Washington DC

States - Big Screen

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington DC’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.47%
Change from
2018 to 2019
705,749
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
43,484
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-18.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
14,137
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-12.33%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.51%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.01%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.84%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 693,972 702,455 705,749
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 53,816 45,920 43,484
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 23,746 16,771 14,137
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 331,843 344,984 351,504
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 44.12% 36.52% 32.51%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.97% 79.03% 79.84%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.10% 5.60% 5.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 29.10% 34.10% 26.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70% 13.80% 11.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 38,176 35,439 33,866
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 53,211 44,929 44,547
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 22,844 16,999 12,660
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 60,388 60,388 59,236
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 7,405 7,405 4,898
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,963 1,884 1,578
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 1,888 2,994 2,738
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 3,733 3,304 1,160

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 802 868 846
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.60% 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,284 13,896 13,422

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A 1,958 2,427
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A 10,359 7,209
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A 12,395 10,166
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A 15.10% 23.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.60% 3.50% 3.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.70% 4.50% 2.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.00% 11.30% 13.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 581 483 356
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 750 623 338
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,922 1,556 1,508
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,733 1,809 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 8 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2 1 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 22.00% 13.00% 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.31 0.15 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 15.00% N/A 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,385 2,358 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,491 31,430 30,500
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 88 N/A 146
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 29 N/A 63

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,859,000 $3,286,662 $2,638,051
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,218,000 $3,017,125 $5,270,070
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,958,000 $13,119,316 $18,468,656
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,718,000 $6,401,004 $4,675,061
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00% 29.00% 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 397 539 401
Number of people served in facility based work. 307 186 378
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 655 511 714
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 41.70 55.20 61.86

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 55.61% 56.47% 56.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 17.38% 15.23% 15.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 10.04% 9.41% 9.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 63.00% 71.00% 76.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.13% 20.59% 24.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 18.62% 29.99% 34.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 32.96% 36.11% 54.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 6.49% 6.12% 9.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 20 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 20 20 0

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services.  (Page 216) Title II

 The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 270) Title 1I

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title 1I

DC Gov’t as Model Employer:
In the past year, DDS has partnered with DC Human Resources (DCHR) to work towards the District becoming a model employer of people with disabilities. First, DDS has developed and is piloting the Aspiring Professionals program. This is a paid internship program that places people with disabilities in positions throughout the DC government, in positions where the person has a real possibility of being hired. So far, DDS has placed 21 people with disabilities in internships and with 4 having completed their internships, 3 have been hired to date and the 4th was offered an extension on his internship, funded by the host organization.
Next, DDS/RSA funds a position within DCHR so that there is a staff person with expertise and focused attention on recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees with disabilities throughout the DC government and providing technical assistance to DC agencies regarding employment of people with disabilities. (Page 274) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Customized Employment

~~• INCREASE PROVIDER ACCESS TO TRAINING: IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT RSA PARTNER WITH THE THEIR COMMUNITY RESOURCE PROVIDERS TO PROVIDE THE SAME TRAININGS OFFERED TO THE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION COUNSELORS AS IT RELATES TO IMPROVED SERVICES TO PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. TRAININGS SHOULD INCLUDE: PERSON CENTERED THINKING TRAINING, CUSTOMIZED EMPLOYMENT AND OTHER RELATED TRAININGS. (Page 214) Title II

Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services. (Page 216) Title II

In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

Evidenced Based Supported Employment (EBSE), and the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) among others. While DCRSA is no longer receiving direct training of staff from GWU as was in the past following the reorganization of TACE and initiation of new training entities such as Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) by the Department of Education these new training entities are well equipped to provide needed rehabilitation counseling trainings as well as WIOA technical support. In 2017 DCRSA signed an agreement with WINTAC which will boost training alliance and consequently provide opportunities for improved best practices in vocational rehabilitation services, targeted outcomes, and professional development. DCRSA will continue to receive trainings and technical support from these entities especially as it relates to WIOA and its implications for the vocational rehabilitation program. In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

• DCRSA is entering into an intensive TA agreement with the WINTAC and the Y-TAC to provide training to their staff and service providers in customized employment. The organization is encouraged to fully implement this training program throughout the District to provide an option for individuals with the most significant disabilities to obtain and maintain competitive employment. (Page 243) Title II

Provide customized employment training for Human Care Agreement providers and DCRSA staff as part of the project with the WINTAC. The customized employment training will develop the capacity of DCRSA staff and the CRP network throughout the District to provide CE to DCRSA consumers;
• DCRSA is encouraged to expedite the development and use of the vendor report card system they have been working on for several years; (Page 246) Title II

• DCRSA should consider trying to find a way to sustain the employer roundtable events that were held prior to the dissolution to the BRU. These events were touted as an excellent form of outreach to employers and a valuable service to clients. (Page 247) Title II

• DCRSA should ensure that their internal staff focused on business relations and job development attend the customized employment training when it is offered (Page 247) Title II

b. Provide training on customized employment and employer engagement for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA and providers to provide this on an ongoing basis. (Page 253) Title II

Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 255) Title II

The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities and chronic mental illness. This happens, in part, through monthly meetings in addition to other training. In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance-based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. --In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 269-270 ) Title II

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title II

The administration expanded it Business Relations Unit and refocused its efforts on supporting job placement. Lastly, the administration hired external monitors, who provide monitoring and technical assistance to contract provider agencies. From FY 2014 to present, the administration has been focusing more on quality, developing a training schedule with the GW Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), to improve the quality and consistency of services provided. In 2017 and following the phasing out of TACE, the DCRSA entered into training alliance with Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) which is funded by the Department of Education to provide technical assistance and trainings around WIOA, customized employment, HCA provider capacity building, PreETS, and other vocational rehabilitation trainings. The administration has also been reviewing and revising all policies and procedures, and providing training to staff on any changes, to ensure that services are consistent with District and federal regulations. (Page 275) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Supported Employment services are available to any DCRSA client who is certified as having a most significant disability and for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred or has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of that disability, and for whom an appropriate plan for extended services can be developed. DCRSA has identified two primary populations that require the use of supported employment services: persons with serious mental illness (SMI) or serious emotional disturbance (SED) and persons with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The community rehabilitation providers provide to the two populations supported employment services which include intake, assessment and job coaching. In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. Each provider provides individualized services to consumers. Their efforts are geared toward competitive placements in an integrated work environment. At times, a company or a government agency may hire several clients, but the clients are not placed within the same work area to ensure that they are in an integrated work setting. With their rehabilitation specialist’s assistance, clients make informed choices to select their vocational goals. If a client chooses to change that goal during the supported employment process, their VR specialist assists and the new goal is implemented. Every effort is made to ensure clients are placed in jobs that are consistent with their interests and abilities. An "any job will do" attitude is never acceptable. Employment Specialists/Job Coaches spend valuable time with clients teaching them about the workplace’s expectations and the required tasks, assuring also that they know who to ask when assistance is needed. Time is spent with the person on the worksite who is identified as the natural support person as well to ensure that they are comfortable and prepared to provide workplace support as needed. (Page 280) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 40) Title I

1.3 - Align policies, procedures, and performance measures and share data across programs to eliminate barriers to integration.
1.4 - Blend funding and utilize shared contracts to avoid duplication of resources.
1.5 - Foster environment of collaboration through cross-training staff and shared case management. (Page 45) Title 1

8. The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes,, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 50) Title 1

As noted previously, only about $40 million of the over $120 million that is budgeted annually for District programs that have at least some workforce development components comes from the federal government.[1] Accordingly, agencies will engage in planning regarding blended funding, shared contracts, and resource contributions to ensure they are maximizing resources. The District is already beginning to improve coordination between federally and locally funded resources, including through alignment of year-round youth services programming and connections to the Mayor Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP); referrals of WIOA participants to locally funded training options, including UDC-CC course offerings; and the blending of OSSE’s AEFLA federal grant and local match funds with the WIC’s local career pathways funding in an effort to strategically coordinate efforts and fund eligible providers to offer IE&T programs. (Page 56) Title 1

Agencies are working to further integrate services including the development of a common intake, assessment, screening, and referral process. Currently, DOES and OSSE have a common initial intake through the Data Vault (DV). The DV was initially designed based on a single, multi-agency (OSSE AFE and DOES) customer intake and referral process. The DV is currently being implemented at each of the District’s American Job Centers and by OSSE AFE program providers. Furthermore, DDS/RSA has executed an MOA with OSSE AFE regarding the DV and the relevant staff have been trained on its implementation, which will likely begin in the coming months. Similarly, DHS staff have also received the requisite DV training and the related MOA is close to being finalized and implemented. Expansion plans over the next two years include incorporating other workforce system partners including DOES/WIC training providers, DHS, UDC-CC, adult-serving DCPS and DC Public Charter schools (on a voluntary basis), and other partner agencies. Additionally, the Districts’ efforts over the next two years will focus on system alignment and data sharing through interfaces between the DV and LACES, SLED, DOES’s VOS and other data systems. As these additional partners are connected to the Data Vault the system and details associated with the uniform intake, assessment, and referral processes will be updated to ensure they reflect the needs of all partners. (Page 57) Title 1

To increase barrier remediation, DDS/RSA has also strengthened its relationship with the DDA and with the DBH to improve coordination in the provision of supported employment services for people with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). The agency updated its policies regarding provision of supported employment services to ensure that there was a smooth transition from supported employment services with DDS/RSA to extended supported employment services with DDS/DDA or DBH. DDS/RSA established an MOA with DBH, clarifying referral, service provision, and cross training issues; and meets regularly with DBH supported employment staff and meets jointly with DBH and all supported employment providers. (Page 73) Title I

Additionally, programs such as the DC Career Connections Program (DCCC) are designed for specific demographics including youth who have been involved in the criminal justice system, are pregnant or parenting, have low educational attainment, are homeless, or have documented behavioral health challenges. This program will be coupled with WIOA programs that will provide necessary support including barrier removal techniques and innovative strategies to keep youth engaged. OYP also has strong partnerships with many educational institutions throughout the District including the District of Columbia Public Schools, the Public Charter School Board, the OSSE Re-Engagement Center, the Potomac Job Corps Center, and the University of the District of Columbia-Community College. These partnerships enable OYP to operate a streamlined process to move jobseekers into training or connect them to needed resources. The District will also ensure that WIOA Youth services are well linked to core partner programming, including leveraging the Virtual One-Stop (VOS) database, employer services, and well-coordinated referrals and/or co-enrollment in vocational rehabilitation and adult education services where relevant. (Page 153) Title 1

5.1.7: Increase the range of employment outcomes
Outcome: Not Met: There is no reported data shared by the DC Rehabilitation Services Administration pertaining to how they supported this initiative in 2017.
5.1.8: Develop additional outreach materials.
Outcome: Not Met: There is no reported data shared by the DC Rehabilitation Services Administration pertaining to how they supported this initiative in 2017. (Page 210) Title I

5.3 Objective 3: Expand and improve the quality of transition services through improved coordination with the state education agency and all local education agencies and implementation of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to secondary students with disabilities.
Four initiatives were developed and implemented during FY17 in support of this third objective.
5.3.1: Update the Memorandum of Agreement in place with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to comply with new requirements regarding provision of services to all students with disabilities, including those who are potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services and establish or update agreements with all local education agencies in order to establish clear processes for referral for VR services, and coordination of Pre-ETS. (Page 211) Title IV

Improve Financial Data Accuracy: RSA disagrees with the recommendation to contract with an outside agency. In October 2017, DDS implemented an alternative strategy that is intended to address these issues. Specifically, the agency made some management changes to better align services provided by DDS. Prior to the realignment, provider relations, invoice processing and quality assurance functions were handled separately for the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). Yet many providers for job placement and supported employment are shared by the two administrations.  (Page 215) Title II

 The relationship between Adult Education and Family Literacy and DCRSA should be strengthened through formal partnerships and shared planning. Although it was widely reported that DCRSA counselors use Adult Ed to help their consumers to get their GEDs, many were not aware that Adult Ed is a core partner under WIOA. The opportunities for developing and growing the relationship between the two agencies are high and fully supported by WIOA. This partnership is especially important in the District, where literacy was frequently mentioned as need for DCRSA consumers. (Page 244) Title IV

• DCRSA should strive to increase the range and types of jobs that consumers obtain. Individuals that are trained to obtain higher paying, career-level jobs will retain those positions for longer and will support DCRSA’s achievement of their common performance measures. One of the ways to make this happen is by encouraging consumer participation in postsecondary education programs, including graduate level education. Although many participants in this study characterized DCRSA consumers as needing to go to work immediately and unable to pursue higher education, DCRSA can promote the ability to assist consumers to obtain part-time jobs while they attend school and support those jobs with service delivery. (Page 241) Title II

. DCRSA has already taken many positive steps to make this culture shift, including receiving training and technical assistance in the common performance measures and their potential impact on numerous system in the VR program. The agency is encouraged to continue with this training process and to reinforce the message of achieving in-demand career-level jobs at every level of the organization. The agency is also encouraged to examine its key performance indictors and ensure that they are aligned with the common performance measures. (Page 242) Title IV

The transition population represents a group that can greatly benefit from the pursuit of postsecondary education and increase the quality and pay of employment that they obtain in the future. Counselors should ensure that they are having in-depth discussions with transition-age youth about higher education opportunities and that they are exploring the possibility of helping those youth obtain part-time jobs while they go to school. Wherever appropriate, counselors should be encouraging youth to set their sights high and strive for in-demand, career-level positions. This is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act as amended by WIOA, and fully supports the new common performance measures in WIOA. In order to fully realize this potential for youth, DCRSA will need to ensure that they are identifying “504” students in addition to those students being served by Special Education. These students need to receive encouragement to apply for DCRSA services and DCRSA counselors should meet them at their school sites whenever possible. (Page 245) Title IV

As a part of the review of the payment structure for job placement, DCRSA should consider establishing contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA. These would include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR program. Incentives might also be considered for high-paying jobs that exceed the median earnings of all clients; (Page 246) Title IV

h. DCRSA will provide ongoing training to staff on HCAs, including the payment structure for job development and placement. (Page 256) Title IV

The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities and chronic mental illness. (Page 269-270) Title II

In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance-based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. (Page 270) Title II

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DOES is working to develop a formal MOA with DDS/RSA to increase access to and opportunities for employment, education training and support services necessary to succeed in the labor market for people in the District, particularly people with barriers to employment, including people with disabilities. Through this MOA, DOES will provide workforce investment activities, through statewide and local workforce development systems, that increase the employment, retention and earnings of participants, and increase attainment of recognized postsecondary credentials by participants, and as a result, improve the quality of the workforce, reduce welfare dependence, increase economic self-sufficiency, and meet the skill requirements of employers. The agency has a VR counselor who is co-located at AJC HQ to provide onsite services to customers who may possess barriers requiring DDS/RSA assistance. (Page 74) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The District’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) services are eligibility based, and are provided to people who have a disability, which presents a substantial impediment to employment, and who would benefit from services to achieve an employment outcome. In addition, pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) are available for all students with disabilities, including those who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services; i.e., students receiving special education services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or who are eligible for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. VR services are individualized, based on the strengths, needs, abilities, interests, capabilities, and informed choice of the person. DDS/RSA currently serves about 4,600 people across the full range of services, which include evaluation, counseling and guidance, physical and mental restoration services, transition between advancement opportunities and related services, job exploration and readiness training, vocational training, support services and monetary supports, and placement services, supported employment services, job coaching, among others. The District receives $14 million in federal VR funds per year, in addition to about $6.5 million in local funding. RSA also administers a supported employment grant of $300,000, 50 percent of which must be used to provide services to youth; and an independent living grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services of about $300,000, and an Independent Living/Older Blind Grant for $225,000. Also, please note that at the time this plan was being reviewed, the Supported Employment Grant was not included in the FY 2018 federal budget. DCRSA will continue to provide these services through its federal VR grant. (Page 35) Title I

Changes in Vocational Rehabilitation Requirements - WIOA requirements that adjust DDS/RSA’s Vocational Rehabilitation requirements related to performance tracking and funding requirements for in-school-youth services necessitate significant changes in operations. The District has made a number of changes to ensure requirements are met and enhanced partnerships with other programming, but implementation burdens are significant. (Page 38) Title I

The District wants to ensure that youth work experiences are as meaningful as possible and relate to their long-term goals. DOES and OSSE will align work experiences, both year-round and summer, to industries related to specific Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs of Study for CTE concentrators, completers, or students who have declared a CTE focus. Additionally, DOES, OSSE, and RSA will collaborate to ensure youth with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), participate in year-round and summer work experiences that align with the transition goals in their IEP. Furthermore, DOES will ensure RSA representatives are integrated into the SYEP orientations for youth, their families, and employers, and work to identify youth with disabilities early enough to make appropriate job placements and work with employers on providing appropriate accommodations. (Page 66) Title I

OSSE’s recent Adult and Family Education (AFE) grant has required that all AFE providers (who educate hundreds of older youth between the ages of 18 and 24) offer an integrated education and training model as explained in the section above. OSSE AFE’s new grant also requires their providers to offer transition services to postsecondary education, training, apprenticeships, and employment for all students at the adult secondary education levels. Similarly, all WIOA core partners will require that all participants within in-school WIOA funded programs, and all REC clients nearing completion of their secondary education, have established a transition plan that includes specific and appropriate postsecondary goals. Students with an Individual Graduation Plan and/or an IEP with an appropriate secondary transition plan by the age of 14, as required by local statute, can be waived of this requirement. (Page 67) Title I

DDS/RSA has agreements in place with the Child and Family Services Agency (CFSA) and the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS) Agency. Consistent with these agreements, DDS/RSA has a vocational rehabilitation (VR) specialist assigned to work in each of these offices to work with adults, youth in foster care, and youth in the District’s juvenile justice system. The VR specialist conducts intakes and provides rehabilitation services to assist these youths to obtain necessary services to prepare for and obtain employment. (Page 73) Title I

DDS/RSA has established a data sharing agreement with OSSE and is finalizing an agreement with DOES in order to collect and report on post-closure employment and education performance indicators. (Page 94) Title I

The themes that emerged from the plan and the recommendations included there have been very helpful in informing the modifications to the VR Program Specific Portion of the Unified State Plan.
Some changes that have been underway in response to the earlier CSNA included implementation of additional staff training, including supervisory training, expanding the presence of DDS/RSA at the American Job Centers from one day per week to five days per week, expanding outreach to specific population identified in the CSNA as unserved or underserved, development of agreement with the Development Disability Administration to improve coordination of services for people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, expanding the coordination of services to transition youth through increased cooperation with the DC Public Schools, as well as all DC Public Charter Schools, coordinating with schools to begin referral for VR services earlier to ensure that DDS/RSA is available to work with students for at least the final two years of high school, and establishing performance based contracts for Job Development and Supported Employment providers. (Page 113) Title II

• Number of people placed by RSA that remained employer for 90 calendar days or more
• Percent of people with an individualized plan for employment developed within 90 calendar days of eligibility determination
• Percent of people for whom eligibility is determined within 60 calendar days
• Average entry level wages for people whose cases are closed successfully
• Percentage of eligible transition youth for whom an IPE is developed (Page 126) Title II

Additionally, programs such as the DC Career Connections Program (DCCC) are designed for specific demographics including youth who have been involved in the criminal justice system, are pregnant or parenting, have low educational attainment, are homeless, or have documented behavioral health challenges. This program will be coupled with WIOA programs that will provide necessary support including barrier removal techniques and innovative strategies to keep youth engaged. OYP also has strong partnerships with many educational institutions throughout the District including the District of Columbia Public Schools, the Public Charter School Board, the OSSE Re-Engagement Center, the Potomac Job Corps Center, and the University of the District of Columbia-Community College. These partnerships enable OYP to operate a streamlined process to move jobseekers into training or connect them to needed resources. The District will also ensure that WIOA Youth services are well linked to core partner programming, including leveraging the Virtual One-Stop (VOS) database, employer services, and well-coordinated referrals and/or co-enrollment in vocational rehabilitation and adult education services where relevant. (Page 153) Title II

Mission: The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) was created in response to federal law2 and Mayoral Order 93-149, to empower and respect the dual dignities of people with disabilities in the District of Columbia; and maximize their employment outcome, self-determination, economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion and integration into society based on the informed choices of people with disabilities in the District of Columbia.
Purpose: The purpose of the SRC is to act in an advisory capacity to the Administrator of DCRSA on the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to people with disabilities in the District of Columbia. (Page 201) Title II

Outcome: Not Met: In 2017, DCRSA continued to serve and provide easy access to vocational rehabilitation services to DC residents across all 8 wards. Besides the 46 field sites which were identified in 2016, additional community service agencies were added in 2017. These include Amazing Love Health Services, LLC, and New Beginning Temporary Shelter and referrals include people with disabilities, those who are homeless, and veterans. A counselor was assigned to CSOSA and MORCA to specifically serve returning citizens. A total of eleven (11) DCRSA counselors were assigned to the four AJC (or DOES) locations in the District. Two bilingual counselors were assigned to locations serving Hispanic and Latino communities and one counselor with Amharic proficiencies to serve the Ethiopian community. (Page 208) Title II

5.3.1: Update the Memorandum of Agreement in place with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to comply with new requirements regarding provision of services to all students with disabilities, including those who are potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services and establish or update agreements with all local education agencies in order to establish clear processes for referral for VR services, and coordination of Pre-ETS. (Page 211) Title II

5.3.2: Provide Opportunities for work experience for students with disabilities (Contract with a community-based agency to improve coordination of transition services for students attending PCS, and work with DCRSA to establish agreements with each PCS serving transition age youth, that defines the responsibilities of RSA and PCS staff in coordination of Pre-ETS services, post-secondary transition planning and referral for VR services.)  (Page 211) Title II

Outcome: Not Met: DCRSA coordinated to ensure that pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) were available to all transition aged students with disabilities. VR counselors provided Pre-ETS opportunities to 81% (1,673) of all transition aged DCPS students. One hundred ninety nine (199) students participated in integrated work-based learning experiences in the community this past school year. VR counselors engaged 13% (134) of transition aged PCS students in Pre-ETS activities. Through coordination with DOES, RSA provided Pre-ETS to one hundred seventy two (172) students who were enrolled in post-secondary education or training programs. (Page 212) Title IV

In the past year, DCRSA has strengthened its partnership with DOES, specifically the Office of Youth Programs (OYP). DCRSA coordinates closely with DOES-OYP on its Mayor Marion Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (MBSYEP). MBSYEP provides an excellent opportunity for paid Work-Based Learning Experience and Job Readiness Training for both in-school and out-of-school transition age youth, ages 14-24. DCRSA also has an agreement with the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS) to provide a VR Counselor on-site, bi-weekly to offer vocational rehabilitation services to eligible DYRS youth and strengthen placement and re-entry service strategies to further enhance employment opportunities for youth with disabilities returning from secure confinement. (Page 219) Title II

The Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division within DCRSA now has two (2) Youth and Transition Units, including two supervisors, fourteen VR specialists, two project managers, one community liaison specialists, one employment specialist, two Rehabilitation Assistants, one administrative assistant, and one program manager. The VR Specialists are assigned to all schools serving District of Columbia students. They conduct intake interviews, attend IEP meetings, develop Individual Plans for Employment (IPE), and provide and monitor the provision of pre-employment transition activities for all students with disabilities, those who have open VR cases, as well as all students who are potentially eligible for VR services. The VR Specialist determines a student’s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, develops an IPE, and makes referrals for necessary transition services to assist the student to plan for and obtain successful post-school employment. They also work with workforce development coordinators that serve all schools with DC students. In collaboration with the VR counselors, the workforce development coordinators provide monthly work readiness workshops for students with disabilities who are potentially eligible or eligible for VR services. Pre-ETS is delivered in individualized or group settings to students with disabilities. The workshops include instruction on the five required Pre-ETS categories: Job / Career Exploration, Workplace Readiness Training, Work-based Learning Experiences, Counseling for Enrollment in Post-Secondary Education & Training Programs, and Self-advocacy Instruction. Students engage in workforce development by learning soft skills, employability skills, and independent living skills. (Page 221) Title II

DCRSA staff work closely with DOES Mayor Marion Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (MBSYEP) staff to ensure that students with disabilities who participate in MBSYEP have any necessary supports or accommodations in order to be successful in their MBSYEP experience. In addition, DCRSA is working with DOES-OYP to ensure that all Title I Youth Programs are available to students with disabilities. In FY2018, DCRSA project manager developed a partnership to recruit students with disabilities and provide technical assistance for the DOES-OYP Work Readiness Training pilot program. The Work Readiness Training program for in-school youth ages 14-21 provides education and training for DC high-demand career fields. DCRSA VR counselors provide supports to potentially eligible students participating in the program. Lastly, DCRSA, DOES, DCPS, OSSE and DCPCS have worked together to create an MBSYEP Institute for students with most significant disabilities. In this Institute, students receive a one week “boot camp,” which provides work readiness training prior to the start of MBSYEP, then ongoing supported employment services while at their work site. DCRSA and DOES will continue to ensure meaningful access and enriched programming experiences for all students participating in MBSYEP. (Page 221-222) Title 1I

The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title II

The Administration’s trainer provides training monthly, works closely with the George Washington School of Rehabilitation Counseling, which also provides monthly training for VR staff, and monitors to ensure the provision of continuing education for all VR Specialists, in order to maintain CRC certification, as well as, identifying appropriate courses for staff who still require additional courses to become CRC eligible. The total number of personnel employed by the Administration in the provision of providing vocational rehabilitation service is 109, with 5 current vacancies. The total number of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Specialists is 45. This includes one person who works primarily with independent living and people receiving services through the independent living, older blind program, although there are also 3 VR Specialist vacancies. The total number of support staff for VR counselors is 10. The projected number of consumers to be served is among the data reviewed in consideration of staffing levels. The following are projections of the anticipated number of applicants and eligible individuals coming into the system annually for each of the next three years. FFY17 Actual (Applicants: 2,654; Eligible: 2,052); FFY18 Estimate (Applicants: 2,703; Eligible: 2,151); FFY19 Estimate (Applicants: 2,757; Eligible: 2,258); FFY20 Estimate (Applicants: 2,812; Eligible: 2,370). The current number of active cases is approximately 4600. (Page 231) Title II

