans Employee Resource Group (VERG) - 04/12/2019

~~“The VERG exists to help integrate the experience, values, and knowledge of both veterans and service members in state employment.  This Employee Resource Group supports former and active military personnel and their families through a system of comprehensive activities and developmental opportunities. The Veteran Employee Resource Group (VERG) has partnered with JBLM ACAP and increased the number of transitioning Service Members who are gaining state employment, supporting the Veteran’s Fellowship Program, supporting NW Edge and site visits with State Agencies and co-sponsoring hiring events – 18 State Agencies were represented at Career Day!”

Systems
  • Other

RETAIN – Washington - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information about the RETAIN program in the state of Washington.  This includes the Lead Agency, the amount of the grant, the population served and the partner agencies.

Systems
  • Other

Veterans Employment resources - 01/18/2019

~~“Veterans can enter their prior military experience and explore comparable civilian careers at My Next Move.

We’re proud to partner with the Department of Defense’s Military OneSource, which provides 24/7 access to support for military personnel and their spouses throughout their service and for up to 12 months after separation. Scroll through the site to view different categories of resources, including Education & Employment, Family & Relationships and more!

Washington’s Veterans Military Crosswalk is an easy-to-use tool for translating your military skills to job openings in Washington state. Service men and women simply enter their current Military Occupation Code and the website finds jobs that match their skills and experience. The website also works on mobile devices.”.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

19- 01 FINAL REPORT: Employment and Community Inclusion Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 01/10/2019

~~“DDA and DVR both offer employment services to persons with developmental disabilities. The agencies have different terminology, data and case management systems, and processes for serving clients. In some parts of the state, DDA and DVR offices do not have procedures to coordinate employment services. Clients, families, DDA case managers, and DVR counselors reported that poor coordination had resulted in confusion and inefficiencies. 

DDA and DVR have taken steps to address this issue, independent of this audit. A new memorandum of understanding was signed by DVR and DDA in August 2018 that aims to improve coordination of services across the state.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State DSHS/DVR 2016-2020 State Plan: the Supported Employment Program (Draft)

The cooperative agreements, program goals, funding distribution, and supported employment services described in this section represent the coordinated efforts of DSHS/DVR, its State collaborators, and its service delivery partners to ensure that all Washingtonians with disabilities can access the support services needed to obtain and maintain employment, maximize independence, and experience improved quality of life.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Project Search

 

“The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

 

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Social Security Administration - Mental Health Treatment Study - 10/01/2006

 

“The Mental Health Treatment Study (MHTS) evaluated the impact that better access to treatment and employment support services would have on outcomes such as medical recovery, functioning, employment, and benefit receipt for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a primary impairment of schizophrenia or affective disorder. We examined the advantages and disadvantages of providing these SSDI beneficiaries access to high quality services designed to improve their employment outcomes.  The services included systematic medication management, the services of a nurse-care coordinator to coordinate participants’ physical and mental health therapies, and the services of a supported employment specialist trained in the individual placement and support model.  We also paid for out-of-pocket mental health expenses and other expenses necessary to help participants return to work.” [Study included Vancouver, WA]

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Washington Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) Program

“The Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based, supported employment. BEST provides consumers with meaningful choice and control of employment and support services. It uses peer counselors, reduces unemployment, and supports the recovery and resiliency of individuals with serious mental illness, including co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WA Division of Developmental Disabilities, Jobs by 21 Partnership Project Report for FY 2009

“The Jobs by 21 Partnership Project was funded by the Washington State Legislature for the 2007–2009 biennium. The Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) was authorized to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s counties, school districts, employers, families, students with developmental disabilities, and adult service agencies. The focus of the collaborative relationships between Partnership Projects stakeholders was to obtain “Jobs by 21” for young adults with developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) – WA Individualized Learning Plan Research and Demonstration Project

“The ODEP study launched in the 2008-09 school year and targeted for completion in 2012-13, is the first longitudinal research and demonstration project designed to understand the effectiveness of ILPs. It looks at ILPs in 14 (rural, urban and suburban) schools in four states (LA, NM, SC, and WA). The research is built around core features included in the Guideposts for Success."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

 

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”

By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Yakima County Veterans Resource Guide - 04/12/2019

~~This document has information about many organizations in the Yakima County area that provide services to veterans including employment training.

Systems
  • Other

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Guide to Transition Assessment in Washington State - 12/01/2007

Age-appropriate transition assessment is the primary component in the process of secondary transition planning. The transition assessments are the framework through which information is gathered to guide the development of a student’s program in order to successfully move the student from the public school to a post–high school setting. While the transition assessments can include formal or commercial assessments, they can also include interviews, observation, and surveys. Perhaps more important than the type of assessment used is that the process is a systematic method used to collect and organize information regarding the student’s interests, skills, strengths, temperaments and areas of need. This process should begin early and be quite broad during the middle school years, but becomes increasingly more specific as the student moves closer to graduation. The goal of transition assessment is to assist the student in achieving her or his vocational potential; therefore, the goal of the person responsible for the age-appropriate transition assessments is to accurately determine that potential as closely as possible. This becomes more likely by looking at the student’s interests, aptitudes, and preparation opportunities from a global concept and gathering that information in a systematic way.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT)

“The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through technology and education. It promotes awareness and accessibility—in both the classroom and the workplace—to maximize the potential of individuals with disabilities and make our communities more vibrant, diverse, and inclusive.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment

“Customized Employment is a unique approach to providing job development and job retention services through an individualized process that fits each person's particular needs. Services are provided by qualified staff who are ACRE Certified (The Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators) through the Rehabilitation Services Commission. All Customized Employment Services are funded through the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (ORSC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens

“Parents, teachers, and mentors encourage teens with disabilities to participate in work-based learning experiences in this video presentation. It can be used as training for training these stakeholders so that they can more effectively promote work-based learning for young people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Highline Community College Employment Professional Certificate Program

~~“We have been in partnership with Highline College for over 10 years in providing a program … to establish a certification path for employment professionals. These professionals provide employment support to individuals with developmental disabilities, and play an integral role in assisting people to become contributing members of their  community.The program offers high quality training taught by skilled professionals, intended to build on the skills of the participants, offer opportunities for networking with others, and serve as a building block for future leaders in supported employment.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

WiSe Washington Initiative for Supported Employment

“We provide training to agencies, employers, school districts and other groups interested in equitable employment for people with developmental disabilities. Here you will find the On Demand training, links to our Webinar offerings, and other local training opportunities!”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Overview - Long-term Services and Supports Program Administration - 01/17/2019

~~“Long-term care (LTC) programs provide services for the aged and disabled in need of institutional care. Some individuals who receive LTC services are able to continue living in their home or in an alternate living facility (ALF) on a Home and Community based (HCB) Waiver authorized by Home and Community Services (HCS) or the Development Disabilities Administration (DDA). LTSS programs that are not considered “institutional” programs are Medicaid Personal Care (MPC) and Community First Choice (CFC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Overview - 08/02/2018

~~“The Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) offers five Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waivers:•Basic Plus•Children's Intensive In-home Behavioral Supports (CIIBS)•Community Protection        •Core•Individual and Family Services (IFS).

Each of the five waivers provides an array of services tailored to the specific populations they serve. Waiver services provide additional support when Medicaid state plan services and other supports are not sufficient.  For more information about the waiver program, go to the Services and Information Request form, contact your Case Resource Manager, Social Worker, or regional DDA office.

For detailed information about all DDA services, please visit the Informing Families Website.

DDA received approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for the 5 year renewals of the following 4 waivers:  Basic Plus, Core, Community Protection (CP) and Children’s Intensive In-home Behavioral Support (CIIBS).  DDA also received approval of the Individual and Family Services (IFS) waiver amendment.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington Community First Choice - 07/01/2015

“​Community first choice (CFC) is a Washington apple health state plan benefit authorized under Section 1915(k) of the Social Security Act. CFC enables the agency and its contracted entities to deliver person-centered home and community based long-term services and supports (LTSS) to Medicaid-eligible people who meet the institutional level of care.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”   By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Washington Medicaid State Plan

The Washington Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Washington administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Washington may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA COPES Waiver (0049.R08.00)

 

“Provides adult day health, home health aide, personal care, adult day care, client support training, community transition, environmental mods, home delivered meals, nurse delegation, personal emergency response, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and physical and other disabilities ages 18-64.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Basic Plus Waiver 0409.R03

~~“Provides community inclusion, individual supported employment/group supported employment, personal care, prevocational services, respite, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, specialized psychiatric services, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion bed services, behavioral health stabilization services-positive behavior support and consultation, chemical extermination of bed bugs, community guide, emergency assistance, environmental adaptations, individualized technical assistance, occupational therapy, physical therapy, positive behavior support and consultation, risk assessment, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, speech, hearing and language services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation, wellness education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 – no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA - Community Protection Waiver (0411.R03.00)

~~“Provides individual supported employment/group supported employment, prevocational services, residential habilitation, behavioral health stabilization services - specialized psychiatric services, specialized psychiatric services, behavioral health stabilization services - behavioral health crisis diversion beds, behavioral health stabilization services - positive behavior support and consultation, chemical extermination of bed bugs, community transition, environmental adaptations, individualized technical assistance, occupational therapy, physical therapy, positive behavior support and consultation, risk assessment, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, speech, hearing, and language services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 18 – no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
7,614,893
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.84%
Change from
2018 to 2019
474,653
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
198,492
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.46%
Change from
2018 to 2019
41.82%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.53%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.25%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 7,614,893
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 474,653
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 198,492
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,307,354
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.82%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.25%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.30%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 471,324
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 477,606
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 763,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 35,277
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 83,121
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 17,162
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 48,481
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 4,610
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 47,347
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 32,127

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,428
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 165,880

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,348
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 33,170
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 58,023
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,740
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 145
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 99
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.38

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,801
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 272,200
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 449
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 428

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $59,332,663
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $1,135,298
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $7,968
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $6,658,804
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 85.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,645
Number of people served in facility based work. 154
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 104.97

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.13%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.86%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 95.81%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 21.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.77%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 302
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 259
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 561