In FY 2012, the Administration began recruiting counselors at grade 12 pay level, the highest grade level for a rehabilitation specialist. Applicants at this level must have completed a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling with at least one year of experience and CRC. Furthermore, the administration only hires new VR Specialists who are eligible to sit for the CRC examination. The administration does not limit hiring to only VR Specialists with a CRC because this could preclude hiring of new graduates from VR counseling programs in the area, one of the best means of recruiting new staff for the agency. The Administration has a recruitment plan in place to address the hiring of a sufficient number of vocational rehabilitation counselors within DCRSA. These recruitment efforts include (1) posting vacancy announcements on the D.C. Office of Personnel website (at the time any vacancy occurs), and (2) posting vacancy announcements at community programs and through professional organizations, (3) visiting classrooms and faculty at universities, and (4) increasing its use of interns and volunteers. The recruitment plan consists of two major goals: Goal 1: Expand recruitment efforts Objective 1.1 Contact graduate school programs and develop relationships with the program chairs. (Page 235) Title IV

This orientation is comprised of 7 modules. Informed Consent, Ethics (All staff receive 1 CRC credit), Overview of the VR Process, Intake & Eligibility, Comprehensive Assessment, IPE Development, Overview of Internal Database System, and DC Policy Review (Review with Supervisor during initial week of employment). DCRSA implemented a 12 session supervisor training “boot camp” in the summer of 2012 to help supervisors support counselors and other staff through prevailing practices in management. (Page 235-236) Title IV

During FY 2015, staff began participation in a comprehensive, year-long, program of core vocational rehabilitation trainings, often developed and presented in conjunction with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling Research and Education (CRCRE). Training provided to all vocational rehabilitation specialists and supervisors during these trainings included Foundations of the Rehabilitation Act; Supported Employment Overview and Policy; Initial interviewing; Career Assessments; IPE Development; Case and Caseload Management; Job Development and Placement; and Motivational Interviewing. In 2015, DCRSA provided additional monthly trainings to all vocational rehabilitation specialists and supervisors including Working with Transition Students, Vocational Rehabilitation Ethics, Financial Management / Fiscal Responsibility, Trial Work, Eligibility Determination Extension, Supported Employment, and Self-Employment. A comprehensive in-house training program for all new and currently employed vocational rehabilitation specialists as well as supervisors with DC RSA was developed and implemented in FY 2015. This program incorporated classroom, small group, and direct consumer work over a multi-week period to ensure a complete understanding and thorough synthesis of both the vocational rehabilitation process and practice. Topics covered are inclusive of but not limited to:
• Vocational rehabilitation for individuals experiencing substance use disorders
• Comprehensive treatment services-
• Comprehensive Assessment
• Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (Page 237-238) Title IV

• DCRSA needs to work with schools and CRPs to develop more work-based learning sites. Work experience helps to meet numerous needs found in transition-age youth as it relates to employment, including soft and hard skill development, establishing a good work ethic, and simply understanding what is required in the work force.
• The development of soft skills early in the youth’s life was stressed repeatedly by participants. DCRSA should ensure that this pre-employment transition service is available and provided in as many formats as possible to ensure that youth have been adequately trained. The earlier this can be provided in high school, the better. (Page 245) Title IV

Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Review and update the Transition Tool Kit.
2. Develop materials for the General Intake Unit, similar to the Transition Tool Kit, to include at least FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions); Information about Developing an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE); the VR Process; Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Changes to the Rehabilitation Act; and Client/Applicant Rights.  (Page 254) Title IV
4. Finalize new data sharing agreement and MOA with DC Public Schools, which allows for data sharing in order to provide services to students, clarifies the referral process for DCPS, and establishes the responsibilities for provision of Pre-ETS between DCPS and DCRSA. Coordinate with OSSE, Public Charter School Board (PCSB), DCPS and community providers to have annual transition fair. (Page 257) Title IV

b. DCRSA will determine eligibility within 60 days of receiving the application, and complete the IPE within 90 days of determining eligibility. VR counselors will visit the schools regularly, on at least a monthly basis, or more frequently for schools that have higher referral numbers, and be available to see students to complete applications, determine eligibility, complete comprehensive assessment in order to develop IPE, provide ongoing counseling and guidance and provide pre-employment transition services. (Page 257) Title IV

1. VR Counselors will provide monthly job readiness training sessions in all DC Public Schools for students with disabilities who are potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 258) Title IV

a. At least 75% of students with IEPs will receive at least one Pre-ETS service during the 2017-18 school year
b. At least 75% of students with 504 plans will receive at least one Pre-ETS service during the 2017-18 school year. (Page 259) Title IV

DCRSA established Order of Selection priority categories as follows: Depending upon agency resources, the categories are closed for services in order beginning with Priority III, then II and, finally Priority Category I. Categories may be closed based on the following circumstances Limitations of case service dollars or limitation in adequate staff to serve all eligible individuals. Notwithstanding these priority categories, DCRSA will continue to provide pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities, because these services are made available to students who are potentially eligible for services. However, students who require vocational rehabilitation services, in addition to pre-employment transition services, will receive those services based on the priority category into which they are assigned based on the determination made upon consideration for eligibility for VR services. In addition, DCRSA will provide services to people who require specific services or equipment in order to maintain employment, regardless of their priority category. (Page 261) Title IV

DCRSA is working with the Center for Independent Living and the Statewide Independent Living Council to improve coordination of independent living and vocational rehabilitation services. The need for improved coordination between DCRSA and the CIL was identified as a need in the 2014 CSNA. In addition, the passage of WIOA, and the adoption of an additional IL core service, i.e., transition (from nursing home to the community and from secondary school to post-secondary education, training or employment), further highlights the need for closer collaboration. DCRSA will assist in supporting the resource plan of the SILC, in order to maximize the limited resources available in the District to meet IL needs of people with disabilities. (Page 266) Title IV

DCRSA is also working closely with DOES in order to ensure that students with disabilities have access to the summer youth employment program, and that we are able to provide any necessary supports, including supported employment services, in a timely manner, to ensure the success of students in their summer work experience. In the summer of 2015, students with disabilities were represented in the summer youth employment services at about the same rate that these students are represented in the school system, i.e., 12% of program participants were students with disabilities. DCRSA is working closely with DOES in order to identify students who have accommodation needs so that supports can be in place on day one of the student’s summer work experience. DCRSA will also participate in all DOES summer youth employment orientations, for program participants and businesses, in order to provide information about workplace accommodations and the availability of support services from DCRSA. (Page 269) Title II

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration continues to add new Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) that partner with us to provide an array of vocational rehabilitation services to consumers. As indicated above, the agency doubled the number of evidence based supported employment providers in FY 2015. Additional services available to our consumer through the Human Care agreements include job readiness services, trial work experiences, job placement and benefits analysis and planning.  (Page 269) Title IV

With the introduction of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the performance measures for the vocational rehabilitation program will be changing. The specific performance standards will be addressed in the Unified State Workforce Development Plan. Because all of these measures are new, DCRSA is proposing to use the first two years to collect sufficient data on the new measures in order to develop realistic goals to implement as the new performance standards. In order to prepare for these new measures, the administration is taking a number of steps, including: working with the agency that provides the electronic case management system to ensure that we are capturing all data we are required to report; working with the other workforce agencies in the state to ensure that all measures have a common definition; improving monitoring of progress in training and education programs in order to provide accurate information on performance regarding completion of training and measurable skills gains, and to obtain more complete data about the performance of existing training providers to assist in improved informed choice of providers and improved outcomes for clients; and establishing new protocols for following up with clients post-closure to check on their progress and provide information about availability of ongoing services. (Page 270) Title IV

From FY 2014 to present, the administration has been focusing more on quality, developing a training schedule with the GW Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), to improve the quality and consistency of services provided. In 2017 and following the phasing out of TACE, the DCRSA entered into training alliance with Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) which is funded by the Department of Education to provide technical assistance and trainings around WIOA, customized employment, HCA provider capacity building, PreETS, and other vocational rehabilitation trainings. (Page 275) Title IV

In 2016, the following policies were implemented: Informed Choice, Case Closure, Case Record, and Protection, Use and Release of Information. Policies that are currently at the Deputy Director’s level of review include Transportation, Case Transfer, Case Management, IPE, and Supported Employment Policy (updated for WIOA). The Pre-ETS Policy Draft has been completed and accepted by the Department of Education. Other Policies, Procedures or SOPS that are in development include Pre-ETS SOP, Case Closure Procedure, Services and Authorizations, Eligibility, and Due Process which is on hold pending revised district regulations. (Page 276) Title IV

Goal 2: Improve the efficiency of RSA operations. The Administration made significant progress in updating policies and procedures during FY 2015, updating policies, procedures and protocols in the following areas: Postsecondary Education and Training Policy and Procedure, Maintenance Policy, Policy Regarding Rates of Payment for VR Services, Self-Employment Policy and Procedures, Protocol on Quality and Supervisory Case Review, Eligibility Determination Extension Protocol, and Trial Work Protocol. As each new policy, procedure or protocol was implemented, training was provided to all relevant staff on implementation, and subsequent quality review regarding implementation has been conducted. In 2016, the following policies were implemented: Informed Choice, Case Closure, Case Record, and Protection, Use and Release of Information. Policies that are currently at the Deputy Director’s level of review include Transportation, Case Transfer, Case Management, IPE, and Supported Employment Policy (updated for WIOA). The Pre-ETS Policy Draft has been completed and accepted by the Department of Education. Other Policies, Procedures or SOPS that are in development include Pre-ETS SOP, Case Closure Procedure, Services and Authorizations, Eligibility, and Due Process which is on hold pending revised district regulations. (Page 276) Title IV

The agency needed for the CRP module to be implemented in order to fully implement a vendor report card process to provide information and support to RSA customers in exercising informed choice when selecting vendors and providers for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the Authority of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as Amended in 1998; CFR Section 361.52. We expect to have thorough accurate data to provide to consumers during FY 2016, and to publish performance data. Over the past three years, the administration has made significant progress in improving the efficiency of operations in terms of compliance with federal standards related to timeliness of determining eligibility and developing Individualized Plans for Employment. In FY 2013, the administration determined eligibility within sixty days 83% of the time, increased from 68% in FY 2012; and timely developed IPEs 92% of the time, compared with 80% of the time in FY 2012. In FY 2015, both of DCRSA performed at 95% for both of these measures. In 2016 and 2017 this improved to 96% and 97% respectively (Page 276) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~District residents often face one or more barriers which prevent them from accessing education, training programs, and from ultimately being successful in the workforce. Consequently, the District’s workforce system must take meaningful steps to help remediate these barriers to ensure residents are able to overcome obstacles and attain their goals. A common barrier is economically-related as residents need to work to support themselves and their families. Due to this, agencies are working to increase access to earn and learn opportunities through partnerships and innovative methods to include expanding apprenticeship and on-the-job (OJT) training opportunities. Other common barriers include health issues (both physical and behavioral), transportation costs, housing, income supports, and child-care. Consequently, workforce system partners are strengthening partnerships among other District agencies that can provide barrier remediation services for our residents, such as the Department of Behavioral Health, the Department of Human Services, and OSSE’s Division of Early Learning. (Page 60-61) Title I

To increase opportunities for work-based learning and career exploration for youth, agencies will ensure all youth in WIOA core programs have access to work based experiences which include year-round and/or summer paid and unpaid work placements/internships, on-the-job training opportunities, job shadowing, earn-and-learn opportunities, pre-apprenticeship programs, or apprenticeship programs. This effort will prioritize targeted groups including youth with disabilities, English language learners, youth re-engaging in education, homeless youth, and socioeconomically disadvantaged youth. These groups face the highest barriers in and outside of school; and, as such, work-based learning opportunities are even more important to help connect youth to a career pathway.

The District wants to ensure that youth work experiences are as meaningful as possible and relate to their long-term goals. DOES and OSSE will align work experiences, both year-round and summer, to industries related to specific Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs of Study for CTE concentrators, completers, or students who have declared a CTE focus. Additionally, DOES, OSSE, and RSA will collaborate to ensure youth with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), participate in year-round and summer work experiences that align with the transition goals in their IEP. (Page 66) Title I

o Percentage of career pathways developed compared to identified high demand areas
o Percentage of people successfully move off of income support services (like TANF, SSI/SSDI) through successful and sustainable activity
o Number of barriers identified and percentage successfully mitigated (Page 103) Title I

OJT positions must be full-time and must provide an hourly wage that meets the District of Columbia’s living wage of $13.85 and does not exceed the District’s average wage of $23.95 for the participant with evidence that the participant is on a career pathway towards a higher paying job. However, waivers are allowable for individuals with disabilities as well as older workers (55 years and older). Exceptions include a job opportunity that is appropriate to the customer’s needs and skill acquisition that meets the occupational qualifications, but the starting wage does not meet the $14.00 per hour wage. Then an OJT contract can be written for a lower hourly rate in consideration of the participant’s extraordinary limitations and/or barriers.  (Page 145) Title I

• The WIC reviewed OSSE’s draft RFA prior to release and made several edits including adding the requirement:
o to offer work-based learning components;
o to establish employer partnerships; and
o that all sub grantees must participate in the WIC’s recently established Career Pathways Community of Practice (COP). (Page164) Title I

Strategy 1: Increase counselor and client participation in activities sponsored by DCRSA’s Business Relations Unit including: · Monthly Job Readiness Workshops · Monthly Employer/Industry Spotlights · Quarterly Career Fairs · Strategy 2: Strengthen collaboration with the DC Department of Employment Services (DOES), expand the number of days that a VR specialist is located at American Jobs Center sites. Require all VR applicants to register with American Jobs Centers at time of VR application. Strategy 3: Continue to expand the number and types of employers participating in the Project Search program, enabling transition-aged students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while receiving on-the-job support. In school year 2015-16, DCRSA established a new Project Search site at a local hotel, Embassy Suites. This is a particularly positive development as work in the hospitality industry is one of the growth industries in the District. Strategy 4: Coordinate with the Department on Disability Services Ticket to Work program to ensure that eligible ticket holders are referred to ticket agencies for post-closure follow on support services. (Page 270-271) Title IV

Apprenticeship

To increase opportunities for work-based learning and career exploration for youth, agencies will ensure all youth in WIOA core programs have access to work based experiences which include year-round and/or summer paid and unpaid work placements/internships, on-the-job training opportunities, job shadowing, earn-and-learn opportunities, pre-apprenticeship programs, or apprenticeship programs. This effort will prioritize targeted groups including youth with disabilities, English language learners, youth re-engaging in education, homeless youth, and socioeconomically disadvantaged youth. These groups face the highest barriers in and outside of school; and, as such, work-based learning opportunities are even more important to help connect youth to a career pathway. (Page 66) Title I

OSSE’s recent Adult and Family Education (AFE) grant has required that all AFE providers (who educate hundreds of older youth between the ages of 18 and 24) offer an integrated education and training model as explained in the section above. OSSE AFE’s new grant also requires their providers to offer transition services to postsecondary education, training, apprenticeships, and employment for all students at the adult secondary education levels. Similarly, all WIOA core partners will require that all participants within in-school WIOA funded programs, and all REC clients nearing completion of their secondary education, have established a transition plan that includes specific and appropriate postsecondary goals. Students with an Individual Graduation Plan and/or an IEP with an appropriate secondary transition plan by the age of 14, as required by local statute, can be waived of this requirement. (Page 67) Title I

The DOES Business Services Group, in conjunction with the DOES Office of Apprenticeship, Information, and Technology, continues to serve as the primary connection to assist residents in entering Registered Apprenticeship programs and positions. To ensure the inclusion of underrepresented groups in these efforts, DOES currently has referral partnerships with community-based organizations, DC Public Schools, the American Job Centers, the TANF and FSET programs, and various workforce programs throughout the District. To further increase inclusion, DOES has actively identified and met with agencies and organizations committed to serving women, veterans, individuals with disabilities, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged groups. (Page 148) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title IV

One of the challenges in the District has been the lack of an extended service provider for people with developmental disabilities, other than an intellectual disability. The only current source of support for extended services in the District for people receiving supported employment services are the HCBS Waiver with DDA, that provides services to people with intellectual disabilities, supports provided through the Department of Behavioral Health for people with SMI or SED, Ticket to Work, and natural supports. The changes in WIOA related to the provision of extended services for youth have been helpful in allowing the agency to provide extended supports to youth with developmental disabilities. In comments to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, we sought clarification whether these services had to terminate when the youth turned twenty-four, or if the services were available to any youth for up to four years, if the youth initiates services prior to age twenty four. (Page 228) Title IV

The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports. (Page 230) Title IV

The waiver services for people with intellectual disabilities are managed by the Developmental Disability Administration within the same designated state agency that houses DCRSA. In April, 2014, the agency finalized a protocol regarding the coordination of services between the two administrations, i.e., DCRSA and DCDDA. This protocol addresses referrals from DDA to RSA for supported employment services; coordination between the VR Specialist and DDA Service Coordinator, while a person is served by both administrations, and the provisions for ensuring referral back to DDA for extended services through the Medicaid Waiver, including a provision that DCRSA will maintain the case open for sixty days after waiver services are initiated to ensure there are no gaps in services. (Page 230) Title IV

The funds available to support youth in extended services are very helpful in the District, as the District’s developmental disability agency supports only persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is currently no Medicaid waiver support for extended services for people with developmental disabilities, other than ID. Therefore, DCRSA will use extended services to support youth with developmental disabilities (typically youth with autism spectrum disorder) as they achieve stabilization in employment, as defined by the agency’s supported employment policy, but continue to require ongoing supports to be successful in employment. The agency will also rely on natural supports and ticket to work support in developing long-term planning with youth with disabilities, to ensure comprehensive supports are in place to support youth who transition from supported employment with the VR program. (Page 265) Title IV

Strategy 3: Continue to expand the number and types of employers participating in the Project Search program, enabling transition-aged students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while receiving on-the-job support. In school year 2015-16, DCRSA established a new Project Search site at a local hotel, Embassy Suites. This is a particularly positive development as work in the hospitality industry is one of the growth industries in the District. Strategy 4: Coordinate with the Department on Disability Services Ticket to Work program to ensure that eligible ticket holders are referred to ticket agencies for post-closure follow on support services. (Page 271) Title IV

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~BRU services to businesses include:
• Conducting disability awareness education training
• Creating opportunities for businesses to market themselves to people with disabilities through Industry Spotlights, where job seekers learn about various businesses and the expectations for successful applicants and employees
• Creating opportunities for businesses to participate in Mock Interviews with job seekers and provide feedback
• Sharing employment announcements with job seekers
• Employers are invited to career day events which are industry specific to meet job seekers and share information to assist job seekers with identifying or solidifying their employment goal.
• Screening and identifying qualified employment candidates
• Educating business about tax incentives
• Sharing resources to assist businesses with retaining existing employees and sharing sources for reasonable accommodations
• Brain storming potential opportunities to increase the pipeline of qualified talent to businesses (Page 84) Title 1

In feedback collected from employers, they reported several challenges in accessing effective business services, including lack of coordination among and within government agencies, too often hearing from multiple providers and agencies that are looking to place their participants without coordinating efforts, and difficulty in understanding and navigating programs and incentives that exist that may meet their needs. Consequently, the WIC and DOES have been working in conjunction with agency business engagement and job development staff to develop a unified business services plan. This plan would streamline both outreach and services to area businesses in order to better meet their needs and provide more comprehensive services. DOES’s Employer Services team already provides significant services to business partners, including competency-based assessment pre-screenings, targeted hiring events, technical support, access to workforce system clients with documented skill sets, compliance assistance, and apprenticeship registration. Job development services are also provided through other agencies, including DDS/RSA and DHS. Moving forward, the District will look to build on these offerings and implement a unified business services plan that better coordinates efforts and continues to improve quality. (Page 62) Title I

Data Collection

1.3 - Align policies, procedures, and performance measures and share data across programs to eliminate barriers to integration. 1.4 - Blend funding and utilize shared contracts to avoid duplication of resources. 1.5 - Foster environment of collaboration through cross-training staff and shared case management. (Page 45) Title 1

8. The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes,, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 50) Title 1

In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title IV

While DCRSA is no longer receiving direct training from GWU as was in the past following the reorganization of TACE and initiation of new training entities such a Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) by the Department of Education, In 2017 DCRSA signed a cooperation agreement with WINTAC which will boost training alliance with WINTAC. DCRSA will continue to receive trainings and technical support from these entities especially as it relates to WIOA and its implications for the vocational rehabilitation program. In 2017 WINTAC provided technical training on WIOA common performance measures and PreETS. DCRSA is currently working with WINTAC staff on Customized Employment training which is slated to take place in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in enhancing employment opportunities for persons with severe disabilities. (Page 239-240) Title IV

DCRSA has already taken many positive steps to make this culture shift, including receiving training and technical assistance in the common performance measures and their potential impact on numerous system in the VR program. The agency is encouraged to continue with this training process and to reinforce the message of achieving in-demand career-level jobs at every level of the organization. The agency is also encouraged to examine its key performance indictors and ensure that they are aligned with the common performance measures. (Page 242) Title IV

The transition population represents a group that can greatly benefit from the pursuit of postsecondary education and increase the quality and pay of employment that they obtain in the future. Counselors should ensure that they are having in-depth discussions with transition-age youth about higher education opportunities and that they are exploring the possibility of helping those youth obtain part-time jobs while they go to school. Wherever appropriate, counselors should be encouraging youth to set their sights high and strive for in-demand, career-level positions. This is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act as amended by WIOA, and fully supports the new common performance measures in WIOA. In order to fully realize this potential for youth, DCRSA will need to ensure that they are identifying “504” students in addition to those students being served by Special Education. These students need to receive encouragement to apply for DCRSA services and DCRSA counselors should meet them at their school sites whenever possible. (Page 245) Title IV

As a part of the review of the payment structure for job placement, DCRSA should consider establishing contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA. These would include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR program. Incentives might also be considered for high-paying jobs that exceed the median earnings of all clients; (Page 246) Title IV Establish contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA to include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR Program. (Page 256) Title IV

Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher. Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services. Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 271) Title II

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page129) Title I

The District is committed to equal opportunity employment. All decisions made regarding recruitment, hiring, training, and other terms and conditions of program operations will be made without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation, or belief. The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 129-130) Title I

Avoid unnecessary requirements that tend to screen out individuals with disabilities, such as requiring a driver’s license as the only acceptable form of identification, or requirements mandating that individuals must complete intake forms without assistance. Permit special benefits beyond those required by regulation, such as additional one-on-one assistance or extra time beyond typical time limits. Provide reasonable accommodations to customers with disabilities, unless providing those accommodations would cause undue hardship (e.g., modified computer keyboards, sign-language interpreters, intensive staff assistance, modified computer screens). Ensure communications with customers and members of the public with disabilities are as effective as communications with others (i.e., providing auxiliary aids such as qualified interpreters, assistive listening headsets, closed and open captioning on videos, and telecommunication devices [TDD and TTY]) Comply with WIOA nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions. (Page 131) Title I

Veterans

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Workforce services are not just limited to occupational training and adult education, but may also include work readiness, job placement and on-the-job training, and services to businesses as well as human, social, mental health, disability and other supportive services. Key agencies making significant investments include:
• Department of Employment Services
• University of the District of Columbia- Community College (UDC-CC)
• Department of Human Services
• Department on Disability Services
• Department of Behavioral Health
• Office of the State Superintendent of Education
• Workforce Investment Council (Page 39) Title IV

The District wants to ensure all residents who seek employment services - including those who have recently been incarcerated have access to comprehensive support to enter the workforce. District residents pending release from incarceration face a unique set of challenges when seeking to obtain employment. Limited employment history, inadequate educational credentials, substance abuse and mental health challenges are but a few of the obstacles faced by the clients this partnership serves. Through the development of life skills, job training, and basic computer training participants are better prepared for the employment challenges they will face upon release. To that end, the DC Jail Work Reentry Program was established in July 2015 in partnership with the Department of Corrections (DOC), to provide intensive 6-week job training for incarcerated persons with an impending release date. This program enhances the availability of employment options for returning citizens by beginning the process of reintegration prior to release (Page 72) Title I

To increase barrier remediation, DDS/RSA has also strengthened its relationship with the DDA and with the DBH to improve coordination in the provision of supported employment services for people with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). The agency updated its policies regarding provision of supported employment services to ensure that there was a smooth transition from supported employment services with DDS/RSA to extended supported employment services with DDS/DDA or DBH. DDS/RSA established an MOA with DBH, clarifying referral, service provision, and cross training issues; and meets regularly with DBH supported employment staff and meets jointly with DBH and all supported employment providers.  (Page 73) Title IV

Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs ( Page 118) Title I

• Ability to administer additional assessments/screenings including: mental health screening, domestic violence screening, substance abuse screening, and career assessment (Assessments align with the DHS Online Work Readiness Assessment);
• Ability to upload, view and print required eligibility documents and track documentation submissions (List of eligibility documents aligns with WIOA); (Page 121) Title I

• Strive to anticipate the needs of people with disabilities in the physical design of the center, as well as the design of services that provide opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in an effective and meaningful way in an integrated setting; and, (Page 131) Title IV

These community sites include the following diverse settings such as rehabilitation centers, mental health clinics, hospitals, community health centers, homeless shelters, other DC Government Offices, and the court system. DCRSA offers services in or receives referrals from the following community agencies and centers: DC Department of Employment Services (DOES) American Job Centers (AJC) (4 sites, albeit one is currently under renovation, DC Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), DC Child and Family Services Agency, DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services, Unity Health Care (three sites), N Street Village, Salvation Army Rehabilitation Center, The National Multiple Sclerosis Society, George Washington University Hospital Acute Rehabilitation Unit, Gallaudet University, Washington Literacy Council, Model School for the Deaf, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Langston Lang Housing Program, Covenant House, The Arc of DC, Ethiopian Community Center, DC Aging and Disability Resource Center, , Central Union Mission, Washington Hospital Center Outpatient Psychiatric Unit, DC Office of Asian Affairs, DC Superior Court House, DC Office of Veterans Affairs, Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (two sites), Office of Returning Citizens Administration (ORCA), National Rehabilitation Hospital, Providence Hospital, Smithsonian, Seabury Blind Center, the Blair Underwood Health Centers, KRA Corporation, and Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind (CLB). (Page 218) Title II

In FY 2016, DCRSA established one VR unit that is now responsible for working with the cases that are referred from DDA or DBH. This has improved the coordination between the agencies as there are now six dedicated VR Specialists and one VR Supervisor. This has facilitated improved coordination and communication. DDS/RSA and DDA have continued to establish Human Care Agreements with additional supported employment providers who serve people with developmental disabilities. The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title II

Eight (8) private non-profit organizations (Anchor Mental Health; Community Connections, Inc.; Contemporary Family Services, Inc.; Deaf-Reach, Inc.; MBI Health Services, LLC; Pathways to Housing; Psychiatric Center Chartered Inc.; and Psychiatric Rehabilitation Service, Inc.) are providing people with serious mental illness with Evidenced Based Supported Employment. (Page 228) Title II

The DC Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) is responsible for providing mental health services in the District. DCRSA and DBH have been working together to provide Evidence Based Supported Employment Services since 2010. In 2015, the agencies worked together to expand these services, adding additional community-based agencies to provide services. In addition, the agencies developed a Memorandum of Agreement (currently in draft awaiting legal review by DBH). This agreement clarifies the process for referral to DCRSA for supported employment services and identifies when a case will be referred back to DBH for extended services. In addition, the agreement includes provisions for regular meetings between all parties, as well as the provision of cross-training, to ensure that all DCRSA VR Specialists are aware of all mental health services that are available, including Evidence Based Supported Employment and are aware how to make referrals for these services. (Page 230) Title IV

DOES is currently developing a formal plan that will establish the procedures to be implemented to ensure that AJCs are in compliance with Section 508. The term disability is extremely broad. While some individuals can be identified due to mobility issues or sensory deficits (such as people who are blind, visually impaired, or deaf), there are other individuals who are covered under one of the provisions of the law for whom physical access is not an issue, such as those with learning disabilities, mental health issues, head injuries, and many other conditions. DOES is committed to providing services that:
2. Assign three VR counselors to work with all people referred from DBH for evidence based supported employment services.
3. Arrange with DBH to provide training for all VR counselors regarding mental health and substance abuse treatment services available in the District.
4. Review the DDS Protocol regarding coordination of services between DCRSA and DDA, make necessary changes and provide training to all DDA service coordinators and VR counselors. (Page 252) Title IV

Goal 1: Provide continued support to six (6) mental health supported employment providers to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities The Administration will continue to support the Human Care Agreements with eight (8) providers of mental health supported employment services to support staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and the development of placement and employment opportunities through supported employment. (Page 278) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

District of Columbia Partners in Transition - 06/01/2020

~~“Visit OSSE's Secondary Transition website for more information on how to support students with disabilities in successful transitions to life after high school. The website also features information for educators, families, and students about:

Upcoming EventsResources for supporting meaningful student involvement throughout the IEP process, including the Student-led IEP Toolkit and OSSE's Self Determination Film SeriesProfessional development resources for transition practitioners, including the OSSE Secondary Transition Toolkit, Secondary Transition Webinar Series, and more.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“The U.S. Small Business Administration announced that Dog Tag, Inc., has been awarded funding for entrepreneurship training to service-disabled veterans.  It is an educational program for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, and military spouses seeking to launch small business ventures.  The program combines a classroom component taught at Georgetown University and an opportunity to experience small business ownership at Dog Tag Bakery in Washington, D.C.The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.” 

Systems
  • Other

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Employment Services - 06/10/2019

~~“Mission Statement

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) mission is to connect District residents, job seekers, and employers to opportunities and resources that empower fair, safe, effective working communities.Vision

The Department of Employment Services provides comprehensive employment services to ensure a competitive workforce, full employment, life-long learning, economic stability and the highest quality of life for all District residents.

Connect With Us4058 Minnesota Avenue, NEWashington, DC 20019Phone: (202) 724-7000Fax: (202) 673-6993TTY: TTYEmail:does@dc.gov

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

District of Columbia Section 1115 Medicaid Behavioral Health Transformation Demonstration Program - 06/03/2019

~~“On June 3, 2019, the Director of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), pursuant to the authority set forth in the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, and in collaboration with the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), submitted a Section 1115 Medicaid demonstration application for the District Medicaid Program to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for review and approval….The District is seeking approval to incorporate the following services and service changes for individuals participating under the demonstration:• Treatment of adults (21-64 years old) with SMI or SUD in IMD inpatient or residential settings• Crisis Stabilization Services, including changes to Crisis Psychological Emergency Program and Mobile Crisis Services and the addition of Psychiatric Residential Crisis Stabilization• Recovery Support Services, including SUD services provided by certified peer counselors and Clubhouse Peer-Run rehabilitative supports• Trauma-Informed Services• Supported Employment Services” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DDC Five Year Plan 2017-2021 - 06/01/2019

~~“The District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) is pleased to disseminate the New Five -Year State Plan (Plan) describing goals, objectives and activities for fiscal years 2017 through 2021.  This Plan represents the DDC’s commitment to fulfilling our responsibility to our District residents with developmental disabilities and their families as authorized in the federal legislation, Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000.  ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Commission on Persons with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~~“The Commission serves as an advisory body to inform and advise the District on programs, services, facilities, and activities that impact the lives of residents with disabilities in the District of Columbia.  The Commission is committed to enhancing the image, status, inclusion, and quality of life for all District of Columbia residents, visitors, and employees with disabilities, and ensuring that they have the same rights and opportunities as those without disabilities.We are working on community outreach and have established advisory subcommittees on accessible transportation, assistive technology, job creation, adequate housing and the enhancement of independent living skills.  We’re conducting community forums on topics of interest to our constituency, including transportation and health.  We meet with District and private-sector providers of disability services, and generally work toward fuller participation of people with disabilities in District life.  The DCCPD collaborates with other District Government Agencies on the Mayor’s Annual Disability Awareness Conference.  The conference highlights various city services for people with disabilities and encourages meaningful employment opportunities within District Government.  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department on Disability Services Responses to FY17-18 Performance Oversight Questions - 10/14/2018

~~DDS continues to lead a number of Employment First efforts and collaborations across the District. To coordinate efforts DDS leads an Employment First Leadership Team, which includes members the Departments of Employment Services, Health Care Finance (Medicaid) and Behavioral Health; Office of the State Superintendent of Education; and DC Public Schools; and Workforce Investment Council. The group meets at least quarterly to collaborate and share updates, innovations and resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. DDS “Provider Sanctions” - 08/13/2018

When a provider does not meet expectations or established DDS/DDA requirements, that provider, a particular service offered by that provider or service location of that provider may be added to the DDS/DDA Provider Sanctions List. This action prohibits DDA Service Coordinators from referring or transitioning new people to that provider, service or service location until they are removed from the list.”

Systems
  • Other

Project Search - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.

DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:• Young adult between 18-30 years old• Have a documented intellectual/developmental disability• Completing final year of high school OR recent high school graduate• Show willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)• Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readiness• Strong attendance record is preferred

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 27

District of Columbia Partners in Transition - 06/01/2020

~~“Visit OSSE's Secondary Transition website for more information on how to support students with disabilities in successful transitions to life after high school. The website also features information for educators, families, and students about:

Upcoming EventsResources for supporting meaningful student involvement throughout the IEP process, including the Student-led IEP Toolkit and OSSE's Self Determination Film SeriesProfessional development resources for transition practitioners, including the OSSE Secondary Transition Toolkit, Secondary Transition Webinar Series, and more.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Department of Employment Services - 06/10/2019

~~“Mission Statement

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) mission is to connect District residents, job seekers, and employers to opportunities and resources that empower fair, safe, effective working communities.Vision

The Department of Employment Services provides comprehensive employment services to ensure a competitive workforce, full employment, life-long learning, economic stability and the highest quality of life for all District residents.

Connect With Us4058 Minnesota Avenue, NEWashington, DC 20019Phone: (202) 724-7000Fax: (202) 673-6993TTY: TTYEmail:does@dc.gov

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DDC Five Year Plan 2017-2021 - 06/01/2019

~~“The District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) is pleased to disseminate the New Five -Year State Plan (Plan) describing goals, objectives and activities for fiscal years 2017 through 2021.  This Plan represents the DDC’s commitment to fulfilling our responsibility to our District residents with developmental disabilities and their families as authorized in the federal legislation, Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000.  ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Commission on Persons with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~~“The Commission serves as an advisory body to inform and advise the District on programs, services, facilities, and activities that impact the lives of residents with disabilities in the District of Columbia.  The Commission is committed to enhancing the image, status, inclusion, and quality of life for all District of Columbia residents, visitors, and employees with disabilities, and ensuring that they have the same rights and opportunities as those without disabilities.We are working on community outreach and have established advisory subcommittees on accessible transportation, assistive technology, job creation, adequate housing and the enhancement of independent living skills.  We’re conducting community forums on topics of interest to our constituency, including transportation and health.  We meet with District and private-sector providers of disability services, and generally work toward fuller participation of people with disabilities in District life.  The DCCPD collaborates with other District Government Agencies on the Mayor’s Annual Disability Awareness Conference.  The conference highlights various city services for people with disabilities and encourages meaningful employment opportunities within District Government.  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. DDS “Provider Sanctions” - 08/13/2018

When a provider does not meet expectations or established DDS/DDA requirements, that provider, a particular service offered by that provider or service location of that provider may be added to the DDS/DDA Provider Sanctions List. This action prohibits DDA Service Coordinators from referring or transitioning new people to that provider, service or service location until they are removed from the list.”

Systems
  • Other

Project Search - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.

DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:• Young adult between 18-30 years old• Have a documented intellectual/developmental disability• Completing final year of high school OR recent high school graduate• Show willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)• Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readiness• Strong attendance record is preferred

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

“Notice of Funding Availability” Department of Employment Services, Office of Youth Programs - 08/22/2017

~~“Youth with Disabilities:The DOES Office of Youth Programs supports all eligible youth, including those that are identified as having disabilities. Increasing services to this population is critical for serving all eligible youth in the District.  We encourage providers to partner with organizations that serve youth with disabilities.  Youth with disabilities must be afforded more opportunities to practice and improve their workplace skills, explore their career interests and receive services to assist with eliminating barriers. Any provider who submits a proposal with specific programming for this demographic may receive special consideration and preference points during the review process.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Workforce Investment Council Quarterly Board Meeting - 01/23/2017

~~PowerPoint detailing the agenda of the District of Columbia’s Workforce Investment Council.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

DC Developmental Disabilities Council “Government Resources” - 01/01/2017

~~“Inclusion in this resource list does not constitute endorsement by the DC Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC), nor does omission imply non-endorsement. The DDC’s goal is to provide you with information on some key resources available within the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department on Disability Services Responses to FY17-18 Performance Oversight Questions - 10/14/2018

~~DDS continues to lead a number of Employment First efforts and collaborations across the District. To coordinate efforts DDS leads an Employment First Leadership Team, which includes members the Departments of Employment Services, Health Care Finance (Medicaid) and Behavioral Health; Office of the State Superintendent of Education; and DC Public Schools; and Workforce Investment Council. The group meets at least quarterly to collaborate and share updates, innovations and resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“The U.S. Small Business Administration announced that Dog Tag, Inc., has been awarded funding for entrepreneurship training to service-disabled veterans.  It is an educational program for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, and military spouses seeking to launch small business ventures.  The program combines a classroom component taught at Georgetown University and an opportunity to experience small business ownership at Dog Tag Bakery in Washington, D.C.The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.” 

Systems
  • Other

Mayor’s 10th Annual Disability Awareness Expo - 10/26/2017

~~“The purpose of this FREE event is to advance the conversation on equal opportunities and inclusive environments for people with disabilities; complete with information and  exhibitors tables to engage in conversation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

A Path To Community Living Resource Guide - 06/08/2016

This Guide is a compilation of current service providers, resources, tools, and programs available to District of Columbia residents who wish to live independently in the community.  It is designed to be used in conjunction with the “Path to Community Living” Handbook; however, it also functions as a resource list.  This document is updated continuously as information changes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC Transition Plan for the HCBS Waiver - 02/26/2015

“DDS is engaged in a variety of efforts to build the capacity of its staff and provider agencies to support and facilitate greater individualized community exploration and integration, including competitive, integrated employment,” including: “Discovery: Developing Positive Personal Profiles, a nationally recognized tool and process for assessing the vocational interests and goals of people and supporting career exploration and community integration activities;” Individualized Day Supports (IDS) Implementation Training, “including development of regulations, training for DDA staff and providers on the new service, how to recruit and train staff, the development of formats for initial and ongoing Community Integration Plans, and how to conduct Community Mapping;” and Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities’ Employment Learning Community, “which brings providers together on a regular basis through a community of practice approach where national and local resources are shared and providers learn from one another.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Georgetown University Hosts Conference on Employment of People with Disabilities” - 01/29/2015

~~“The second panel, moderated by Justin Ford with the Truman National Security Project, focused on the role of the recent federal contracting regulations promulgated by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Panelists included Jennifer Sheehy, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Disability Employment Policy, DOL; Naomi Levin, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, DOL; Bob Vetere, Human Resource Specialist, Northrop Grumman; and Eric Eversole, Vice President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce & Executive Director, Hiring Our Heroes. They offered their perspective on how the OFCCP Section 503 regulations – and more specifically the 7% hiring target ? could impact Veterans with disabilities seeking gainful employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DHCF and DDS Home and Community Based Settings (HCBS) 101 - 12/01/2014

This training power point provides information on the HCBS waiver, basic information on revising the waiver, designing and restructuring it, and waiver rules and restrictions.  It also details the role of DCHF and DDS in the revision and administration of the HCBS waiver.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Secondary Transition Assessment Tool-kit - 11/01/2013

The District of Columbia Secondary Transition Process Toolkit was designed to assist educators in effectively addressing the transition planning needs of students with disabilities who are preparing to transition from high school to postsecondary employment, education/training, and independent living. This guide was developed using Federal and District of Columbia policies, procedures, and regulations.   
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

A Path to Community Living Handbook - 01/25/2013

This handbook is designed to assist people who have moved or are planning to move out of institutions into the community of their choice.  These forms are designed to help you identify the services and supports you may need to successfully live in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

District of Columbia Section 1115 Medicaid Behavioral Health Transformation Demonstration Program - 06/03/2019

~~“On June 3, 2019, the Director of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), pursuant to the authority set forth in the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, and in collaboration with the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), submitted a Section 1115 Medicaid demonstration application for the District Medicaid Program to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for review and approval….The District is seeking approval to incorporate the following services and service changes for individuals participating under the demonstration:• Treatment of adults (21-64 years old) with SMI or SUD in IMD inpatient or residential settings• Crisis Stabilization Services, including changes to Crisis Psychological Emergency Program and Mobile Crisis Services and the addition of Psychiatric Residential Crisis Stabilization• Recovery Support Services, including SUD services provided by certified peer counselors and Clubhouse Peer-Run rehabilitative supports• Trauma-Informed Services• Supported Employment Services” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: https://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington DC’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.47%
Change from
2018 to 2019
705,749
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
43,484
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-18.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
14,137
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-12.33%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.51%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.01%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.84%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 693,972 702,455 705,749
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 53,816 45,920 43,484
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 23,746 16,771 14,137
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 331,843 344,984 351,504
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 44.12% 36.52% 32.51%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.97% 79.03% 79.84%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.10% 5.60% 5.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 29.10% 34.10% 26.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70% 13.80% 11.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 38,176 35,439 33,866
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 53,211 44,929 44,547
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 22,844 16,999 12,660
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 60,388 60,388 59,236
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 7,405 7,405 4,898
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,963 1,884 1,578
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 1,888 2,994 2,738
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 3,733 3,304 1,160

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 802 868 846
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.60% 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,284 13,896 13,422

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A 1,958 2,427
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A 10,359 7,209
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A 12,395 10,166
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A 15.10% 23.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.60% 3.50% 3.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.70% 4.50% 2.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.00% 11.30% 13.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 581 483 356
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 750 623 338
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,922 1,556 1,508
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,733 1,809 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 8 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2 1 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 22.00% 13.00% 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.31 0.15 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 15.00% N/A 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,385 2,358 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,491 31,430 30,500
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 88 N/A 146
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 29 N/A 63

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,859,000 $3,286,662 $2,638,051
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,218,000 $3,017,125 $5,270,070
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,958,000 $13,119,316 $18,468,656
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,718,000 $6,401,004 $4,675,061
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00% 29.00% 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 397 539 401
Number of people served in facility based work. 307 186 378
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 655 511 714
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 41.70 55.20 61.86

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 55.61% 56.47% 56.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 17.38% 15.23% 15.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 10.04% 9.41% 9.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 63.00% 71.00% 76.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.13% 20.59% 24.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 18.62% 29.99% 34.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 32.96% 36.11% 54.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 6.49% 6.12% 9.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 20 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 20 20 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services.  (Page 216) Title II

 The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 270) Title 1I

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title 1I

DC Gov’t as Model Employer:
In the past year, DDS has partnered with DC Human Resources (DCHR) to work towards the District becoming a model employer of people with disabilities. First, DDS has developed and is piloting the Aspiring Professionals program. This is a paid internship program that places people with disabilities in positions throughout the DC government, in positions where the person has a real possibility of being hired. So far, DDS has placed 21 people with disabilities in internships and with 4 having completed their internships, 3 have been hired to date and the 4th was offered an extension on his internship, funded by the host organization.
Next, DDS/RSA funds a position within DCHR so that there is a staff person with expertise and focused attention on recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees with disabilities throughout the DC government and providing technical assistance to DC agencies regarding employment of people with disabilities. (Page 274) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Customized Employment

~~• INCREASE PROVIDER ACCESS TO TRAINING: IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT RSA PARTNER WITH THE THEIR COMMUNITY RESOURCE PROVIDERS TO PROVIDE THE SAME TRAININGS OFFERED TO THE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION COUNSELORS AS IT RELATES TO IMPROVED SERVICES TO PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. TRAININGS SHOULD INCLUDE: PERSON CENTERED THINKING TRAINING, CUSTOMIZED EMPLOYMENT AND OTHER RELATED TRAININGS. (Page 214) Title II

Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services. (Page 216) Title II

In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

Evidenced Based Supported Employment (EBSE), and the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) among others. While DCRSA is no longer receiving direct training of staff from GWU as was in the past following the reorganization of TACE and initiation of new training entities such as Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) by the Department of Education these new training entities are well equipped to provide needed rehabilitation counseling trainings as well as WIOA technical support. In 2017 DCRSA signed an agreement with WINTAC which will boost training alliance and consequently provide opportunities for improved best practices in vocational rehabilitation services, targeted outcomes, and professional development. DCRSA will continue to receive trainings and technical support from these entities especially as it relates to WIOA and its implications for the vocational rehabilitation program. In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

• DCRSA is entering into an intensive TA agreement with the WINTAC and the Y-TAC to provide training to their staff and service providers in customized employment. The organization is encouraged to fully implement this training program throughout the District to provide an option for individuals with the most significant disabilities to obtain and maintain competitive employment. (Page 243) Title II

Provide customized employment training for Human Care Agreement providers and DCRSA staff as part of the project with the WINTAC. The customized employment training will develop the capacity of DCRSA staff and the CRP network throughout the District to provide CE to DCRSA consumers;
• DCRSA is encouraged to expedite the development and use of the vendor report card system they have been working on for several years; (Page 246) Title II

• DCRSA should consider trying to find a way to sustain the employer roundtable events that were held prior to the dissolution to the BRU. These events were touted as an excellent form of outreach to employers and a valuable service to clients. (Page 247) Title II

• DCRSA should ensure that their internal staff focused on business relations and job development attend the customized employment training when it is offered (Page 247) Title II

b. Provide training on customized employment and employer engagement for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA and providers to provide this on an ongoing basis. (Page 253) Title II

Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 255) Title II

The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities and chronic mental illness. This happens, in part, through monthly meetings in addition to other training. In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance-based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. --In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 269-270 ) Title II

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title II

The administration expanded it Business Relations Unit and refocused its efforts on supporting job placement. Lastly, the administration hired external monitors, who provide monitoring and technical assistance to contract provider agencies. From FY 2014 to present, the administration has been focusing more on quality, developing a training schedule with the GW Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), to improve the quality and consistency of services provided. In 2017 and following the phasing out of TACE, the DCRSA entered into training alliance with Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) which is funded by the Department of Education to provide technical assistance and trainings around WIOA, customized employment, HCA provider capacity building, PreETS, and other vocational rehabilitation trainings. The administration has also been reviewing and revising all policies and procedures, and providing training to staff on any changes, to ensure that services are consistent with District and federal regulations. (Page 275) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Supported Employment services are available to any DCRSA client who is certified as having a most significant disability and for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred or has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of that disability, and for whom an appropriate plan for extended services can be developed. DCRSA has identified two primary populations that require the use of supported employment services: persons with serious mental illness (SMI) or serious emotional disturbance (SED) and persons with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The community rehabilitation providers provide to the two populations supported employment services which include intake, assessment and job coaching. In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. Each provider provides individualized services to consumers. Their efforts are geared toward competitive placements in an integrated work environment. At times, a company or a government agency may hire several clients, but the clients are not placed within the same work area to ensure that they are in an integrated work setting. With their rehabilitation specialist’s assistance, clients make informed choices to select their vocational goals. If a client chooses to change that goal during the supported employment process, their VR specialist assists and the new goal is implemented. Every effort is made to ensure clients are placed in jobs that are consistent with their interests and abilities. An "any job will do" attitude is never acceptable. Employment Specialists/Job Coaches spend valuable time with clients teaching them about the workplace’s expectations and the required tasks, assuring also that they know who to ask when assistance is needed. Time is spent with the person on the worksite who is identified as the natural support person as well to ensure that they are comfortable and prepared to provide workplace support as needed. (Page 280) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 40) Title I

1.3 - Align policies, procedures, and performance measures and share data across programs to eliminate barriers to integration.
1.4 - Blend funding and utilize shared contracts to avoid duplication of resources.
1.5 - Foster environment of collaboration through cross-training staff and shared case management. (Page 45) Title 1

8. The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes,, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 50) Title 1

As noted previously, only about $40 million of the over $120 million that is budgeted annually for District programs that have at least some workforce development components comes from the federal government.[1] Accordingly, agencies will engage in planning regarding blended funding, shared contracts, and resource contributions to ensure they are maximizing resources. The District is already beginning to improve coordination between federally and locally funded resources, including through alignment of year-round youth services programming and connections to the Mayor Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP); referrals of WIOA participants to locally funded training options, including UDC-CC course offerings; and the blending of OSSE’s AEFLA federal grant and local match funds with the WIC’s local career pathways funding in an effort to strategically coordinate efforts and fund eligible providers to offer IE&T programs. (Page 56) Title 1

Agencies are working to further integrate services including the development of a common intake, assessment, screening, and referral process. Currently, DOES and OSSE have a common initial intake through the Data Vault (DV). The DV was initially designed based on a single, multi-agency (OSSE AFE and DOES) customer intake and referral process. The DV is currently being implemented at each of the District’s American Job Centers and by OSSE AFE program providers. Furthermore, DDS/RSA has executed an MOA with OSSE AFE regarding the DV and the relevant staff have been trained on its implementation, which will likely begin in the coming months. Similarly, DHS staff have also received the requisite DV training and the related MOA is close to being finalized and implemented. Expansion plans over the next two years include incorporating other workforce system partners including DOES/WIC training providers, DHS, UDC-CC, adult-serving DCPS and DC Public Charter schools (on a voluntary basis), and other partner agencies. Additionally, the Districts’ efforts over the next two years will focus on system alignment and data sharing through interfaces between the DV and LACES, SLED, DOES’s VOS and other data systems. As these additional partners are connected to the Data Vault the system and details associated with the uniform intake, assessment, and referral processes will be updated to ensure they reflect the needs of all partners. (Page 57) Title 1

To increase barrier remediation, DDS/RSA has also strengthened its relationship with the DDA and with the DBH to improve coordination in the provision of supported employment services for people with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). The agency updated its policies regarding provision of supported employment services to ensure that there was a smooth transition from supported employment services with DDS/RSA to extended supported employment services with DDS/DDA or DBH. DDS/RSA established an MOA with DBH, clarifying referral, service provision, and cross training issues; and meets regularly with DBH supported employment staff and meets jointly with DBH and all supported employment providers. (Page 73) Title I

Additionally, programs such as the DC Career Connections Program (DCCC) are designed for specific demographics including youth who have been involved in the criminal justice system, are pregnant or parenting, have low educational attainment, are homeless, or have documented behavioral health challenges. This program will be coupled with WIOA programs that will provide necessary support including barrier removal techniques and innovative strategies to keep youth engaged. OYP also has strong partnerships with many educational institutions throughout the District including the District of Columbia Public Schools, the Public Charter School Board, the OSSE Re-Engagement Center, the Potomac Job Corps Center, and the University of the District of Columbia-Community College. These partnerships enable OYP to operate a streamlined process to move jobseekers into training or connect them to needed resources. The District will also ensure that WIOA Youth services are well linked to core partner programming, including leveraging the Virtual One-Stop (VOS) database, employer services, and well-coordinated referrals and/or co-enrollment in vocational rehabilitation and adult education services where relevant. (Page 153) Title 1

5.1.7: Increase the range of employment outcomes
Outcome: Not Met: There is no reported data shared by the DC Rehabilitation Services Administration pertaining to how they supported this initiative in 2017.
5.1.8: Develop additional outreach materials.
Outcome: Not Met: There is no reported data shared by the DC Rehabilitation Services Administration pertaining to how they supported this initiative in 2017. (Page 210) Title I

5.3 Objective 3: Expand and improve the quality of transition services through improved coordination with the state education agency and all local education agencies and implementation of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to secondary students with disabilities.
Four initiatives were developed and implemented during FY17 in support of this third objective.
5.3.1: Update the Memorandum of Agreement in place with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to comply with new requirements regarding provision of services to all students with disabilities, including those who are potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services and establish or update agreements with all local education agencies in order to establish clear processes for referral for VR services, and coordination of Pre-ETS. (Page 211) Title IV

Improve Financial Data Accuracy: RSA disagrees with the recommendation to contract with an outside agency. In October 2017, DDS implemented an alternative strategy that is intended to address these issues. Specifically, the agency made some management changes to better align services provided by DDS. Prior to the realignment, provider relations, invoice processing and quality assurance functions were handled separately for the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). Yet many providers for job placement and supported employment are shared by the two administrations.  (Page 215) Title II