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~This streamlined integration requires all service providers to quickly identify needs, and then match resources to meet those needs. Increased collaboration and coordination among system partners ensures that the best of what the system has to offer comes forward with a minimum of duplication. Integration provides a flexible, interconnected set of services tailored to each customer. Customers receive a range of services via various providers and funding streams that may be braided together to meet their specific needs. (Page 35) Title I

Based on intake information, a navigator or navigation team will evaluate a customer’s need for support services, readiness to pursue education, training, employment, or a combination, and make appropriate referrals. The navigator or navigation team will follow up with the customer to ensure smooth transition, or to redirect the customer if needed. Partners will work together beyond the points of program transition to braid funding and services across organizations for the benefit of the customer. (Page 36) Title I

The key is to leverage the investment and resources of all partners toward a common goal. Rather than competing for the attention of businesses, the workforce system strategically braids together the resources of the public, philanthropic, and private sectors to create new solutions to ever—changing business challenges. (Page 46) Title I

Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. (Pages 181-182) Title I

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner—Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services. (Page 97) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~• Strengthen DSHS/DVR participation in current School-to-Work programs statewide by providing increased training and technical assistance for School-to-Work partners, including earlier DSHS/DVR input into assessment and employment planning for students.

• Contract with Centers for Independent Living to enhance and expand core independent living services, focusing on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, Centers for Independent Living have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas. Additional outreach efforts include targeted disability groups, minority groups, and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment in which youth feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies. This goal will be accomplished by enhancing youth understanding of the Independent Living philosophy, successful self-advocacy, and how engage with legislators about disability issues.  (Page 234) Title I

• Hired transition consultants to increase capacity to provide Pre-ETS services directly and through coordination and collaboration with community partners.
• Continued coordination with Center for Change in Transition Services to coordinate DSHS/DVR and school-based transition services.
• Continued school-to-work contracts with county developmental disabilities programs. (Page 290) Title I

The memorandum of understanding clarifies responsibility and coordination of roles in providing services and programs for those students who are both eligible for special education services under IDEA, and who are also eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. The current agreement remains in effect until September 30, 2020, but may require amendments after federal regulations are finalized. The agreement outlines each agency’s overall role and responsibilities relating to the provision of transition services to high school students with disabilities. This agreement provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) before each student determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. (Page 316) Title IV

DSB youth and transition specialists conduct outreach and ongoing consultation statewide to teachers of the visually impaired, students, families and others in the education community. Coordination and outreach elements for pre-employment transition services are included in the agreement. (Page 316) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K—12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self—support through viable avenues. Many ES—staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource. (Page 97) Title I

State strategies under WIOA potentially enlarge the system of service providers to employers and departs further from the more limited, traditional Wagner—Peyser job order and hiring fair approaches. Innovative linkages by local boards in some workforce development areas such as facilitating employer panels that bring together industry sector employers and current and future jobseekers to discuss particular employer needs and hiring practices are very successful at generating interest in career pathways and employment outcomes and are anticipated to engage more local Wagner—Peyser and education partners. (Page 109) Title I

Finding the right program fit can occur in subsequent visits, but the customer should not be bombarded with duplicative requests for information or skills assessments. Staff must be “Navigators” who help people design individual career pathways and then assist them in finding an economically self—sustaining route forward. Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand—offs) between organizations, the points of co—servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 125) Title I

Other entities with specialized programs serving parents on TANF, Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs), MSFWs, homeless, ex-offenders, veterans, dislocated workers, persons with disabilities, and the long-term unemployed when included should increase the number of participants who have defined career pathways and who gain portable skills. All will be better informed and served as Integrated Service Delivery advances. (Page 183) Title III

These activities include: • BEdA system wide, three-day training on developing college and career pathways. This was developed to support WIOA and the state plan requirement to implement college and career readiness pathways for all basic skills students. (Page 210) Title I

Apprenticeship

There are areas where the public system and business share in the cost of developing an employee’s skills, including work—based learning (on—the—job training, incumbent worker training, apprenticeship). Business partnerships with workforce development and human services programs can increase diversity in the hiring pool and support job retention in the workplace. If employers are willing to partner with the workforce system, expend energy, and, devote resources, they can leverage their investment to create sustainable solutions to their workforce challenges. (Page 44) Title I

Youth Program Elements (Youth Only): • Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to a high school diploma or recognized equivalent or recognized post—secondary credential • Alternative secondary school services or dropout recovery services, as appropriate • Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education components (summer employment, pre—apprenticeship, internships, job shadowing, OJT (Page 65) Title I

• Increased coordination with WSATC, L&I, labor and business to support and develop pre—apprenticeship and apprenticeship opportunities and providing customized assistance or referral for assistance in the development of registered apprenticeships (Page 68) Title I

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiencies. (Page 73) Title I

Wherever possible, DSHS/DVR will integrate its customer skill development services with other one—stop partners to include project—based learning in the classroom, online coursework, industry guest lecturers, or direct workplace experience, including job shadows, mentorships, internships (paid or unpaid), clinicals, cooperative learning models, and apprenticeships. (Page77) Title I

Enrollees will be encouraged to pursue certifications and sub—grantees will facilitate on—the—job employment (OJE) opportunities that place them within view of and consideration by these industries and occupations. This can include internships; apprenticeships and registered apprenticeship opportunities based upon the individual’s personal preferences and IEP. (Page 81) Title I

Support apprenticeships, paid internships, and on-the-job training opportunities to enhance customers’ employability, in partnership with LWDBs and the business community. (Page 286) Title I

The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self-sufficiency. The DSB expects to explore bridges among the partner Department of Labor Youth programs to fully engage blind youth in integrated and competitive work experience opportunities that fit individual need. (Page 349) Title IV

The DSB expects partner programs to identify shared core—participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common—need trainings — and share presentation efforts where applicable — to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. The DSB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual’s aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self—sufficiency. (Page 359) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. (Page 93) Title I

Beyond the DOL contracting process the state manager is exploring the development of MOUs between the State and the National grantees in order to create cohesion of the program; develop formal agreements with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; potentially data sharing agreements with State entities; accessing the DSHS and or WDC Ticket to Work EN network for reimbursement for the services provided by the grantees (with the exception of Goodwill Industries which already is a EN). (Page 123) Title I

DSHS/DVR continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability, mental health, and traumatic brain injury service providers to build their capacity for providing extended support services. (Page 143) Title I

Train staff and partners on Social Security Work Incentives, Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency, and other work incentives to identify optional funding sources. (Page143) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing` a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 227) Title I

DBHR has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model. (Page 242) Title I

In addition to employment-related services, DSHS/DVR customers receive benefits counseling to provide guidance on programs for which they may be eligible. In comparison to the overall population of working age Washingtonians with disabilities, SSI and SSDI recipient rates for DSHS/DVR customers are higher for SSI and similar for SSDI at application and higher for both at case closure: 24% at application and 32% at closure for SSI and 23% at application and 30% at case closure for SSDI. For both SSI and SSDI, 43% of DSHS/DVR customers are receiving benefits at application and 52% at case closure. (Page 256) Title I

Social Security Administration estimates for Social Security disability recipients in Washington State show that approximately 16.3% of all residents with a disability receive SSI/SSDI benefits. For FFY2017, 20.4% of all participants served through the agency’s VR program were recipients of Social Security benefits. Of those individuals who exited with an employment outcome and had listed public assistance as their primary support at application, 75% instead were able to list earnings from their work as primary support at exit. We serve a higher proportion of individuals on SSI/SSDI, and fewer DSB participants require those benefits upon exiting the program. (Page 337) Title IV

At this point in time it is uncertain how many individuals may be enrolled /co—enrolled with DVR services. One of DVR’s goals on its newly developed State Plan is to increase access to services for those individuals with disabilities (on SSDI) who have a work history but became unemployed and exhausted their unemployment benefits. (Page 448) Title IV

Ticket to Work Employment Network. Washington State DSHS agencies (DBHR, DDA, ALTSA/HCS and DVR) are now partners as an administrative Employment Network. The SCSEP State Leadership has expressed interest in being involved with this collaboration. Goodwill Industries is currently an Employment Network and several of the State Sub—grantees are either currently or in discussions with becoming an Employment Network via their involvement with the local WDCs. (Page 449) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

Under Washington state law, the Workforce Board conducts a substantial program of assessment, research and evaluation activities that have historically included most of the core WIOA programs (Titles I, II, IV plus TANF/Workfirst), as well as additional workforce programs. This program has included an annual participant outcome evaluation using State Core Measures (very similar to WIOA measures), periodic surveys of participants, and periodic net impact studies using statistically adjusted comparison group methodology. All of these activities are conducted or contracted by Workforce Board staff, with the cooperation of program agencies and support of other state sources of participant data including Unemployment Insurance wage data, and K12 participant data from the state’s P-20 system agency, the Education Research and Data Center. (Page 131) Title I

Recognizing the challenges of developing data collection methodologies to ensure an accurate representation of the experiences of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) throughout Washington State, the results of the CRP Cost Study were delayed. Additionally, DSHS/DVR experienced a change in executive leadership in late 2016 which postponed the implementation of modifications based on the results of the study. DSHS/DVR formally communicated the results of the cost study in early 2017. The CRP Cost Study resulted in a restructure of the fees paid to CRPs. To DSHS/DVR’s knowledge, this study was the first of its kind in the nation. The methodologies and results were shared at a national level to help improve the delivery of services to customers and the businesses that provide these valuable services. (Page 225) Title IV

Analysis of customer satisfaction surveys, performance data and RSA statistics show that DSB provides very high quality services and outcomes. The RSA r-911 data provides strong evidence that DSB places emphasis on careers that provide living wages and benefits, within a competitive and integrated context. The agency wants to maintain and build on this excellence in quality of services and outcomes. (Page 335) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DSB and Washington State have long believed that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards for years. (Page 321) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low—level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created. (Page 58) Title I

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs. (Page 148) Title I

5. A training plan stating training and competency expectations for ES staff within available resources for onboarding and refresher coursework on the SWA online Learning Management System, and on parallel WDC-hosted systems and through in-person training. (EO nondiscrimination, data security, and procedures using the Management Information System are already mandatory recurrent trainings. EO and data security also require refresher training bi-annually and annually, respectively.) (Page 179) Title I