 The relationship between Adult Education and Family Literacy and DCRSA should be strengthened through formal partnerships and shared planning. Although it was widely reported that DCRSA counselors use Adult Ed to help their consumers to get their GEDs, many were not aware that Adult Ed is a core partner under WIOA. The opportunities for developing and growing the relationship between the two agencies are high and fully supported by WIOA. This partnership is especially important in the District, where literacy was frequently mentioned as need for DCRSA consumers. (Page 244) Title IV

• DCRSA should strive to increase the range and types of jobs that consumers obtain. Individuals that are trained to obtain higher paying, career-level jobs will retain those positions for longer and will support DCRSA’s achievement of their common performance measures. One of the ways to make this happen is by encouraging consumer participation in postsecondary education programs, including graduate level education. Although many participants in this study characterized DCRSA consumers as needing to go to work immediately and unable to pursue higher education, DCRSA can promote the ability to assist consumers to obtain part-time jobs while they attend school and support those jobs with service delivery. (Page 241) Title II

. DCRSA has already taken many positive steps to make this culture shift, including receiving training and technical assistance in the common performance measures and their potential impact on numerous system in the VR program. The agency is encouraged to continue with this training process and to reinforce the message of achieving in-demand career-level jobs at every level of the organization. The agency is also encouraged to examine its key performance indictors and ensure that they are aligned with the common performance measures. (Page 242) Title IV

The transition population represents a group that can greatly benefit from the pursuit of postsecondary education and increase the quality and pay of employment that they obtain in the future. Counselors should ensure that they are having in-depth discussions with transition-age youth about higher education opportunities and that they are exploring the possibility of helping those youth obtain part-time jobs while they go to school. Wherever appropriate, counselors should be encouraging youth to set their sights high and strive for in-demand, career-level positions. This is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act as amended by WIOA, and fully supports the new common performance measures in WIOA. In order to fully realize this potential for youth, DCRSA will need to ensure that they are identifying “504” students in addition to those students being served by Special Education. These students need to receive encouragement to apply for DCRSA services and DCRSA counselors should meet them at their school sites whenever possible. (Page 245) Title IV

As a part of the review of the payment structure for job placement, DCRSA should consider establishing contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA. These would include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR program. Incentives might also be considered for high-paying jobs that exceed the median earnings of all clients; (Page 246) Title IV

h. DCRSA will provide ongoing training to staff on HCAs, including the payment structure for job development and placement. (Page 256) Title IV

The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities and chronic mental illness. (Page 269-270) Title II

In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance-based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. (Page 270) Title II

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DOES is working to develop a formal MOA with DDS/RSA to increase access to and opportunities for employment, education training and support services necessary to succeed in the labor market for people in the District, particularly people with barriers to employment, including people with disabilities. Through this MOA, DOES will provide workforce investment activities, through statewide and local workforce development systems, that increase the employment, retention and earnings of participants, and increase attainment of recognized postsecondary credentials by participants, and as a result, improve the quality of the workforce, reduce welfare dependence, increase economic self-sufficiency, and meet the skill requirements of employers. The agency has a VR counselor who is co-located at AJC HQ to provide onsite services to customers who may possess barriers requiring DDS/RSA assistance. (Page 74) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The District’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) services are eligibility based, and are provided to people who have a disability, which presents a substantial impediment to employment, and who would benefit from services to achieve an employment outcome. In addition, pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) are available for all students with disabilities, including those who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services; i.e., students receiving special education services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or who are eligible for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. VR services are individualized, based on the strengths, needs, abilities, interests, capabilities, and informed choice of the person. DDS/RSA currently serves about 4,600 people across the full range of services, which include evaluation, counseling and guidance, physical and mental restoration services, transition between advancement opportunities and related services, job exploration and readiness training, vocational training, support services and monetary supports, and placement services, supported employment services, job coaching, among others. The District receives $14 million in federal VR funds per year, in addition to about $6.5 million in local funding. RSA also administers a supported employment grant of $300,000, 50 percent of which must be used to provide services to youth; and an independent living grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services of about $300,000, and an Independent Living/Older Blind Grant for $225,000. Also, please note that at the time this plan was being reviewed, the Supported Employment Grant was not included in the FY 2018 federal budget. DCRSA will continue to provide these services through its federal VR grant. (Page 35) Title I

Changes in Vocational Rehabilitation Requirements - WIOA requirements that adjust DDS/RSA’s Vocational Rehabilitation requirements related to performance tracking and funding requirements for in-school-youth services necessitate significant changes in operations. The District has made a number of changes to ensure requirements are met and enhanced partnerships with other programming, but implementation burdens are significant. (Page 38) Title I

The District wants to ensure that youth work experiences are as meaningful as possible and relate to their long-term goals. DOES and OSSE will align work experiences, both year-round and summer, to industries related to specific Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs of Study for CTE concentrators, completers, or students who have declared a CTE focus. Additionally, DOES, OSSE, and RSA will collaborate to ensure youth with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), participate in year-round and summer work experiences that align with the transition goals in their IEP. Furthermore, DOES will ensure RSA representatives are integrated into the SYEP orientations for youth, their families, and employers, and work to identify youth with disabilities early enough to make appropriate job placements and work with employers on providing appropriate accommodations. (Page 66) Title I

OSSE’s recent Adult and Family Education (AFE) grant has required that all AFE providers (who educate hundreds of older youth between the ages of 18 and 24) offer an integrated education and training model as explained in the section above. OSSE AFE’s new grant also requires their providers to offer transition services to postsecondary education, training, apprenticeships, and employment for all students at the adult secondary education levels. Similarly, all WIOA core partners will require that all participants within in-school WIOA funded programs, and all REC clients nearing completion of their secondary education, have established a transition plan that includes specific and appropriate postsecondary goals. Students with an Individual Graduation Plan and/or an IEP with an appropriate secondary transition plan by the age of 14, as required by local statute, can be waived of this requirement. (Page 67) Title I

DDS/RSA has agreements in place with the Child and Family Services Agency (CFSA) and the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS) Agency. Consistent with these agreements, DDS/RSA has a vocational rehabilitation (VR) specialist assigned to work in each of these offices to work with adults, youth in foster care, and youth in the District’s juvenile justice system. The VR specialist conducts intakes and provides rehabilitation services to assist these youths to obtain necessary services to prepare for and obtain employment. (Page 73) Title I

DDS/RSA has established a data sharing agreement with OSSE and is finalizing an agreement with DOES in order to collect and report on post-closure employment and education performance indicators. (Page 94) Title I

The themes that emerged from the plan and the recommendations included there have been very helpful in informing the modifications to the VR Program Specific Portion of the Unified State Plan.
Some changes that have been underway in response to the earlier CSNA included implementation of additional staff training, including supervisory training, expanding the presence of DDS/RSA at the American Job Centers from one day per week to five days per week, expanding outreach to specific population identified in the CSNA as unserved or underserved, development of agreement with the Development Disability Administration to improve coordination of services for people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, expanding the coordination of services to transition youth through increased cooperation with the DC Public Schools, as well as all DC Public Charter Schools, coordinating with schools to begin referral for VR services earlier to ensure that DDS/RSA is available to work with students for at least the final two years of high school, and establishing performance based contracts for Job Development and Supported Employment providers. (Page 113) Title II

• Number of people placed by RSA that remained employer for 90 calendar days or more
• Percent of people with an individualized plan for employment developed within 90 calendar days of eligibility determination
• Percent of people for whom eligibility is determined within 60 calendar days
• Average entry level wages for people whose cases are closed successfully
• Percentage of eligible transition youth for whom an IPE is developed (Page 126) Title II

Additionally, programs such as the DC Career Connections Program (DCCC) are designed for specific demographics including youth who have been involved in the criminal justice system, are pregnant or parenting, have low educational attainment, are homeless, or have documented behavioral health challenges. This program will be coupled with WIOA programs that will provide necessary support including barrier removal techniques and innovative strategies to keep youth engaged. OYP also has strong partnerships with many educational institutions throughout the District including the District of Columbia Public Schools, the Public Charter School Board, the OSSE Re-Engagement Center, the Potomac Job Corps Center, and the University of the District of Columbia-Community College. These partnerships enable OYP to operate a streamlined process to move jobseekers into training or connect them to needed resources. The District will also ensure that WIOA Youth services are well linked to core partner programming, including leveraging the Virtual One-Stop (VOS) database, employer services, and well-coordinated referrals and/or co-enrollment in vocational rehabilitation and adult education services where relevant. (Page 153) Title II

Mission: The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) was created in response to federal law2 and Mayoral Order 93-149, to empower and respect the dual dignities of people with disabilities in the District of Columbia; and maximize their employment outcome, self-determination, economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion and integration into society based on the informed choices of people with disabilities in the District of Columbia.
Purpose: The purpose of the SRC is to act in an advisory capacity to the Administrator of DCRSA on the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to people with disabilities in the District of Columbia. (Page 201) Title II

Outcome: Not Met: In 2017, DCRSA continued to serve and provide easy access to vocational rehabilitation services to DC residents across all 8 wards. Besides the 46 field sites which were identified in 2016, additional community service agencies were added in 2017. These include Amazing Love Health Services, LLC, and New Beginning Temporary Shelter and referrals include people with disabilities, those who are homeless, and veterans. A counselor was assigned to CSOSA and MORCA to specifically serve returning citizens. A total of eleven (11) DCRSA counselors were assigned to the four AJC (or DOES) locations in the District. Two bilingual counselors were assigned to locations serving Hispanic and Latino communities and one counselor with Amharic proficiencies to serve the Ethiopian community. (Page 208) Title II

5.3.1: Update the Memorandum of Agreement in place with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to comply with new requirements regarding provision of services to all students with disabilities, including those who are potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services and establish or update agreements with all local education agencies in order to establish clear processes for referral for VR services, and coordination of Pre-ETS. (Page 211) Title II

5.3.2: Provide Opportunities for work experience for students with disabilities (Contract with a community-based agency to improve coordination of transition services for students attending PCS, and work with DCRSA to establish agreements with each PCS serving transition age youth, that defines the responsibilities of RSA and PCS staff in coordination of Pre-ETS services, post-secondary transition planning and referral for VR services.)  (Page 211) Title II

Outcome: Not Met: DCRSA coordinated to ensure that pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) were available to all transition aged students with disabilities. VR counselors provided Pre-ETS opportunities to 81% (1,673) of all transition aged DCPS students. One hundred ninety nine (199) students participated in integrated work-based learning experiences in the community this past school year. VR counselors engaged 13% (134) of transition aged PCS students in Pre-ETS activities. Through coordination with DOES, RSA provided Pre-ETS to one hundred seventy two (172) students who were enrolled in post-secondary education or training programs. (Page 212) Title IV

In the past year, DCRSA has strengthened its partnership with DOES, specifically the Office of Youth Programs (OYP). DCRSA coordinates closely with DOES-OYP on its Mayor Marion Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (MBSYEP). MBSYEP provides an excellent opportunity for paid Work-Based Learning Experience and Job Readiness Training for both in-school and out-of-school transition age youth, ages 14-24. DCRSA also has an agreement with the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS) to provide a VR Counselor on-site, bi-weekly to offer vocational rehabilitation services to eligible DYRS youth and strengthen placement and re-entry service strategies to further enhance employment opportunities for youth with disabilities returning from secure confinement. (Page 219) Title II

The Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division within DCRSA now has two (2) Youth and Transition Units, including two supervisors, fourteen VR specialists, two project managers, one community liaison specialists, one employment specialist, two Rehabilitation Assistants, one administrative assistant, and one program manager. The VR Specialists are assigned to all schools serving District of Columbia students. They conduct intake interviews, attend IEP meetings, develop Individual Plans for Employment (IPE), and provide and monitor the provision of pre-employment transition activities for all students with disabilities, those who have open VR cases, as well as all students who are potentially eligible for VR services. The VR Specialist determines a student’s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, develops an IPE, and makes referrals for necessary transition services to assist the student to plan for and obtain successful post-school employment. They also work with workforce development coordinators that serve all schools with DC students. In collaboration with the VR counselors, the workforce development coordinators provide monthly work readiness workshops for students with disabilities who are potentially eligible or eligible for VR services. Pre-ETS is delivered in individualized or group settings to students with disabilities. The workshops include instruction on the five required Pre-ETS categories: Job / Career Exploration, Workplace Readiness Training, Work-based Learning Experiences, Counseling for Enrollment in Post-Secondary Education & Training Programs, and Self-advocacy Instruction. Students engage in workforce development by learning soft skills, employability skills, and independent living skills. (Page 221) Title II

DCRSA staff work closely with DOES Mayor Marion Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (MBSYEP) staff to ensure that students with disabilities who participate in MBSYEP have any necessary supports or accommodations in order to be successful in their MBSYEP experience. In addition, DCRSA is working with DOES-OYP to ensure that all Title I Youth Programs are available to students with disabilities. In FY2018, DCRSA project manager developed a partnership to recruit students with disabilities and provide technical assistance for the DOES-OYP Work Readiness Training pilot program. The Work Readiness Training program for in-school youth ages 14-21 provides education and training for DC high-demand career fields. DCRSA VR counselors provide supports to potentially eligible students participating in the program. Lastly, DCRSA, DOES, DCPS, OSSE and DCPCS have worked together to create an MBSYEP Institute for students with most significant disabilities. In this Institute, students receive a one week “boot camp,” which provides work readiness training prior to the start of MBSYEP, then ongoing supported employment services while at their work site. DCRSA and DOES will continue to ensure meaningful access and enriched programming experiences for all students participating in MBSYEP. (Page 221-222) Title 1I

The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title II

The Administration’s trainer provides training monthly, works closely with the George Washington School of Rehabilitation Counseling, which also provides monthly training for VR staff, and monitors to ensure the provision of continuing education for all VR Specialists, in order to maintain CRC certification, as well as, identifying appropriate courses for staff who still require additional courses to become CRC eligible. The total number of personnel employed by the Administration in the provision of providing vocational rehabilitation service is 109, with 5 current vacancies. The total number of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Specialists is 45. This includes one person who works primarily with independent living and people receiving services through the independent living, older blind program, although there are also 3 VR Specialist vacancies. The total number of support staff for VR counselors is 10. The projected number of consumers to be served is among the data reviewed in consideration of staffing levels. The following are projections of the anticipated number of applicants and eligible individuals coming into the system annually for each of the next three years. FFY17 Actual (Applicants: 2,654; Eligible: 2,052); FFY18 Estimate (Applicants: 2,703; Eligible: 2,151); FFY19 Estimate (Applicants: 2,757; Eligible: 2,258); FFY20 Estimate (Applicants: 2,812; Eligible: 2,370). The current number of active cases is approximately 4600. (Page 231) Title II

In FY 2012, the Administration began recruiting counselors at grade 12 pay level, the highest grade level for a rehabilitation specialist. Applicants at this level must have completed a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling with at least one year of experience and CRC. Furthermore, the administration only hires new VR Specialists who are eligible to sit for the CRC examination. The administration does not limit hiring to only VR Specialists with a CRC because this could preclude hiring of new graduates from VR counseling programs in the area, one of the best means of recruiting new staff for the agency. The Administration has a recruitment plan in place to address the hiring of a sufficient number of vocational rehabilitation counselors within DCRSA. These recruitment efforts include (1) posting vacancy announcements on the D.C. Office of Personnel website (at the time any vacancy occurs), and (2) posting vacancy announcements at community programs and through professional organizations, (3) visiting classrooms and faculty at universities, and (4) increasing its use of interns and volunteers. The recruitment plan consists of two major goals: Goal 1: Expand recruitment efforts Objective 1.1 Contact graduate school programs and develop relationships with the program chairs. (Page 235) Title IV

This orientation is comprised of 7 modules. Informed Consent, Ethics (All staff receive 1 CRC credit), Overview of the VR Process, Intake & Eligibility, Comprehensive Assessment, IPE Development, Overview of Internal Database System, and DC Policy Review (Review with Supervisor during initial week of employment). DCRSA implemented a 12 session supervisor training “boot camp” in the summer of 2012 to help supervisors support counselors and other staff through prevailing practices in management. (Page 235-236) Title IV

During FY 2015, staff began participation in a comprehensive, year-long, program of core vocational rehabilitation trainings, often developed and presented in conjunction with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling Research and Education (CRCRE). Training provided to all vocational rehabilitation specialists and supervisors during these trainings included Foundations of the Rehabilitation Act; Supported Employment Overview and Policy; Initial interviewing; Career Assessments; IPE Development; Case and Caseload Management; Job Development and Placement; and Motivational Interviewing. In 2015, DCRSA provided additional monthly trainings to all vocational rehabilitation specialists and supervisors including Working with Transition Students, Vocational Rehabilitation Ethics, Financial Management / Fiscal Responsibility, Trial Work, Eligibility Determination Extension, Supported Employment, and Self-Employment. A comprehensive in-house training program for all new and currently employed vocational rehabilitation specialists as well as supervisors with DC RSA was developed and implemented in FY 2015. This program incorporated classroom, small group, and direct consumer work over a multi-week period to ensure a complete understanding and thorough synthesis of both the vocational rehabilitation process and practice. Topics covered are inclusive of but not limited to:
• Vocational rehabilitation for individuals experiencing substance use disorders
• Comprehensive treatment services-
• Comprehensive Assessment
• Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (Page 237-238) Title IV

• DCRSA needs to work with schools and CRPs to develop more work-based learning sites. Work experience helps to meet numerous needs found in transition-age youth as it relates to employment, including soft and hard skill development, establishing a good work ethic, and simply understanding what is required in the work force.
• The development of soft skills early in the youth’s life was stressed repeatedly by participants. DCRSA should ensure that this pre-employment transition service is available and provided in as many formats as possible to ensure that youth have been adequately trained. The earlier this can be provided in high school, the better. (Page 245) Title IV

Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Review and update the Transition Tool Kit.
2. Develop materials for the General Intake Unit, similar to the Transition Tool Kit, to include at least FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions); Information about Developing an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE); the VR Process; Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Changes to the Rehabilitation Act; and Client/Applicant Rights.  (Page 254) Title IV
4. Finalize new data sharing agreement and MOA with DC Public Schools, which allows for data sharing in order to provide services to students, clarifies the referral process for DCPS, and establishes the responsibilities for provision of Pre-ETS between DCPS and DCRSA. Coordinate with OSSE, Public Charter School Board (PCSB), DCPS and community providers to have annual transition fair. (Page 257) Title IV

b. DCRSA will determine eligibility within 60 days of receiving the application, and complete the IPE within 90 days of determining eligibility. VR counselors will visit the schools regularly, on at least a monthly basis, or more frequently for schools that have higher referral numbers, and be available to see students to complete applications, determine eligibility, complete comprehensive assessment in order to develop IPE, provide ongoing counseling and guidance and provide pre-employment transition services. (Page 257) Title IV

1. VR Counselors will provide monthly job readiness training sessions in all DC Public Schools for students with disabilities who are potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 258) Title IV

a. At least 75% of students with IEPs will receive at least one Pre-ETS service during the 2017-18 school year
b. At least 75% of students with 504 plans will receive at least one Pre-ETS service during the 2017-18 school year. (Page 259) Title IV

DCRSA established Order of Selection priority categories as follows: Depending upon agency resources, the categories are closed for services in order beginning with Priority III, then II and, finally Priority Category I. Categories may be closed based on the following circumstances Limitations of case service dollars or limitation in adequate staff to serve all eligible individuals. Notwithstanding these priority categories, DCRSA will continue to provide pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities, because these services are made available to students who are potentially eligible for services. However, students who require vocational rehabilitation services, in addition to pre-employment transition services, will receive those services based on the priority category into which they are assigned based on the determination made upon consideration for eligibility for VR services. In addition, DCRSA will provide services to people who require specific services or equipment in order to maintain employment, regardless of their priority category. (Page 261) Title IV

DCRSA is working with the Center for Independent Living and the Statewide Independent Living Council to improve coordination of independent living and vocational rehabilitation services. The need for improved coordination between DCRSA and the CIL was identified as a need in the 2014 CSNA. In addition, the passage of WIOA, and the adoption of an additional IL core service, i.e., transition (from nursing home to the community and from secondary school to post-secondary education, training or employment), further highlights the need for closer collaboration. DCRSA will assist in supporting the resource plan of the SILC, in order to maximize the limited resources available in the District to meet IL needs of people with disabilities. (Page 266) Title IV

DCRSA is also working closely with DOES in order to ensure that students with disabilities have access to the summer youth employment program, and that we are able to provide any necessary supports, including supported employment services, in a timely manner, to ensure the success of students in their summer work experience. In the summer of 2015, students with disabilities were represented in the summer youth employment services at about the same rate that these students are represented in the school system, i.e., 12% of program participants were students with disabilities. DCRSA is working closely with DOES in order to identify students who have accommodation needs so that supports can be in place on day one of the student’s summer work experience. DCRSA will also participate in all DOES summer youth employment orientations, for program participants and businesses, in order to provide information about workplace accommodations and the availability of support services from DCRSA. (Page 269) Title II

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration continues to add new Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) that partner with us to provide an array of vocational rehabilitation services to consumers. As indicated above, the agency doubled the number of evidence based supported employment providers in FY 2015. Additional services available to our consumer through the Human Care agreements include job readiness services, trial work experiences, job placement and benefits analysis and planning.  (Page 269) Title IV

With the introduction of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the performance measures for the vocational rehabilitation program will be changing. The specific performance standards will be addressed in the Unified State Workforce Development Plan. Because all of these measures are new, DCRSA is proposing to use the first two years to collect sufficient data on the new measures in order to develop realistic goals to implement as the new performance standards. In order to prepare for these new measures, the administration is taking a number of steps, including: working with the agency that provides the electronic case management system to ensure that we are capturing all data we are required to report; working with the other workforce agencies in the state to ensure that all measures have a common definition; improving monitoring of progress in training and education programs in order to provide accurate information on performance regarding completion of training and measurable skills gains, and to obtain more complete data about the performance of existing training providers to assist in improved informed choice of providers and improved outcomes for clients; and establishing new protocols for following up with clients post-closure to check on their progress and provide information about availability of ongoing services. (Page 270) Title IV

From FY 2014 to present, the administration has been focusing more on quality, developing a training schedule with the GW Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), to improve the quality and consistency of services provided. In 2017 and following the phasing out of TACE, the DCRSA entered into training alliance with Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) which is funded by the Department of Education to provide technical assistance and trainings around WIOA, customized employment, HCA provider capacity building, PreETS, and other vocational rehabilitation trainings. (Page 275) Title IV

In 2016, the following policies were implemented: Informed Choice, Case Closure, Case Record, and Protection, Use and Release of Information. Policies that are currently at the Deputy Director’s level of review include Transportation, Case Transfer, Case Management, IPE, and Supported Employment Policy (updated for WIOA). The Pre-ETS Policy Draft has been completed and accepted by the Department of Education. Other Policies, Procedures or SOPS that are in development include Pre-ETS SOP, Case Closure Procedure, Services and Authorizations, Eligibility, and Due Process which is on hold pending revised district regulations. (Page 276) Title IV

Goal 2: Improve the efficiency of RSA operations. The Administration made significant progress in updating policies and procedures during FY 2015, updating policies, procedures and protocols in the following areas: Postsecondary Education and Training Policy and Procedure, Maintenance Policy, Policy Regarding Rates of Payment for VR Services, Self-Employment Policy and Procedures, Protocol on Quality and Supervisory Case Review, Eligibility Determination Extension Protocol, and Trial Work Protocol. As each new policy, procedure or protocol was implemented, training was provided to all relevant staff on implementation, and subsequent quality review regarding implementation has been conducted. In 2016, the following policies were implemented: Informed Choice, Case Closure, Case Record, and Protection, Use and Release of Information. Policies that are currently at the Deputy Director’s level of review include Transportation, Case Transfer, Case Management, IPE, and Supported Employment Policy (updated for WIOA). The Pre-ETS Policy Draft has been completed and accepted by the Department of Education. Other Policies, Procedures or SOPS that are in development include Pre-ETS SOP, Case Closure Procedure, Services and Authorizations, Eligibility, and Due Process which is on hold pending revised district regulations. (Page 276) Title IV

The agency needed for the CRP module to be implemented in order to fully implement a vendor report card process to provide information and support to RSA customers in exercising informed choice when selecting vendors and providers for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the Authority of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as Amended in 1998; CFR Section 361.52. We expect to have thorough accurate data to provide to consumers during FY 2016, and to publish performance data. Over the past three years, the administration has made significant progress in improving the efficiency of operations in terms of compliance with federal standards related to timeliness of determining eligibility and developing Individualized Plans for Employment. In FY 2013, the administration determined eligibility within sixty days 83% of the time, increased from 68% in FY 2012; and timely developed IPEs 92% of the time, compared with 80% of the time in FY 2012. In FY 2015, both of DCRSA performed at 95% for both of these measures. In 2016 and 2017 this improved to 96% and 97% respectively (Page 276) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~District residents often face one or more barriers which prevent them from accessing education, training programs, and from ultimately being successful in the workforce. Consequently, the District’s workforce system must take meaningful steps to help remediate these barriers to ensure residents are able to overcome obstacles and attain their goals. A common barrier is economically-related as residents need to work to support themselves and their families. Due to this, agencies are working to increase access to earn and learn opportunities through partnerships and innovative methods to include expanding apprenticeship and on-the-job (OJT) training opportunities. Other common barriers include health issues (both physical and behavioral), transportation costs, housing, income supports, and child-care. Consequently, workforce system partners are strengthening partnerships among other District agencies that can provide barrier remediation services for our residents, such as the Department of Behavioral Health, the Department of Human Services, and OSSE’s Division of Early Learning. (Page 60-61) Title I

To increase opportunities for work-based learning and career exploration for youth, agencies will ensure all youth in WIOA core programs have access to work based experiences which include year-round and/or summer paid and unpaid work placements/internships, on-the-job training opportunities, job shadowing, earn-and-learn opportunities, pre-apprenticeship programs, or apprenticeship programs. This effort will prioritize targeted groups including youth with disabilities, English language learners, youth re-engaging in education, homeless youth, and socioeconomically disadvantaged youth. These groups face the highest barriers in and outside of school; and, as such, work-based learning opportunities are even more important to help connect youth to a career pathway.