Veterans

Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP):

  1. Provide intensive services and facilitate placements to meet the employment needs of veterans, transitioning service members (TSMs) and eligible spouses
  2. Case manage veterans, TSMs and eligible spouses to help overcome significant barriers to employment (SBEs) and place in living wage career positions
  3. Outreach to community events, activities and organizations to locate and assist veterans with SBEs
  4. Prioritize services to veterans in accordance with 38 USC Chapter 41
  5. Manage and document caseload activities

Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER):

  1. Conduct outreach to employers to assist veterans in gaining employment, including employer seminars, and job search workshops/groups
  2. Facilitate employment, training and placement services furnished to veterans under the local service delivery model
  3. Coordinate with unions, apprenticeship programs and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans
  4. Inform Federal contractors on process to recruit and retain veterans
  5. Coordinate and participate with partner agencies and entities, internal and external, on business outreach
  6. Coordinate, plan and orchestrate hiring events to promote the hiring of veterans (Page 78) Title III

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 95) Title I

Alignment and coordination across federal, state and local programs for veteran employment and training is mandated by the Jobs for Veterans Act and regulated by 20 CFR 1010, as well as joint DOL VETS and ETA formally issued guidance and WorkSource system policy. Locally operated DOL programs, including Wagner—Peyser and TAA under the direct oversight of ES management, and other programs identified in the regulation must provide Priority of Service to covered persons as mandated. Qualified disabled veterans may receive a referral to a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist if they meet at least one of the DOL VETS disability or disadvantaged veteran criteria. (Page 98) Title I

System—wide referral of veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Employment Security Department’s Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). Line staff in all of the core and partner programs under Washington’s Combined State Plan will be educated as to the definition of SBE in order to more readily identify such veterans when they present themselves and those line staff will also be availed of contact information and directions for the nearest WorkSource (one—stop) center(s) to facilitate a front—end assessment and staff referral to DVOP. (Page 100) Title I

Work Opportunity Tax Credit:

o Employers can reduce their federal business taxes by up to $2,400 for more eligible hires. Up to $9,000 over two years for each qualifying welfare recipient; $5,600 for most military veterans and up to $9,600 for hiring veterans who have a service—related disability.

o Eligible workers, people who are on or who received public assistance within 18 months of being hired; needy or disabled veterans; felons hired within a year after leaving prison and those participating in work release; people in state or federal vocational rehabilitation programs that have an employment plan for employment within two years of being hired; adults under 40 who receive food stamps in the six months before being hired; anyone who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for any month in the 60 days before being hired. (Page 111) Title I

This policy communicates a system-wide policy and procedure for core and partner programs included in the WIOA state plan for identifying and referring veterans with significant barriers to employment (SBE) to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP, which is operated by the Employment Security Department (ESD), provides intensive case management and services, job referrals, and job readiness activities to disabled veterans and other veterans with significant barriers to employment. Common Assurance No. 11 in WIOA Unified and Combined State Plan Requirements directs states to provide assurances to the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education that “(s)ervice providers have a referral process in place for directing Veterans with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE) to DVOP services, when appropriate.” (Page 148) Title I

Disabled veterans may receive assistance and intensive services from WorkSource staff and partners, The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), the VA/VR&E Program, a local DVOP, or any combination of these. Disabled veterans are identified during the veteran validation process at WorkSource and are referred to the appropriate level of service based upon the veteran’s interests, abilities, skills, needs, and SBE status. Also, through a close partnership with the VA, DVOPs assist veterans who are seeking entry into new careers and have received vocational rehabilitation assistance from the VA/VR&E program in alignment with at least one of their 5 Tracks to Employment to obtain workplace skills. Local DVOP staff work in partnership with VA/VR&E case managers to jointly build career plans that aid the veteran in obtaining suitable work based upon their abilities. This partnership is supported by the Intensive Services Coordinator (ISC), a DVOP out-stationed at the VA/VR&E Regional Offices in Seattle. Washington State also coordinates to provision of intensive services for VR&E clients with VA/VR&E case managers stationed at the Portland, OR and Boise, ID Regional Offices. ESD and the Regional VA/VR&E office in Seattle are planning a cross-agency Lean event to assess and improve services being provided to VR&E clients. (Page 409) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery - Mental Health (DBHR-MH), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR-MR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 143) Title I

Participate in an interagency service committee which supports initiatives and increased employment outcomes for persons living with developmental disabilities, mental health disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and traumatic brain injuries. (Page 143) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 227) Title I

• DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers.
• DSHS/DVR is represented as a member of the Washington State Behavioral Health Advisory Council. (Page 228) Title I

Substantial resource reductions within the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR), DSHS/DVR’s supported employment partner for customers with mental health disabilities, has limited State capacity to provide extended services to this population. Diligent efforts continue to address these reductions. DSHS/DVR continues its collaboration with DBHR, the Mental Health Employment Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. These efforts intend to establish cooperative agreements with all Behavioral Health Organizations (BHOs) responsible for county-level delivery of community mental health services. (Page 239) Title I

DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) contracts with counties to deliver outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR also contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.
• DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR contracts with each county.
• DSHS/DVR has been collaborating with DBHR on a pilot project that provides extended services for joint supported employment customers, using Medicaid behavioral health funding.

In 2017, a Medicaid waiver was approved, which will expand these services throughout the State. In addition to DSHS/DVR and DBHR, partners in the Medicaid waiver collaborative include the State Health Care Authority, Aging and Long-Term Care Administration and a third party vendor. (Page 242) Title I

DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several mental health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 242) Title I

Customers and service providers most frequently identified Placement into a Job, Assistance Searching for a Job, and Job Coaching as needed services. DSHS/DVR staff most frequently identified Vocational Counseling & Guidance and Mental Health Counseling and Treatment as needed services, though the top three customer-identified needs were also selected by a majority of DSHS/DVR staff. (Page 257) Title I

DSHS estimates that 75% of individuals with disabilities in their service systems have a mental health service need, compared to 50% of customers served by DSHS/DVR. (Page. 259) Title I

DSB has active collaboration with the Division of Behavioral Health, but as DSB is not part of the Department of Social and Health Services family of agencies, we do not yet have a formalized agreement with either agency. We will work towards that goal as part of this state plan. DSB will negotiate an agreement with the Department of Social and Health Services Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery in order to formalize collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports. (Page 324) Title IV

Needs assessments are conducted by several entities, including but not limited to health districts, United Way agencies, mental health providers, healthcare providers, workforce development councils, and area agencies on aging. From their different perspectives, these needs assessments can help pinpoint specific unmet needs and offer an opportunity to discuss solutions for meeting those needs. An example of this can be found online at United Way of King County WA Snapshot. It reviews several key indicators of basic need: requests for basic need assistance (including utility and rent, food, and financial), employment security and the unemployment rate, and home foreclosures. Their assessment website links to best practices where specific organizations successfully addressing the issues can be found. (Page 453) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Use state employment and local offices to orient UI claimants to the services offered across all programs. Ensure all those that administer programs that can touch a UI claimant have the basic understanding of eligibility requirements including being able and available for all suitable work and making an active search for work. Work closer with training programs, community and technical colleges, Labor and Industries (apprenticeships and other back to work programs), Human Services (WorkFirst and DVR), The Washington Labor Council, along with various other programs and co—enrolling where a good fit is determined. This can be done by reaching out to claimants and assessing their needs. (Page 78) Title I

PARTNER PROGRAMS UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE Staff working with claimants and employers will have a basic understanding of UI eligibility requirements and will follow through to make sure only those meeting the qualifications the employer is looking for and is a good match will be referred. Follow up from the employers and claimants will be necessary to ensure those that are not following through as directed are referred to the claims center for adjudication of any issues that arise maintaining program integrity and a high—quality service to the employers. (Page 110) Title I

Other unemployed, lower-skilled individuals seeking training who may not qualify for weekly UI benefits might qualify for WIOA Adult services or state retraining resources such as Worker Retraining funds, federal training funds tied to Department of Agriculture BFET programs, or special grants such as HHS Healthcare Careers for All. Although these other programs do not provide weekly subsistence benefits they can provide for training costs and some support services such as transportation etc. (Page 181) Title II

In the first 5 weeks of receiving benefits, UI claimants may be called in for mandatory reemployment services. Individuals who may be unemployed and not aware of services, or those who have abandoned searching for work, are also sought out through regular staff outreach or public service announcements. The online marketing of job fairs, employer hiring events and free workshops through websites and social media is also motivating customers to participate in services. UI claimants not selected for RESEA may freely pursue any self-service, facilitated self-help, or staff-assisted services which are supported by W-P funds, or any career services also supported by WIOA Title 1 Adult or Dislocated Worker funds for those eligible. (Page 183) Title I

Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are: currently employed, to retain or advance in employment; previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment; students nearing completion of academic programs; individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits; and other underserved populations. (Page 281) Title I

As reflected in our strategic plan, we are actively searching for additional ways to integrate our unemployment insurance program with labor exchange programs, and increasing visibility of UI in one-stop centers across the state. We have a strong Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessments (RESEA) program centered in the one-stops, and are pursuing full integration of our new UI benefits and job-matching computer systems in one customer portal in order to provide job-seekers with a seamless experience as they search for employment and collect unemployment benefits. (Page 435) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 77

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

SHB 1199 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to health care for working individuals with disabilities; amending RCW 74.09.540; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 05/05/2020

“It is the intent of the legislature to remove barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities by providing medical assistance to working individuals with disabilities through a buy-in program in accordance with section 1902(a)(10)(A)(ii) of the social security act and eligibility and cost-sharing requirements established by the authority.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

HB 1783 - 2019-20- AN ACT Relating to creating the Washington state office of equity; adding a new chapter to Title 43 RCW; creating a new section; and providing an effective date - 04/03/2020

“The Washington state office of equity is established within the office of the governor for the purpose of promoting access to equitable opportunities and resources that reduce disparities, and improve outcomes statewide across state government.

The office envisions everyone in Washington having full access to the opportunities and resources they need to flourish and achieve their full potential….