The District wants to ensure that youth work experiences are as meaningful as possible and relate to their long-term goals. DOES and OSSE will align work experiences, both year-round and summer, to industries related to specific Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs of Study for CTE concentrators, completers, or students who have declared a CTE focus. Additionally, DOES, OSSE, and RSA will collaborate to ensure youth with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), participate in year-round and summer work experiences that align with the transition goals in their IEP. (Page 66) Title I

o Percentage of career pathways developed compared to identified high demand areas
o Percentage of people successfully move off of income support services (like TANF, SSI/SSDI) through successful and sustainable activity
o Number of barriers identified and percentage successfully mitigated (Page 103) Title I

OJT positions must be full-time and must provide an hourly wage that meets the District of Columbia’s living wage of $13.85 and does not exceed the District’s average wage of $23.95 for the participant with evidence that the participant is on a career pathway towards a higher paying job. However, waivers are allowable for individuals with disabilities as well as older workers (55 years and older). Exceptions include a job opportunity that is appropriate to the customer’s needs and skill acquisition that meets the occupational qualifications, but the starting wage does not meet the $14.00 per hour wage. Then an OJT contract can be written for a lower hourly rate in consideration of the participant’s extraordinary limitations and/or barriers.  (Page 145) Title I

• The WIC reviewed OSSE’s draft RFA prior to release and made several edits including adding the requirement:
o to offer work-based learning components;
o to establish employer partnerships; and
o that all sub grantees must participate in the WIC’s recently established Career Pathways Community of Practice (COP). (Page164) Title I

Strategy 1: Increase counselor and client participation in activities sponsored by DCRSA’s Business Relations Unit including: · Monthly Job Readiness Workshops · Monthly Employer/Industry Spotlights · Quarterly Career Fairs · Strategy 2: Strengthen collaboration with the DC Department of Employment Services (DOES), expand the number of days that a VR specialist is located at American Jobs Center sites. Require all VR applicants to register with American Jobs Centers at time of VR application. Strategy 3: Continue to expand the number and types of employers participating in the Project Search program, enabling transition-aged students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while receiving on-the-job support. In school year 2015-16, DCRSA established a new Project Search site at a local hotel, Embassy Suites. This is a particularly positive development as work in the hospitality industry is one of the growth industries in the District. Strategy 4: Coordinate with the Department on Disability Services Ticket to Work program to ensure that eligible ticket holders are referred to ticket agencies for post-closure follow on support services. (Page 270-271) Title IV

Apprenticeship

To increase opportunities for work-based learning and career exploration for youth, agencies will ensure all youth in WIOA core programs have access to work based experiences which include year-round and/or summer paid and unpaid work placements/internships, on-the-job training opportunities, job shadowing, earn-and-learn opportunities, pre-apprenticeship programs, or apprenticeship programs. This effort will prioritize targeted groups including youth with disabilities, English language learners, youth re-engaging in education, homeless youth, and socioeconomically disadvantaged youth. These groups face the highest barriers in and outside of school; and, as such, work-based learning opportunities are even more important to help connect youth to a career pathway. (Page 66) Title I

OSSE’s recent Adult and Family Education (AFE) grant has required that all AFE providers (who educate hundreds of older youth between the ages of 18 and 24) offer an integrated education and training model as explained in the section above. OSSE AFE’s new grant also requires their providers to offer transition services to postsecondary education, training, apprenticeships, and employment for all students at the adult secondary education levels. Similarly, all WIOA core partners will require that all participants within in-school WIOA funded programs, and all REC clients nearing completion of their secondary education, have established a transition plan that includes specific and appropriate postsecondary goals. Students with an Individual Graduation Plan and/or an IEP with an appropriate secondary transition plan by the age of 14, as required by local statute, can be waived of this requirement. (Page 67) Title I

The DOES Business Services Group, in conjunction with the DOES Office of Apprenticeship, Information, and Technology, continues to serve as the primary connection to assist residents in entering Registered Apprenticeship programs and positions. To ensure the inclusion of underrepresented groups in these efforts, DOES currently has referral partnerships with community-based organizations, DC Public Schools, the American Job Centers, the TANF and FSET programs, and various workforce programs throughout the District. To further increase inclusion, DOES has actively identified and met with agencies and organizations committed to serving women, veterans, individuals with disabilities, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged groups. (Page 148) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title IV

One of the challenges in the District has been the lack of an extended service provider for people with developmental disabilities, other than an intellectual disability. The only current source of support for extended services in the District for people receiving supported employment services are the HCBS Waiver with DDA, that provides services to people with intellectual disabilities, supports provided through the Department of Behavioral Health for people with SMI or SED, Ticket to Work, and natural supports. The changes in WIOA related to the provision of extended services for youth have been helpful in allowing the agency to provide extended supports to youth with developmental disabilities. In comments to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, we sought clarification whether these services had to terminate when the youth turned twenty-four, or if the services were available to any youth for up to four years, if the youth initiates services prior to age twenty four. (Page 228) Title IV

The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports. (Page 230) Title IV

The waiver services for people with intellectual disabilities are managed by the Developmental Disability Administration within the same designated state agency that houses DCRSA. In April, 2014, the agency finalized a protocol regarding the coordination of services between the two administrations, i.e., DCRSA and DCDDA. This protocol addresses referrals from DDA to RSA for supported employment services; coordination between the VR Specialist and DDA Service Coordinator, while a person is served by both administrations, and the provisions for ensuring referral back to DDA for extended services through the Medicaid Waiver, including a provision that DCRSA will maintain the case open for sixty days after waiver services are initiated to ensure there are no gaps in services. (Page 230) Title IV

The funds available to support youth in extended services are very helpful in the District, as the District’s developmental disability agency supports only persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is currently no Medicaid waiver support for extended services for people with developmental disabilities, other than ID. Therefore, DCRSA will use extended services to support youth with developmental disabilities (typically youth with autism spectrum disorder) as they achieve stabilization in employment, as defined by the agency’s supported employment policy, but continue to require ongoing supports to be successful in employment. The agency will also rely on natural supports and ticket to work support in developing long-term planning with youth with disabilities, to ensure comprehensive supports are in place to support youth who transition from supported employment with the VR program. (Page 265) Title IV

Strategy 3: Continue to expand the number and types of employers participating in the Project Search program, enabling transition-aged students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while receiving on-the-job support. In school year 2015-16, DCRSA established a new Project Search site at a local hotel, Embassy Suites. This is a particularly positive development as work in the hospitality industry is one of the growth industries in the District. Strategy 4: Coordinate with the Department on Disability Services Ticket to Work program to ensure that eligible ticket holders are referred to ticket agencies for post-closure follow on support services. (Page 271) Title IV

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~BRU services to businesses include:
• Conducting disability awareness education training
• Creating opportunities for businesses to market themselves to people with disabilities through Industry Spotlights, where job seekers learn about various businesses and the expectations for successful applicants and employees
• Creating opportunities for businesses to participate in Mock Interviews with job seekers and provide feedback
• Sharing employment announcements with job seekers
• Employers are invited to career day events which are industry specific to meet job seekers and share information to assist job seekers with identifying or solidifying their employment goal.
• Screening and identifying qualified employment candidates
• Educating business about tax incentives
• Sharing resources to assist businesses with retaining existing employees and sharing sources for reasonable accommodations
• Brain storming potential opportunities to increase the pipeline of qualified talent to businesses (Page 84) Title 1

In feedback collected from employers, they reported several challenges in accessing effective business services, including lack of coordination among and within government agencies, too often hearing from multiple providers and agencies that are looking to place their participants without coordinating efforts, and difficulty in understanding and navigating programs and incentives that exist that may meet their needs. Consequently, the WIC and DOES have been working in conjunction with agency business engagement and job development staff to develop a unified business services plan. This plan would streamline both outreach and services to area businesses in order to better meet their needs and provide more comprehensive services. DOES’s Employer Services team already provides significant services to business partners, including competency-based assessment pre-screenings, targeted hiring events, technical support, access to workforce system clients with documented skill sets, compliance assistance, and apprenticeship registration. Job development services are also provided through other agencies, including DDS/RSA and DHS. Moving forward, the District will look to build on these offerings and implement a unified business services plan that better coordinates efforts and continues to improve quality. (Page 62) Title I

Data Collection

1.3 - Align policies, procedures, and performance measures and share data across programs to eliminate barriers to integration. 1.4 - Blend funding and utilize shared contracts to avoid duplication of resources. 1.5 - Foster environment of collaboration through cross-training staff and shared case management. (Page 45) Title 1

8. The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes,, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 50) Title 1

In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title IV

While DCRSA is no longer receiving direct training from GWU as was in the past following the reorganization of TACE and initiation of new training entities such a Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) by the Department of Education, In 2017 DCRSA signed a cooperation agreement with WINTAC which will boost training alliance with WINTAC. DCRSA will continue to receive trainings and technical support from these entities especially as it relates to WIOA and its implications for the vocational rehabilitation program. In 2017 WINTAC provided technical training on WIOA common performance measures and PreETS. DCRSA is currently working with WINTAC staff on Customized Employment training which is slated to take place in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in enhancing employment opportunities for persons with severe disabilities. (Page 239-240) Title IV

DCRSA has already taken many positive steps to make this culture shift, including receiving training and technical assistance in the common performance measures and their potential impact on numerous system in the VR program. The agency is encouraged to continue with this training process and to reinforce the message of achieving in-demand career-level jobs at every level of the organization. The agency is also encouraged to examine its key performance indictors and ensure that they are aligned with the common performance measures. (Page 242) Title IV

The transition population represents a group that can greatly benefit from the pursuit of postsecondary education and increase the quality and pay of employment that they obtain in the future. Counselors should ensure that they are having in-depth discussions with transition-age youth about higher education opportunities and that they are exploring the possibility of helping those youth obtain part-time jobs while they go to school. Wherever appropriate, counselors should be encouraging youth to set their sights high and strive for in-demand, career-level positions. This is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act as amended by WIOA, and fully supports the new common performance measures in WIOA. In order to fully realize this potential for youth, DCRSA will need to ensure that they are identifying “504” students in addition to those students being served by Special Education. These students need to receive encouragement to apply for DCRSA services and DCRSA counselors should meet them at their school sites whenever possible. (Page 245) Title IV

As a part of the review of the payment structure for job placement, DCRSA should consider establishing contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA. These would include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR program. Incentives might also be considered for high-paying jobs that exceed the median earnings of all clients; (Page 246) Title IV Establish contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA to include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR Program. (Page 256) Title IV

Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher. Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services. Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 271) Title II

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page129) Title I

The District is committed to equal opportunity employment. All decisions made regarding recruitment, hiring, training, and other terms and conditions of program operations will be made without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation, or belief. The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 129-130) Title I

Avoid unnecessary requirements that tend to screen out individuals with disabilities, such as requiring a driver’s license as the only acceptable form of identification, or requirements mandating that individuals must complete intake forms without assistance. Permit special benefits beyond those required by regulation, such as additional one-on-one assistance or extra time beyond typical time limits. Provide reasonable accommodations to customers with disabilities, unless providing those accommodations would cause undue hardship (e.g., modified computer keyboards, sign-language interpreters, intensive staff assistance, modified computer screens). Ensure communications with customers and members of the public with disabilities are as effective as communications with others (i.e., providing auxiliary aids such as qualified interpreters, assistive listening headsets, closed and open captioning on videos, and telecommunication devices [TDD and TTY]) Comply with WIOA nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions. (Page 131) Title I

Veterans

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Workforce services are not just limited to occupational training and adult education, but may also include work readiness, job placement and on-the-job training, and services to businesses as well as human, social, mental health, disability and other supportive services. Key agencies making significant investments include:
• Department of Employment Services
• University of the District of Columbia- Community College (UDC-CC)
• Department of Human Services
• Department on Disability Services
• Department of Behavioral Health
• Office of the State Superintendent of Education
• Workforce Investment Council (Page 39) Title IV

The District wants to ensure all residents who seek employment services - including those who have recently been incarcerated have access to comprehensive support to enter the workforce. District residents pending release from incarceration face a unique set of challenges when seeking to obtain employment. Limited employment history, inadequate educational credentials, substance abuse and mental health challenges are but a few of the obstacles faced by the clients this partnership serves. Through the development of life skills, job training, and basic computer training participants are better prepared for the employment challenges they will face upon release. To that end, the DC Jail Work Reentry Program was established in July 2015 in partnership with the Department of Corrections (DOC), to provide intensive 6-week job training for incarcerated persons with an impending release date. This program enhances the availability of employment options for returning citizens by beginning the process of reintegration prior to release (Page 72) Title I

To increase barrier remediation, DDS/RSA has also strengthened its relationship with the DDA and with the DBH to improve coordination in the provision of supported employment services for people with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). The agency updated its policies regarding provision of supported employment services to ensure that there was a smooth transition from supported employment services with DDS/RSA to extended supported employment services with DDS/DDA or DBH. DDS/RSA established an MOA with DBH, clarifying referral, service provision, and cross training issues; and meets regularly with DBH supported employment staff and meets jointly with DBH and all supported employment providers.  (Page 73) Title IV

Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs ( Page 118) Title I

• Ability to administer additional assessments/screenings including: mental health screening, domestic violence screening, substance abuse screening, and career assessment (Assessments align with the DHS Online Work Readiness Assessment);
• Ability to upload, view and print required eligibility documents and track documentation submissions (List of eligibility documents aligns with WIOA); (Page 121) Title I

• Strive to anticipate the needs of people with disabilities in the physical design of the center, as well as the design of services that provide opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in an effective and meaningful way in an integrated setting; and, (Page 131) Title IV

These community sites include the following diverse settings such as rehabilitation centers, mental health clinics, hospitals, community health centers, homeless shelters, other DC Government Offices, and the court system. DCRSA offers services in or receives referrals from the following community agencies and centers: DC Department of Employment Services (DOES) American Job Centers (AJC) (4 sites, albeit one is currently under renovation, DC Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), DC Child and Family Services Agency, DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services, Unity Health Care (three sites), N Street Village, Salvation Army Rehabilitation Center, The National Multiple Sclerosis Society, George Washington University Hospital Acute Rehabilitation Unit, Gallaudet University, Washington Literacy Council, Model School for the Deaf, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Langston Lang Housing Program, Covenant House, The Arc of DC, Ethiopian Community Center, DC Aging and Disability Resource Center, , Central Union Mission, Washington Hospital Center Outpatient Psychiatric Unit, DC Office of Asian Affairs, DC Superior Court House, DC Office of Veterans Affairs, Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (two sites), Office of Returning Citizens Administration (ORCA), National Rehabilitation Hospital, Providence Hospital, Smithsonian, Seabury Blind Center, the Blair Underwood Health Centers, KRA Corporation, and Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind (CLB). (Page 218) Title II

In FY 2016, DCRSA established one VR unit that is now responsible for working with the cases that are referred from DDA or DBH. This has improved the coordination between the agencies as there are now six dedicated VR Specialists and one VR Supervisor. This has facilitated improved coordination and communication. DDS/RSA and DDA have continued to establish Human Care Agreements with additional supported employment providers who serve people with developmental disabilities. The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title II

Eight (8) private non-profit organizations (Anchor Mental Health; Community Connections, Inc.; Contemporary Family Services, Inc.; Deaf-Reach, Inc.; MBI Health Services, LLC; Pathways to Housing; Psychiatric Center Chartered Inc.; and Psychiatric Rehabilitation Service, Inc.) are providing people with serious mental illness with Evidenced Based Supported Employment. (Page 228) Title II

The DC Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) is responsible for providing mental health services in the District. DCRSA and DBH have been working together to provide Evidence Based Supported Employment Services since 2010. In 2015, the agencies worked together to expand these services, adding additional community-based agencies to provide services. In addition, the agencies developed a Memorandum of Agreement (currently in draft awaiting legal review by DBH). This agreement clarifies the process for referral to DCRSA for supported employment services and identifies when a case will be referred back to DBH for extended services. In addition, the agreement includes provisions for regular meetings between all parties, as well as the provision of cross-training, to ensure that all DCRSA VR Specialists are aware of all mental health services that are available, including Evidence Based Supported Employment and are aware how to make referrals for these services. (Page 230) Title IV

DOES is currently developing a formal plan that will establish the procedures to be implemented to ensure that AJCs are in compliance with Section 508. The term disability is extremely broad. While some individuals can be identified due to mobility issues or sensory deficits (such as people who are blind, visually impaired, or deaf), there are other individuals who are covered under one of the provisions of the law for whom physical access is not an issue, such as those with learning disabilities, mental health issues, head injuries, and many other conditions. DOES is committed to providing services that:
2. Assign three VR counselors to work with all people referred from DBH for evidence based supported employment services.
3. Arrange with DBH to provide training for all VR counselors regarding mental health and substance abuse treatment services available in the District.
4. Review the DDS Protocol regarding coordination of services between DCRSA and DDA, make necessary changes and provide training to all DDA service coordinators and VR counselors. (Page 252) Title IV

Goal 1: Provide continued support to six (6) mental health supported employment providers to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities The Administration will continue to support the Human Care Agreements with eight (8) providers of mental health supported employment services to support staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and the development of placement and employment opportunities through supported employment. (Page 278) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

District of Columbia Partners in Transition - 06/01/2020

~~“Visit OSSE's Secondary Transition website for more information on how to support students with disabilities in successful transitions to life after high school. The website also features information for educators, families, and students about:

Upcoming EventsResources for supporting meaningful student involvement throughout the IEP process, including the Student-led IEP Toolkit and OSSE's Self Determination Film SeriesProfessional development resources for transition practitioners, including the OSSE Secondary Transition Toolkit, Secondary Transition Webinar Series, and more.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“The U.S. Small Business Administration announced that Dog Tag, Inc., has been awarded funding for entrepreneurship training to service-disabled veterans.  It is an educational program for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, and military spouses seeking to launch small business ventures.  The program combines a classroom component taught at Georgetown University and an opportunity to experience small business ownership at Dog Tag Bakery in Washington, D.C.The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.” 

Systems
  • Other

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Employment Services - 06/10/2019

~~“Mission Statement

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) mission is to connect District residents, job seekers, and employers to opportunities and resources that empower fair, safe, effective working communities.Vision

The Department of Employment Services provides comprehensive employment services to ensure a competitive workforce, full employment, life-long learning, economic stability and the highest quality of life for all District residents.

Connect With Us4058 Minnesota Avenue, NEWashington, DC 20019Phone: (202) 724-7000Fax: (202) 673-6993TTY: TTYEmail:does@dc.gov

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

District of Columbia Section 1115 Medicaid Behavioral Health Transformation Demonstration Program - 06/03/2019

~~“On June 3, 2019, the Director of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), pursuant to the authority set forth in the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, and in collaboration with the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), submitted a Section 1115 Medicaid demonstration application for the District Medicaid Program to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for review and approval….The District is seeking approval to incorporate the following services and service changes for individuals participating under the demonstration:• Treatment of adults (21-64 years old) with SMI or SUD in IMD inpatient or residential settings• Crisis Stabilization Services, including changes to Crisis Psychological Emergency Program and Mobile Crisis Services and the addition of Psychiatric Residential Crisis Stabilization• Recovery Support Services, including SUD services provided by certified peer counselors and Clubhouse Peer-Run rehabilitative supports• Trauma-Informed Services• Supported Employment Services” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DDC Five Year Plan 2017-2021 - 06/01/2019

~~“The District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) is pleased to disseminate the New Five -Year State Plan (Plan) describing goals, objectives and activities for fiscal years 2017 through 2021.  This Plan represents the DDC’s commitment to fulfilling our responsibility to our District residents with developmental disabilities and their families as authorized in the federal legislation, Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000.  ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Commission on Persons with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~~“The Commission serves as an advisory body to inform and advise the District on programs, services, facilities, and activities that impact the lives of residents with disabilities in the District of Columbia.  The Commission is committed to enhancing the image, status, inclusion, and quality of life for all District of Columbia residents, visitors, and employees with disabilities, and ensuring that they have the same rights and opportunities as those without disabilities.We are working on community outreach and have established advisory subcommittees on accessible transportation, assistive technology, job creation, adequate housing and the enhancement of independent living skills.  We’re conducting community forums on topics of interest to our constituency, including transportation and health.  We meet with District and private-sector providers of disability services, and generally work toward fuller participation of people with disabilities in District life.  The DCCPD collaborates with other District Government Agencies on the Mayor’s Annual Disability Awareness Conference.  The conference highlights various city services for people with disabilities and encourages meaningful employment opportunities within District Government.  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department on Disability Services Responses to FY17-18 Performance Oversight Questions - 10/14/2018

~~DDS continues to lead a number of Employment First efforts and collaborations across the District. To coordinate efforts DDS leads an Employment First Leadership Team, which includes members the Departments of Employment Services, Health Care Finance (Medicaid) and Behavioral Health; Office of the State Superintendent of Education; and DC Public Schools; and Workforce Investment Council. The group meets at least quarterly to collaborate and share updates, innovations and resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. DDS “Provider Sanctions” - 08/13/2018

When a provider does not meet expectations or established DDS/DDA requirements, that provider, a particular service offered by that provider or service location of that provider may be added to the DDS/DDA Provider Sanctions List. This action prohibits DDA Service Coordinators from referring or transitioning new people to that provider, service or service location until they are removed from the list.”

Systems
  • Other

Project Search - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.

DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:• Young adult between 18-30 years old• Have a documented intellectual/developmental disability• Completing final year of high school OR recent high school graduate• Show willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)• Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readiness• Strong attendance record is preferred

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 27

District of Columbia Partners in Transition - 06/01/2020

~~“Visit OSSE's Secondary Transition website for more information on how to support students with disabilities in successful transitions to life after high school. The website also features information for educators, families, and students about:

Upcoming EventsResources for supporting meaningful student involvement throughout the IEP process, including the Student-led IEP Toolkit and OSSE's Self Determination Film SeriesProfessional development resources for transition practitioners, including the OSSE Secondary Transition Toolkit, Secondary Transition Webinar Series, and more.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Department of Employment Services - 06/10/2019

~~“Mission Statement

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) mission is to connect District residents, job seekers, and employers to opportunities and resources that empower fair, safe, effective working communities.Vision

The Department of Employment Services provides comprehensive employment services to ensure a competitive workforce, full employment, life-long learning, economic stability and the highest quality of life for all District residents.

Connect With Us4058 Minnesota Avenue, NEWashington, DC 20019Phone: (202) 724-7000Fax: (202) 673-6993TTY: TTYEmail:does@dc.gov

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DDC Five Year Plan 2017-2021 - 06/01/2019

~~“The District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) is pleased to disseminate the New Five -Year State Plan (Plan) describing goals, objectives and activities for fiscal years 2017 through 2021.  This Plan represents the DDC’s commitment to fulfilling our responsibility to our District residents with developmental disabilities and their families as authorized in the federal legislation, Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000.  ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Commission on Persons with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~~“The Commission serves as an advisory body to inform and advise the District on programs, services, facilities, and activities that impact the lives of residents with disabilities in the District of Columbia.  The Commission is committed to enhancing the image, status, inclusion, and quality of life for all District of Columbia residents, visitors, and employees with disabilities, and ensuring that they have the same rights and opportunities as those without disabilities.We are working on community outreach and have established advisory subcommittees on accessible transportation, assistive technology, job creation, adequate housing and the enhancement of independent living skills.  We’re conducting community forums on topics of interest to our constituency, including transportation and health.  We meet with District and private-sector providers of disability services, and generally work toward fuller participation of people with disabilities in District life.  The DCCPD collaborates with other District Government Agencies on the Mayor’s Annual Disability Awareness Conference.  The conference highlights various city services for people with disabilities and encourages meaningful employment opportunities within District Government.  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. DDS “Provider Sanctions” - 08/13/2018

When a provider does not meet expectations or established DDS/DDA requirements, that provider, a particular service offered by that provider or service location of that provider may be added to the DDS/DDA Provider Sanctions List. This action prohibits DDA Service Coordinators from referring or transitioning new people to that provider, service or service location until they are removed from the list.”

Systems
  • Other

Project Search - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.

DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:• Young adult between 18-30 years old• Have a documented intellectual/developmental disability• Completing final year of high school OR recent high school graduate• Show willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)• Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readiness• Strong attendance record is preferred

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

“Notice of Funding Availability” Department of Employment Services, Office of Youth Programs - 08/22/2017

~~“Youth with Disabilities:The DOES Office of Youth Programs supports all eligible youth, including those that are identified as having disabilities. Increasing services to this population is critical for serving all eligible youth in the District.  We encourage providers to partner with organizations that serve youth with disabilities.  Youth with disabilities must be afforded more opportunities to practice and improve their workplace skills, explore their career interests and receive services to assist with eliminating barriers. Any provider who submits a proposal with specific programming for this demographic may receive special consideration and preference points during the review process.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Workforce Investment Council Quarterly Board Meeting - 01/23/2017

~~PowerPoint detailing the agenda of the District of Columbia’s Workforce Investment Council.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

DC Developmental Disabilities Council “Government Resources” - 01/01/2017

~~“Inclusion in this resource list does not constitute endorsement by the DC Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC), nor does omission imply non-endorsement. The DDC’s goal is to provide you with information on some key resources available within the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department on Disability Services Responses to FY17-18 Performance Oversight Questions - 10/14/2018

~~DDS continues to lead a number of Employment First efforts and collaborations across the District. To coordinate efforts DDS leads an Employment First Leadership Team, which includes members the Departments of Employment Services, Health Care Finance (Medicaid) and Behavioral Health; Office of the State Superintendent of Education; and DC Public Schools; and Workforce Investment Council. The group meets at least quarterly to collaborate and share updates, innovations and resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“The U.S. Small Business Administration announced that Dog Tag, Inc., has been awarded funding for entrepreneurship training to service-disabled veterans.  It is an educational program for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, and military spouses seeking to launch small business ventures.  The program combines a classroom component taught at Georgetown University and an opportunity to experience small business ownership at Dog Tag Bakery in Washington, D.C.The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.” 

Systems
  • Other

Mayor’s 10th Annual Disability Awareness Expo - 10/26/2017

~~“The purpose of this FREE event is to advance the conversation on equal opportunities and inclusive environments for people with disabilities; complete with information and  exhibitors tables to engage in conversation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

A Path To Community Living Resource Guide - 06/08/2016

This Guide is a compilation of current service providers, resources, tools, and programs available to District of Columbia residents who wish to live independently in the community.  It is designed to be used in conjunction with the “Path to Community Living” Handbook; however, it also functions as a resource list.  This document is updated continuously as information changes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC Transition Plan for the HCBS Waiver - 02/26/2015

“DDS is engaged in a variety of efforts to build the capacity of its staff and provider agencies to support and facilitate greater individualized community exploration and integration, including competitive, integrated employment,” including: “Discovery: Developing Positive Personal Profiles, a nationally recognized tool and process for assessing the vocational interests and goals of people and supporting career exploration and community integration activities;” Individualized Day Supports (IDS) Implementation Training, “including development of regulations, training for DDA staff and providers on the new service, how to recruit and train staff, the development of formats for initial and ongoing Community Integration Plans, and how to conduct Community Mapping;” and Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities’ Employment Learning Community, “which brings providers together on a regular basis through a community of practice approach where national and local resources are shared and providers learn from one another.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Georgetown University Hosts Conference on Employment of People with Disabilities” - 01/29/2015

~~“The second panel, moderated by Justin Ford with the Truman National Security Project, focused on the role of the recent federal contracting regulations promulgated by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Panelists included Jennifer Sheehy, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Disability Employment Policy, DOL; Naomi Levin, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, DOL; Bob Vetere, Human Resource Specialist, Northrop Grumman; and Eric Eversole, Vice President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce & Executive Director, Hiring Our Heroes. They offered their perspective on how the OFCCP Section 503 regulations – and more specifically the 7% hiring target ? could impact Veterans with disabilities seeking gainful employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DHCF and DDS Home and Community Based Settings (HCBS) 101 - 12/01/2014

This training power point provides information on the HCBS waiver, basic information on revising the waiver, designing and restructuring it, and waiver rules and restrictions.  It also details the role of DCHF and DDS in the revision and administration of the HCBS waiver.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Secondary Transition Assessment Tool-kit - 11/01/2013

The District of Columbia Secondary Transition Process Toolkit was designed to assist educators in effectively addressing the transition planning needs of students with disabilities who are preparing to transition from high school to postsecondary employment, education/training, and independent living. This guide was developed using Federal and District of Columbia policies, procedures, and regulations.   
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

A Path to Community Living Handbook - 01/25/2013

This handbook is designed to assist people who have moved or are planning to move out of institutions into the community of their choice.  These forms are designed to help you identify the services and supports you may need to successfully live in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

District of Columbia Section 1115 Medicaid Behavioral Health Transformation Demonstration Program - 06/03/2019

~~“On June 3, 2019, the Director of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), pursuant to the authority set forth in the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, and in collaboration with the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), submitted a Section 1115 Medicaid demonstration application for the District Medicaid Program to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for review and approval….The District is seeking approval to incorporate the following services and service changes for individuals participating under the demonstration:• Treatment of adults (21-64 years old) with SMI or SUD in IMD inpatient or residential settings• Crisis Stabilization Services, including changes to Crisis Psychological Emergency Program and Mobile Crisis Services and the addition of Psychiatric Residential Crisis Stabilization• Recovery Support Services, including SUD services provided by certified peer counselors and Clubhouse Peer-Run rehabilitative supports• Trauma-Informed Services• Supported Employment Services” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: https://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington DC’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.47%
Change from
2018 to 2019
705,749
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
43,484
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-18.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
14,137
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-12.33%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.51%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.01%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.84%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 693,972 702,455 705,749
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 53,816 45,920 43,484
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 23,746 16,771 14,137
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 331,843 344,984 351,504
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 44.12% 36.52% 32.51%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.97% 79.03% 79.84%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.10% 5.60% 5.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 29.10% 34.10% 26.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70% 13.80% 11.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 38,176 35,439 33,866
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 53,211 44,929 44,547
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 22,844 16,999 12,660
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 60,388 60,388 59,236
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 7,405 7,405 4,898
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,963 1,884 1,578
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 1,888 2,994 2,738
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 3,733 3,304 1,160

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 802 868 846
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.60% 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,284 13,896 13,422

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A 1,958 2,427
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A 10,359 7,209
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A 12,395 10,166
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A 15.10% 23.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.60% 3.50% 3.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.70% 4.50% 2.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.00% 11.30% 13.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 581 483 356
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 750 623 338
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,922 1,556 1,508
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,733 1,809 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 8 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2 1 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 22.00% 13.00% 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.31 0.15 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 15.00% N/A 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,385 2,358 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,491 31,430 30,500
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 88 N/A 146
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 29 N/A 63

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,859,000 $3,286,662 $2,638,051
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,218,000 $3,017,125 $5,270,070
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,958,000 $13,119,316 $18,468,656
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,718,000 $6,401,004 $4,675,061
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00% 29.00% 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 397 539 401
Number of people served in facility based work. 307 186 378
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 655 511 714
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 41.70 55.20 61.86

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 55.61% 56.47% 56.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 17.38% 15.23% 15.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 10.04% 9.41% 9.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 63.00% 71.00% 76.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.13% 20.59% 24.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 18.62% 29.99% 34.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 32.96% 36.11% 54.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 6.49% 6.12% 9.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 1 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2 2 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 20 20 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 20 20 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services.  (Page 216) Title II

 The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 270) Title 1I

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title 1I

DC Gov’t as Model Employer:
In the past year, DDS has partnered with DC Human Resources (DCHR) to work towards the District becoming a model employer of people with disabilities. First, DDS has developed and is piloting the Aspiring Professionals program. This is a paid internship program that places people with disabilities in positions throughout the DC government, in positions where the person has a real possibility of being hired. So far, DDS has placed 21 people with disabilities in internships and with 4 having completed their internships, 3 have been hired to date and the 4th was offered an extension on his internship, funded by the host organization.
Next, DDS/RSA funds a position within DCHR so that there is a staff person with expertise and focused attention on recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees with disabilities throughout the DC government and providing technical assistance to DC agencies regarding employment of people with disabilities. (Page 274) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Customized Employment

~~• INCREASE PROVIDER ACCESS TO TRAINING: IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT RSA PARTNER WITH THE THEIR COMMUNITY RESOURCE PROVIDERS TO PROVIDE THE SAME TRAININGS OFFERED TO THE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION COUNSELORS AS IT RELATES TO IMPROVED SERVICES TO PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. TRAININGS SHOULD INCLUDE: PERSON CENTERED THINKING TRAINING, CUSTOMIZED EMPLOYMENT AND OTHER RELATED TRAININGS. (Page 214) Title II

Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services. (Page 216) Title II

In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

Evidenced Based Supported Employment (EBSE), and the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) among others. While DCRSA is no longer receiving direct training of staff from GWU as was in the past following the reorganization of TACE and initiation of new training entities such as Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) by the Department of Education these new training entities are well equipped to provide needed rehabilitation counseling trainings as well as WIOA technical support. In 2017 DCRSA signed an agreement with WINTAC which will boost training alliance and consequently provide opportunities for improved best practices in vocational rehabilitation services, targeted outcomes, and professional development. DCRSA will continue to receive trainings and technical support from these entities especially as it relates to WIOA and its implications for the vocational rehabilitation program. In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

• DCRSA is entering into an intensive TA agreement with the WINTAC and the Y-TAC to provide training to their staff and service providers in customized employment. The organization is encouraged to fully implement this training program throughout the District to provide an option for individuals with the most significant disabilities to obtain and maintain competitive employment. (Page 243) Title II

Provide customized employment training for Human Care Agreement providers and DCRSA staff as part of the project with the WINTAC. The customized employment training will develop the capacity of DCRSA staff and the CRP network throughout the District to provide CE to DCRSA consumers;
• DCRSA is encouraged to expedite the development and use of the vendor report card system they have been working on for several years; (Page 246) Title II

• DCRSA should consider trying to find a way to sustain the employer roundtable events that were held prior to the dissolution to the BRU. These events were touted as an excellent form of outreach to employers and a valuable service to clients. (Page 247) Title II

• DCRSA should ensure that their internal staff focused on business relations and job development attend the customized employment training when it is offered (Page 247) Title II

b. Provide training on customized employment and employer engagement for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA and providers to provide this on an ongoing basis. (Page 253) Title II

Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 255) Title II

The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities and chronic mental illness. This happens, in part, through monthly meetings in addition to other training. In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance-based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. --In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 269-270 ) Title II

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title II

The administration expanded it Business Relations Unit and refocused its efforts on supporting job placement. Lastly, the administration hired external monitors, who provide monitoring and technical assistance to contract provider agencies. From FY 2014 to present, the administration has been focusing more on quality, developing a training schedule with the GW Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), to improve the quality and consistency of services provided. In 2017 and following the phasing out of TACE, the DCRSA entered into training alliance with Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) which is funded by the Department of Education to provide technical assistance and trainings around WIOA, customized employment, HCA provider capacity building, PreETS, and other vocational rehabilitation trainings. The administration has also been reviewing and revising all policies and procedures, and providing training to staff on any changes, to ensure that services are consistent with District and federal regulations. (Page 275) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Supported Employment services are available to any DCRSA client who is certified as having a most significant disability and for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred or has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of that disability, and for whom an appropriate plan for extended services can be developed. DCRSA has identified two primary populations that require the use of supported employment services: persons with serious mental illness (SMI) or serious emotional disturbance (SED) and persons with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The community rehabilitation providers provide to the two populations supported employment services which include intake, assessment and job coaching. In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. Each provider provides individualized services to consumers. Their efforts are geared toward competitive placements in an integrated work environment. At times, a company or a government agency may hire several clients, but the clients are not placed within the same work area to ensure that they are in an integrated work setting. With their rehabilitation specialist’s assistance, clients make informed choices to select their vocational goals. If a client chooses to change that goal during the supported employment process, their VR specialist assists and the new goal is implemented. Every effort is made to ensure clients are placed in jobs that are consistent with their interests and abilities. An "any job will do" attitude is never acceptable. Employment Specialists/Job Coaches spend valuable time with clients teaching them about the workplace’s expectations and the required tasks, assuring also that they know who to ask when assistance is needed. Time is spent with the person on the worksite who is identified as the natural support person as well to ensure that they are comfortable and prepared to provide workplace support as needed. (Page 280) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 40) Title I

1.3 - Align policies, procedures, and performance measures and share data across programs to eliminate barriers to integration.
1.4 - Blend funding and utilize shared contracts to avoid duplication of resources.
1.5 - Foster environment of collaboration through cross-training staff and shared case management. (Page 45) Title 1

8. The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes,, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 50) Title 1

As noted previously, only about $40 million of the over $120 million that is budgeted annually for District programs that have at least some workforce development components comes from the federal government.[1] Accordingly, agencies will engage in planning regarding blended funding, shared contracts, and resource contributions to ensure they are maximizing resources. The District is already beginning to improve coordination between federally and locally funded resources, including through alignment of year-round youth services programming and connections to the Mayor Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP); referrals of WIOA participants to locally funded training options, including UDC-CC course offerings; and the blending of OSSE’s AEFLA federal grant and local match funds with the WIC’s local career pathways funding in an effort to strategically coordinate efforts and fund eligible providers to offer IE&T programs. (Page 56) Title 1

Agencies are working to further integrate services including the development of a common intake, assessment, screening, and referral process. Currently, DOES and OSSE have a common initial intake through the Data Vault (DV). The DV was initially designed based on a single, multi-agency (OSSE AFE and DOES) customer intake and referral process. The DV is currently being implemented at each of the District’s American Job Centers and by OSSE AFE program providers. Furthermore, DDS/RSA has executed an MOA with OSSE AFE regarding the DV and the relevant staff have been trained on its implementation, which will likely begin in the coming months. Similarly, DHS staff have also received the requisite DV training and the related MOA is close to being finalized and implemented. Expansion plans over the next two years include incorporating other workforce system partners including DOES/WIC training providers, DHS, UDC-CC, adult-serving DCPS and DC Public Charter schools (on a voluntary basis), and other partner agencies. Additionally, the Districts’ efforts over the next two years will focus on system alignment and data sharing through interfaces between the DV and LACES, SLED, DOES’s VOS and other data systems. As these additional partners are connected to the Data Vault the system and details associated with the uniform intake, assessment, and referral processes will be updated to ensure they reflect the needs of all partners. (Page 57) Title 1

To increase barrier remediation, DDS/RSA has also strengthened its relationship with the DDA and with the DBH to improve coordination in the provision of supported employment services for people with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). The agency updated its policies regarding provision of supported employment services to ensure that there was a smooth transition from supported employment services with DDS/RSA to extended supported employment services with DDS/DDA or DBH. DDS/RSA established an MOA with DBH, clarifying referral, service provision, and cross training issues; and meets regularly with DBH supported employment staff and meets jointly with DBH and all supported employment providers. (Page 73) Title I

Additionally, programs such as the DC Career Connections Program (DCCC) are designed for specific demographics including youth who have been involved in the criminal justice system, are pregnant or parenting, have low educational attainment, are homeless, or have documented behavioral health challenges. This program will be coupled with WIOA programs that will provide necessary support including barrier removal techniques and innovative strategies to keep youth engaged. OYP also has strong partnerships with many educational institutions throughout the District including the District of Columbia Public Schools, the Public Charter School Board, the OSSE Re-Engagement Center, the Potomac Job Corps Center, and the University of the District of Columbia-Community College. These partnerships enable OYP to operate a streamlined process to move jobseekers into training or connect them to needed resources. The District will also ensure that WIOA Youth services are well linked to core partner programming, including leveraging the Virtual One-Stop (VOS) database, employer services, and well-coordinated referrals and/or co-enrollment in vocational rehabilitation and adult education services where relevant. (Page 153) Title 1

5.1.7: Increase the range of employment outcomes
Outcome: Not Met: There is no reported data shared by the DC Rehabilitation Services Administration pertaining to how they supported this initiative in 2017.
5.1.8: Develop additional outreach materials.
Outcome: Not Met: There is no reported data shared by the DC Rehabilitation Services Administration pertaining to how they supported this initiative in 2017. (Page 210) Title I

5.3 Objective 3: Expand and improve the quality of transition services through improved coordination with the state education agency and all local education agencies and implementation of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) to secondary students with disabilities.
Four initiatives were developed and implemented during FY17 in support of this third objective.
5.3.1: Update the Memorandum of Agreement in place with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to comply with new requirements regarding provision of services to all students with disabilities, including those who are potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services and establish or update agreements with all local education agencies in order to establish clear processes for referral for VR services, and coordination of Pre-ETS. (Page 211) Title IV

Improve Financial Data Accuracy: RSA disagrees with the recommendation to contract with an outside agency. In October 2017, DDS implemented an alternative strategy that is intended to address these issues. Specifically, the agency made some management changes to better align services provided by DDS. Prior to the realignment, provider relations, invoice processing and quality assurance functions were handled separately for the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). Yet many providers for job placement and supported employment are shared by the two administrations.  (Page 215) Title II

 The relationship between Adult Education and Family Literacy and DCRSA should be strengthened through formal partnerships and shared planning. Although it was widely reported that DCRSA counselors use Adult Ed to help their consumers to get their GEDs, many were not aware that Adult Ed is a core partner under WIOA. The opportunities for developing and growing the relationship between the two agencies are high and fully supported by WIOA. This partnership is especially important in the District, where literacy was frequently mentioned as need for DCRSA consumers. (Page 244) Title IV

• DCRSA should strive to increase the range and types of jobs that consumers obtain. Individuals that are trained to obtain higher paying, career-level jobs will retain those positions for longer and will support DCRSA’s achievement of their common performance measures. One of the ways to make this happen is by encouraging consumer participation in postsecondary education programs, including graduate level education. Although many participants in this study characterized DCRSA consumers as needing to go to work immediately and unable to pursue higher education, DCRSA can promote the ability to assist consumers to obtain part-time jobs while they attend school and support those jobs with service delivery. (Page 241) Title II

. DCRSA has already taken many positive steps to make this culture shift, including receiving training and technical assistance in the common performance measures and their potential impact on numerous system in the VR program. The agency is encouraged to continue with this training process and to reinforce the message of achieving in-demand career-level jobs at every level of the organization. The agency is also encouraged to examine its key performance indictors and ensure that they are aligned with the common performance measures. (Page 242) Title IV

The transition population represents a group that can greatly benefit from the pursuit of postsecondary education and increase the quality and pay of employment that they obtain in the future. Counselors should ensure that they are having in-depth discussions with transition-age youth about higher education opportunities and that they are exploring the possibility of helping those youth obtain part-time jobs while they go to school. Wherever appropriate, counselors should be encouraging youth to set their sights high and strive for in-demand, career-level positions. This is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act as amended by WIOA, and fully supports the new common performance measures in WIOA. In order to fully realize this potential for youth, DCRSA will need to ensure that they are identifying “504” students in addition to those students being served by Special Education. These students need to receive encouragement to apply for DCRSA services and DCRSA counselors should meet them at their school sites whenever possible. (Page 245) Title IV

As a part of the review of the payment structure for job placement, DCRSA should consider establishing contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA. These would include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR program. Incentives might also be considered for high-paying jobs that exceed the median earnings of all clients; (Page 246) Title IV

h. DCRSA will provide ongoing training to staff on HCAs, including the payment structure for job development and placement. (Page 256) Title IV

The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities and chronic mental illness. (Page 269-270) Title II

In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance-based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. (Page 270) Title II

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~DOES is working to develop a formal MOA with DDS/RSA to increase access to and opportunities for employment, education training and support services necessary to succeed in the labor market for people in the District, particularly people with barriers to employment, including people with disabilities. Through this MOA, DOES will provide workforce investment activities, through statewide and local workforce development systems, that increase the employment, retention and earnings of participants, and increase attainment of recognized postsecondary credentials by participants, and as a result, improve the quality of the workforce, reduce welfare dependence, increase economic self-sufficiency, and meet the skill requirements of employers. The agency has a VR counselor who is co-located at AJC HQ to provide onsite services to customers who may possess barriers requiring DDS/RSA assistance. (Page 74) Title I.

School to Work Transition

~~The District’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) services are eligibility based, and are provided to people who have a disability, which presents a substantial impediment to employment, and who would benefit from services to achieve an employment outcome. In addition, pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) are available for all students with disabilities, including those who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services; i.e., students receiving special education services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) or who are eligible for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. VR services are individualized, based on the strengths, needs, abilities, interests, capabilities, and informed choice of the person. DDS/RSA currently serves about 4,600 people across the full range of services, which include evaluation, counseling and guidance, physical and mental restoration services, transition between advancement opportunities and related services, job exploration and readiness training, vocational training, support services and monetary supports, and placement services, supported employment services, job coaching, among others. The District receives $14 million in federal VR funds per year, in addition to about $6.5 million in local funding. RSA also administers a supported employment grant of $300,000, 50 percent of which must be used to provide services to youth; and an independent living grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services of about $300,000, and an Independent Living/Older Blind Grant for $225,000. Also, please note that at the time this plan was being reviewed, the Supported Employment Grant was not included in the FY 2018 federal budget. DCRSA will continue to provide these services through its federal VR grant. (Page 35) Title I

Changes in Vocational Rehabilitation Requirements - WIOA requirements that adjust DDS/RSA’s Vocational Rehabilitation requirements related to performance tracking and funding requirements for in-school-youth services necessitate significant changes in operations. The District has made a number of changes to ensure requirements are met and enhanced partnerships with other programming, but implementation burdens are significant. (Page 38) Title I

The District wants to ensure that youth work experiences are as meaningful as possible and relate to their long-term goals. DOES and OSSE will align work experiences, both year-round and summer, to industries related to specific Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs of Study for CTE concentrators, completers, or students who have declared a CTE focus. Additionally, DOES, OSSE, and RSA will collaborate to ensure youth with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), participate in year-round and summer work experiences that align with the transition goals in their IEP. Furthermore, DOES will ensure RSA representatives are integrated into the SYEP orientations for youth, their families, and employers, and work to identify youth with disabilities early enough to make appropriate job placements and work with employers on providing appropriate accommodations. (Page 66) Title I

OSSE’s recent Adult and Family Education (AFE) grant has required that all AFE providers (who educate hundreds of older youth between the ages of 18 and 24) offer an integrated education and training model as explained in the section above. OSSE AFE’s new grant also requires their providers to offer transition services to postsecondary education, training, apprenticeships, and employment for all students at the adult secondary education levels. Similarly, all WIOA core partners will require that all participants within in-school WIOA funded programs, and all REC clients nearing completion of their secondary education, have established a transition plan that includes specific and appropriate postsecondary goals. Students with an Individual Graduation Plan and/or an IEP with an appropriate secondary transition plan by the age of 14, as required by local statute, can be waived of this requirement. (Page 67) Title I

DDS/RSA has agreements in place with the Child and Family Services Agency (CFSA) and the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS) Agency. Consistent with these agreements, DDS/RSA has a vocational rehabilitation (VR) specialist assigned to work in each of these offices to work with adults, youth in foster care, and youth in the District’s juvenile justice system. The VR specialist conducts intakes and provides rehabilitation services to assist these youths to obtain necessary services to prepare for and obtain employment. (Page 73) Title I

DDS/RSA has established a data sharing agreement with OSSE and is finalizing an agreement with DOES in order to collect and report on post-closure employment and education performance indicators. (Page 94) Title I

The themes that emerged from the plan and the recommendations included there have been very helpful in informing the modifications to the VR Program Specific Portion of the Unified State Plan.
Some changes that have been underway in response to the earlier CSNA included implementation of additional staff training, including supervisory training, expanding the presence of DDS/RSA at the American Job Centers from one day per week to five days per week, expanding outreach to specific population identified in the CSNA as unserved or underserved, development of agreement with the Development Disability Administration to improve coordination of services for people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, expanding the coordination of services to transition youth through increased cooperation with the DC Public Schools, as well as all DC Public Charter Schools, coordinating with schools to begin referral for VR services earlier to ensure that DDS/RSA is available to work with students for at least the final two years of high school, and establishing performance based contracts for Job Development and Supported Employment providers. (Page 113) Title II

• Number of people placed by RSA that remained employer for 90 calendar days or more
• Percent of people with an individualized plan for employment developed within 90 calendar days of eligibility determination
• Percent of people for whom eligibility is determined within 60 calendar days
• Average entry level wages for people whose cases are closed successfully
• Percentage of eligible transition youth for whom an IPE is developed (Page 126) Title II

Additionally, programs such as the DC Career Connections Program (DCCC) are designed for specific demographics including youth who have been involved in the criminal justice system, are pregnant or parenting, have low educational attainment, are homeless, or have documented behavioral health challenges. This program will be coupled with WIOA programs that will provide necessary support including barrier removal techniques and innovative strategies to keep youth engaged. OYP also has strong partnerships with many educational institutions throughout the District including the District of Columbia Public Schools, the Public Charter School Board, the OSSE Re-Engagement Center, the Potomac Job Corps Center, and the University of the District of Columbia-Community College. These partnerships enable OYP to operate a streamlined process to move jobseekers into training or connect them to needed resources. The District will also ensure that WIOA Youth services are well linked to core partner programming, including leveraging the Virtual One-Stop (VOS) database, employer services, and well-coordinated referrals and/or co-enrollment in vocational rehabilitation and adult education services where relevant. (Page 153) Title II

Mission: The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) was created in response to federal law2 and Mayoral Order 93-149, to empower and respect the dual dignities of people with disabilities in the District of Columbia; and maximize their employment outcome, self-determination, economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion and integration into society based on the informed choices of people with disabilities in the District of Columbia.
Purpose: The purpose of the SRC is to act in an advisory capacity to the Administrator of DCRSA on the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to people with disabilities in the District of Columbia. (Page 201) Title II

Outcome: Not Met: In 2017, DCRSA continued to serve and provide easy access to vocational rehabilitation services to DC residents across all 8 wards. Besides the 46 field sites which were identified in 2016, additional community service agencies were added in 2017. These include Amazing Love Health Services, LLC, and New Beginning Temporary Shelter and referrals include people with disabilities, those who are homeless, and veterans. A counselor was assigned to CSOSA and MORCA to specifically serve returning citizens. A total of eleven (11) DCRSA counselors were assigned to the four AJC (or DOES) locations in the District. Two bilingual counselors were assigned to locations serving Hispanic and Latino communities and one counselor with Amharic proficiencies to serve the Ethiopian community. (Page 208) Title II

5.3.1: Update the Memorandum of Agreement in place with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to comply with new requirements regarding provision of services to all students with disabilities, including those who are potentially eligible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services and establish or update agreements with all local education agencies in order to establish clear processes for referral for VR services, and coordination of Pre-ETS. (Page 211) Title II

5.3.2: Provide Opportunities for work experience for students with disabilities (Contract with a community-based agency to improve coordination of transition services for students attending PCS, and work with DCRSA to establish agreements with each PCS serving transition age youth, that defines the responsibilities of RSA and PCS staff in coordination of Pre-ETS services, post-secondary transition planning and referral for VR services.)  (Page 211) Title II

Outcome: Not Met: DCRSA coordinated to ensure that pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) were available to all transition aged students with disabilities. VR counselors provided Pre-ETS opportunities to 81% (1,673) of all transition aged DCPS students. One hundred ninety nine (199) students participated in integrated work-based learning experiences in the community this past school year. VR counselors engaged 13% (134) of transition aged PCS students in Pre-ETS activities. Through coordination with DOES, RSA provided Pre-ETS to one hundred seventy two (172) students who were enrolled in post-secondary education or training programs. (Page 212) Title IV

In the past year, DCRSA has strengthened its partnership with DOES, specifically the Office of Youth Programs (OYP). DCRSA coordinates closely with DOES-OYP on its Mayor Marion Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (MBSYEP). MBSYEP provides an excellent opportunity for paid Work-Based Learning Experience and Job Readiness Training for both in-school and out-of-school transition age youth, ages 14-24. DCRSA also has an agreement with the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS) to provide a VR Counselor on-site, bi-weekly to offer vocational rehabilitation services to eligible DYRS youth and strengthen placement and re-entry service strategies to further enhance employment opportunities for youth with disabilities returning from secure confinement. (Page 219) Title II

The Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division within DCRSA now has two (2) Youth and Transition Units, including two supervisors, fourteen VR specialists, two project managers, one community liaison specialists, one employment specialist, two Rehabilitation Assistants, one administrative assistant, and one program manager. The VR Specialists are assigned to all schools serving District of Columbia students. They conduct intake interviews, attend IEP meetings, develop Individual Plans for Employment (IPE), and provide and monitor the provision of pre-employment transition activities for all students with disabilities, those who have open VR cases, as well as all students who are potentially eligible for VR services. The VR Specialist determines a student’s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, develops an IPE, and makes referrals for necessary transition services to assist the student to plan for and obtain successful post-school employment. They also work with workforce development coordinators that serve all schools with DC students. In collaboration with the VR counselors, the workforce development coordinators provide monthly work readiness workshops for students with disabilities who are potentially eligible or eligible for VR services. Pre-ETS is delivered in individualized or group settings to students with disabilities. The workshops include instruction on the five required Pre-ETS categories: Job / Career Exploration, Workplace Readiness Training, Work-based Learning Experiences, Counseling for Enrollment in Post-Secondary Education & Training Programs, and Self-advocacy Instruction. Students engage in workforce development by learning soft skills, employability skills, and independent living skills. (Page 221) Title II

DCRSA staff work closely with DOES Mayor Marion Barry Summer Youth Employment Program (MBSYEP) staff to ensure that students with disabilities who participate in MBSYEP have any necessary supports or accommodations in order to be successful in their MBSYEP experience. In addition, DCRSA is working with DOES-OYP to ensure that all Title I Youth Programs are available to students with disabilities. In FY2018, DCRSA project manager developed a partnership to recruit students with disabilities and provide technical assistance for the DOES-OYP Work Readiness Training pilot program. The Work Readiness Training program for in-school youth ages 14-21 provides education and training for DC high-demand career fields. DCRSA VR counselors provide supports to potentially eligible students participating in the program. Lastly, DCRSA, DOES, DCPS, OSSE and DCPCS have worked together to create an MBSYEP Institute for students with most significant disabilities. In this Institute, students receive a one week “boot camp,” which provides work readiness training prior to the start of MBSYEP, then ongoing supported employment services while at their work site. DCRSA and DOES will continue to ensure meaningful access and enriched programming experiences for all students participating in MBSYEP. (Page 221-222) Title 1I

The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title II

The Administration’s trainer provides training monthly, works closely with the George Washington School of Rehabilitation Counseling, which also provides monthly training for VR staff, and monitors to ensure the provision of continuing education for all VR Specialists, in order to maintain CRC certification, as well as, identifying appropriate courses for staff who still require additional courses to become CRC eligible. The total number of personnel employed by the Administration in the provision of providing vocational rehabilitation service is 109, with 5 current vacancies. The total number of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Specialists is 45. This includes one person who works primarily with independent living and people receiving services through the independent living, older blind program, although there are also 3 VR Specialist vacancies. The total number of support staff for VR counselors is 10. The projected number of consumers to be served is among the data reviewed in consideration of staffing levels. The following are projections of the anticipated number of applicants and eligible individuals coming into the system annually for each of the next three years. FFY17 Actual (Applicants: 2,654; Eligible: 2,052); FFY18 Estimate (Applicants: 2,703; Eligible: 2,151); FFY19 Estimate (Applicants: 2,757; Eligible: 2,258); FFY20 Estimate (Applicants: 2,812; Eligible: 2,370). The current number of active cases is approximately 4600. (Page 231) Title II

In FY 2012, the Administration began recruiting counselors at grade 12 pay level, the highest grade level for a rehabilitation specialist. Applicants at this level must have completed a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling with at least one year of experience and CRC. Furthermore, the administration only hires new VR Specialists who are eligible to sit for the CRC examination. The administration does not limit hiring to only VR Specialists with a CRC because this could preclude hiring of new graduates from VR counseling programs in the area, one of the best means of recruiting new staff for the agency. The Administration has a recruitment plan in place to address the hiring of a sufficient number of vocational rehabilitation counselors within DCRSA. These recruitment efforts include (1) posting vacancy announcements on the D.C. Office of Personnel website (at the time any vacancy occurs), and (2) posting vacancy announcements at community programs and through professional organizations, (3) visiting classrooms and faculty at universities, and (4) increasing its use of interns and volunteers. The recruitment plan consists of two major goals: Goal 1: Expand recruitment efforts Objective 1.1 Contact graduate school programs and develop relationships with the program chairs. (Page 235) Title IV

This orientation is comprised of 7 modules. Informed Consent, Ethics (All staff receive 1 CRC credit), Overview of the VR Process, Intake & Eligibility, Comprehensive Assessment, IPE Development, Overview of Internal Database System, and DC Policy Review (Review with Supervisor during initial week of employment). DCRSA implemented a 12 session supervisor training “boot camp” in the summer of 2012 to help supervisors support counselors and other staff through prevailing practices in management. (Page 235-236) Title IV

During FY 2015, staff began participation in a comprehensive, year-long, program of core vocational rehabilitation trainings, often developed and presented in conjunction with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling Research and Education (CRCRE). Training provided to all vocational rehabilitation specialists and supervisors during these trainings included Foundations of the Rehabilitation Act; Supported Employment Overview and Policy; Initial interviewing; Career Assessments; IPE Development; Case and Caseload Management; Job Development and Placement; and Motivational Interviewing. In 2015, DCRSA provided additional monthly trainings to all vocational rehabilitation specialists and supervisors including Working with Transition Students, Vocational Rehabilitation Ethics, Financial Management / Fiscal Responsibility, Trial Work, Eligibility Determination Extension, Supported Employment, and Self-Employment. A comprehensive in-house training program for all new and currently employed vocational rehabilitation specialists as well as supervisors with DC RSA was developed and implemented in FY 2015. This program incorporated classroom, small group, and direct consumer work over a multi-week period to ensure a complete understanding and thorough synthesis of both the vocational rehabilitation process and practice. Topics covered are inclusive of but not limited to:
• Vocational rehabilitation for individuals experiencing substance use disorders
• Comprehensive treatment services-
• Comprehensive Assessment
• Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (Page 237-238) Title IV

• DCRSA needs to work with schools and CRPs to develop more work-based learning sites. Work experience helps to meet numerous needs found in transition-age youth as it relates to employment, including soft and hard skill development, establishing a good work ethic, and simply understanding what is required in the work force.
• The development of soft skills early in the youth’s life was stressed repeatedly by participants. DCRSA should ensure that this pre-employment transition service is available and provided in as many formats as possible to ensure that youth have been adequately trained. The earlier this can be provided in high school, the better. (Page 245) Title IV

Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Review and update the Transition Tool Kit.
2. Develop materials for the General Intake Unit, similar to the Transition Tool Kit, to include at least FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions); Information about Developing an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE); the VR Process; Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Changes to the Rehabilitation Act; and Client/Applicant Rights.  (Page 254) Title IV
4. Finalize new data sharing agreement and MOA with DC Public Schools, which allows for data sharing in order to provide services to students, clarifies the referral process for DCPS, and establishes the responsibilities for provision of Pre-ETS between DCPS and DCRSA. Coordinate with OSSE, Public Charter School Board (PCSB), DCPS and community providers to have annual transition fair. (Page 257) Title IV

b. DCRSA will determine eligibility within 60 days of receiving the application, and complete the IPE within 90 days of determining eligibility. VR counselors will visit the schools regularly, on at least a monthly basis, or more frequently for schools that have higher referral numbers, and be available to see students to complete applications, determine eligibility, complete comprehensive assessment in order to develop IPE, provide ongoing counseling and guidance and provide pre-employment transition services. (Page 257) Title IV

1. VR Counselors will provide monthly job readiness training sessions in all DC Public Schools for students with disabilities who are potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 258) Title IV

a. At least 75% of students with IEPs will receive at least one Pre-ETS service during the 2017-18 school year
b. At least 75% of students with 504 plans will receive at least one Pre-ETS service during the 2017-18 school year. (Page 259) Title IV

DCRSA established Order of Selection priority categories as follows: Depending upon agency resources, the categories are closed for services in order beginning with Priority III, then II and, finally Priority Category I. Categories may be closed based on the following circumstances Limitations of case service dollars or limitation in adequate staff to serve all eligible individuals. Notwithstanding these priority categories, DCRSA will continue to provide pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities, because these services are made available to students who are potentially eligible for services. However, students who require vocational rehabilitation services, in addition to pre-employment transition services, will receive those services based on the priority category into which they are assigned based on the determination made upon consideration for eligibility for VR services. In addition, DCRSA will provide services to people who require specific services or equipment in order to maintain employment, regardless of their priority category. (Page 261) Title IV

DCRSA is working with the Center for Independent Living and the Statewide Independent Living Council to improve coordination of independent living and vocational rehabilitation services. The need for improved coordination between DCRSA and the CIL was identified as a need in the 2014 CSNA. In addition, the passage of WIOA, and the adoption of an additional IL core service, i.e., transition (from nursing home to the community and from secondary school to post-secondary education, training or employment), further highlights the need for closer collaboration. DCRSA will assist in supporting the resource plan of the SILC, in order to maximize the limited resources available in the District to meet IL needs of people with disabilities. (Page 266) Title IV

DCRSA is also working closely with DOES in order to ensure that students with disabilities have access to the summer youth employment program, and that we are able to provide any necessary supports, including supported employment services, in a timely manner, to ensure the success of students in their summer work experience. In the summer of 2015, students with disabilities were represented in the summer youth employment services at about the same rate that these students are represented in the school system, i.e., 12% of program participants were students with disabilities. DCRSA is working closely with DOES in order to identify students who have accommodation needs so that supports can be in place on day one of the student’s summer work experience. DCRSA will also participate in all DOES summer youth employment orientations, for program participants and businesses, in order to provide information about workplace accommodations and the availability of support services from DCRSA. (Page 269) Title II

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration continues to add new Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) that partner with us to provide an array of vocational rehabilitation services to consumers. As indicated above, the agency doubled the number of evidence based supported employment providers in FY 2015. Additional services available to our consumer through the Human Care agreements include job readiness services, trial work experiences, job placement and benefits analysis and planning.  (Page 269) Title IV

With the introduction of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, the performance measures for the vocational rehabilitation program will be changing. The specific performance standards will be addressed in the Unified State Workforce Development Plan. Because all of these measures are new, DCRSA is proposing to use the first two years to collect sufficient data on the new measures in order to develop realistic goals to implement as the new performance standards. In order to prepare for these new measures, the administration is taking a number of steps, including: working with the agency that provides the electronic case management system to ensure that we are capturing all data we are required to report; working with the other workforce agencies in the state to ensure that all measures have a common definition; improving monitoring of progress in training and education programs in order to provide accurate information on performance regarding completion of training and measurable skills gains, and to obtain more complete data about the performance of existing training providers to assist in improved informed choice of providers and improved outcomes for clients; and establishing new protocols for following up with clients post-closure to check on their progress and provide information about availability of ongoing services. (Page 270) Title IV

From FY 2014 to present, the administration has been focusing more on quality, developing a training schedule with the GW Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), to improve the quality and consistency of services provided. In 2017 and following the phasing out of TACE, the DCRSA entered into training alliance with Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) which is funded by the Department of Education to provide technical assistance and trainings around WIOA, customized employment, HCA provider capacity building, PreETS, and other vocational rehabilitation trainings. (Page 275) Title IV

In 2016, the following policies were implemented: Informed Choice, Case Closure, Case Record, and Protection, Use and Release of Information. Policies that are currently at the Deputy Director’s level of review include Transportation, Case Transfer, Case Management, IPE, and Supported Employment Policy (updated for WIOA). The Pre-ETS Policy Draft has been completed and accepted by the Department of Education. Other Policies, Procedures or SOPS that are in development include Pre-ETS SOP, Case Closure Procedure, Services and Authorizations, Eligibility, and Due Process which is on hold pending revised district regulations. (Page 276) Title IV

Goal 2: Improve the efficiency of RSA operations. The Administration made significant progress in updating policies and procedures during FY 2015, updating policies, procedures and protocols in the following areas: Postsecondary Education and Training Policy and Procedure, Maintenance Policy, Policy Regarding Rates of Payment for VR Services, Self-Employment Policy and Procedures, Protocol on Quality and Supervisory Case Review, Eligibility Determination Extension Protocol, and Trial Work Protocol. As each new policy, procedure or protocol was implemented, training was provided to all relevant staff on implementation, and subsequent quality review regarding implementation has been conducted. In 2016, the following policies were implemented: Informed Choice, Case Closure, Case Record, and Protection, Use and Release of Information. Policies that are currently at the Deputy Director’s level of review include Transportation, Case Transfer, Case Management, IPE, and Supported Employment Policy (updated for WIOA). The Pre-ETS Policy Draft has been completed and accepted by the Department of Education. Other Policies, Procedures or SOPS that are in development include Pre-ETS SOP, Case Closure Procedure, Services and Authorizations, Eligibility, and Due Process which is on hold pending revised district regulations. (Page 276) Title IV

The agency needed for the CRP module to be implemented in order to fully implement a vendor report card process to provide information and support to RSA customers in exercising informed choice when selecting vendors and providers for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the Authority of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as Amended in 1998; CFR Section 361.52. We expect to have thorough accurate data to provide to consumers during FY 2016, and to publish performance data. Over the past three years, the administration has made significant progress in improving the efficiency of operations in terms of compliance with federal standards related to timeliness of determining eligibility and developing Individualized Plans for Employment. In FY 2013, the administration determined eligibility within sixty days 83% of the time, increased from 68% in FY 2012; and timely developed IPEs 92% of the time, compared with 80% of the time in FY 2012. In FY 2015, both of DCRSA performed at 95% for both of these measures. In 2016 and 2017 this improved to 96% and 97% respectively (Page 276) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~District residents often face one or more barriers which prevent them from accessing education, training programs, and from ultimately being successful in the workforce. Consequently, the District’s workforce system must take meaningful steps to help remediate these barriers to ensure residents are able to overcome obstacles and attain their goals. A common barrier is economically-related as residents need to work to support themselves and their families. Due to this, agencies are working to increase access to earn and learn opportunities through partnerships and innovative methods to include expanding apprenticeship and on-the-job (OJT) training opportunities. Other common barriers include health issues (both physical and behavioral), transportation costs, housing, income supports, and child-care. Consequently, workforce system partners are strengthening partnerships among other District agencies that can provide barrier remediation services for our residents, such as the Department of Behavioral Health, the Department of Human Services, and OSSE’s Division of Early Learning. (Page 60-61) Title I

To increase opportunities for work-based learning and career exploration for youth, agencies will ensure all youth in WIOA core programs have access to work based experiences which include year-round and/or summer paid and unpaid work placements/internships, on-the-job training opportunities, job shadowing, earn-and-learn opportunities, pre-apprenticeship programs, or apprenticeship programs. This effort will prioritize targeted groups including youth with disabilities, English language learners, youth re-engaging in education, homeless youth, and socioeconomically disadvantaged youth. These groups face the highest barriers in and outside of school; and, as such, work-based learning opportunities are even more important to help connect youth to a career pathway.

The District wants to ensure that youth work experiences are as meaningful as possible and relate to their long-term goals. DOES and OSSE will align work experiences, both year-round and summer, to industries related to specific Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs of Study for CTE concentrators, completers, or students who have declared a CTE focus. Additionally, DOES, OSSE, and RSA will collaborate to ensure youth with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs), participate in year-round and summer work experiences that align with the transition goals in their IEP. (Page 66) Title I

o Percentage of career pathways developed compared to identified high demand areas
o Percentage of people successfully move off of income support services (like TANF, SSI/SSDI) through successful and sustainable activity
o Number of barriers identified and percentage successfully mitigated (Page 103) Title I

OJT positions must be full-time and must provide an hourly wage that meets the District of Columbia’s living wage of $13.85 and does not exceed the District’s average wage of $23.95 for the participant with evidence that the participant is on a career pathway towards a higher paying job. However, waivers are allowable for individuals with disabilities as well as older workers (55 years and older). Exceptions include a job opportunity that is appropriate to the customer’s needs and skill acquisition that meets the occupational qualifications, but the starting wage does not meet the $14.00 per hour wage. Then an OJT contract can be written for a lower hourly rate in consideration of the participant’s extraordinary limitations and/or barriers.  (Page 145) Title I

• The WIC reviewed OSSE’s draft RFA prior to release and made several edits including adding the requirement:
o to offer work-based learning components;
o to establish employer partnerships; and
o that all sub grantees must participate in the WIC’s recently established Career Pathways Community of Practice (COP). (Page164) Title I

Strategy 1: Increase counselor and client participation in activities sponsored by DCRSA’s Business Relations Unit including: · Monthly Job Readiness Workshops · Monthly Employer/Industry Spotlights · Quarterly Career Fairs · Strategy 2: Strengthen collaboration with the DC Department of Employment Services (DOES), expand the number of days that a VR specialist is located at American Jobs Center sites. Require all VR applicants to register with American Jobs Centers at time of VR application. Strategy 3: Continue to expand the number and types of employers participating in the Project Search program, enabling transition-aged students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while receiving on-the-job support. In school year 2015-16, DCRSA established a new Project Search site at a local hotel, Embassy Suites. This is a particularly positive development as work in the hospitality industry is one of the growth industries in the District. Strategy 4: Coordinate with the Department on Disability Services Ticket to Work program to ensure that eligible ticket holders are referred to ticket agencies for post-closure follow on support services. (Page 270-271) Title IV

Apprenticeship

To increase opportunities for work-based learning and career exploration for youth, agencies will ensure all youth in WIOA core programs have access to work based experiences which include year-round and/or summer paid and unpaid work placements/internships, on-the-job training opportunities, job shadowing, earn-and-learn opportunities, pre-apprenticeship programs, or apprenticeship programs. This effort will prioritize targeted groups including youth with disabilities, English language learners, youth re-engaging in education, homeless youth, and socioeconomically disadvantaged youth. These groups face the highest barriers in and outside of school; and, as such, work-based learning opportunities are even more important to help connect youth to a career pathway. (Page 66) Title I

OSSE’s recent Adult and Family Education (AFE) grant has required that all AFE providers (who educate hundreds of older youth between the ages of 18 and 24) offer an integrated education and training model as explained in the section above. OSSE AFE’s new grant also requires their providers to offer transition services to postsecondary education, training, apprenticeships, and employment for all students at the adult secondary education levels. Similarly, all WIOA core partners will require that all participants within in-school WIOA funded programs, and all REC clients nearing completion of their secondary education, have established a transition plan that includes specific and appropriate postsecondary goals. Students with an Individual Graduation Plan and/or an IEP with an appropriate secondary transition plan by the age of 14, as required by local statute, can be waived of this requirement. (Page 67) Title I

The DOES Business Services Group, in conjunction with the DOES Office of Apprenticeship, Information, and Technology, continues to serve as the primary connection to assist residents in entering Registered Apprenticeship programs and positions. To ensure the inclusion of underrepresented groups in these efforts, DOES currently has referral partnerships with community-based organizations, DC Public Schools, the American Job Centers, the TANF and FSET programs, and various workforce programs throughout the District. To further increase inclusion, DOES has actively identified and met with agencies and organizations committed to serving women, veterans, individuals with disabilities, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged groups. (Page 148) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title IV

One of the challenges in the District has been the lack of an extended service provider for people with developmental disabilities, other than an intellectual disability. The only current source of support for extended services in the District for people receiving supported employment services are the HCBS Waiver with DDA, that provides services to people with intellectual disabilities, supports provided through the Department of Behavioral Health for people with SMI or SED, Ticket to Work, and natural supports. The changes in WIOA related to the provision of extended services for youth have been helpful in allowing the agency to provide extended supports to youth with developmental disabilities. In comments to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, we sought clarification whether these services had to terminate when the youth turned twenty-four, or if the services were available to any youth for up to four years, if the youth initiates services prior to age twenty four. (Page 228) Title IV

The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports. (Page 230) Title IV

The waiver services for people with intellectual disabilities are managed by the Developmental Disability Administration within the same designated state agency that houses DCRSA. In April, 2014, the agency finalized a protocol regarding the coordination of services between the two administrations, i.e., DCRSA and DCDDA. This protocol addresses referrals from DDA to RSA for supported employment services; coordination between the VR Specialist and DDA Service Coordinator, while a person is served by both administrations, and the provisions for ensuring referral back to DDA for extended services through the Medicaid Waiver, including a provision that DCRSA will maintain the case open for sixty days after waiver services are initiated to ensure there are no gaps in services. (Page 230) Title IV

The funds available to support youth in extended services are very helpful in the District, as the District’s developmental disability agency supports only persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is currently no Medicaid waiver support for extended services for people with developmental disabilities, other than ID. Therefore, DCRSA will use extended services to support youth with developmental disabilities (typically youth with autism spectrum disorder) as they achieve stabilization in employment, as defined by the agency’s supported employment policy, but continue to require ongoing supports to be successful in employment. The agency will also rely on natural supports and ticket to work support in developing long-term planning with youth with disabilities, to ensure comprehensive supports are in place to support youth who transition from supported employment with the VR program. (Page 265) Title IV

Strategy 3: Continue to expand the number and types of employers participating in the Project Search program, enabling transition-aged students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience while receiving on-the-job support. In school year 2015-16, DCRSA established a new Project Search site at a local hotel, Embassy Suites. This is a particularly positive development as work in the hospitality industry is one of the growth industries in the District. Strategy 4: Coordinate with the Department on Disability Services Ticket to Work program to ensure that eligible ticket holders are referred to ticket agencies for post-closure follow on support services. (Page 271) Title IV

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~BRU services to businesses include:
• Conducting disability awareness education training
• Creating opportunities for businesses to market themselves to people with disabilities through Industry Spotlights, where job seekers learn about various businesses and the expectations for successful applicants and employees
• Creating opportunities for businesses to participate in Mock Interviews with job seekers and provide feedback
• Sharing employment announcements with job seekers
• Employers are invited to career day events which are industry specific to meet job seekers and share information to assist job seekers with identifying or solidifying their employment goal.
• Screening and identifying qualified employment candidates
• Educating business about tax incentives
• Sharing resources to assist businesses with retaining existing employees and sharing sources for reasonable accommodations
• Brain storming potential opportunities to increase the pipeline of qualified talent to businesses (Page 84) Title 1

In feedback collected from employers, they reported several challenges in accessing effective business services, including lack of coordination among and within government agencies, too often hearing from multiple providers and agencies that are looking to place their participants without coordinating efforts, and difficulty in understanding and navigating programs and incentives that exist that may meet their needs. Consequently, the WIC and DOES have been working in conjunction with agency business engagement and job development staff to develop a unified business services plan. This plan would streamline both outreach and services to area businesses in order to better meet their needs and provide more comprehensive services. DOES’s Employer Services team already provides significant services to business partners, including competency-based assessment pre-screenings, targeted hiring events, technical support, access to workforce system clients with documented skill sets, compliance assistance, and apprenticeship registration. Job development services are also provided through other agencies, including DDS/RSA and DHS. Moving forward, the District will look to build on these offerings and implement a unified business services plan that better coordinates efforts and continues to improve quality. (Page 62) Title I

Data Collection

1.3 - Align policies, procedures, and performance measures and share data across programs to eliminate barriers to integration. 1.4 - Blend funding and utilize shared contracts to avoid duplication of resources. 1.5 - Foster environment of collaboration through cross-training staff and shared case management. (Page 45) Title 1

8. The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes,, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 50) Title 1

In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title IV

While DCRSA is no longer receiving direct training from GWU as was in the past following the reorganization of TACE and initiation of new training entities such a Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) by the Department of Education, In 2017 DCRSA signed a cooperation agreement with WINTAC which will boost training alliance with WINTAC. DCRSA will continue to receive trainings and technical support from these entities especially as it relates to WIOA and its implications for the vocational rehabilitation program. In 2017 WINTAC provided technical training on WIOA common performance measures and PreETS. DCRSA is currently working with WINTAC staff on Customized Employment training which is slated to take place in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in enhancing employment opportunities for persons with severe disabilities. (Page 239-240) Title IV

DCRSA has already taken many positive steps to make this culture shift, including receiving training and technical assistance in the common performance measures and their potential impact on numerous system in the VR program. The agency is encouraged to continue with this training process and to reinforce the message of achieving in-demand career-level jobs at every level of the organization. The agency is also encouraged to examine its key performance indictors and ensure that they are aligned with the common performance measures. (Page 242) Title IV

The transition population represents a group that can greatly benefit from the pursuit of postsecondary education and increase the quality and pay of employment that they obtain in the future. Counselors should ensure that they are having in-depth discussions with transition-age youth about higher education opportunities and that they are exploring the possibility of helping those youth obtain part-time jobs while they go to school. Wherever appropriate, counselors should be encouraging youth to set their sights high and strive for in-demand, career-level positions. This is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act as amended by WIOA, and fully supports the new common performance measures in WIOA. In order to fully realize this potential for youth, DCRSA will need to ensure that they are identifying “504” students in addition to those students being served by Special Education. These students need to receive encouragement to apply for DCRSA services and DCRSA counselors should meet them at their school sites whenever possible. (Page 245) Title IV

As a part of the review of the payment structure for job placement, DCRSA should consider establishing contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA. These would include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR program. Incentives might also be considered for high-paying jobs that exceed the median earnings of all clients; (Page 246) Title IV Establish contracts that support consumers achieving the milestones contained in the common performance measures in WIOA to include payment for consumers that retain employment during the second and fourth quarter after exit from the VR Program. (Page 256) Title IV

Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher. Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services. Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 271) Title II

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page129) Title I

The District is committed to equal opportunity employment. All decisions made regarding recruitment, hiring, training, and other terms and conditions of program operations will be made without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation, or belief. The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 129-130) Title I

Avoid unnecessary requirements that tend to screen out individuals with disabilities, such as requiring a driver’s license as the only acceptable form of identification, or requirements mandating that individuals must complete intake forms without assistance. Permit special benefits beyond those required by regulation, such as additional one-on-one assistance or extra time beyond typical time limits. Provide reasonable accommodations to customers with disabilities, unless providing those accommodations would cause undue hardship (e.g., modified computer keyboards, sign-language interpreters, intensive staff assistance, modified computer screens). Ensure communications with customers and members of the public with disabilities are as effective as communications with others (i.e., providing auxiliary aids such as qualified interpreters, assistive listening headsets, closed and open captioning on videos, and telecommunication devices [TDD and TTY]) Comply with WIOA nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions. (Page 131) Title I