(a) Equity requires developing, strengthening, and supporting policies and procedures that distribute and prioritize resources to those who have been historically and currently marginalized, including tribes; (b) Equity requires the elimination of systemic barriers that have been deeply entrenched in systems of inequality and oppression; and (c) Equity achieves procedural and outcome fairness, promoting dignity, honor, and respect for all people.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Seattle Council Bill 119220: Subminimum Wages - 04/13/2018

“AN ORDINANCE relating to the Office of Labor Standards; amending Section 14.19.025 of the Seattle Municipal Code to remove the authority to pay a subminimum wage to people with disabilities as set forth in RCW 49.46.060(2).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Washington House Bill 1299 - 06/11/2015

Transportation appropriations bill for the 2015–2017 biennium. Includes $7.5 million for the state’s Paratransit/Special Needs Grant Program, which awards funds to nonprofits to improve transit services for people who can’t provide their own transportation due to age, disability or income; program goals include enhanced access to employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 2063 - 05/01/2015

"AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience [ABLE] program; and creating new sections."

"The legislature finds that the federal achieving a better life experience act of 2014 (P.L. 113-295) encourages and assists individuals and families in saving private moneys for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Washington RCW 28A.155.220: High School Transition Services - 04/15/2015

“The office of the superintendent of public instruction must establish interagency agreements with the department of social and health services, the department of services for the blind, and any other state agency that provides high school transition services for special education students. Such interagency agreements shall not interfere with existing individualized education programs, nor override any individualized education program team's decision-making power. The purpose of the interagency agreements is to foster effective collaboration among the multiple agencies providing transition services for individualized education program-eligible special education students from the beginning of transition planning, as soon as educationally and developmentally appropriate, through age twenty-one, or through high school graduation, whichever occurs first. Interagency agreements are also intended to streamline services and programs, promote efficiencies, and establish a uniform focus on improved outcomes related to self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

WA County Services for Working Age Adults Policy 4.11 - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive order helps military spouses and veterans find jobs, training - 05/13/2019

~~“Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Monday that builds upon the state’s efforts to support military spouses and veterans with employment and training opportunities as families transition to civilian life in Washington state."

The text of the Executive Order is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other

WA State Governor’s Executive Order 13-02 - Employment of people with disabilities - 03/22/2013

Executive Order 13-02 includes several directives including a Disability Employment Challenge that establishes a goal of five percent of Washington state government’s workforce being comprised of persons living with a disability. A Disability Employment Task Force has been established to help state agencies with the recruitment and retention of persons with disabilities.    
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 28

Future of Work Task Force 2019 Policy Report - 12/01/2020

“Seeking to bring together diverging viewpoints and priorities on how to best foster shared prosperity for all stakeholders, Washington’s 2018 Legislature created and funded the Future of Work project. It’s the first of its kind in the United States, and puts Washington in the spotlight as a thought leader through the creation of a 16-member, tri-partite Task Force made up of legislators, business, and labor leaders. The Task Force was charged with developing a set of policy recommendations that will benefit both Washington’s workers and businesses, with the goal of shared gains for all of the state’s diverse populations and communities….

This report is intended as an outline detailing Washington’s efforts to proactively address the future of work. The report is written with a broad range of audiences in mind, including, but not limited to, policymakers, research institutes, public institutions, academics, and others with a vested interest in the future of work. The report provides an overview chronicling how the Task Force arrived at its final policy recommendations, supported by detailed information related to each policy recommendation and its relevance to the future of work.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA

Statewide Veteran Employment Program Report to the Legislature - 12/01/2020

“Washington, through executive orders, laws and policies, has expressed the goal of employing more veterans. However, a number of issues are in the way, including the complex application of veterans’ preference, outreach to all veterans, hiring practices, retention policies and other recruitment matters….

Today, Washington has an opportunity to develop an understanding of the uniqueness of veterans and how additional subcategories such as generation, gender, ethnicity, retirement, disabilities or length of service affect veterans’ employment after military service….

By allocating appropriate and enduring resources, Washington can take measured and deliberate steps to improve hiring practices, increase their transparency and be accountable for the results associated with increasing veteran representation in the executive branch workforce."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Continuous Employment Incentive - 07/01/2020

“An eligible employer may receive a one-time continuous-employment incentive payment of 10% of the worker’s wages or $10,000, whichever is less.

To qualify, the employer must:

Continuously employ a certified preferred worker in a medically approved job. Not reduce the base wage. Employ the preferred worker for at least 12 months…

We may certify a worker with permanent medical restrictions as a ‘preferred worker.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Continuous Employment Incentive Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities - 01/01/2020

“The Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities program policy and procedures described here are effective January 1, 2020.