Veterans

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Workforce services are not just limited to occupational training and adult education, but may also include work readiness, job placement and on-the-job training, and services to businesses as well as human, social, mental health, disability and other supportive services. Key agencies making significant investments include:
• Department of Employment Services
• University of the District of Columbia- Community College (UDC-CC)
• Department of Human Services
• Department on Disability Services
• Department of Behavioral Health
• Office of the State Superintendent of Education
• Workforce Investment Council (Page 39) Title IV

The District wants to ensure all residents who seek employment services - including those who have recently been incarcerated have access to comprehensive support to enter the workforce. District residents pending release from incarceration face a unique set of challenges when seeking to obtain employment. Limited employment history, inadequate educational credentials, substance abuse and mental health challenges are but a few of the obstacles faced by the clients this partnership serves. Through the development of life skills, job training, and basic computer training participants are better prepared for the employment challenges they will face upon release. To that end, the DC Jail Work Reentry Program was established in July 2015 in partnership with the Department of Corrections (DOC), to provide intensive 6-week job training for incarcerated persons with an impending release date. This program enhances the availability of employment options for returning citizens by beginning the process of reintegration prior to release (Page 72) Title I

To increase barrier remediation, DDS/RSA has also strengthened its relationship with the DDA and with the DBH to improve coordination in the provision of supported employment services for people with Serious Mental Illness (SMI), Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED), and Intellectual Disabilities (ID). The agency updated its policies regarding provision of supported employment services to ensure that there was a smooth transition from supported employment services with DDS/RSA to extended supported employment services with DDS/DDA or DBH. DDS/RSA established an MOA with DBH, clarifying referral, service provision, and cross training issues; and meets regularly with DBH supported employment staff and meets jointly with DBH and all supported employment providers.  (Page 73) Title IV

Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs ( Page 118) Title I

• Ability to administer additional assessments/screenings including: mental health screening, domestic violence screening, substance abuse screening, and career assessment (Assessments align with the DHS Online Work Readiness Assessment);
• Ability to upload, view and print required eligibility documents and track documentation submissions (List of eligibility documents aligns with WIOA); (Page 121) Title I

• Strive to anticipate the needs of people with disabilities in the physical design of the center, as well as the design of services that provide opportunities for people with disabilities to participate in an effective and meaningful way in an integrated setting; and, (Page 131) Title IV

These community sites include the following diverse settings such as rehabilitation centers, mental health clinics, hospitals, community health centers, homeless shelters, other DC Government Offices, and the court system. DCRSA offers services in or receives referrals from the following community agencies and centers: DC Department of Employment Services (DOES) American Job Centers (AJC) (4 sites, albeit one is currently under renovation, DC Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), DC Child and Family Services Agency, DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services, Unity Health Care (three sites), N Street Village, Salvation Army Rehabilitation Center, The National Multiple Sclerosis Society, George Washington University Hospital Acute Rehabilitation Unit, Gallaudet University, Washington Literacy Council, Model School for the Deaf, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, Langston Lang Housing Program, Covenant House, The Arc of DC, Ethiopian Community Center, DC Aging and Disability Resource Center, , Central Union Mission, Washington Hospital Center Outpatient Psychiatric Unit, DC Office of Asian Affairs, DC Superior Court House, DC Office of Veterans Affairs, Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (two sites), Office of Returning Citizens Administration (ORCA), National Rehabilitation Hospital, Providence Hospital, Smithsonian, Seabury Blind Center, the Blair Underwood Health Centers, KRA Corporation, and Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind (CLB). (Page 218) Title II

In FY 2016, DCRSA established one VR unit that is now responsible for working with the cases that are referred from DDA or DBH. This has improved the coordination between the agencies as there are now six dedicated VR Specialists and one VR Supervisor. This has facilitated improved coordination and communication. DDS/RSA and DDA have continued to establish Human Care Agreements with additional supported employment providers who serve people with developmental disabilities. The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Extended services for consumers are provided by DDA and DBH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DBH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. (Page 228) Title II

Eight (8) private non-profit organizations (Anchor Mental Health; Community Connections, Inc.; Contemporary Family Services, Inc.; Deaf-Reach, Inc.; MBI Health Services, LLC; Pathways to Housing; Psychiatric Center Chartered Inc.; and Psychiatric Rehabilitation Service, Inc.) are providing people with serious mental illness with Evidenced Based Supported Employment. (Page 228) Title II

The DC Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) is responsible for providing mental health services in the District. DCRSA and DBH have been working together to provide Evidence Based Supported Employment Services since 2010. In 2015, the agencies worked together to expand these services, adding additional community-based agencies to provide services. In addition, the agencies developed a Memorandum of Agreement (currently in draft awaiting legal review by DBH). This agreement clarifies the process for referral to DCRSA for supported employment services and identifies when a case will be referred back to DBH for extended services. In addition, the agreement includes provisions for regular meetings between all parties, as well as the provision of cross-training, to ensure that all DCRSA VR Specialists are aware of all mental health services that are available, including Evidence Based Supported Employment and are aware how to make referrals for these services. (Page 230) Title IV

DOES is currently developing a formal plan that will establish the procedures to be implemented to ensure that AJCs are in compliance with Section 508. The term disability is extremely broad. While some individuals can be identified due to mobility issues or sensory deficits (such as people who are blind, visually impaired, or deaf), there are other individuals who are covered under one of the provisions of the law for whom physical access is not an issue, such as those with learning disabilities, mental health issues, head injuries, and many other conditions. DOES is committed to providing services that:
2. Assign three VR counselors to work with all people referred from DBH for evidence based supported employment services.
3. Arrange with DBH to provide training for all VR counselors regarding mental health and substance abuse treatment services available in the District.
4. Review the DDS Protocol regarding coordination of services between DCRSA and DDA, make necessary changes and provide training to all DDA service coordinators and VR counselors. (Page 252) Title IV

Goal 1: Provide continued support to six (6) mental health supported employment providers to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities The Administration will continue to support the Human Care Agreements with eight (8) providers of mental health supported employment services to support staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and the development of placement and employment opportunities through supported employment. (Page 278) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

District of Columbia Partners in Transition - 06/01/2020

~~“Visit OSSE's Secondary Transition website for more information on how to support students with disabilities in successful transitions to life after high school. The website also features information for educators, families, and students about:

Upcoming EventsResources for supporting meaningful student involvement throughout the IEP process, including the Student-led IEP Toolkit and OSSE's Self Determination Film SeriesProfessional development resources for transition practitioners, including the OSSE Secondary Transition Toolkit, Secondary Transition Webinar Series, and more.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“The U.S. Small Business Administration announced that Dog Tag, Inc., has been awarded funding for entrepreneurship training to service-disabled veterans.  It is an educational program for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, and military spouses seeking to launch small business ventures.  The program combines a classroom component taught at Georgetown University and an opportunity to experience small business ownership at Dog Tag Bakery in Washington, D.C.The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.” 

Systems
  • Other

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Employment Services - 06/10/2019

~~“Mission Statement

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) mission is to connect District residents, job seekers, and employers to opportunities and resources that empower fair, safe, effective working communities.Vision

The Department of Employment Services provides comprehensive employment services to ensure a competitive workforce, full employment, life-long learning, economic stability and the highest quality of life for all District residents.

Connect With Us4058 Minnesota Avenue, NEWashington, DC 20019Phone: (202) 724-7000Fax: (202) 673-6993TTY: TTYEmail:does@dc.gov

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

District of Columbia Section 1115 Medicaid Behavioral Health Transformation Demonstration Program - 06/03/2019

~~“On June 3, 2019, the Director of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), pursuant to the authority set forth in the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, and in collaboration with the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), submitted a Section 1115 Medicaid demonstration application for the District Medicaid Program to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for review and approval….The District is seeking approval to incorporate the following services and service changes for individuals participating under the demonstration:• Treatment of adults (21-64 years old) with SMI or SUD in IMD inpatient or residential settings• Crisis Stabilization Services, including changes to Crisis Psychological Emergency Program and Mobile Crisis Services and the addition of Psychiatric Residential Crisis Stabilization• Recovery Support Services, including SUD services provided by certified peer counselors and Clubhouse Peer-Run rehabilitative supports• Trauma-Informed Services• Supported Employment Services” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DDC Five Year Plan 2017-2021 - 06/01/2019

~~“The District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) is pleased to disseminate the New Five -Year State Plan (Plan) describing goals, objectives and activities for fiscal years 2017 through 2021.  This Plan represents the DDC’s commitment to fulfilling our responsibility to our District residents with developmental disabilities and their families as authorized in the federal legislation, Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000.  ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Commission on Persons with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~~“The Commission serves as an advisory body to inform and advise the District on programs, services, facilities, and activities that impact the lives of residents with disabilities in the District of Columbia.  The Commission is committed to enhancing the image, status, inclusion, and quality of life for all District of Columbia residents, visitors, and employees with disabilities, and ensuring that they have the same rights and opportunities as those without disabilities.We are working on community outreach and have established advisory subcommittees on accessible transportation, assistive technology, job creation, adequate housing and the enhancement of independent living skills.  We’re conducting community forums on topics of interest to our constituency, including transportation and health.  We meet with District and private-sector providers of disability services, and generally work toward fuller participation of people with disabilities in District life.  The DCCPD collaborates with other District Government Agencies on the Mayor’s Annual Disability Awareness Conference.  The conference highlights various city services for people with disabilities and encourages meaningful employment opportunities within District Government.  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department on Disability Services Responses to FY17-18 Performance Oversight Questions - 10/14/2018

~~DDS continues to lead a number of Employment First efforts and collaborations across the District. To coordinate efforts DDS leads an Employment First Leadership Team, which includes members the Departments of Employment Services, Health Care Finance (Medicaid) and Behavioral Health; Office of the State Superintendent of Education; and DC Public Schools; and Workforce Investment Council. The group meets at least quarterly to collaborate and share updates, innovations and resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. DDS “Provider Sanctions” - 08/13/2018

When a provider does not meet expectations or established DDS/DDA requirements, that provider, a particular service offered by that provider or service location of that provider may be added to the DDS/DDA Provider Sanctions List. This action prohibits DDA Service Coordinators from referring or transitioning new people to that provider, service or service location until they are removed from the list.”

Systems
  • Other

Project Search - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.

DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:• Young adult between 18-30 years old• Have a documented intellectual/developmental disability• Completing final year of high school OR recent high school graduate• Show willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)• Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readiness• Strong attendance record is preferred

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 27

District of Columbia Partners in Transition - 06/01/2020

~~“Visit OSSE's Secondary Transition website for more information on how to support students with disabilities in successful transitions to life after high school. The website also features information for educators, families, and students about:

Upcoming EventsResources for supporting meaningful student involvement throughout the IEP process, including the Student-led IEP Toolkit and OSSE's Self Determination Film SeriesProfessional development resources for transition practitioners, including the OSSE Secondary Transition Toolkit, Secondary Transition Webinar Series, and more.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Department of Employment Services - 06/10/2019

~~“Mission Statement

The Department of Employment Services (DOES) mission is to connect District residents, job seekers, and employers to opportunities and resources that empower fair, safe, effective working communities.Vision

The Department of Employment Services provides comprehensive employment services to ensure a competitive workforce, full employment, life-long learning, economic stability and the highest quality of life for all District residents.

Connect With Us4058 Minnesota Avenue, NEWashington, DC 20019Phone: (202) 724-7000Fax: (202) 673-6993TTY: TTYEmail:does@dc.gov

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DDC Five Year Plan 2017-2021 - 06/01/2019

~~“The District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) is pleased to disseminate the New Five -Year State Plan (Plan) describing goals, objectives and activities for fiscal years 2017 through 2021.  This Plan represents the DDC’s commitment to fulfilling our responsibility to our District residents with developmental disabilities and their families as authorized in the federal legislation, Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000.  ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Commission on Persons with Disabilities - 05/20/2019

~~“The Commission serves as an advisory body to inform and advise the District on programs, services, facilities, and activities that impact the lives of residents with disabilities in the District of Columbia.  The Commission is committed to enhancing the image, status, inclusion, and quality of life for all District of Columbia residents, visitors, and employees with disabilities, and ensuring that they have the same rights and opportunities as those without disabilities.We are working on community outreach and have established advisory subcommittees on accessible transportation, assistive technology, job creation, adequate housing and the enhancement of independent living skills.  We’re conducting community forums on topics of interest to our constituency, including transportation and health.  We meet with District and private-sector providers of disability services, and generally work toward fuller participation of people with disabilities in District life.  The DCCPD collaborates with other District Government Agencies on the Mayor’s Annual Disability Awareness Conference.  The conference highlights various city services for people with disabilities and encourages meaningful employment opportunities within District Government.  ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. DDS “Provider Sanctions” - 08/13/2018

When a provider does not meet expectations or established DDS/DDA requirements, that provider, a particular service offered by that provider or service location of that provider may be added to the DDS/DDA Provider Sanctions List. This action prohibits DDA Service Coordinators from referring or transitioning new people to that provider, service or service location until they are removed from the list.”

Systems
  • Other

Project Search - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.

DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:• Young adult between 18-30 years old• Have a documented intellectual/developmental disability• Completing final year of high school OR recent high school graduate• Show willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)• Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readiness• Strong attendance record is preferred

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

“Notice of Funding Availability” Department of Employment Services, Office of Youth Programs - 08/22/2017

~~“Youth with Disabilities:The DOES Office of Youth Programs supports all eligible youth, including those that are identified as having disabilities. Increasing services to this population is critical for serving all eligible youth in the District.  We encourage providers to partner with organizations that serve youth with disabilities.  Youth with disabilities must be afforded more opportunities to practice and improve their workplace skills, explore their career interests and receive services to assist with eliminating barriers. Any provider who submits a proposal with specific programming for this demographic may receive special consideration and preference points during the review process.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Workforce Investment Council Quarterly Board Meeting - 01/23/2017

~~PowerPoint detailing the agenda of the District of Columbia’s Workforce Investment Council.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

DC Developmental Disabilities Council “Government Resources” - 01/01/2017

~~“Inclusion in this resource list does not constitute endorsement by the DC Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC), nor does omission imply non-endorsement. The DDC’s goal is to provide you with information on some key resources available within the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department on Disability Services Responses to FY17-18 Performance Oversight Questions - 10/14/2018

~~DDS continues to lead a number of Employment First efforts and collaborations across the District. To coordinate efforts DDS leads an Employment First Leadership Team, which includes members the Departments of Employment Services, Health Care Finance (Medicaid) and Behavioral Health; Office of the State Superintendent of Education; and DC Public Schools; and Workforce Investment Council. The group meets at least quarterly to collaborate and share updates, innovations and resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“The U.S. Small Business Administration announced that Dog Tag, Inc., has been awarded funding for entrepreneurship training to service-disabled veterans.  It is an educational program for transitioning service members, service-disabled veterans, and military spouses seeking to launch small business ventures.  The program combines a classroom component taught at Georgetown University and an opportunity to experience small business ownership at Dog Tag Bakery in Washington, D.C.The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.” 

Systems
  • Other

Mayor’s 10th Annual Disability Awareness Expo - 10/26/2017

~~“The purpose of this FREE event is to advance the conversation on equal opportunities and inclusive environments for people with disabilities; complete with information and  exhibitors tables to engage in conversation”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

A Path To Community Living Resource Guide - 06/08/2016

This Guide is a compilation of current service providers, resources, tools, and programs available to District of Columbia residents who wish to live independently in the community.  It is designed to be used in conjunction with the “Path to Community Living” Handbook; however, it also functions as a resource list.  This document is updated continuously as information changes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC Transition Plan for the HCBS Waiver - 02/26/2015

“DDS is engaged in a variety of efforts to build the capacity of its staff and provider agencies to support and facilitate greater individualized community exploration and integration, including competitive, integrated employment,” including: “Discovery: Developing Positive Personal Profiles, a nationally recognized tool and process for assessing the vocational interests and goals of people and supporting career exploration and community integration activities;” Individualized Day Supports (IDS) Implementation Training, “including development of regulations, training for DDA staff and providers on the new service, how to recruit and train staff, the development of formats for initial and ongoing Community Integration Plans, and how to conduct Community Mapping;” and Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities’ Employment Learning Community, “which brings providers together on a regular basis through a community of practice approach where national and local resources are shared and providers learn from one another.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Georgetown University Hosts Conference on Employment of People with Disabilities” - 01/29/2015

~~“The second panel, moderated by Justin Ford with the Truman National Security Project, focused on the role of the recent federal contracting regulations promulgated by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Panelists included Jennifer Sheehy, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Disability Employment Policy, DOL; Naomi Levin, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, DOL; Bob Vetere, Human Resource Specialist, Northrop Grumman; and Eric Eversole, Vice President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce & Executive Director, Hiring Our Heroes. They offered their perspective on how the OFCCP Section 503 regulations – and more specifically the 7% hiring target ? could impact Veterans with disabilities seeking gainful employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DHCF and DDS Home and Community Based Settings (HCBS) 101 - 12/01/2014

This training power point provides information on the HCBS waiver, basic information on revising the waiver, designing and restructuring it, and waiver rules and restrictions.  It also details the role of DCHF and DDS in the revision and administration of the HCBS waiver.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Secondary Transition Assessment Tool-kit - 11/01/2013

The District of Columbia Secondary Transition Process Toolkit was designed to assist educators in effectively addressing the transition planning needs of students with disabilities who are preparing to transition from high school to postsecondary employment, education/training, and independent living. This guide was developed using Federal and District of Columbia policies, procedures, and regulations.   
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

A Path to Community Living Handbook - 01/25/2013

This handbook is designed to assist people who have moved or are planning to move out of institutions into the community of their choice.  These forms are designed to help you identify the services and supports you may need to successfully live in the community.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

District of Columbia Section 1115 Medicaid Behavioral Health Transformation Demonstration Program - 06/03/2019

~~“On June 3, 2019, the Director of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), pursuant to the authority set forth in the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, and in collaboration with the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), submitted a Section 1115 Medicaid demonstration application for the District Medicaid Program to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for review and approval….The District is seeking approval to incorporate the following services and service changes for individuals participating under the demonstration:• Treatment of adults (21-64 years old) with SMI or SUD in IMD inpatient or residential settings• Crisis Stabilization Services, including changes to Crisis Psychological Emergency Program and Mobile Crisis Services and the addition of Psychiatric Residential Crisis Stabilization• Recovery Support Services, including SUD services provided by certified peer counselors and Clubhouse Peer-Run rehabilitative supports• Trauma-Informed Services• Supported Employment Services” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: https://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington DC’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
0.47%
Change from
2018 to 2019
705,749
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.6%
Change from
2018 to 2019
43,484
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-18.63%
Change from
2018 to 2019
14,137
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-12.33%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.51%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.01%
Change from
2018 to 2019
79.84%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 705,749
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 43,484
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 14,137
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 351,504
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.51%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.84%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 33,866
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 44,547
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 12,660
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 59,236
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,898
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,578
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 2,738
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,160

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 846
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 13,422

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 2,427
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 7,209
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 10,166
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 23.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 13.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 356
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 338
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,508
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 27.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,178
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 30,500
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 146
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 63

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $2,638,051
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $5,270,070
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $18,468,656
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,675,061
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 401
Number of people served in facility based work. 378
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 714
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 61.86

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.31%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 9.03%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 76.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 34.22%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 54.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 9.85%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 0

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services.  (Page 216) Title II

 The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 270) Title 1I

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title 1I

DC Gov’t as Model Employer:
In the past year, DDS has partnered with DC Human Resources (DCHR) to work towards the District becoming a model employer of people with disabilities. First, DDS has developed and is piloting the Aspiring Professionals program. This is a paid internship program that places people with disabilities in positions throughout the DC government, in positions where the person has a real possibility of being hired. So far, DDS has placed 21 people with disabilities in internships and with 4 having completed their internships, 3 have been hired to date and the 4th was offered an extension on his internship, funded by the host organization.
Next, DDS/RSA funds a position within DCHR so that there is a staff person with expertise and focused attention on recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees with disabilities throughout the DC government and providing technical assistance to DC agencies regarding employment of people with disabilities. (Page 274) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Customized Employment

~~• INCREASE PROVIDER ACCESS TO TRAINING: IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT RSA PARTNER WITH THE THEIR COMMUNITY RESOURCE PROVIDERS TO PROVIDE THE SAME TRAININGS OFFERED TO THE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION COUNSELORS AS IT RELATES TO IMPROVED SERVICES TO PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES. TRAININGS SHOULD INCLUDE: PERSON CENTERED THINKING TRAINING, CUSTOMIZED EMPLOYMENT AND OTHER RELATED TRAININGS. (Page 214) Title II

Increase Provider Access to Training: RSA currently offers PCT training targeted to VR providers. Additionally, to support providers to build capacity for customized employment, employer engagement, and other competencies related to supporting people with disabilities to achieve strong employment outcomes, RSA is offering capacity-building training through support from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy and their Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). The District was one of 10 states selected as Core States for this funding support. To support capacity-building, we are offering two Training-of-Trainers programs. For one, we will train 25-30 people to become ACRE-Certified Trainers. ACRE is the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators. ACRE’s curriculum is designed to “improve employment services for individuals with disabilities by providing competency-based training to professionals working in this field. [People trained in ACRE competencies] seek to improve outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities who receive community-based employment services.” This training will support a strong provider network, building their capacity to implement best practices, with a focus on providers of supported employment, employment readiness and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) services. (Page 216) Title II

In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

Evidenced Based Supported Employment (EBSE), and the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE) among others. While DCRSA is no longer receiving direct training of staff from GWU as was in the past following the reorganization of TACE and initiation of new training entities such as Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) and Youth Technical Assistance Center (Y-TAC) by the Department of Education these new training entities are well equipped to provide needed rehabilitation counseling trainings as well as WIOA technical support. In 2017 DCRSA signed an agreement with WINTAC which will boost training alliance and consequently provide opportunities for improved best practices in vocational rehabilitation services, targeted outcomes, and professional development. DCRSA will continue to receive trainings and technical support from these entities especially as it relates to WIOA and its implications for the vocational rehabilitation program. In 2017 WINTAC staff provided technical training on the new WIOA Common Performance Measures and PreETS to DCRSA staff that included management staff, supervisors, counselors, and other stakeholders. DCRSA is currently planning with WINTAC to have Customized Employment training in 2018. It’s hoped that this training will aid in bolstering employment opportunities for persons with most severe disabilities. (Page 239) Title II

• DCRSA is entering into an intensive TA agreement with the WINTAC and the Y-TAC to provide training to their staff and service providers in customized employment. The organization is encouraged to fully implement this training program throughout the District to provide an option for individuals with the most significant disabilities to obtain and maintain competitive employment. (Page 243) Title II

Provide customized employment training for Human Care Agreement providers and DCRSA staff as part of the project with the WINTAC. The customized employment training will develop the capacity of DCRSA staff and the CRP network throughout the District to provide CE to DCRSA consumers;
• DCRSA is encouraged to expedite the development and use of the vendor report card system they have been working on for several years; (Page 246) Title II

• DCRSA should consider trying to find a way to sustain the employer roundtable events that were held prior to the dissolution to the BRU. These events were touted as an excellent form of outreach to employers and a valuable service to clients. (Page 247) Title II

• DCRSA should ensure that their internal staff focused on business relations and job development attend the customized employment training when it is offered (Page 247) Title II

b. Provide training on customized employment and employer engagement for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA and providers to provide this on an ongoing basis. (Page 253) Title II

Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 255) Title II

The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities and chronic mental illness. This happens, in part, through monthly meetings in addition to other training. In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance-based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. --In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes. (Page 269-270 ) Title II

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support: for those identified in Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit. Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling; Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short-term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area. Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 272) Title II

The administration expanded it Business Relations Unit and refocused its efforts on supporting job placement. Lastly, the administration hired external monitors, who provide monitoring and technical assistance to contract provider agencies. From FY 2014 to present, the administration has been focusing more on quality, developing a training schedule with the GW Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), to improve the quality and consistency of services provided. In 2017 and following the phasing out of TACE, the DCRSA entered into training alliance with Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) which is funded by the Department of Education to provide technical assistance and trainings around WIOA, customized employment, HCA provider capacity building, PreETS, and other vocational rehabilitation trainings. The administration has also been reviewing and revising all policies and procedures, and providing training to staff on any changes, to ensure that services are consistent with District and federal regulations. (Page 275) Title II

Goal 2: Implement improved procedures with DCDDA in order to ensure that more persons referred from DDA achieve a successful outcome. One VR counselor is being designated and assigned to work specifically with this population. This counselor will then develop relationships with DDA staff, in order to ensure an effective referral. In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. (Page 278) Title II

Supported Employment services are available to any DCRSA client who is certified as having a most significant disability and for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred or has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of that disability, and for whom an appropriate plan for extended services can be developed. DCRSA has identified two primary populations that require the use of supported employment services: persons with serious mental illness (SMI) or serious emotional disturbance (SED) and persons with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The community rehabilitation providers provide to the two populations supported employment services which include intake, assessment and job coaching. In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. Each provider provides individualized services to consumers. Their efforts are geared toward competitive placements in an integrated work environment. At times, a company or a government agency may hire several clients, but the clients are not placed within the same work area to ensure that they are in an integrated work setting. With their rehabilitation specialist’s assistance, clients make informed choices to select their vocational goals. If a client chooses to change that goal during the supported employment process, their VR specialist assists and the new goal is implemented. Every effort is made to ensure clients are placed in jobs that are consistent with their interests and abilities. An "any job will do" attitude is never acceptable. Employment Specialists/Job Coaches spend valuable time with clients teaching them about the workplace’s expectations and the required tasks, assuring also that they know who to ask when assistance is needed. Time is spent with the person on the worksite who is identified as the natural support person as well to ensure that they are comfortable and prepared to provide workplace support as needed. (Page 280) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 40) Title I

1.3 - Align policies, procedures, and performance measures and share data across programs to eliminate barriers to integration.
1.4 - Blend funding and utilize shared contracts to avoid duplication of resources.
1.5 - Foster environment of collaboration through cross-training staff and shared case management. (Page 45) Title 1

8. The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes,, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 50) Title 1

As noted previously, only about $40 million of the over $120 million that is budgeted annually for District programs that have at least some workforce development components comes from the federal government.[1] Accordingly, agencies will engage in planning regarding blended funding, shared contracts, and resource contributions to ensure they are maximizing resources. The District is already beginning to improve coordination between federally and locally funded resources, including through alignment of year-round youth services programming and connections to the Mayor Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Emplo