Purpose: This section describes the Apple Health for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) program. HWD recognizes the employment potential of people with disabilities. The enactment of the federal Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act or the Ticket group of 1999 and the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 enable many people with disabilities to work and keep their health care.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - 06/30/2019

~~“Our Purpose

DVR believes employment contributes to a person’s ability to live independently and everyone has a right to work. Our purpose is to empower people with disabilities to achieve a greater quality of life by obtaining and maintaining employment.  As a division of the Department of Social and Health Services, with offices located throughout Washington, DVR has partnered with communities for over 70 years to help meet the employment needs of people with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) - 05/20/2019

~~“The Pre-ETS contract provides Workplace Readiness Training and Work-Based Learning, including paid internships, to a group of students with disabilities.General information• Workplace Readiness     o Purpose:  Preparing students for entering the world of work and living independently     o Sample Services: Soft skills training, Time management, Punctuality, Financial literacy, Mock interviews, Resume building, Accessing services/supports• Work-Based Learning          o Purpose: Try-out jobs or gain work experience prior to graduation     o Sample Services: Job shadowing, Work place tours, Informational interviews, Paid internships” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider Qualifications for Employment and Day Program Services - 04/15/2019

~~“This policy applies to all providers of employment and day program services contracted with the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) or subcontracted with a county. Day program services include Community Inclusion and Child Development services. This policy does not apply to providers of Individualized Technical Assistance or Family Resources Coordination.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Washington Veterans Employee Resource Group (VERG) - 04/12/2019

~~“The VERG exists to help integrate the experience, values, and knowledge of both veterans and service members in state employment.  This Employee Resource Group supports former and active military personnel and their families through a system of comprehensive activities and developmental opportunities. The Veteran Employee Resource Group (VERG) has partnered with JBLM ACAP and increased the number of transitioning Service Members who are gaining state employment, supporting the Veteran’s Fellowship Program, supporting NW Edge and site visits with State Agencies and co-sponsoring hiring events – 18 State Agencies were represented at Career Day!”

Systems
  • Other

RETAIN – Washington - 01/20/2019

~~This page has information about the RETAIN program in the state of Washington.  This includes the Lead Agency, the amount of the grant, the population served and the partner agencies.

Systems
  • Other

Veterans Employment resources - 01/18/2019

~~“Veterans can enter their prior military experience and explore comparable civilian careers at My Next Move.

We’re proud to partner with the Department of Defense’s Military OneSource, which provides 24/7 access to support for military personnel and their spouses throughout their service and for up to 12 months after separation. Scroll through the site to view different categories of resources, including Education & Employment, Family & Relationships and more!

Washington’s Veterans Military Crosswalk is an easy-to-use tool for translating your military skills to job openings in Washington state. Service men and women simply enter their current Military Occupation Code and the website finds jobs that match their skills and experience. The website also works on mobile devices.”.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

19- 01 FINAL REPORT: Employment and Community Inclusion Services for People with Developmental Disabilities - 01/10/2019

~~“DDA and DVR both offer employment services to persons with developmental disabilities. The agencies have different terminology, data and case management systems, and processes for serving clients. In some parts of the state, DDA and DVR offices do not have procedures to coordinate employment services. Clients, families, DDA case managers, and DVR counselors reported that poor coordination had resulted in confusion and inefficiencies. 

DDA and DVR have taken steps to address this issue, independent of this audit. A new memorandum of understanding was signed by DVR and DDA in August 2018 that aims to improve coordination of services across the state.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State DSHS/DVR 2016-2020 State Plan: the Supported Employment Program (Draft)

The cooperative agreements, program goals, funding distribution, and supported employment services described in this section represent the coordinated efforts of DSHS/DVR, its State collaborators, and its service delivery partners to ensure that all Washingtonians with disabilities can access the support services needed to obtain and maintain employment, maximize independence, and experience improved quality of life.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Project Search

 

“The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

 

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Social Security Administration - Mental Health Treatment Study - 10/01/2006

 

“The Mental Health Treatment Study (MHTS) evaluated the impact that better access to treatment and employment support services would have on outcomes such as medical recovery, functioning, employment, and benefit receipt for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a primary impairment of schizophrenia or affective disorder. We examined the advantages and disadvantages of providing these SSDI beneficiaries access to high quality services designed to improve their employment outcomes.  The services included systematic medication management, the services of a nurse-care coordinator to coordinate participants’ physical and mental health therapies, and the services of a supported employment specialist trained in the individual placement and support model.  We also paid for out-of-pocket mental health expenses and other expenses necessary to help participants return to work.” [Study included Vancouver, WA]

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Washington Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) Program

“The Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based, supported employment. BEST provides consumers with meaningful choice and control of employment and support services. It uses peer counselors, reduces unemployment, and supports the recovery and resiliency of individuals with serious mental illness, including co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WA Division of Developmental Disabilities, Jobs by 21 Partnership Project Report for FY 2009

“The Jobs by 21 Partnership Project was funded by the Washington State Legislature for the 2007–2009 biennium. The Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) was authorized to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s counties, school districts, employers, families, students with developmental disabilities, and adult service agencies. The focus of the collaborative relationships between Partnership Projects stakeholders was to obtain “Jobs by 21” for young adults with developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) – WA Individualized Learning Plan Research and Demonstration Project

“The ODEP study launched in the 2008-09 school year and targeted for completion in 2012-13, is the first longitudinal research and demonstration project designed to understand the effectiveness of ILPs. It looks at ILPs in 14 (rural, urban and suburban) schools in four states (LA, NM, SC, and WA). The research is built around core features included in the Guideposts for Success."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations