West Virginia

States - Big Screen

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.76%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,792,147
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2018 to 2019
178,229
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.65%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,719
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
12.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.38%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.14%
Change from
2018 to 2019
72.14%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,815,857 1,805,832 1,792,147
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 188,696 175,002 178,229
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 49,199 49,839 57,719
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 621,100 633,203 626,123
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 26.07% 28.48% 32.38%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.23% 71.32% 72.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.20% 5.30% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 25.50% 24.30% 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.50% 16.30% 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 185,891 169,467 175,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 175,597 169,210 172,424
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 342,941 317,007 327,823
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,123 13,931 11,777
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,307 2,764 3,773
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,048 799
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 394 917 448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,525 5,013 6,219
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,820 N/A 1,066

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,909 1,860 1,798
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.60% 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 87,754 86,060 83,775

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,598 5,671 5,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 11,658 9,923 9,085
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 31,805 27,243 24,473
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.70% 20.80% 21.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% 0.00% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.90% 4.80% 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.70% 2.00% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,196 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,677 2 164
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 475 489 180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A 207 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,673 2,694 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 8 13 19
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 6 9 12
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 75.00% 69.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.32 0.49 0.69

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 32.00% 24.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,287 3,367 2,068
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 142,511 140,211 137,160
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 50 48 66
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 102 136 106

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,220,045 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,933,096 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 35.00% N/A N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,600 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 46.31 N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.46% 64.65% 64.64%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.07% 7.67% 7.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.72% 1.49% 1.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 94.75% 99.67% 99.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 16.78% 19.22% 16.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 51.44% 58.88% 58.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.34% 69.09% 69.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.66% 39.66% 42.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 8 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 8 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 264 241 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 264 241 59

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. (Page 243) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow—along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state—appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 238) Title IV

—The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 243) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:….
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 62) Title I

Region 3 will encourage the co-enrollment of high risk Out-of-school Youth, ages 18-24, as both WIOA Adult (Title II) and WIOA Youth participants. This has been realized through dual enrollments with the YouthBuild Program in the region, as well as the Employment for Independent Living Program, which serves foster youth. Blending and braiding these resources only increases the level of support offered to enrolled youth. (Page 79) Title I

• The braiding of WIOA Title I—B funded programs with other youth—directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low—income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year—round services and summer employment activities. (Page 94) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out—of—school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements:
a. tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent;
b. alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;
c. paid and unpaid work experiences, including summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; pre—apprenticeship programs; internships and job shadowing; and on—the—job training opportunities;
d. occupational skill training;
e. education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;
f. leadership development opportunities;
g. supportive services;
h. adult mentoring;
i. follow—up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;
j. comprehensive guidance and counseling;
k. financial literacy education;
l. entrepreneurial skills training;
m. services that provide labor market and employment information about in—demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area; and
n. activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training. (Page 174) Title II

School to Work Transition

~~Pre—employment transition services, including job exploration counseling; work—based learning experiences; counseling on enrollment opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self—advocacy, are provided for those who need assistance in finding a career path that matches their interests and abilities. Once a career path has been selected, post—secondary education and training programs are made available with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services funds to help individuals get the specialized college, apprenticeship, or employment supports they need to be successful in the workplace. (Page 49) Title IV

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 167-168) Title I

In FY 2015, DRS re—structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre—employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 227) Title IV

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post—secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system. (Page 236) Title IV

In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV

In addition to ongoing program activities, DRS will host a one week summer workshop for transition students who are juniors entering into their senior year of high school. The workshop will be held in seven areas across the state. DRS staff participating include the PETS Counselor, Employment Specialist, and RSA assigned to the PETS territory. Class will start at 9:00am and end at 4:00pm. Class size for each of the seven workshops will be approximately 30 students. Students will earn minimum wage for the time that they attend. DRS is also requesting WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students.
Topics to be covered:
-Career planning
-Career preparation
-SSI/SSDI Information
-Understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, e.g., social security card, driver’s license, birth certificate, pay stubs.
-Communication
-Conflict Management (Page 307; 314; 319) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~The state will encourage Local Workforce Development Boards to engage in partnerships with local educational entities, businesses, community—based organizations, etc. in order to communicate the benefits of technical training and the development of robust and comprehensive career pathways models. (Page 50) Title I

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development
It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and/or training for skills that lead to quality employment in high—demand jobs or entry—level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low—skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation, or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 60; 75; 87-88; 296) Title III

The state will assess the overall effectiveness of the workforce system and those educational programs that support and work with it on the basis of their collective ability to produce career pathways leading to industry—valued, recognized postsecondary credentials and apprenticeship enrollments. (Page 61) Title III

The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with leading and emergent industry sectors’ skills needs.
• Career pathways: enabling of progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development corresponds with a labor market payoff for those being trained or educated. (Page 62) Title I

The Region 7 WDB works with employer partnerships, community and technical colleges, secondary and post-secondary schools to establish credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills, and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment especially those with disabilities. (Page 74) Title I

Industry-led partnerships are coupled with Career Pathways. Region 5 Job Center Operator, Core and Required Partners have implemented Career Pathways initiatives in Health Care, IT and CDL Training. Career Pathways Services are diverse with multiple entry and exit points that allow individuals with varying degrees of ability to have realistic access to pathways. (Page 75) Title I

DRS continues to inform its consumers about available career pathway programs available through Adult Education, Career and Technical Education, the Community and Technical College System, and four-year colleges. In 2016, DRS assisted 1,650 consumers with four-year college training, 423 consumers with junior/community college training and 259 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. In 2017, DRS assisted 1,660 consumers with four-year college training, 433 consumers with junior/community college training, and 326 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. (Page 75) Title I

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team will continue working toward a desk manual of Career Pathways based on the Demand Occupation List within the MOV-WDB region. The Career Pathway manual will align occupations within industries as well as required degree, diploma, or certification. Career Planners will promote a career pathway system in MOV that includes ITA services potentially followed by OJT with an employer to complete or continue the career path of an individual. Working with employers to expand the career path of their employees through Incumbent Worker training to expand the skill sets of current employees and promote the development of new technology on the job. (Page 76) Title I

Strategy 3.3: Educate individuals (job—seekers and employers) and encourage career pathways in training and employment environments.
Region 1 provides counseling/career services to support individuals with their career goals. We utilize resources such as the WorkForce GPS and WV Career Pathways to help individuals navigate through the career pathway system to enter training that meets the demands of local businesses. (Page 77) Title III

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team goal of creating a Career Pathway desk manual is that it will serve as resource for Adult, Youth, and Partner Agency front-line staff to utilize in working with program participants to develop training and employment goals. The Career Pathway desk manual will be a resource utilized by the MOV-WDB contracted Business Service Rep. to assist the review of MOV-WDB Region employer needs based on the outlined training programs. training curriculums of specific programs, and skill-sets obtained through training program completion. (Page 77) Title I

DRS has created PathwaysWV.org, a website for students with disabilities to gain valuable and relevant information on career pathways, education and training opportunities, and current and future in-demand occupations. (Page 78) Title I

The State will mainstream job seekers with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to the maximum extent possible by offering realistic entry points into career pathways and by ensuring necessary supportive services are in place and coordinated across agencies, so that those individuals with the most significant barriers to employment are successful in accessing and navigating career pathways. When appropriate, job seekers will be co—enrolled between core and other partner programs in order to provide the most comprehensive services possible. (Page 86) Title IV

The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post—secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro— credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide. (Page 87) Title I

The state will take further actions to coordinate services between WIOA core programs and non— core programs and services to create an effective career pathway system. These actions will include the following:
• The education agencies and educational institutions will work with the State WDB and LWDBs to build career pathways that include secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs of study. (Page 93) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education will work with the education system to support and develop career pathways identified by employers and the workforce system. This support will be provided by developing and implementing bridge and pre—bridge programs as part of the Moving Pathways Forward imitative. During program year 2013—2014 the West Virginia Adult Education Program applied for and was selected to take part in the multi—year Moving Pathways Forward Project. This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE). West Virginia will be one of fourteen states to be provided with technical assistance in the development of state and local career pathways systems that will assist youth and adults to achieve success in postsecondary education training and employment in high—growth and high demand occupations. (Page 98) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education's response to the WIOA requirement to increase the number of low-skill adults' transitioning into postsecondary education and training has been to focus on participation in a career pathway system and, within this system of career pathways programs,

Bridge programs.

Career pathway programs are a "series of connected education and training programs and support services that enable individuals to secure employment within a specific industry or occupational sector, and to advance over time to successively higher levels of education and employment within that sector" (Jenkins 2006,6). Career pathways often include "stackable" credentials and accelerated courses offered at flexible times that support student entry and exit along the pathway.

Bridge programs, one of the first steps in a career pathway for low-skill adults, support the transition from adult education to the next step in an occupational pathway. By connecting adult education programs to community college occupational programs, bridge programs seek to increase the rates at which low-skill adults move into college-level occupational programs, persist in these programs, and obtain postsecondary credentials in industries offering family-sustaining wages and career advancement. (Page 202) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning. We partner with employers to provide work—based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job—driven training rather than erroneous skills training. Other: • Development of apprenticeship training programs (Page 59) Title IV

3(7) AND INCLUDES REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP. “IN-DEMAND INDUSTRY SECTOR OR OCCUPATION” IS DEFINED AT WIOA SECTION 3(23).

We will create an approach based on the needs of the job seekers as well as the needs of the employer. Our workforce development system must examine the needs of the employer, assess the skills and skills gaps of the workforce and then create solutions to ensure maximum benefit to both customer groups.

Strategy 2.1: Work with employers to identify true workforce needs.

Strategy 2.2: Assess skill gaps and needs of individuals seeking employment and/or training.

Strategy 2.3: Ensure that individuals with barriers, especially those with disabilities, to employment have increased access to and for opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services.

Strategy 2.4: Make available training programs that solve both the needs of employers and individuals. (Page 65) Title I

The State will promote and support the creation of pre—apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs, (ApprenticeshipUSA) particularly in non-traditional occupations and for non-traditional populations, as part of relevant career pathway models. The State will add apprenticeship opportunities to West Virginia WorkForce programs and will promote them as job/training options to job seekers. (Page 88-89) Title I

The State will establish statewide and regional lists of industry—recognized credentials with a focus on identifying credentials along established career pathways, including badges, micro—credentials and entry level credentials appropriate for individuals with barriers to employment. The lists will include academic credentials as well as credentials demonstrating job readiness and the attainment of employability skills through workforce preparation activities. The State will consult with LWDBs and engaged employers, including through Registered Apprenticeship programs and industry partnerships, to ensure that the credential lists reflect skills that are in demand. (Page 89) Title I

Programs will confirm that they are providing learning activities that are contextualized, so students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for transition to their individual career pathway. Programs will ensure that the teaching staff offer a variety of instructional strategies that engage students and promote student persistence and retention; this should include whole group instruction, peer tutoring, and individualized instruction along with distance learning. The variety of instructional strategies will integrate academics, career counseling, and soft skills to bolster the students’ ability to gain employment, go to college, or enter a training program that could include an apprenticeship. Integrated education and training programs will align with the needs of the local labor market The occupational training provided as part of an integrated education and training program will be connected to realistic, existing employment opportunities in the local area that connect to a career pathway for the participants. (Page 196) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DRS also included representatives from WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students. A concerted effort was made to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) to students in the CEO Summits. Topics covered included career planning, career preparation, SSI/SSDI Information, understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, communication, conflict management, employer expectations, attendance and punctuality, timeliness of task completion, being able to work without supervision, positive work ethic, managing multiple tasks, high-growth jobs, personal brand, and job hunting tools such as resumes, cover letters, interviews, and digital profiles. (Page 80) Title IV

Other agencies with which DRS collaborates for the provision of time—limited supported employment services are:
1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
2. West Virginia Title XIX——Home and Community—Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs.
In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Under Title IV, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) provides services that help allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning (work—based training, and on the job training). Title IV emphasizes the need to provide pre—employment transition services (PETS) for students with disabilities prior to their exiting the school system. Additionally, the new federal act emphasizes creating employer engagement within the community by creating work—based learning experiences for individuals, thus allowing employers to be matched with skilled workers. (Page 59) Title IV

DRS also coordinates with employers through participation and membership in various community and regional organizations. These activities range from employer—specific organizations to public—private partnerships and allow DRS to better understand the needs of employers while jointly developing employment—related activities. Some of these partnerships include:
—Regional WDBs;
—Beckley—Raleigh Chamber of Commerce;
—Fayette County Chamber of Commerce;
—Weirton Area Chamber of commerce;
—Employer engagement and worksite tours for VR consumers through partnerships with community colleges such as Mountwest and Bridge Valley; and
—Employer tours through partnerships with high school and adult vocational/technical centers including South Branch Career and Technical Center and James Rumsey Technical Institute. (Page 241) Title IV

The resource guide provides information regarding staffing services, training programs and incentives for hiring people with disabilities, financial incentives, accessibility assessments, accommodating employees with disabilities, basic disability etiquette, attitudinal barriers, the Americans with Disabilities Act, locating a DRS office, and where to find additional resources. DRS Employment Specialists conducted over 1,000 employer visits with more than 800 employers in both FYs 2016 and 2017. (Page 328) Title IV
 

Data Collection

The West Virginia WDS will utilize its integrated data system to monitor and evaluate the performance of the WIOA core partner programs in relation to the four state goals described above. The data collected for the common performance measures and the WIOA Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) will provide all of the data elements needed to monitor and evaluate performance on the state goals. Because these data are required to be collected by all WIOA core programs, there will be no additional burden posed on the programs. (Page 85) Title I

West Virginia has an integrated data collection and performance management system (MACC) that covers the following programs:

• WIOA Adult, Dislocated Workers, Youth

• National Dislocated Worker Grants

• Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

• Wagner—Peyser • Trade Adjustment Assistance

• Jobs for Veterans State Grants

• West Virginia’s Unemployment Compensation MIS interfaces with MACC.

All other partners have management information systems that are customized to meet the needs of their programs. WorkForce West Virginia, Rehabilitation Services, and Adult Education will each make the necessary changes to their systems to collect the required data elements. Initially, common data elements will be shared among the partners through a regular file exchange; ultimately linkages will be put in place to allow partners to access the information in real time. Employment and wage data will be shared with partners to the extent allowed by the WRIS/WRIS2 agreement. (Page 109) Title I

The WIOA core partners in West Virginia, including WorkForce West Virginia, WV Division of Rehabilitation Services, and WV Adult Education will implement a practical and effective system to fulfill the data alignment and integration requirements of WIOA. Each program has a unique system of data collection that is tailored to meet its unique needs. To maximize the efficient exchange of data to support assessment and evaluation, the core partners have collaborated to begin the development and implementation of a system for data sharing. Data will be uploaded to a data warehouse operated by WorkForce West Virginia and/or an IT contractor, and retrieved by each partner as needed and updated where appropriate based on consumers’ progress in the One—Stop Center system. This will allow all partners to track common consumer service delivery while minimizing duplication of service.

This system operates as follows:

1. A data warehouse will be created to store mandated data collected/shared by the three partners. The three core partners are identifying data elements that represent common intake information in the One—Stop system.

2. Each consumer in the system on implementation will be assigned a unique participant identifier upon entering the system (Workforce West Virginia, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult Basic Ed). The date each consumer enters and exits each program is recorded. The unique participant identifier and program entry/exit dates will be used to identify common consumers across the core programs and provide access to the common data elements will be collected by other partners and stored in the One—Stop system.

3. To ensure effectiveness and efficiency in the One—Stop system, data collected by each program on new consumers are sent to the One—Stop data warehouse and are made available for each program to track service delivery of common consumers. This process will ensure that service delivery for each consumer can be tracked across all programs.

4. Data stored in the warehouse will be used to generate reports required under section 116, performance accountability system. Alignment of each partner’s system of data collection will improve service delivery to job seekers at the One—Stop, including individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, by providing the three core partners with more information about how consumers are being assisted across programs in the One—Stop system in West Virginia. This information enables the core partners to have a greater understanding of how the needs of their consumers are being met across programs, to track their progress, and to minimize duplication of service. Alignment and integration of data across programs in a data sharing system supports a consumer—focused approach to service delivery that will generate quality employment outcomes for consumers in the One—Stop system. (Page 130-131) Title III

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on:

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;

—The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; and

—The indicators of effectiveness in serving employers. (Page 299; 316-317) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DRS agrees with the Council’s recommendation to continue to strengthen the link between the agency and the public school system, as this link is considered vital to the continued referral of students with disabilities. DRS continues to maintain a strong connection and working relationship with the West Virginia Department of Education, as well as the county—level Boards of Education. The agency has updated its Memorandums of Understanding with the WV Department of Education and all 55 County Boards of Education to reflect changes concerning Section 511 and pre-employment transition services (pre-ETS). With the implementation of WIOA, DRS has increased collaborative efforts with school staff at the state and local level, particularly regarding the provision of pre—employment transition services to high school students with disabilities beginning in the tenth grade. (Page 220) Title IV

In consultation with DRS, the WV Office of Special Education amended its policies to demonstrate compliance with WIOA Section 511, and include pre-ETS on the Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Additionally, the WV Department of Education plans to reduce the age at which Transition must be addressed on the IEP from 16 to 14 by the year 2019. Therefore, education and VR partners demonstrate alignment of not only WIOA and IDEA regulations, but also a shared vision of all students with disabilities offered the same transition service opportunities. After the implementation of the new policies, DRS and WV Department of Education staff conducted cross-trainings across the state. Those in attendance were County Special Education Directors, teachers, principals, IEP Specialists, and case managers. Staff were instructed on how to involve DRS Counselors in the coordination and provision of Pre-ETS for students with disabilities through the Transition Services Planner. Additionally, staff were instructed on how and when to use and distribute other transition materials for the tracking of and referral to pre-ETS and other transition services. (Page 221) Title IV

The cooperative agreements between DRS and WVDOE, both at the state and the local levels, assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education, vocational education, and/or vocational rehabilitation services is identified and that the appropriate services, including pre—employment transition services, are made available to the individual. The cooperative agreements cover:
1. Determination of DRS responsibility;
2. Student/consumer referrals;
3. Joint development of the Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
4. Services;
5. Coordinated planning and payment of services;
6. Confidentiality of information;
7. Subminimum wage employment (per the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act);
8. Local agreements;
9. General supervision; and
10. Dispute resolution. (Page 226-227) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One—Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability—related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 137) Title III

Veterans

All core programs are participating either by physical presence or part of a shared electronic referral system. Further, required partners participating include: • Trade Adjustment Assistance • Second Chance Act • Jobs for Veterans Grant (LVER/DVOP) • Job Corp • Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) • National Farmworker Jobs Program • Senior Community Services Employment Program (SCSEP) • Unemployment Compensation • Housing and Urban Development (HUD) • Career and Technical Education (Perkins) • Indian & Native American Programs • Youthbuild (Page 47) Title I Priority of Service for Veterans is implemented by WorkForce West Virginia in accordance with Title 38 part III Ch. 42. 4215 via One Stop Career Centers located throughout the state, by using clear and concise guidelines, and by trained staff familiar with state guidelines. To ensure access to services for veterans and veterans with significant barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, the state has established formal guidance regarding priority of service for veterans that all Wagner Peyser and Workforce West Virginia staff must follow. (Page 136) Title I

To effectively and efficiently facilitate the provision services to eligible veterans and eligible persons, a Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialist (DVOPS) is assigned to each of the seven proposed One—Stop Centers located in West Virginia. However, most local areas exceed the minimum of one DVOPS staff depending on criteria involving necessity and population. (Page 136) Title I

Wagner—Peyser staff are the veteran’s and eligible person’s first point of contact in the One—Stop Centers. At this point, veterans are assessed and entered into the service delivery system where veterans and eligible persons receive priority of service and veterans that have a Significant Barrier to Employment of (SBE) and are in need of intensive services are referred to DVOPS staff. DVOPS staff continue the assessment process to determine the veterans’ employment options, assist with the Veterans Employment Development Plan, and provides information to the veterans or eligible persons about a wide range of resources available. (Page 137) Title I

The state will incorporate Registered Apprenticeships into its strategies and services by requiring the WorkForce WV One Stop Centers to seek out and assist Registered Apprenticeship Programs with recruitment into their individual training programs. Recruitment will include posting and advertisement of Registered Apprenticeship statewide announcements, job orders, phone notifications of apprenticeship openings, veteran priority of service, pre-application testing, initial screening of eligibility requirements and referral. Referral not only includes referral to the job order but to our partners for orientation and eligibility determination for WIOA funding for training. Additional strategies and services will include making space available to the apprenticeship programs for onsite job fairs for recruitment, advertising space for apprenticeship marketing items, space for onsite interviews and assist, as needed, with testing applicants at offsite locations. (Page 153) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DRS has continued collaborative efforts with the WV Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BHHF) to expand employment opportunities for individuals with behavioral health challenges (e.g., mental health, substance use disorders, and developmental disabilities). During the first half of Program Year 2017, 284 individuals referred by mental health providers have become DRS consumers. (Page 73) Title I

11. whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs; (Page 125) Title I

Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 195) Title I

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Adult Behavioral Health assures and provides access to services and supports to meet the mental health and co—occurring needs of adults and transitional age youth, enabling them to live, learn, work, and participate actively in their communities. The Division establishes standards to ensure effective and culturally competent care to promote recovery. The Division sets policy, promotes self—determination, protects human rights, and supports mental health training and research. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has teamed up with them on several efforts, such as having them present on “Behavioral Health Connections” at the DRS 2014 Statewide Training Conference, assisting them in the planning of their 2015 Integrated Behavioral Health Care Conference and exhibiting at that conference whereby information regarding DRS was disseminated to approximately 700 behavioral health professionals, and serving as a subject matter expert on their Clinical Adult Review Process (CARP), which looks at the needs of individuals transitioning out of state psychiatric facilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health is the Single State Authority for Children’s Mental Health charged with monitoring and improving the children’s behavioral health service delivery system. The Division is responsible for overseeing the implementation and evaluation of the federal block grant. The Division works collaboratively across all child serving systems, at both the state and local level, to ensure access to quality behavioral health services and supports for children and adolescents with and/or at risk for serious emotional disturbances. The Division provides leadership and technical assistance to facilitate an effective system of care for children and their families. DRS continues a working relationship with this office and their partners and, for example, has been working with the Expanded School Mental Health Steering Team Initiative. DRS has also worked together with The Family Advocacy, Support, & Training (FAST) program which is a statewide parent and youth network that engages families in the planning, management, and evaluation of their child’s mental health treatment and service needs. (Page 244-245) Title IV

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 247) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 47

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

Planning the Future for Students with Disabilities - 08/01/2018

~~“This guide is intended to provide information that is applicable to “most” young adults. However, individual needs, developmental levels and circumstances vary. Parental/guardian involvement and young adults’ input is highly recommended in all phases of transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Department of Education Policy 2520.16: West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards - 07/01/2018

“West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards defines the alternate academic achievement standards grades K-12 for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities and provides rigorous and challenging standards to meet the requirements of Policy 2510.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires the state to adopt challenging alternate academic achievement standards, linked to the state’s grade-level academic content standards, for students with significant cognitive disabilities, to form the basis of instruction, assessment and accountability for this group.   A student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team determines whether the student has a significant cognitive disability requiring instruction on these standards.  West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards will ensure alignment of the state’s alternate academic achievement standards with the West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Standards in the areas of English language arts, mathematics, and science for grades K-12 which is consistent with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

USDOL Investigation results in WV Employer Paying $119,040 to Employees with Disabilities to Resolve Violations - 03/21/2018

“After a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation, a federal jury has entered a verdict against Randolph County Sheltered Workshop Inc. - doing business as Seneca Designs - and ordered the Elkins nonprofit to pay $119,040 in back wages to 34 employees. Entered in the U.S District Court for the Northern District of West Virginia-Elkins Division, the investigation found that the organization violated the minimum wage provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Division investigators found violations that resulted from the employer’s failure to obtain a certificate authorizing their payment of sub-minimum wages to employees with disabilities. Absent that certificate, employees were legally due the full federal minimum wage. The Agency also found that the employer failed to post information about rights for employees with disabilities paid at a sub-minimum wage, as the law requires.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for WV’s Waiver Transition Plan Application - 07/01/2018

~~This review has been conducted in two sections.  To begin the transition plan development process, BMS conducted a review of the HCBS services provided by the current West Virginia waivers impacted by the new rule (Exhibit 1) as well as the waivers’ supporting documentation (operation manuals, authorizing legislation, waiver applications, etc.).  The State used CMS guidance documents, particularly “Summary of Regulatory Requirements for Home and Community Based Settings” to guide the analysis.   The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (WVDHHR) Recommendations from the HCBS

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.76%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,792,147
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2018 to 2019
178,229
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.65%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,719
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
12.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.38%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.14%
Change from
2018 to 2019
72.14%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,815,857 1,805,832 1,792,147
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 188,696 175,002 178,229
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 49,199 49,839 57,719
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 621,100 633,203 626,123
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 26.07% 28.48% 32.38%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.23% 71.32% 72.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.20% 5.30% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 25.50% 24.30% 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.50% 16.30% 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 185,891 169,467 175,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 175,597 169,210 172,424
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 342,941 317,007 327,823
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,123 13,931 11,777
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,307 2,764 3,773
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,048 799
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 394 917 448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,525 5,013 6,219
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,820 N/A 1,066

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,909 1,860 1,798
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.60% 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 87,754 86,060 83,775

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,598 5,671 5,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 11,658 9,923 9,085
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 31,805 27,243 24,473
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.70% 20.80% 21.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% 0.00% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.90% 4.80% 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.70% 2.00% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,196 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,677 2 164
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 475 489 180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A 207 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,673 2,694 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 8 13 19
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 6 9 12
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 75.00% 69.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.32 0.49 0.69

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 32.00% 24.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,287 3,367 2,068
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 142,511 140,211 137,160
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 50 48 66
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 102 136 106

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,220,045 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,933,096 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 35.00% N/A N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,600 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 46.31 N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.46% 64.65% 64.64%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.07% 7.67% 7.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.72% 1.49% 1.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 94.75% 99.67% 99.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 16.78% 19.22% 16.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 51.44% 58.88% 58.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.34% 69.09% 69.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.66% 39.66% 42.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 8 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 8 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 264 241 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 264 241 59

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. (Page 243) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow—along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state—appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 238) Title IV

—The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 243) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:….
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 62) Title I

Region 3 will encourage the co-enrollment of high risk Out-of-school Youth, ages 18-24, as both WIOA Adult (Title II) and WIOA Youth participants. This has been realized through dual enrollments with the YouthBuild Program in the region, as well as the Employment for Independent Living Program, which serves foster youth. Blending and braiding these resources only increases the level of support offered to enrolled youth. (Page 79) Title I

• The braiding of WIOA Title I—B funded programs with other youth—directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low—income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year—round services and summer employment activities. (Page 94) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out—of—school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements:
a. tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent;
b. alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;
c. paid and unpaid work experiences, including summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; pre—apprenticeship programs; internships and job shadowing; and on—the—job training opportunities;
d. occupational skill training;
e. education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;
f. leadership development opportunities;
g. supportive services;
h. adult mentoring;
i. follow—up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;
j. comprehensive guidance and counseling;
k. financial literacy education;
l. entrepreneurial skills training;
m. services that provide labor market and employment information about in—demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area; and
n. activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training. (Page 174) Title II

School to Work Transition

~~Pre—employment transition services, including job exploration counseling; work—based learning experiences; counseling on enrollment opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self—advocacy, are provided for those who need assistance in finding a career path that matches their interests and abilities. Once a career path has been selected, post—secondary education and training programs are made available with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services funds to help individuals get the specialized college, apprenticeship, or employment supports they need to be successful in the workplace. (Page 49) Title IV

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 167-168) Title I

In FY 2015, DRS re—structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre—employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 227) Title IV

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post—secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system. (Page 236) Title IV

In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV

In addition to ongoing program activities, DRS will host a one week summer workshop for transition students who are juniors entering into their senior year of high school. The workshop will be held in seven areas across the state. DRS staff participating include the PETS Counselor, Employment Specialist, and RSA assigned to the PETS territory. Class will start at 9:00am and end at 4:00pm. Class size for each of the seven workshops will be approximately 30 students. Students will earn minimum wage for the time that they attend. DRS is also requesting WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students.
Topics to be covered:
-Career planning
-Career preparation
-SSI/SSDI Information
-Understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, e.g., social security card, driver’s license, birth certificate, pay stubs.
-Communication
-Conflict Management (Page 307; 314; 319) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~The state will encourage Local Workforce Development Boards to engage in partnerships with local educational entities, businesses, community—based organizations, etc. in order to communicate the benefits of technical training and the development of robust and comprehensive career pathways models. (Page 50) Title I

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development
It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and/or training for skills that lead to quality employment in high—demand jobs or entry—level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low—skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation, or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 60; 75; 87-88; 296) Title III

The state will assess the overall effectiveness of the workforce system and those educational programs that support and work with it on the basis of their collective ability to produce career pathways leading to industry—valued, recognized postsecondary credentials and apprenticeship enrollments. (Page 61) Title III

The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with leading and emergent industry sectors’ skills needs.
• Career pathways: enabling of progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development corresponds with a labor market payoff for those being trained or educated. (Page 62) Title I

The Region 7 WDB works with employer partnerships, community and technical colleges, secondary and post-secondary schools to establish credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills, and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment especially those with disabilities. (Page 74) Title I

Industry-led partnerships are coupled with Career Pathways. Region 5 Job Center Operator, Core and Required Partners have implemented Career Pathways initiatives in Health Care, IT and CDL Training. Career Pathways Services are diverse with multiple entry and exit points that allow individuals with varying degrees of ability to have realistic access to pathways. (Page 75) Title I

DRS continues to inform its consumers about available career pathway programs available through Adult Education, Career and Technical Education, the Community and Technical College System, and four-year colleges. In 2016, DRS assisted 1,650 consumers with four-year college training, 423 consumers with junior/community college training and 259 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. In 2017, DRS assisted 1,660 consumers with four-year college training, 433 consumers with junior/community college training, and 326 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. (Page 75) Title I

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team will continue working toward a desk manual of Career Pathways based on the Demand Occupation List within the MOV-WDB region. The Career Pathway manual will align occupations within industries as well as required degree, diploma, or certification. Career Planners will promote a career pathway system in MOV that includes ITA services potentially followed by OJT with an employer to complete or continue the career path of an individual. Working with employers to expand the career path of their employees through Incumbent Worker training to expand the skill sets of current employees and promote the development of new technology on the job. (Page 76) Title I

Strategy 3.3: Educate individuals (job—seekers and employers) and encourage career pathways in training and employment environments.
Region 1 provides counseling/career services to support individuals with their career goals. We utilize resources such as the WorkForce GPS and WV Career Pathways to help individuals navigate through the career pathway system to enter training that meets the demands of local businesses. (Page 77) Title III

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team goal of creating a Career Pathway desk manual is that it will serve as resource for Adult, Youth, and Partner Agency front-line staff to utilize in working with program participants to develop training and employment goals. The Career Pathway desk manual will be a resource utilized by the MOV-WDB contracted Business Service Rep. to assist the review of MOV-WDB Region employer needs based on the outlined training programs. training curriculums of specific programs, and skill-sets obtained through training program completion. (Page 77) Title I

DRS has created PathwaysWV.org, a website for students with disabilities to gain valuable and relevant information on career pathways, education and training opportunities, and current and future in-demand occupations. (Page 78) Title I

The State will mainstream job seekers with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to the maximum extent possible by offering realistic entry points into career pathways and by ensuring necessary supportive services are in place and coordinated across agencies, so that those individuals with the most significant barriers to employment are successful in accessing and navigating career pathways. When appropriate, job seekers will be co—enrolled between core and other partner programs in order to provide the most comprehensive services possible. (Page 86) Title IV

The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post—secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro— credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide. (Page 87) Title I

The state will take further actions to coordinate services between WIOA core programs and non— core programs and services to create an effective career pathway system. These actions will include the following:
• The education agencies and educational institutions will work with the State WDB and LWDBs to build career pathways that include secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs of study. (Page 93) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education will work with the education system to support and develop career pathways identified by employers and the workforce system. This support will be provided by developing and implementing bridge and pre—bridge programs as part of the Moving Pathways Forward imitative. During program year 2013—2014 the West Virginia Adult Education Program applied for and was selected to take part in the multi—year Moving Pathways Forward Project. This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE). West Virginia will be one of fourteen states to be provided with technical assistance in the development of state and local career pathways systems that will assist youth and adults to achieve success in postsecondary education training and employment in high—growth and high demand occupations. (Page 98) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education's response to the WIOA requirement to increase the number of low-skill adults' transitioning into postsecondary education and training has been to focus on participation in a career pathway system and, within this system of career pathways programs,

Bridge programs.

Career pathway programs are a "series of connected education and training programs and support services that enable individuals to secure employment within a specific industry or occupational sector, and to advance over time to successively higher levels of education and employment within that sector" (Jenkins 2006,6). Career pathways often include "stackable" credentials and accelerated courses offered at flexible times that support student entry and exit along the pathway.

Bridge programs, one of the first steps in a career pathway for low-skill adults, support the transition from adult education to the next step in an occupational pathway. By connecting adult education programs to community college occupational programs, bridge programs seek to increase the rates at which low-skill adults move into college-level occupational programs, persist in these programs, and obtain postsecondary credentials in industries offering family-sustaining wages and career advancement. (Page 202) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning. We partner with employers to provide work—based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job—driven training rather than erroneous skills training. Other: • Development of apprenticeship training programs (Page 59) Title IV

3(7) AND INCLUDES REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP. “IN-DEMAND INDUSTRY SECTOR OR OCCUPATION” IS DEFINED AT WIOA SECTION 3(23).

We will create an approach based on the needs of the job seekers as well as the needs of the employer. Our workforce development system must examine the needs of the employer, assess the skills and skills gaps of the workforce and then create solutions to ensure maximum benefit to both customer groups.

Strategy 2.1: Work with employers to identify true workforce needs.

Strategy 2.2: Assess skill gaps and needs of individuals seeking employment and/or training.

Strategy 2.3: Ensure that individuals with barriers, especially those with disabilities, to employment have increased access to and for opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services.

Strategy 2.4: Make available training programs that solve both the needs of employers and individuals. (Page 65) Title I

The State will promote and support the creation of pre—apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs, (ApprenticeshipUSA) particularly in non-traditional occupations and for non-traditional populations, as part of relevant career pathway models. The State will add apprenticeship opportunities to West Virginia WorkForce programs and will promote them as job/training options to job seekers. (Page 88-89) Title I

The State will establish statewide and regional lists of industry—recognized credentials with a focus on identifying credentials along established career pathways, including badges, micro—credentials and entry level credentials appropriate for individuals with barriers to employment. The lists will include academic credentials as well as credentials demonstrating job readiness and the attainment of employability skills through workforce preparation activities. The State will consult with LWDBs and engaged employers, including through Registered Apprenticeship programs and industry partnerships, to ensure that the credential lists reflect skills that are in demand. (Page 89) Title I

Programs will confirm that they are providing learning activities that are contextualized, so students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for transition to their individual career pathway. Programs will ensure that the teaching staff offer a variety of instructional strategies that engage students and promote student persistence and retention; this should include whole group instruction, peer tutoring, and individualized instruction along with distance learning. The variety of instructional strategies will integrate academics, career counseling, and soft skills to bolster the students’ ability to gain employment, go to college, or enter a training program that could include an apprenticeship. Integrated education and training programs will align with the needs of the local labor market The occupational training provided as part of an integrated education and training program will be connected to realistic, existing employment opportunities in the local area that connect to a career pathway for the participants. (Page 196) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DRS also included representatives from WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students. A concerted effort was made to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) to students in the CEO Summits. Topics covered included career planning, career preparation, SSI/SSDI Information, understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, communication, conflict management, employer expectations, attendance and punctuality, timeliness of task completion, being able to work without supervision, positive work ethic, managing multiple tasks, high-growth jobs, personal brand, and job hunting tools such as resumes, cover letters, interviews, and digital profiles. (Page 80) Title IV

Other agencies with which DRS collaborates for the provision of time—limited supported employment services are:
1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
2. West Virginia Title XIX——Home and Community—Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs.
In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Under Title IV, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) provides services that help allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning (work—based training, and on the job training). Title IV emphasizes the need to provide pre—employment transition services (PETS) for students with disabilities prior to their exiting the school system. Additionally, the new federal act emphasizes creating employer engagement within the community by creating work—based learning experiences for individuals, thus allowing employers to be matched with skilled workers. (Page 59) Title IV

DRS also coordinates with employers through participation and membership in various community and regional organizations. These activities range from employer—specific organizations to public—private partnerships and allow DRS to better understand the needs of employers while jointly developing employment—related activities. Some of these partnerships include:
—Regional WDBs;
—Beckley—Raleigh Chamber of Commerce;
—Fayette County Chamber of Commerce;
—Weirton Area Chamber of commerce;
—Employer engagement and worksite tours for VR consumers through partnerships with community colleges such as Mountwest and Bridge Valley; and
—Employer tours through partnerships with high school and adult vocational/technical centers including South Branch Career and Technical Center and James Rumsey Technical Institute. (Page 241) Title IV

The resource guide provides information regarding staffing services, training programs and incentives for hiring people with disabilities, financial incentives, accessibility assessments, accommodating employees with disabilities, basic disability etiquette, attitudinal barriers, the Americans with Disabilities Act, locating a DRS office, and where to find additional resources. DRS Employment Specialists conducted over 1,000 employer visits with more than 800 employers in both FYs 2016 and 2017. (Page 328) Title IV
 

Data Collection

The West Virginia WDS will utilize its integrated data system to monitor and evaluate the performance of the WIOA core partner programs in relation to the four state goals described above. The data collected for the common performance measures and the WIOA Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) will provide all of the data elements needed to monitor and evaluate performance on the state goals. Because these data are required to be collected by all WIOA core programs, there will be no additional burden posed on the programs. (Page 85) Title I

West Virginia has an integrated data collection and performance management system (MACC) that covers the following programs:

• WIOA Adult, Dislocated Workers, Youth

• National Dislocated Worker Grants

• Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

• Wagner—Peyser • Trade Adjustment Assistance

• Jobs for Veterans State Grants

• West Virginia’s Unemployment Compensation MIS interfaces with MACC.

All other partners have management information systems that are customized to meet the needs of their programs. WorkForce West Virginia, Rehabilitation Services, and Adult Education will each make the necessary changes to their systems to collect the required data elements. Initially, common data elements will be shared among the partners through a regular file exchange; ultimately linkages will be put in place to allow partners to access the information in real time. Employment and wage data will be shared with partners to the extent allowed by the WRIS/WRIS2 agreement. (Page 109) Title I

The WIOA core partners in West Virginia, including WorkForce West Virginia, WV Division of Rehabilitation Services, and WV Adult Education will implement a practical and effective system to fulfill the data alignment and integration requirements of WIOA. Each program has a unique system of data collection that is tailored to meet its unique needs. To maximize the efficient exchange of data to support assessment and evaluation, the core partners have collaborated to begin the development and implementation of a system for data sharing. Data will be uploaded to a data warehouse operated by WorkForce West Virginia and/or an IT contractor, and retrieved by each partner as needed and updated where appropriate based on consumers’ progress in the One—Stop Center system. This will allow all partners to track common consumer service delivery while minimizing duplication of service.

This system operates as follows:

1. A data warehouse will be created to store mandated data collected/shared by the three partners. The three core partners are identifying data elements that represent common intake information in the One—Stop system.

2. Each consumer in the system on implementation will be assigned a unique participant identifier upon entering the system (Workforce West Virginia, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult Basic Ed). The date each consumer enters and exits each program is recorded. The unique participant identifier and program entry/exit dates will be used to identify common consumers across the core programs and provide access to the common data elements will be collected by other partners and stored in the One—Stop system.

3. To ensure effectiveness and efficiency in the One—Stop system, data collected by each program on new consumers are sent to the One—Stop data warehouse and are made available for each program to track service delivery of common consumers. This process will ensure that service delivery for each consumer can be tracked across all programs.

4. Data stored in the warehouse will be used to generate reports required under section 116, performance accountability system. Alignment of each partner’s system of data collection will improve service delivery to job seekers at the One—Stop, including individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, by providing the three core partners with more information about how consumers are being assisted across programs in the One—Stop system in West Virginia. This information enables the core partners to have a greater understanding of how the needs of their consumers are being met across programs, to track their progress, and to minimize duplication of service. Alignment and integration of data across programs in a data sharing system supports a consumer—focused approach to service delivery that will generate quality employment outcomes for consumers in the One—Stop system. (Page 130-131) Title III

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on:

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;

—The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; and

—The indicators of effectiveness in serving employers. (Page 299; 316-317) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DRS agrees with the Council’s recommendation to continue to strengthen the link between the agency and the public school system, as this link is considered vital to the continued referral of students with disabilities. DRS continues to maintain a strong connection and working relationship with the West Virginia Department of Education, as well as the county—level Boards of Education. The agency has updated its Memorandums of Understanding with the WV Department of Education and all 55 County Boards of Education to reflect changes concerning Section 511 and pre-employment transition services (pre-ETS). With the implementation of WIOA, DRS has increased collaborative efforts with school staff at the state and local level, particularly regarding the provision of pre—employment transition services to high school students with disabilities beginning in the tenth grade. (Page 220) Title IV

In consultation with DRS, the WV Office of Special Education amended its policies to demonstrate compliance with WIOA Section 511, and include pre-ETS on the Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Additionally, the WV Department of Education plans to reduce the age at which Transition must be addressed on the IEP from 16 to 14 by the year 2019. Therefore, education and VR partners demonstrate alignment of not only WIOA and IDEA regulations, but also a shared vision of all students with disabilities offered the same transition service opportunities. After the implementation of the new policies, DRS and WV Department of Education staff conducted cross-trainings across the state. Those in attendance were County Special Education Directors, teachers, principals, IEP Specialists, and case managers. Staff were instructed on how to involve DRS Counselors in the coordination and provision of Pre-ETS for students with disabilities through the Transition Services Planner. Additionally, staff were instructed on how and when to use and distribute other transition materials for the tracking of and referral to pre-ETS and other transition services. (Page 221) Title IV

The cooperative agreements between DRS and WVDOE, both at the state and the local levels, assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education, vocational education, and/or vocational rehabilitation services is identified and that the appropriate services, including pre—employment transition services, are made available to the individual. The cooperative agreements cover:
1. Determination of DRS responsibility;
2. Student/consumer referrals;
3. Joint development of the Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
4. Services;
5. Coordinated planning and payment of services;
6. Confidentiality of information;
7. Subminimum wage employment (per the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act);
8. Local agreements;
9. General supervision; and
10. Dispute resolution. (Page 226-227) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One—Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability—related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 137) Title III

Veterans

All core programs are participating either by physical presence or part of a shared electronic referral system. Further, required partners participating include: • Trade Adjustment Assistance • Second Chance Act • Jobs for Veterans Grant (LVER/DVOP) • Job Corp • Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) • National Farmworker Jobs Program • Senior Community Services Employment Program (SCSEP) • Unemployment Compensation • Housing and Urban Development (HUD) • Career and Technical Education (Perkins) • Indian & Native American Programs • Youthbuild (Page 47) Title I Priority of Service for Veterans is implemented by WorkForce West Virginia in accordance with Title 38 part III Ch. 42. 4215 via One Stop Career Centers located throughout the state, by using clear and concise guidelines, and by trained staff familiar with state guidelines. To ensure access to services for veterans and veterans with significant barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, the state has established formal guidance regarding priority of service for veterans that all Wagner Peyser and Workforce West Virginia staff must follow. (Page 136) Title I

To effectively and efficiently facilitate the provision services to eligible veterans and eligible persons, a Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialist (DVOPS) is assigned to each of the seven proposed One—Stop Centers located in West Virginia. However, most local areas exceed the minimum of one DVOPS staff depending on criteria involving necessity and population. (Page 136) Title I

Wagner—Peyser staff are the veteran’s and eligible person’s first point of contact in the One—Stop Centers. At this point, veterans are assessed and entered into the service delivery system where veterans and eligible persons receive priority of service and veterans that have a Significant Barrier to Employment of (SBE) and are in need of intensive services are referred to DVOPS staff. DVOPS staff continue the assessment process to determine the veterans’ employment options, assist with the Veterans Employment Development Plan, and provides information to the veterans or eligible persons about a wide range of resources available. (Page 137) Title I

The state will incorporate Registered Apprenticeships into its strategies and services by requiring the WorkForce WV One Stop Centers to seek out and assist Registered Apprenticeship Programs with recruitment into their individual training programs. Recruitment will include posting and advertisement of Registered Apprenticeship statewide announcements, job orders, phone notifications of apprenticeship openings, veteran priority of service, pre-application testing, initial screening of eligibility requirements and referral. Referral not only includes referral to the job order but to our partners for orientation and eligibility determination for WIOA funding for training. Additional strategies and services will include making space available to the apprenticeship programs for onsite job fairs for recruitment, advertising space for apprenticeship marketing items, space for onsite interviews and assist, as needed, with testing applicants at offsite locations. (Page 153) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DRS has continued collaborative efforts with the WV Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BHHF) to expand employment opportunities for individuals with behavioral health challenges (e.g., mental health, substance use disorders, and developmental disabilities). During the first half of Program Year 2017, 284 individuals referred by mental health providers have become DRS consumers. (Page 73) Title I

11. whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs; (Page 125) Title I

Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 195) Title I

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Adult Behavioral Health assures and provides access to services and supports to meet the mental health and co—occurring needs of adults and transitional age youth, enabling them to live, learn, work, and participate actively in their communities. The Division establishes standards to ensure effective and culturally competent care to promote recovery. The Division sets policy, promotes self—determination, protects human rights, and supports mental health training and research. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has teamed up with them on several efforts, such as having them present on “Behavioral Health Connections” at the DRS 2014 Statewide Training Conference, assisting them in the planning of their 2015 Integrated Behavioral Health Care Conference and exhibiting at that conference whereby information regarding DRS was disseminated to approximately 700 behavioral health professionals, and serving as a subject matter expert on their Clinical Adult Review Process (CARP), which looks at the needs of individuals transitioning out of state psychiatric facilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health is the Single State Authority for Children’s Mental Health charged with monitoring and improving the children’s behavioral health service delivery system. The Division is responsible for overseeing the implementation and evaluation of the federal block grant. The Division works collaboratively across all child serving systems, at both the state and local level, to ensure access to quality behavioral health services and supports for children and adolescents with and/or at risk for serious emotional disturbances. The Division provides leadership and technical assistance to facilitate an effective system of care for children and their families. DRS continues a working relationship with this office and their partners and, for example, has been working with the Expanded School Mental Health Steering Team Initiative. DRS has also worked together with The Family Advocacy, Support, & Training (FAST) program which is a statewide parent and youth network that engages families in the planning, management, and evaluation of their child’s mental health treatment and service needs. (Page 244-245) Title IV

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 247) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 47

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

Planning the Future for Students with Disabilities - 08/01/2018

~~“This guide is intended to provide information that is applicable to “most” young adults. However, individual needs, developmental levels and circumstances vary. Parental/guardian involvement and young adults’ input is highly recommended in all phases of transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Department of Education Policy 2520.16: West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards - 07/01/2018

“West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards defines the alternate academic achievement standards grades K-12 for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities and provides rigorous and challenging standards to meet the requirements of Policy 2510.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires the state to adopt challenging alternate academic achievement standards, linked to the state’s grade-level academic content standards, for students with significant cognitive disabilities, to form the basis of instruction, assessment and accountability for this group.   A student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team determines whether the student has a significant cognitive disability requiring instruction on these standards.  West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards will ensure alignment of the state’s alternate academic achievement standards with the West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Standards in the areas of English language arts, mathematics, and science for grades K-12 which is consistent with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

USDOL Investigation results in WV Employer Paying $119,040 to Employees with Disabilities to Resolve Violations - 03/21/2018

“After a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation, a federal jury has entered a verdict against Randolph County Sheltered Workshop Inc. - doing business as Seneca Designs - and ordered the Elkins nonprofit to pay $119,040 in back wages to 34 employees. Entered in the U.S District Court for the Northern District of West Virginia-Elkins Division, the investigation found that the organization violated the minimum wage provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Division investigators found violations that resulted from the employer’s failure to obtain a certificate authorizing their payment of sub-minimum wages to employees with disabilities. Absent that certificate, employees were legally due the full federal minimum wage. The Agency also found that the employer failed to post information about rights for employees with disabilities paid at a sub-minimum wage, as the law requires.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for WV’s Waiver Transition Plan Application - 07/01/2018

~~This review has been conducted in two sections.  To begin the transition plan development process, BMS conducted a review of the HCBS services provided by the current West Virginia waivers impacted by the new rule (Exhibit 1) as well as the waivers’ supporting documentation (operation manuals, authorizing legislation, waiver applications, etc.).  The State used CMS guidance documents, particularly “Summary of Regulatory Requirements for Home and Community Based Settings” to guide the analysis.   The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (WVDHHR) Recommendations from the HCBS

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.76%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,792,147
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2018 to 2019
178,229
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.65%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,719
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
12.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.38%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.14%
Change from
2018 to 2019
72.14%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 1,815,857 1,805,832 1,792,147
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 188,696 175,002 178,229
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 49,199 49,839 57,719
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 621,100 633,203 626,123
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 26.07% 28.48% 32.38%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.23% 71.32% 72.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.20% 5.30% 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 25.50% 24.30% 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.50% 16.30% 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 185,891 169,467 175,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 175,597 169,210 172,424
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 342,941 317,007 327,823
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,123 13,931 11,777
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,307 2,764 3,773
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,048 799
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 394 917 448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 4,525 5,013 6,219
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,820 N/A 1,066

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,909 1,860 1,798
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.60% 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 87,754 86,060 83,775

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,598 5,671 5,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 11,658 9,923 9,085
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 31,805 27,243 24,473
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.70% 20.80% 21.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00% 0.00% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 12.90% 4.80% 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.70% 2.00% 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,196 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,677 2 164
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 475 489 180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A 207 N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,673 2,694 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 8 13 19
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 6 9 12
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 75.00% 69.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.32 0.49 0.69

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.00% 32.00% 24.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,287 3,367 2,068
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 142,511 140,211 137,160
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 50 48 66
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 102 136 106

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $3,220,045 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $14,933,096 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 35.00% N/A N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,600 N/A N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 46.31 N/A N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.46% 64.65% 64.64%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.07% 7.67% 7.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.72% 1.49% 1.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 94.75% 99.67% 99.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 16.78% 19.22% 16.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 51.44% 58.88% 58.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.34% 69.09% 69.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.66% 39.66% 42.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8 8 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8 8 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 264 241 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 264 241 59

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. (Page 243) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow—along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state—appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 238) Title IV

—The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 243) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:….
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 62) Title I

Region 3 will encourage the co-enrollment of high risk Out-of-school Youth, ages 18-24, as both WIOA Adult (Title II) and WIOA Youth participants. This has been realized through dual enrollments with the YouthBuild Program in the region, as well as the Employment for Independent Living Program, which serves foster youth. Blending and braiding these resources only increases the level of support offered to enrolled youth. (Page 79) Title I

• The braiding of WIOA Title I—B funded programs with other youth—directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low—income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year—round services and summer employment activities. (Page 94) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out—of—school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements:
a. tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent;
b. alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;
c. paid and unpaid work experiences, including summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; pre—apprenticeship programs; internships and job shadowing; and on—the—job training opportunities;
d. occupational skill training;
e. education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;
f. leadership development opportunities;
g. supportive services;
h. adult mentoring;
i. follow—up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;
j. comprehensive guidance and counseling;
k. financial literacy education;
l. entrepreneurial skills training;
m. services that provide labor market and employment information about in—demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area; and
n. activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training. (Page 174) Title II

School to Work Transition

~~Pre—employment transition services, including job exploration counseling; work—based learning experiences; counseling on enrollment opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self—advocacy, are provided for those who need assistance in finding a career path that matches their interests and abilities. Once a career path has been selected, post—secondary education and training programs are made available with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services funds to help individuals get the specialized college, apprenticeship, or employment supports they need to be successful in the workplace. (Page 49) Title IV

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 167-168) Title I

In FY 2015, DRS re—structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre—employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 227) Title IV

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post—secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system. (Page 236) Title IV

In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV

In addition to ongoing program activities, DRS will host a one week summer workshop for transition students who are juniors entering into their senior year of high school. The workshop will be held in seven areas across the state. DRS staff participating include the PETS Counselor, Employment Specialist, and RSA assigned to the PETS territory. Class will start at 9:00am and end at 4:00pm. Class size for each of the seven workshops will be approximately 30 students. Students will earn minimum wage for the time that they attend. DRS is also requesting WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students.
Topics to be covered:
-Career planning
-Career preparation
-SSI/SSDI Information
-Understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, e.g., social security card, driver’s license, birth certificate, pay stubs.
-Communication
-Conflict Management (Page 307; 314; 319) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~The state will encourage Local Workforce Development Boards to engage in partnerships with local educational entities, businesses, community—based organizations, etc. in order to communicate the benefits of technical training and the development of robust and comprehensive career pathways models. (Page 50) Title I

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development
It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and/or training for skills that lead to quality employment in high—demand jobs or entry—level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low—skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation, or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 60; 75; 87-88; 296) Title III

The state will assess the overall effectiveness of the workforce system and those educational programs that support and work with it on the basis of their collective ability to produce career pathways leading to industry—valued, recognized postsecondary credentials and apprenticeship enrollments. (Page 61) Title III

The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with leading and emergent industry sectors’ skills needs.
• Career pathways: enabling of progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development corresponds with a labor market payoff for those being trained or educated. (Page 62) Title I

The Region 7 WDB works with employer partnerships, community and technical colleges, secondary and post-secondary schools to establish credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills, and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment especially those with disabilities. (Page 74) Title I

Industry-led partnerships are coupled with Career Pathways. Region 5 Job Center Operator, Core and Required Partners have implemented Career Pathways initiatives in Health Care, IT and CDL Training. Career Pathways Services are diverse with multiple entry and exit points that allow individuals with varying degrees of ability to have realistic access to pathways. (Page 75) Title I

DRS continues to inform its consumers about available career pathway programs available through Adult Education, Career and Technical Education, the Community and Technical College System, and four-year colleges. In 2016, DRS assisted 1,650 consumers with four-year college training, 423 consumers with junior/community college training and 259 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. In 2017, DRS assisted 1,660 consumers with four-year college training, 433 consumers with junior/community college training, and 326 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. (Page 75) Title I

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team will continue working toward a desk manual of Career Pathways based on the Demand Occupation List within the MOV-WDB region. The Career Pathway manual will align occupations within industries as well as required degree, diploma, or certification. Career Planners will promote a career pathway system in MOV that includes ITA services potentially followed by OJT with an employer to complete or continue the career path of an individual. Working with employers to expand the career path of their employees through Incumbent Worker training to expand the skill sets of current employees and promote the development of new technology on the job. (Page 76) Title I

Strategy 3.3: Educate individuals (job—seekers and employers) and encourage career pathways in training and employment environments.
Region 1 provides counseling/career services to support individuals with their career goals. We utilize resources such as the WorkForce GPS and WV Career Pathways to help individuals navigate through the career pathway system to enter training that meets the demands of local businesses. (Page 77) Title III

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team goal of creating a Career Pathway desk manual is that it will serve as resource for Adult, Youth, and Partner Agency front-line staff to utilize in working with program participants to develop training and employment goals. The Career Pathway desk manual will be a resource utilized by the MOV-WDB contracted Business Service Rep. to assist the review of MOV-WDB Region employer needs based on the outlined training programs. training curriculums of specific programs, and skill-sets obtained through training program completion. (Page 77) Title I

DRS has created PathwaysWV.org, a website for students with disabilities to gain valuable and relevant information on career pathways, education and training opportunities, and current and future in-demand occupations. (Page 78) Title I

The State will mainstream job seekers with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to the maximum extent possible by offering realistic entry points into career pathways and by ensuring necessary supportive services are in place and coordinated across agencies, so that those individuals with the most significant barriers to employment are successful in accessing and navigating career pathways. When appropriate, job seekers will be co—enrolled between core and other partner programs in order to provide the most comprehensive services possible. (Page 86) Title IV

The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post—secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro— credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide. (Page 87) Title I

The state will take further actions to coordinate services between WIOA core programs and non— core programs and services to create an effective career pathway system. These actions will include the following:
• The education agencies and educational institutions will work with the State WDB and LWDBs to build career pathways that include secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs of study. (Page 93) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education will work with the education system to support and develop career pathways identified by employers and the workforce system. This support will be provided by developing and implementing bridge and pre—bridge programs as part of the Moving Pathways Forward imitative. During program year 2013—2014 the West Virginia Adult Education Program applied for and was selected to take part in the multi—year Moving Pathways Forward Project. This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE). West Virginia will be one of fourteen states to be provided with technical assistance in the development of state and local career pathways systems that will assist youth and adults to achieve success in postsecondary education training and employment in high—growth and high demand occupations. (Page 98) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education's response to the WIOA requirement to increase the number of low-skill adults' transitioning into postsecondary education and training has been to focus on participation in a career pathway system and, within this system of career pathways programs,

Bridge programs.

Career pathway programs are a "series of connected education and training programs and support services that enable individuals to secure employment within a specific industry or occupational sector, and to advance over time to successively higher levels of education and employment within that sector" (Jenkins 2006,6). Career pathways often include "stackable" credentials and accelerated courses offered at flexible times that support student entry and exit along the pathway.

Bridge programs, one of the first steps in a career pathway for low-skill adults, support the transition from adult education to the next step in an occupational pathway. By connecting adult education programs to community college occupational programs, bridge programs seek to increase the rates at which low-skill adults move into college-level occupational programs, persist in these programs, and obtain postsecondary credentials in industries offering family-sustaining wages and career advancement. (Page 202) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning. We partner with employers to provide work—based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job—driven training rather than erroneous skills training. Other: • Development of apprenticeship training programs (Page 59) Title IV

3(7) AND INCLUDES REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP. “IN-DEMAND INDUSTRY SECTOR OR OCCUPATION” IS DEFINED AT WIOA SECTION 3(23).

We will create an approach based on the needs of the job seekers as well as the needs of the employer. Our workforce development system must examine the needs of the employer, assess the skills and skills gaps of the workforce and then create solutions to ensure maximum benefit to both customer groups.

Strategy 2.1: Work with employers to identify true workforce needs.

Strategy 2.2: Assess skill gaps and needs of individuals seeking employment and/or training.

Strategy 2.3: Ensure that individuals with barriers, especially those with disabilities, to employment have increased access to and for opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services.

Strategy 2.4: Make available training programs that solve both the needs of employers and individuals. (Page 65) Title I

The State will promote and support the creation of pre—apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs, (ApprenticeshipUSA) particularly in non-traditional occupations and for non-traditional populations, as part of relevant career pathway models. The State will add apprenticeship opportunities to West Virginia WorkForce programs and will promote them as job/training options to job seekers. (Page 88-89) Title I

The State will establish statewide and regional lists of industry—recognized credentials with a focus on identifying credentials along established career pathways, including badges, micro—credentials and entry level credentials appropriate for individuals with barriers to employment. The lists will include academic credentials as well as credentials demonstrating job readiness and the attainment of employability skills through workforce preparation activities. The State will consult with LWDBs and engaged employers, including through Registered Apprenticeship programs and industry partnerships, to ensure that the credential lists reflect skills that are in demand. (Page 89) Title I

Programs will confirm that they are providing learning activities that are contextualized, so students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for transition to their individual career pathway. Programs will ensure that the teaching staff offer a variety of instructional strategies that engage students and promote student persistence and retention; this should include whole group instruction, peer tutoring, and individualized instruction along with distance learning. The variety of instructional strategies will integrate academics, career counseling, and soft skills to bolster the students’ ability to gain employment, go to college, or enter a training program that could include an apprenticeship. Integrated education and training programs will align with the needs of the local labor market The occupational training provided as part of an integrated education and training program will be connected to realistic, existing employment opportunities in the local area that connect to a career pathway for the participants. (Page 196) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DRS also included representatives from WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students. A concerted effort was made to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) to students in the CEO Summits. Topics covered included career planning, career preparation, SSI/SSDI Information, understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, communication, conflict management, employer expectations, attendance and punctuality, timeliness of task completion, being able to work without supervision, positive work ethic, managing multiple tasks, high-growth jobs, personal brand, and job hunting tools such as resumes, cover letters, interviews, and digital profiles. (Page 80) Title IV

Other agencies with which DRS collaborates for the provision of time—limited supported employment services are:
1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
2. West Virginia Title XIX——Home and Community—Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs.
In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Under Title IV, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) provides services that help allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning (work—based training, and on the job training). Title IV emphasizes the need to provide pre—employment transition services (PETS) for students with disabilities prior to their exiting the school system. Additionally, the new federal act emphasizes creating employer engagement within the community by creating work—based learning experiences for individuals, thus allowing employers to be matched with skilled workers. (Page 59) Title IV

DRS also coordinates with employers through participation and membership in various community and regional organizations. These activities range from employer—specific organizations to public—private partnerships and allow DRS to better understand the needs of employers while jointly developing employment—related activities. Some of these partnerships include:
—Regional WDBs;
—Beckley—Raleigh Chamber of Commerce;
—Fayette County Chamber of Commerce;
—Weirton Area Chamber of commerce;
—Employer engagement and worksite tours for VR consumers through partnerships with community colleges such as Mountwest and Bridge Valley; and
—Employer tours through partnerships with high school and adult vocational/technical centers including South Branch Career and Technical Center and James Rumsey Technical Institute. (Page 241) Title IV

The resource guide provides information regarding staffing services, training programs and incentives for hiring people with disabilities, financial incentives, accessibility assessments, accommodating employees with disabilities, basic disability etiquette, attitudinal barriers, the Americans with Disabilities Act, locating a DRS office, and where to find additional resources. DRS Employment Specialists conducted over 1,000 employer visits with more than 800 employers in both FYs 2016 and 2017. (Page 328) Title IV
 

Data Collection

The West Virginia WDS will utilize its integrated data system to monitor and evaluate the performance of the WIOA core partner programs in relation to the four state goals described above. The data collected for the common performance measures and the WIOA Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) will provide all of the data elements needed to monitor and evaluate performance on the state goals. Because these data are required to be collected by all WIOA core programs, there will be no additional burden posed on the programs. (Page 85) Title I

West Virginia has an integrated data collection and performance management system (MACC) that covers the following programs:

• WIOA Adult, Dislocated Workers, Youth

• National Dislocated Worker Grants

• Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

• Wagner—Peyser • Trade Adjustment Assistance

• Jobs for Veterans State Grants

• West Virginia’s Unemployment Compensation MIS interfaces with MACC.

All other partners have management information systems that are customized to meet the needs of their programs. WorkForce West Virginia, Rehabilitation Services, and Adult Education will each make the necessary changes to their systems to collect the required data elements. Initially, common data elements will be shared among the partners through a regular file exchange; ultimately linkages will be put in place to allow partners to access the information in real time. Employment and wage data will be shared with partners to the extent allowed by the WRIS/WRIS2 agreement. (Page 109) Title I

The WIOA core partners in West Virginia, including WorkForce West Virginia, WV Division of Rehabilitation Services, and WV Adult Education will implement a practical and effective system to fulfill the data alignment and integration requirements of WIOA. Each program has a unique system of data collection that is tailored to meet its unique needs. To maximize the efficient exchange of data to support assessment and evaluation, the core partners have collaborated to begin the development and implementation of a system for data sharing. Data will be uploaded to a data warehouse operated by WorkForce West Virginia and/or an IT contractor, and retrieved by each partner as needed and updated where appropriate based on consumers’ progress in the One—Stop Center system. This will allow all partners to track common consumer service delivery while minimizing duplication of service.

This system operates as follows:

1. A data warehouse will be created to store mandated data collected/shared by the three partners. The three core partners are identifying data elements that represent common intake information in the One—Stop system.

2. Each consumer in the system on implementation will be assigned a unique participant identifier upon entering the system (Workforce West Virginia, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult Basic Ed). The date each consumer enters and exits each program is recorded. The unique participant identifier and program entry/exit dates will be used to identify common consumers across the core programs and provide access to the common data elements will be collected by other partners and stored in the One—Stop system.

3. To ensure effectiveness and efficiency in the One—Stop system, data collected by each program on new consumers are sent to the One—Stop data warehouse and are made available for each program to track service delivery of common consumers. This process will ensure that service delivery for each consumer can be tracked across all programs.

4. Data stored in the warehouse will be used to generate reports required under section 116, performance accountability system. Alignment of each partner’s system of data collection will improve service delivery to job seekers at the One—Stop, including individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, by providing the three core partners with more information about how consumers are being assisted across programs in the One—Stop system in West Virginia. This information enables the core partners to have a greater understanding of how the needs of their consumers are being met across programs, to track their progress, and to minimize duplication of service. Alignment and integration of data across programs in a data sharing system supports a consumer—focused approach to service delivery that will generate quality employment outcomes for consumers in the One—Stop system. (Page 130-131) Title III

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on:

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;

—The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; and

—The indicators of effectiveness in serving employers. (Page 299; 316-317) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DRS agrees with the Council’s recommendation to continue to strengthen the link between the agency and the public school system, as this link is considered vital to the continued referral of students with disabilities. DRS continues to maintain a strong connection and working relationship with the West Virginia Department of Education, as well as the county—level Boards of Education. The agency has updated its Memorandums of Understanding with the WV Department of Education and all 55 County Boards of Education to reflect changes concerning Section 511 and pre-employment transition services (pre-ETS). With the implementation of WIOA, DRS has increased collaborative efforts with school staff at the state and local level, particularly regarding the provision of pre—employment transition services to high school students with disabilities beginning in the tenth grade. (Page 220) Title IV

In consultation with DRS, the WV Office of Special Education amended its policies to demonstrate compliance with WIOA Section 511, and include pre-ETS on the Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Additionally, the WV Department of Education plans to reduce the age at which Transition must be addressed on the IEP from 16 to 14 by the year 2019. Therefore, education and VR partners demonstrate alignment of not only WIOA and IDEA regulations, but also a shared vision of all students with disabilities offered the same transition service opportunities. After the implementation of the new policies, DRS and WV Department of Education staff conducted cross-trainings across the state. Those in attendance were County Special Education Directors, teachers, principals, IEP Specialists, and case managers. Staff were instructed on how to involve DRS Counselors in the coordination and provision of Pre-ETS for students with disabilities through the Transition Services Planner. Additionally, staff were instructed on how and when to use and distribute other transition materials for the tracking of and referral to pre-ETS and other transition services. (Page 221) Title IV

The cooperative agreements between DRS and WVDOE, both at the state and the local levels, assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education, vocational education, and/or vocational rehabilitation services is identified and that the appropriate services, including pre—employment transition services, are made available to the individual. The cooperative agreements cover:
1. Determination of DRS responsibility;
2. Student/consumer referrals;
3. Joint development of the Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
4. Services;
5. Coordinated planning and payment of services;
6. Confidentiality of information;
7. Subminimum wage employment (per the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act);
8. Local agreements;
9. General supervision; and
10. Dispute resolution. (Page 226-227) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One—Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability—related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 137) Title III

Veterans

All core programs are participating either by physical presence or part of a shared electronic referral system. Further, required partners participating include: • Trade Adjustment Assistance • Second Chance Act • Jobs for Veterans Grant (LVER/DVOP) • Job Corp • Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) • National Farmworker Jobs Program • Senior Community Services Employment Program (SCSEP) • Unemployment Compensation • Housing and Urban Development (HUD) • Career and Technical Education (Perkins) • Indian & Native American Programs • Youthbuild (Page 47) Title I Priority of Service for Veterans is implemented by WorkForce West Virginia in accordance with Title 38 part III Ch. 42. 4215 via One Stop Career Centers located throughout the state, by using clear and concise guidelines, and by trained staff familiar with state guidelines. To ensure access to services for veterans and veterans with significant barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, the state has established formal guidance regarding priority of service for veterans that all Wagner Peyser and Workforce West Virginia staff must follow. (Page 136) Title I

To effectively and efficiently facilitate the provision services to eligible veterans and eligible persons, a Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialist (DVOPS) is assigned to each of the seven proposed One—Stop Centers located in West Virginia. However, most local areas exceed the minimum of one DVOPS staff depending on criteria involving necessity and population. (Page 136) Title I

Wagner—Peyser staff are the veteran’s and eligible person’s first point of contact in the One—Stop Centers. At this point, veterans are assessed and entered into the service delivery system where veterans and eligible persons receive priority of service and veterans that have a Significant Barrier to Employment of (SBE) and are in need of intensive services are referred to DVOPS staff. DVOPS staff continue the assessment process to determine the veterans’ employment options, assist with the Veterans Employment Development Plan, and provides information to the veterans or eligible persons about a wide range of resources available. (Page 137) Title I

The state will incorporate Registered Apprenticeships into its strategies and services by requiring the WorkForce WV One Stop Centers to seek out and assist Registered Apprenticeship Programs with recruitment into their individual training programs. Recruitment will include posting and advertisement of Registered Apprenticeship statewide announcements, job orders, phone notifications of apprenticeship openings, veteran priority of service, pre-application testing, initial screening of eligibility requirements and referral. Referral not only includes referral to the job order but to our partners for orientation and eligibility determination for WIOA funding for training. Additional strategies and services will include making space available to the apprenticeship programs for onsite job fairs for recruitment, advertising space for apprenticeship marketing items, space for onsite interviews and assist, as needed, with testing applicants at offsite locations. (Page 153) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DRS has continued collaborative efforts with the WV Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BHHF) to expand employment opportunities for individuals with behavioral health challenges (e.g., mental health, substance use disorders, and developmental disabilities). During the first half of Program Year 2017, 284 individuals referred by mental health providers have become DRS consumers. (Page 73) Title I

11. whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs; (Page 125) Title I

Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 195) Title I

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Adult Behavioral Health assures and provides access to services and supports to meet the mental health and co—occurring needs of adults and transitional age youth, enabling them to live, learn, work, and participate actively in their communities. The Division establishes standards to ensure effective and culturally competent care to promote recovery. The Division sets policy, promotes self—determination, protects human rights, and supports mental health training and research. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has teamed up with them on several efforts, such as having them present on “Behavioral Health Connections” at the DRS 2014 Statewide Training Conference, assisting them in the planning of their 2015 Integrated Behavioral Health Care Conference and exhibiting at that conference whereby information regarding DRS was disseminated to approximately 700 behavioral health professionals, and serving as a subject matter expert on their Clinical Adult Review Process (CARP), which looks at the needs of individuals transitioning out of state psychiatric facilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health is the Single State Authority for Children’s Mental Health charged with monitoring and improving the children’s behavioral health service delivery system. The Division is responsible for overseeing the implementation and evaluation of the federal block grant. The Division works collaboratively across all child serving systems, at both the state and local level, to ensure access to quality behavioral health services and supports for children and adolescents with and/or at risk for serious emotional disturbances. The Division provides leadership and technical assistance to facilitate an effective system of care for children and their families. DRS continues a working relationship with this office and their partners and, for example, has been working with the Expanded School Mental Health Steering Team Initiative. DRS has also worked together with The Family Advocacy, Support, & Training (FAST) program which is a statewide parent and youth network that engages families in the planning, management, and evaluation of their child’s mental health treatment and service needs. (Page 244-245) Title IV

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 247) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 47

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

Planning the Future for Students with Disabilities - 08/01/2018

~~“This guide is intended to provide information that is applicable to “most” young adults. However, individual needs, developmental levels and circumstances vary. Parental/guardian involvement and young adults’ input is highly recommended in all phases of transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Department of Education Policy 2520.16: West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards - 07/01/2018

“West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards defines the alternate academic achievement standards grades K-12 for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities and provides rigorous and challenging standards to meet the requirements of Policy 2510.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires the state to adopt challenging alternate academic achievement standards, linked to the state’s grade-level academic content standards, for students with significant cognitive disabilities, to form the basis of instruction, assessment and accountability for this group.   A student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team determines whether the student has a significant cognitive disability requiring instruction on these standards.  West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards will ensure alignment of the state’s alternate academic achievement standards with the West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Standards in the areas of English language arts, mathematics, and science for grades K-12 which is consistent with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

USDOL Investigation results in WV Employer Paying $119,040 to Employees with Disabilities to Resolve Violations - 03/21/2018

“After a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation, a federal jury has entered a verdict against Randolph County Sheltered Workshop Inc. - doing business as Seneca Designs - and ordered the Elkins nonprofit to pay $119,040 in back wages to 34 employees. Entered in the U.S District Court for the Northern District of West Virginia-Elkins Division, the investigation found that the organization violated the minimum wage provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Division investigators found violations that resulted from the employer’s failure to obtain a certificate authorizing their payment of sub-minimum wages to employees with disabilities. Absent that certificate, employees were legally due the full federal minimum wage. The Agency also found that the employer failed to post information about rights for employees with disabilities paid at a sub-minimum wage, as the law requires.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for WV’s Waiver Transition Plan Application - 07/01/2018

~~This review has been conducted in two sections.  To begin the transition plan development process, BMS conducted a review of the HCBS services provided by the current West Virginia waivers impacted by the new rule (Exhibit 1) as well as the waivers’ supporting documentation (operation manuals, authorizing legislation, waiver applications, etc.).  The State used CMS guidance documents, particularly “Summary of Regulatory Requirements for Home and Community Based Settings” to guide the analysis.   The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (WVDHHR) Recommendations from the HCBS

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.76%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,792,147
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2018 to 2019
178,229
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.65%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,719
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
12.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.38%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.14%
Change from
2018 to 2019
72.14%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 1,792,147
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 178,229
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 57,719
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 626,123
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.38%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 175,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 172,424
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 327,823
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,777
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,773
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 799
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,219
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,066

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,798
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 83,775

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 9,085
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 24,473
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 164
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 19
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 12
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.69

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 24.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,068
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 137,160
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 66
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 106

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.64%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 7.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 16.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 42.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 59

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. (Page 243) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow—along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state—appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 238) Title IV

—The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 243) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:….
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 62) Title I

Region 3 will encourage the co-enrollment of high risk Out-of-school Youth, ages 18-24, as both WIOA Adult (Title II) and WIOA Youth participants. This has been realized through dual enrollments with the YouthBuild Program in the region, as well as the Employment for Independent Living Program, which serves foster youth. Blending and braiding these resources only increases the level of support offered to enrolled youth. (Page 79) Title I

• The braiding of WIOA Title I—B funded programs with other youth—directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low—income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year—round services and summer employment activities. (Page 94) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out—of—school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements:
a. tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent;
b. alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;
c. paid and unpaid work experiences, including summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; pre—apprenticeship programs; internships and job shadowing; and on—the—job training opportunities;
d. occupational skill training;
e. education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;
f. leadership development opportunities;
g. supportive services;
h. adult mentoring;
i. follow—up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;
j. comprehensive guidance and counseling;
k. financial literacy education;
l. entrepreneurial skills training;
m. services that provide labor market and employment information about in—demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area; and
n. activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training. (Page 174) Title II

School to Work Transition

~~Pre—employment transition services, including job exploration counseling; work—based learning experiences; counseling on enrollment opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self—advocacy, are provided for those who need assistance in finding a career path that matches their interests and abilities. Once a career path has been selected, post—secondary education and training programs are made available with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services funds to help individuals get the specialized college, apprenticeship, or employment supports they need to be successful in the workplace. (Page 49) Title IV

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 167-168) Title I

In FY 2015, DRS re—structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre—employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 227) Title IV

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post—secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system. (Page 236) Title IV

In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV

In addition to ongoing program activities, DRS will host a one week summer workshop for transition students who are juniors entering into their senior year of high school. The workshop will be held in seven areas across the state. DRS staff participating include the PETS Counselor, Employment Specialist, and RSA assigned to the PETS territory. Class will start at 9:00am and end at 4:00pm. Class size for each of the seven workshops will be approximately 30 students. Students will earn minimum wage for the time that they attend. DRS is also requesting WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students.
Topics to be covered:
-Career planning
-Career preparation
-SSI/SSDI Information
-Understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, e.g., social security card, driver’s license, birth certificate, pay stubs.
-Communication
-Conflict Management (Page 307; 314; 319) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~The state will encourage Local Workforce Development Boards to engage in partnerships with local educational entities, businesses, community—based organizations, etc. in order to communicate the benefits of technical training and the development of robust and comprehensive career pathways models. (Page 50) Title I

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development
It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and/or training for skills that lead to quality employment in high—demand jobs or entry—level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low—skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation, or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 60; 75; 87-88; 296) Title III

The state will assess the overall effectiveness of the workforce system and those educational programs that support and work with it on the basis of their collective ability to produce career pathways leading to industry—valued, recognized postsecondary credentials and apprenticeship enrollments. (Page 61) Title III

The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with leading and emergent industry sectors’ skills needs.
• Career pathways: enabling of progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development corresponds with a labor market payoff for those being trained or educated. (Page 62) Title I

The Region 7 WDB works with employer partnerships, community and technical colleges, secondary and post-secondary schools to establish credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills, and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment especially those with disabilities. (Page 74) Title I

Industry-led partnerships are coupled with Career Pathways. Region 5 Job Center Operator, Core and Required Partners have implemented Career Pathways initiatives in Health Care, IT and CDL Training. Career Pathways Services are diverse with multiple entry and exit points that allow individuals with varying degrees of ability to have realistic access to pathways. (Page 75) Title I

DRS continues to inform its consumers about available career pathway programs available through Adult Education, Career and Technical Education, the Community and Technical College System, and four-year colleges. In 2016, DRS assisted 1,650 consumers with four-year college training, 423 consumers with junior/community college training and 259 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. In 2017, DRS assisted 1,660 consumers with four-year college training, 433 consumers with junior/community college training, and 326 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. (Page 75) Title I

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team will continue working toward a desk manual of Career Pathways based on the Demand Occupation List within the MOV-WDB region. The Career Pathway manual will align occupations within industries as well as required degree, diploma, or certification. Career Planners will promote a career pathway system in MOV that includes ITA services potentially followed by OJT with an employer to complete or continue the career path of an individual. Working with employers to expand the career path of their employees through Incumbent Worker training to expand the skill sets of current employees and promote the development of new technology on the job. (Page 76) Title I

Strategy 3.3: Educate individuals (job—seekers and employers) and encourage career pathways in training and employment environments.
Region 1 provides counseling/career services to support individuals with their career goals. We utilize resources such as the WorkForce GPS and WV Career Pathways to help individuals navigate through the career pathway system to enter training that meets the demands of local businesses. (Page 77) Title III

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team goal of creating a Career Pathway desk manual is that it will serve as resource for Adult, Youth, and Partner Agency front-line staff to utilize in working with program participants to develop training and employment goals. The Career Pathway desk manual will be a resource utilized by the MOV-WDB contracted Business Service Rep. to assist the review of MOV-WDB Region employer needs based on the outlined training programs. training curriculums of specific programs, and skill-sets obtained through training program completion. (Page 77) Title I

DRS has created PathwaysWV.org, a website for students with disabilities to gain valuable and relevant information on career pathways, education and training opportunities, and current and future in-demand occupations. (Page 78) Title I

The State will mainstream job seekers with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to the maximum extent possible by offering realistic entry points into career pathways and by ensuring necessary supportive services are in place and coordinated across agencies, so that those individuals with the most significant barriers to employment are successful in accessing and navigating career pathways. When appropriate, job seekers will be co—enrolled between core and other partner programs in order to provide the most comprehensive services possible. (Page 86) Title IV

The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post—secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro— credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide. (Page 87) Title I

The state will take further actions to coordinate services between WIOA core programs and non— core programs and services to create an effective career pathway system. These actions will include the following:
• The education agencies and educational institutions will work with the State WDB and LWDBs to build career pathways that include secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs of study. (Page 93) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education will work with the education system to support and develop career pathways identified by employers and the workforce system. This support will be provided by developing and implementing bridge and pre—bridge programs as part of the Moving Pathways Forward imitative. During program year 2013—2014 the West Virginia Adult Education Program applied for and was selected to take part in the multi—year Moving Pathways Forward Project. This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE). West Virginia will be one of fourteen states to be provided with technical assistance in the development of state and local career pathways systems that will assist youth and adults to achieve success in postsecondary education training and employment in high—growth and high demand occupations. (Page 98) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education's response to the WIOA requirement to increase the number of low-skill adults' transitioning into postsecondary education and training has been to focus on participation in a career pathway system and, within this system of career pathways programs,

Bridge programs.

Career pathway programs are a "series of connected education and training programs and support services that enable individuals to secure employment within a specific industry or occupational sector, and to advance over time to successively higher levels of education and employment within that sector" (Jenkins 2006,6). Career pathways often include "stackable" credentials and accelerated courses offered at flexible times that support student entry and exit along the pathway.

Bridge programs, one of the first steps in a career pathway for low-skill adults, support the transition from adult education to the next step in an occupational pathway. By connecting adult education programs to community college occupational programs, bridge programs seek to increase the rates at which low-skill adults move into college-level occupational programs, persist in these programs, and obtain postsecondary credentials in industries offering family-sustaining wages and career advancement. (Page 202) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning. We partner with employers to provide work—based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job—driven training rather than erroneous skills training. Other: • Development of apprenticeship training programs (Page 59) Title IV

3(7) AND INCLUDES REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP. “IN-DEMAND INDUSTRY SECTOR OR OCCUPATION” IS DEFINED AT WIOA SECTION 3(23).

We will create an approach based on the needs of the job seekers as well as the needs of the employer. Our workforce development system must examine the needs of the employer, assess the skills and skills gaps of the workforce and then create solutions to ensure maximum benefit to both customer groups.

Strategy 2.1: Work with employers to identify true workforce needs.

Strategy 2.2: Assess skill gaps and needs of individuals seeking employment and/or training.

Strategy 2.3: Ensure that individuals with barriers, especially those with disabilities, to employment have increased access to and for opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services.

Strategy 2.4: Make available training programs that solve both the needs of employers and individuals. (Page 65) Title I

The State will promote and support the creation of pre—apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs, (ApprenticeshipUSA) particularly in non-traditional occupations and for non-traditional populations, as part of relevant career pathway models. The State will add apprenticeship opportunities to West Virginia WorkForce programs and will promote them as job/training options to job seekers. (Page 88-89) Title I

The State will establish statewide and regional lists of industry—recognized credentials with a focus on identifying credentials along established career pathways, including badges, micro—credentials and entry level credentials appropriate for individuals with barriers to employment. The lists will include academic credentials as well as credentials demonstrating job readiness and the attainment of employability skills through workforce preparation activities. The State will consult with LWDBs and engaged employers, including through Registered Apprenticeship programs and industry partnerships, to ensure that the credential lists reflect skills that are in demand. (Page 89) Title I

Programs will confirm that they are providing learning activities that are contextualized, so students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for transition to their individual career pathway. Programs will ensure that the teaching staff offer a variety of instructional strategies that engage students and promote student persistence and retention; this should include whole group instruction, peer tutoring, and individualized instruction along with distance learning. The variety of instructional strategies will integrate academics, career counseling, and soft skills to bolster the students’ ability to gain employment, go to college, or enter a training program that could include an apprenticeship. Integrated education and training programs will align with the needs of the local labor market The occupational training provided as part of an integrated education and training program will be connected to realistic, existing employment opportunities in the local area that connect to a career pathway for the participants. (Page 196) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DRS also included representatives from WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students. A concerted effort was made to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) to students in the CEO Summits. Topics covered included career planning, career preparation, SSI/SSDI Information, understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, communication, conflict management, employer expectations, attendance and punctuality, timeliness of task completion, being able to work without supervision, positive work ethic, managing multiple tasks, high-growth jobs, personal brand, and job hunting tools such as resumes, cover letters, interviews, and digital profiles. (Page 80) Title IV

Other agencies with which DRS collaborates for the provision of time—limited supported employment services are:
1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
2. West Virginia Title XIX——Home and Community—Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs.
In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Under Title IV, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) provides services that help allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning (work—based training, and on the job training). Title IV emphasizes the need to provide pre—employment transition services (PETS) for students with disabilities prior to their exiting the school system. Additionally, the new federal act emphasizes creating employer engagement within the community by creating work—based learning experiences for individuals, thus allowing employers to be matched with skilled workers. (Page 59) Title IV

DRS also coordinates with employers through participation and membership in various community and regional organizations. These activities range from employer—specific organizations to public—private partnerships and allow DRS to better understand the needs of employers while jointly developing employment—related activities. Some of these partnerships include:
—Regional WDBs;
—Beckley—Raleigh Chamber of Commerce;
—Fayette County Chamber of Commerce;
—Weirton Area Chamber of commerce;
—Employer engagement and worksite tours for VR consumers through partnerships with community colleges such as Mountwest and Bridge Valley; and
—Employer tours through partnerships with high school and adult vocational/technical centers including South Branch Career and Technical Center and James Rumsey Technical Institute. (Page 241) Title IV

The resource guide provides information regarding staffing services, training programs and incentives for hiring people with disabilities, financial incentives, accessibility assessments, accommodating employees with disabilities, basic disability etiquette, attitudinal barriers, the Americans with Disabilities Act, locating a DRS office, and where to find additional resources. DRS Employment Specialists conducted over 1,000 employer visits with more than 800 employers in both FYs 2016 and 2017. (Page 328) Title IV
 

Data Collection

The West Virginia WDS will utilize its integrated data system to monitor and evaluate the performance of the WIOA core partner programs in relation to the four state goals described above. The data collected for the common performance measures and the WIOA Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) will provide all of the data elements needed to monitor and evaluate performance on the state goals. Because these data are required to be collected by all WIOA core programs, there will be no additional burden posed on the programs. (Page 85) Title I

West Virginia has an integrated data collection and performance management system (MACC) that covers the following programs:

• WIOA Adult, Dislocated Workers, Youth

• National Dislocated Worker Grants

• Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

• Wagner—Peyser • Trade Adjustment Assistance

• Jobs for Veterans State Grants

• West Virginia’s Unemployment Compensation MIS interfaces with MACC.

All other partners have management information systems that are customized to meet the needs of their programs. WorkForce West Virginia, Rehabilitation Services, and Adult Education will each make the necessary changes to their systems to collect the required data elements. Initially, common data elements will be shared among the partners through a regular file exchange; ultimately linkages will be put in place to allow partners to access the information in real time. Employment and wage data will be shared with partners to the extent allowed by the WRIS/WRIS2 agreement. (Page 109) Title I

The WIOA core partners in West Virginia, including WorkForce West Virginia, WV Division of Rehabilitation Services, and WV Adult Education will implement a practical and effective system to fulfill the data alignment and integration requirements of WIOA. Each program has a unique system of data collection that is tailored to meet its unique needs. To maximize the efficient exchange of data to support assessment and evaluation, the core partners have collaborated to begin the development and implementation of a system for data sharing. Data will be uploaded to a data warehouse operated by WorkForce West Virginia and/or an IT contractor, and retrieved by each partner as needed and updated where appropriate based on consumers’ progress in the One—Stop Center system. This will allow all partners to track common consumer service delivery while minimizing duplication of service.

This system operates as follows:

1. A data warehouse will be created to store mandated data collected/shared by the three partners. The three core partners are identifying data elements that represent common intake information in the One—Stop system.

2. Each consumer in the system on implementation will be assigned a unique participant identifier upon entering the system (Workforce West Virginia, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult Basic Ed). The date each consumer enters and exits each program is recorded. The unique participant identifier and program entry/exit dates will be used to identify common consumers across the core programs and provide access to the common data elements will be collected by other partners and stored in the One—Stop system.

3. To ensure effectiveness and efficiency in the One—Stop system, data collected by each program on new consumers are sent to the One—Stop data warehouse and are made available for each program to track service delivery of common consumers. This process will ensure that service delivery for each consumer can be tracked across all programs.

4. Data stored in the warehouse will be used to generate reports required under section 116, performance accountability system. Alignment of each partner’s system of data collection will improve service delivery to job seekers at the One—Stop, including individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, by providing the three core partners with more information about how consumers are being assisted across programs in the One—Stop system in West Virginia. This information enables the core partners to have a greater understanding of how the needs of their consumers are being met across programs, to track their progress, and to minimize duplication of service. Alignment and integration of data across programs in a data sharing system supports a consumer—focused approach to service delivery that will generate quality employment outcomes for consumers in the One—Stop system. (Page 130-131) Title III

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on:

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;

—The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; and

—The indicators of effectiveness in serving employers. (Page 299; 316-317) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DRS agrees with the Council’s recommendation to continue to strengthen the link between the agency and the public school system, as this link is considered vital to the continued referral of students with disabilities. DRS continues to maintain a strong connection and working relationship with the West Virginia Department of Education, as well as the county—level Boards of Education. The agency has updated its Memorandums of Understanding with the WV Department of Education and all 55 County Boards of Education to reflect changes concerning Section 511 and pre-employment transition services (pre-ETS). With the implementation of WIOA, DRS has increased collaborative efforts with school staff at the state and local level, particularly regarding the provision of pre—employment transition services to high school students with disabilities beginning in the tenth grade. (Page 220) Title IV

In consultation with DRS, the WV Office of Special Education amended its policies to demonstrate compliance with WIOA Section 511, and include pre-ETS on the Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Additionally, the WV Department of Education plans to reduce the age at which Transition must be addressed on the IEP from 16 to 14 by the year 2019. Therefore, education and VR partners demonstrate alignment of not only WIOA and IDEA regulations, but also a shared vision of all students with disabilities offered the same transition service opportunities. After the implementation of the new policies, DRS and WV Department of Education staff conducted cross-trainings across the state. Those in attendance were County Special Education Directors, teachers, principals, IEP Specialists, and case managers. Staff were instructed on how to involve DRS Counselors in the coordination and provision of Pre-ETS for students with disabilities through the Transition Services Planner. Additionally, staff were instructed on how and when to use and distribute other transition materials for the tracking of and referral to pre-ETS and other transition services. (Page 221) Title IV

The cooperative agreements between DRS and WVDOE, both at the state and the local levels, assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education, vocational education, and/or vocational rehabilitation services is identified and that the appropriate services, including pre—employment transition services, are made available to the individual. The cooperative agreements cover:
1. Determination of DRS responsibility;
2. Student/consumer referrals;
3. Joint development of the Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE);
4. Services;
5. Coordinated planning and payment of services;
6. Confidentiality of information;
7. Subminimum wage employment (per the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act);
8. Local agreements;
9. General supervision; and
10. Dispute resolution. (Page 226-227) Title IV
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One—Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability—related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 137) Title III

Veterans

All core programs are participating either by physical presence or part of a shared electronic referral system. Further, required partners participating include: • Trade Adjustment Assistance • Second Chance Act • Jobs for Veterans Grant (LVER/DVOP) • Job Corp • Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) • National Farmworker Jobs Program • Senior Community Services Employment Program (SCSEP) • Unemployment Compensation • Housing and Urban Development (HUD) • Career and Technical Education (Perkins) • Indian & Native American Programs • Youthbuild (Page 47) Title I Priority of Service for Veterans is implemented by WorkForce West Virginia in accordance with Title 38 part III Ch. 42. 4215 via One Stop Career Centers located throughout the state, by using clear and concise guidelines, and by trained staff familiar with state guidelines. To ensure access to services for veterans and veterans with significant barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, the state has established formal guidance regarding priority of service for veterans that all Wagner Peyser and Workforce West Virginia staff must follow. (Page 136) Title I

To effectively and efficiently facilitate the provision services to eligible veterans and eligible persons, a Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialist (DVOPS) is assigned to each of the seven proposed One—Stop Centers located in West Virginia. However, most local areas exceed the minimum of one DVOPS staff depending on criteria involving necessity and population. (Page 136) Title I

Wagner—Peyser staff are the veteran’s and eligible person’s first point of contact in the One—Stop Centers. At this point, veterans are assessed and entered into the service delivery system where veterans and eligible persons receive priority of service and veterans that have a Significant Barrier to Employment of (SBE) and are in need of intensive services are referred to DVOPS staff. DVOPS staff continue the assessment process to determine the veterans’ employment options, assist with the Veterans Employment Development Plan, and provides information to the veterans or eligible persons about a wide range of resources available. (Page 137) Title I

The state will incorporate Registered Apprenticeships into its strategies and services by requiring the WorkForce WV One Stop Centers to seek out and assist Registered Apprenticeship Programs with recruitment into their individual training programs. Recruitment will include posting and advertisement of Registered Apprenticeship statewide announcements, job orders, phone notifications of apprenticeship openings, veteran priority of service, pre-application testing, initial screening of eligibility requirements and referral. Referral not only includes referral to the job order but to our partners for orientation and eligibility determination for WIOA funding for training. Additional strategies and services will include making space available to the apprenticeship programs for onsite job fairs for recruitment, advertising space for apprenticeship marketing items, space for onsite interviews and assist, as needed, with testing applicants at offsite locations. (Page 153) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~DRS has continued collaborative efforts with the WV Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BHHF) to expand employment opportunities for individuals with behavioral health challenges (e.g., mental health, substance use disorders, and developmental disabilities). During the first half of Program Year 2017, 284 individuals referred by mental health providers have become DRS consumers. (Page 73) Title I

11. whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs; (Page 125) Title I

Flexible Schedules and Coordination with Support Services: The degree to which the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with federal, state, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 195) Title I

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Adult Behavioral Health assures and provides access to services and supports to meet the mental health and co—occurring needs of adults and transitional age youth, enabling them to live, learn, work, and participate actively in their communities. The Division establishes standards to ensure effective and culturally competent care to promote recovery. The Division sets policy, promotes self—determination, protects human rights, and supports mental health training and research. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has teamed up with them on several efforts, such as having them present on “Behavioral Health Connections” at the DRS 2014 Statewide Training Conference, assisting them in the planning of their 2015 Integrated Behavioral Health Care Conference and exhibiting at that conference whereby information regarding DRS was disseminated to approximately 700 behavioral health professionals, and serving as a subject matter expert on their Clinical Adult Review Process (CARP), which looks at the needs of individuals transitioning out of state psychiatric facilities. (Page 244) Title IV

The Division of Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health is the Single State Authority for Children’s Mental Health charged with monitoring and improving the children’s behavioral health service delivery system. The Division is responsible for overseeing the implementation and evaluation of the federal block grant. The Division works collaboratively across all child serving systems, at both the state and local level, to ensure access to quality behavioral health services and supports for children and adolescents with and/or at risk for serious emotional disturbances. The Division provides leadership and technical assistance to facilitate an effective system of care for children and their families. DRS continues a working relationship with this office and their partners and, for example, has been working with the Expanded School Mental Health Steering Team Initiative. DRS has also worked together with The Family Advocacy, Support, & Training (FAST) program which is a statewide parent and youth network that engages families in the planning, management, and evaluation of their child’s mental health treatment and service needs. (Page 244-245) Title IV

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. (Page 247) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 47

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Senate Bill 150 - AN ACT making appropriations of public money out of the Treasury - 03/07/2020

“Section 1. General policy. - The purpose of this bill is to appropriate money necessary for the economical and efficient discharge of the duties and responsibilities of the state and its agencies during the fiscal year 2021…

43 – State Board of Rehabilitation – Division of Rehabilitation Services…

From the above appropriation for Workshop Development (fund 0310, appropriation 16300), fund shall be used exclusively with the private nonprofit community rehabilitation program organizations known as work centers or sheltered workshops. The appropriation shall also be used to continue the support of the program, services, and individuals with disabilities currently in place at those organizations…

370 – Bureau of Senior Services – Community Based Service Fund…

The total amount of these appropriations are funded from annual table game license fees to enable the aged and disabled citizens of West Virginia to stay in their homes through the provision of home and community-based services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Resource Leveraging

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Procedures: A Guide for Families and Districts - 06/06/2019

~~“A Facilitated Individualized Education Program (FIEP) Team meeting is a student focused process designed to help the IEP Team overcome the pressures and challenges of a potentially contentious meeting. The facilitator makes no educational decisions regarding the student or the IEP. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. The facilitator’s role is to:1. Keep the meeting focused on the student.2. Ensure everyone at the table has a voice.3. Encourage active listening by all participants.4. Keep the group from getting stuck on just one aspect of the IEP.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Employment" - 05/21/2019

~~“EmploymentUnder this program, each VA Medical Center (VAMC) has received funding to hire new vocational development specialists who are serving as Community Employment Coordinators (CECs) to boost employment outcomes for Veterans who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.How It Works

CECs work out of each VAMC to forge partnerships and create relationships with local community organizations and employers who have the ability to hire Veterans. CECs work with and pre-screen Veterans who offer a variety of skills and come from all education levels, and are backed by VA’s entire network of services and providers. Employers can also proactively reach out to their local CEC by visiting the CEC contact information page.”

Systems
  • Other

Low Incident Disabilities - 04/26/2019

~~This page has a section of “West Virginia VI Resources” to connect the families of students with disabilities to “local, state and national resources”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center Homeless Veterans "Compensated Work Therapy" - 02/07/2019

~~” Compensated Work Therapy (CWT)

CWT is comprised of the transitional work and supported employment program, which assists homeless Veterans in returning to competitive employment.How It Works

Veterans in CWT are paid at least the federal or state minimum wage, whichever is the higher.”

Systems
  • Other

Services Offered by the Huntington Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Huntington Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in West Virginia (excluding four counties in the northern Panhandle). We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including to those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and to older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other

Planning the Future for Students with Disabilities - 08/01/2018

~~“This guide is intended to provide information that is applicable to “most” young adults. However, individual needs, developmental levels and circumstances vary. Parental/guardian involvement and young adults’ input is highly recommended in all phases of transition planning.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Department of Education Policy 2520.16: West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards - 07/01/2018

“West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards defines the alternate academic achievement standards grades K-12 for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities and provides rigorous and challenging standards to meet the requirements of Policy 2510.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires the state to adopt challenging alternate academic achievement standards, linked to the state’s grade-level academic content standards, for students with significant cognitive disabilities, to form the basis of instruction, assessment and accountability for this group.   A student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team determines whether the student has a significant cognitive disability requiring instruction on these standards.  West Virginia Alternate Academic Achievement Standards will ensure alignment of the state’s alternate academic achievement standards with the West Virginia College- and Career-Readiness Standards in the areas of English language arts, mathematics, and science for grades K-12 which is consistent with the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requirements”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

West Virginia 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“First Choice Services, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” consumers; Small business owners; Self-employed individuals; Part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; Consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment services; Recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage.   For more information, please access the web link or contact the designated project lead.Category: Training and Capacity BuildingContact:Kay GoffPhone: (304) 400-4802Email: kay@1stchs.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

USDOL Investigation results in WV Employer Paying $119,040 to Employees with Disabilities to Resolve Violations - 03/21/2018

“After a U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division investigation, a federal jury has entered a verdict against Randolph County Sheltered Workshop Inc. - doing business as Seneca Designs - and ordered the Elkins nonprofit to pay $119,040 in back wages to 34 employees. Entered in the U.S District Court for the Northern District of West Virginia-Elkins Division, the investigation found that the organization violated the minimum wage provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Division investigators found violations that resulted from the employer’s failure to obtain a certificate authorizing their payment of sub-minimum wages to employees with disabilities. Absent that certificate, employees were legally due the full federal minimum wage. The Agency also found that the employer failed to post information about rights for employees with disabilities paid at a sub-minimum wage, as the law requires.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

DHHR to Add 200 Slots to IDD Waiver Program - 01/22/2019

~~“The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR), Bureau for Medical Services today announced the Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD) Waiver Program will release 200 slots to accommodate individuals on the wait list.  The new slots are a result of the cost savings and efficiencies of the program.

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver is important to many residents and their families as it provides an alternative to institutional care,” said Cindy Beane, Commissioner for DHHR’s Bureau for Medical Services. “These additional slots allow DHHR to continue serving this vulnerable population.”

The IDD Waiver Program assists individuals who have intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible. Individuals must be determined medically and financially eligible for services.

 In addition to the 200 slots to be released in January 2019, the program released 62 new slots and 106 rollover slots in July 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

WV State-Wide Transition Plan - 11/15/2018

~~“The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released new regulations and guidance on the delivery of home and community-based services (HCBS) offered through Medicaid waiver programs. Through this new rule, CMS intends to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS through Medicaid waivers have full access to integrated, community living including receiving services in the most integrated setting possible. To increase understanding of the rule for individuals receiving services, family members and providers, the West Virginia Bureau for Medical Services will post information and relevant materials on this webpage. To fully implement the new rule from CMS, West Virginia must submit a transition plan for the each Medicaid waiver offering HCBS to ensure compliance of the new rule. The Bureau for Medical Services is solicited comments on the draft Transition Plans.  There is one transition plan for each waiver. The transition plans will be combined into one Statewide Transition Plan. Comments from the public will be used to complete the final Statewide Transition Plan to submit to CMS.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Waiver Programs - 09/14/2018

~~“The Bureau for Medical Services has four Waiver Programs:

The Aged and Disabled Waiver (ADW)  is for people age 18 or older who meet the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care and who meet financial requirements.

The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) is for individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities who would otherwise be institutionalized. 

The Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Waiver addresses the immediate and long-term physical, mental and social needs of individuals with substance use disorders, and promotes and sustains their long-term recovery.

The Traumatic Brain Injury Waiver (TBIW) is for people age 3 or older who have a traumatic brain injury defined as a non-degenerative, non-congenital insult to the brain caused by an external physical force resulting in total or partial functional disability and/or psychosocial impairment or an injury caused by anoxia due to near drowning and who meets the medical criteria of receiving nursing home care.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for WV’s Waiver Transition Plan Application - 07/01/2018

~~This review has been conducted in two sections.  To begin the transition plan development process, BMS conducted a review of the HCBS services provided by the current West Virginia waivers impacted by the new rule (Exhibit 1) as well as the waivers’ supporting documentation (operation manuals, authorizing legislation, waiver applications, etc.).  The State used CMS guidance documents, particularly “Summary of Regulatory Requirements for Home and Community Based Settings” to guide the analysis.   The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (WVDHHR) Recommendations from the HCBS

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
-0.76%
Change from
2018 to 2019
1,792,147
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.81%
Change from
2018 to 2019
178,229
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.65%
Change from
2018 to 2019
57,719
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
12.04%
Change from
2018 to 2019
32.38%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.14%
Change from
2018 to 2019
72.14%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 1,792,147
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 178,229
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 57,719
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 626,123
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.38%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.14%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 175,753
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 172,424
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 327,823
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,777
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,773
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 799
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 448
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,219
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,066

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,798
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 83,775

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 9,085
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 24,473
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.00%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 164
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 180
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 19
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 12
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.69

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 24.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,068
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 137,160
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 66
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 106

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. N/A
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. N/A

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.64%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 7.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.60%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 16.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.31%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 42.20%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 59
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 59

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. (Page 243) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow—along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state—appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 238) Title IV

—The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 243) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:….
• Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. (Page 62) Title I

Region 3 will encourage the co-enrollment of high risk Out-of-school Youth, ages 18-24, as both WIOA Adult (Title II) and WIOA Youth participants. This has been realized through dual enrollments with the YouthBuild Program in the region, as well as the Employment for Independent Living Program, which serves foster youth. Blending and braiding these resources only increases the level of support offered to enrolled youth. (Page 79) Title I

• The braiding of WIOA Title I—B funded programs with other youth—directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low—income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year—round services and summer employment activities. (Page 94) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out—of—school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements:
a. tutoring, study skills training, instruction, and evidence—based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent;
b. alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate;
c. paid and unpaid work experiences, including summer employment opportunities and other employment opportunities available throughout the school year; pre—apprenticeship programs; internships and job shadowing; and on—the—job training opportunities;
d. occupational skill training;
e. education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster;
f. leadership development opportunities;
g. supportive services;
h. adult mentoring;
i. follow—up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as appropriate;
j. comprehensive guidance and counseling;
k. financial literacy education;
l. entrepreneurial skills training;
m. services that provide labor market and employment information about in—demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area; and
n. activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training. (Page 174) Title II

School to Work Transition

~~Pre—employment transition services, including job exploration counseling; work—based learning experiences; counseling on enrollment opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self—advocacy, are provided for those who need assistance in finding a career path that matches their interests and abilities. Once a career path has been selected, post—secondary education and training programs are made available with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services funds to help individuals get the specialized college, apprenticeship, or employment supports they need to be successful in the workplace. (Page 49) Title IV

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 167-168) Title I

In FY 2015, DRS re—structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre—employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 227) Title IV

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post—secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system. (Page 236) Title IV

In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV

In addition to ongoing program activities, DRS will host a one week summer workshop for transition students who are juniors entering into their senior year of high school. The workshop will be held in seven areas across the state. DRS staff participating include the PETS Counselor, Employment Specialist, and RSA assigned to the PETS territory. Class will start at 9:00am and end at 4:00pm. Class size for each of the seven workshops will be approximately 30 students. Students will earn minimum wage for the time that they attend. DRS is also requesting WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students.
Topics to be covered:
-Career planning
-Career preparation
-SSI/SSDI Information
-Understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, e.g., social security card, driver’s license, birth certificate, pay stubs.
-Communication
-Conflict Management (Page 307; 314; 319) Title IV
 

Career Pathways

~~The state will encourage Local Workforce Development Boards to engage in partnerships with local educational entities, businesses, community—based organizations, etc. in order to communicate the benefits of technical training and the development of robust and comprehensive career pathways models. (Page 50) Title I

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development
It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and/or training for skills that lead to quality employment in high—demand jobs or entry—level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low—skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation, or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 60; 75; 87-88; 296) Title III

The state will assess the overall effectiveness of the workforce system and those educational programs that support and work with it on the basis of their collective ability to produce career pathways leading to industry—valued, recognized postsecondary credentials and apprenticeship enrollments. (Page 61) Title III

The state will employ and will require state plan partners to adopt or participate in (to the extent appropriate for each program), seven policy strategies that frame, align, and guide program coordination at the state, local, and regional levels. These policies (discussed in further detail in the section on strategies, tactics, and resources) will include the following:
• Sector strategies: aligning workforce and education programs with leading and emergent industry sectors’ skills needs.
• Career pathways: enabling of progressive skills development through education and training programs, using multiple entry and exit points, so that each level of skills development corresponds with a labor market payoff for those being trained or educated. (Page 62) Title I

The Region 7 WDB works with employer partnerships, community and technical colleges, secondary and post-secondary schools to establish credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills, and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment especially those with disabilities. (Page 74) Title I

Industry-led partnerships are coupled with Career Pathways. Region 5 Job Center Operator, Core and Required Partners have implemented Career Pathways initiatives in Health Care, IT and CDL Training. Career Pathways Services are diverse with multiple entry and exit points that allow individuals with varying degrees of ability to have realistic access to pathways. (Page 75) Title I

DRS continues to inform its consumers about available career pathway programs available through Adult Education, Career and Technical Education, the Community and Technical College System, and four-year colleges. In 2016, DRS assisted 1,650 consumers with four-year college training, 423 consumers with junior/community college training and 259 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. In 2017, DRS assisted 1,660 consumers with four-year college training, 433 consumers with junior/community college training, and 326 consumers with other types of occupational/vocational training. (Page 75) Title I

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team will continue working toward a desk manual of Career Pathways based on the Demand Occupation List within the MOV-WDB region. The Career Pathway manual will align occupations within industries as well as required degree, diploma, or certification. Career Planners will promote a career pathway system in MOV that includes ITA services potentially followed by OJT with an employer to complete or continue the career path of an individual. Working with employers to expand the career path of their employees through Incumbent Worker training to expand the skill sets of current employees and promote the development of new technology on the job. (Page 76) Title I

Strategy 3.3: Educate individuals (job—seekers and employers) and encourage career pathways in training and employment environments.
Region 1 provides counseling/career services to support individuals with their career goals. We utilize resources such as the WorkForce GPS and WV Career Pathways to help individuals navigate through the career pathway system to enter training that meets the demands of local businesses. (Page 77) Title III

Region 4 contracted One-Stop Coordinator and the One- Stop Management Team goal of creating a Career Pathway desk manual is that it will serve as resource for Adult, Youth, and Partner Agency front-line staff to utilize in working with program participants to develop training and employment goals. The Career Pathway desk manual will be a resource utilized by the MOV-WDB contracted Business Service Rep. to assist the review of MOV-WDB Region employer needs based on the outlined training programs. training curriculums of specific programs, and skill-sets obtained through training program completion. (Page 77) Title I

DRS has created PathwaysWV.org, a website for students with disabilities to gain valuable and relevant information on career pathways, education and training opportunities, and current and future in-demand occupations. (Page 78) Title I

The State will mainstream job seekers with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to the maximum extent possible by offering realistic entry points into career pathways and by ensuring necessary supportive services are in place and coordinated across agencies, so that those individuals with the most significant barriers to employment are successful in accessing and navigating career pathways. When appropriate, job seekers will be co—enrolled between core and other partner programs in order to provide the most comprehensive services possible. (Page 86) Title IV

The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post—secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro— credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide. (Page 87) Title I

The state will take further actions to coordinate services between WIOA core programs and non— core programs and services to create an effective career pathway system. These actions will include the following:
• The education agencies and educational institutions will work with the State WDB and LWDBs to build career pathways that include secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs of study. (Page 93) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education will work with the education system to support and develop career pathways identified by employers and the workforce system. This support will be provided by developing and implementing bridge and pre—bridge programs as part of the Moving Pathways Forward imitative. During program year 2013—2014 the West Virginia Adult Education Program applied for and was selected to take part in the multi—year Moving Pathways Forward Project. This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE). West Virginia will be one of fourteen states to be provided with technical assistance in the development of state and local career pathways systems that will assist youth and adults to achieve success in postsecondary education training and employment in high—growth and high demand occupations. (Page 98) Title I

West Virginia Adult Education's response to the WIOA requirement to increase the number of low-skill adults' transitioning into postsecondary education and training has been to focus on participation in a career pathway system and, within this system of career pathways programs,

Bridge programs.

Career pathway programs are a "series of connected education and training programs and support services that enable individuals to secure employment within a specific industry or occupational sector, and to advance over time to successively higher levels of education and employment within that sector" (Jenkins 2006,6). Career pathways often include "stackable" credentials and accelerated courses offered at flexible times that support student entry and exit along the pathway.

Bridge programs, one of the first steps in a career pathway for low-skill adults, support the transition from adult education to the next step in an occupational pathway. By connecting adult education programs to community college occupational programs, bridge programs seek to increase the rates at which low-skill adults move into college-level occupational programs, persist in these programs, and obtain postsecondary credentials in industries offering family-sustaining wages and career advancement. (Page 202) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning. We partner with employers to provide work—based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job—driven training rather than erroneous skills training. Other: • Development of apprenticeship training programs (Page 59) Title IV

3(7) AND INCLUDES REGISTERED APPRENTICESHIP. “IN-DEMAND INDUSTRY SECTOR OR OCCUPATION” IS DEFINED AT WIOA SECTION 3(23).

We will create an approach based on the needs of the job seekers as well as the needs of the employer. Our workforce development system must examine the needs of the employer, assess the skills and skills gaps of the workforce and then create solutions to ensure maximum benefit to both customer groups.

Strategy 2.1: Work with employers to identify true workforce needs.

Strategy 2.2: Assess skill gaps and needs of individuals seeking employment and/or training.

Strategy 2.3: Ensure that individuals with barriers, especially those with disabilities, to employment have increased access to and for opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services.

Strategy 2.4: Make available training programs that solve both the needs of employers and individuals. (Page 65) Title I

The State will promote and support the creation of pre—apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs, (ApprenticeshipUSA) particularly in non-traditional occupations and for non-traditional populations, as part of relevant career pathway models. The State will add apprenticeship opportunities to West Virginia WorkForce programs and will promote them as job/training options to job seekers. (Page 88-89) Title I

The State will establish statewide and regional lists of industry—recognized credentials with a focus on identifying credentials along established career pathways, including badges, micro—credentials and entry level credentials appropriate for individuals with barriers to employment. The lists will include academic credentials as well as credentials demonstrating job readiness and the attainment of employability skills through workforce preparation activities. The State will consult with LWDBs and engaged employers, including through Registered Apprenticeship programs and industry partnerships, to ensure that the credential lists reflect skills that are in demand. (Page 89) Title I

Programs will confirm that they are providing learning activities that are contextualized, so students acquire the knowledge and skills needed for transition to their individual career pathway. Programs will ensure that the teaching staff offer a variety of instructional strategies that engage students and promote student persistence and retention; this should include whole group instruction, peer tutoring, and individualized instruction along with distance learning. The variety of instructional strategies will integrate academics, career counseling, and soft skills to bolster the students’ ability to gain employment, go to college, or enter a training program that could include an apprenticeship. Integrated education and training programs will align with the needs of the local labor market The occupational training provided as part of an integrated education and training program will be connected to realistic, existing employment opportunities in the local area that connect to a career pathway for the participants. (Page 196) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~DRS also included representatives from WorkForce WV and WV Adult Education to participate in the workshops to provide additional information to the students. A concerted effort was made to introduce Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) to students in the CEO Summits. Topics covered included career planning, career preparation, SSI/SSDI Information, understanding the importance of necessary personal documents, communication, conflict management, employer expectations, attendance and punctuality, timeliness of task completion, being able to work without supervision, positive work ethic, managing multiple tasks, high-growth jobs, personal brand, and job hunting tools such as resumes, cover letters, interviews, and digital profiles. (Page 80) Title IV

Other agencies with which DRS collaborates for the provision of time—limited supported employment services are:
1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
2. West Virginia Title XIX——Home and Community—Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs.
In implementing school—to—work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks. (Page 238) Title IV
 

Employer / Business Engagement

~~Under Title IV, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) provides services that help allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work—based learning (work—based training, and on the job training). Title IV emphasizes the need to provide pre—employment transition services (PETS) for students with disabilities prior to their exiting the school system. Additionally, the new federal act emphasizes creating employer engagement within the community by creating work—based learning experiences for individuals, thus allowing employers to be matched with skilled workers. (Page 59) Title IV

DRS also coordinates with employers through participation and membership in various community and regional organizations. These activities range from employer—specific organizations to public—private partnerships and allow DRS to better understand the needs of employers while jointly developing employment—related activities. Some of these partnerships include:
—Regional WDBs;
—Beckley—Raleigh Chamber of Commerce;
—Fayette County Chamber of Commerce;
—Weirton Area Chamber of commerce;
—Employer engagement and worksite tours for VR consumers through partnerships with community colleges such as Mountwest and Bridge Valley; and
—Employer tours through partnerships with high school and adult vocational/technical centers including South Branch Career and Technical Center and James Rumsey Technical Institute. (Page 241) Title IV

The resource guide provides information regarding staffing services, training programs and incentives for hiring people with disabilities, financial incentives, accessibility assessments, accommodating employees with disabilities, basic disability etiquette, attitudinal barriers, the Americans with Disabilities Act, locating a DRS office, and where to find additional resources. DRS Employment Specialists conducted over 1,000 employer visits with more than 800 employers in both FYs 2016 and 2017. (Page 328) Title IV
 

Data Collection

The West Virginia WDS will utilize its integrated data system to monitor and evaluate the performance of the WIOA core partner programs in relation to the four state goals described above. The data collected for the common performance measures and the WIOA Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) will provide all of the data elements needed to monitor and evaluate performance on the state goals. Because these data are required to be collected by all WIOA core programs, there will be no additional burden posed on the programs. (Page 85) Title I

West Virginia has an integrated data collection and performance management system (MACC) that covers the following programs:

• WIOA Adult, Dislocated Workers, Youth

• National Dislocated Worker Grants

• Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

• Wagner—Peyser • Trade Adjustment Assistance

• Jobs for Veterans State Grants

• West Virginia’s Unemployment Compensation MIS interfaces with MACC.

All other partners have management information systems that are customized to meet the needs of their programs. WorkForce West Virginia, Rehabilitation Services, and Adult Education will each make the necessary changes to their systems to collect the required data elements. Initially, common data elements will be shared among the partners through a regular file exchange; ultimately linkages will be put in place to allow partners to access the information in real time. Employment and wage data will be shared with partners to the extent allowed by the WRIS/WRIS2 agreement. (Page 109) Title I

The WIOA core partners in West Virginia, including WorkForce West Virginia, WV Division of Rehabilitation Services, and WV Adult Education will implement a practical and effective system to fulfill the data alignment and integration requirements of WIOA. Each program has a unique system of data collection that is tailored to meet its unique needs. To maximize the efficient exchange of data to support assessment and evaluation, the core partners have collaborated to begin the development and implementation of a system for data sharing. Data will be uploaded to a data warehouse operated by WorkForce West Virginia and/or an IT contractor, and retrieved by each partner as needed and updated where appropriate based on consumers’ progress in the One—Stop Center system. This will allow all partners to track common consumer service delivery while minimizing duplication of service.

This system operates as follows:

1. A data warehouse will be created to store mandated data collected/shared by the three partners. The three core partners are identifying data elements that represent common intake information in the One—Stop system.

2. Each consumer in the system on implementation will be assigned a unique participant identifier upon entering the system (Workforce West Virginia, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult Basic Ed). The date each consumer enters and exits each program is recorded. The unique participant identifier and program entry/exit dates will be used to identify common consumers across the core programs and provide access to the common data elements will be collected by other partners and stored in the One—Stop system.

3. To ensure effectiveness and efficiency in the One—Stop system, data collected by each program on new consumers are sent to the One—Stop data warehouse and are made available for each program to track service delivery of common consumers. This process will ensure that service delivery for each consumer can be tracked across all programs.

4. Data stored in the warehouse will be used to generate reports required under section 116, performance accountability system. Alignment of each partner’s system of data collection will improve service delivery to job seekers at the One—Stop, including individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, by providing the three core partners with more information about how consumers are being assisted across programs in the One—Stop system in West Virginia. This information enables the core partners to have a greater understanding of how the needs of their consumers are being met across programs, to track their progress, and to minimize duplication of service. Alignment and integration of data across programs in a data sharing system supports a consumer—focused approach to service delivery that will generate quality employment outcomes for consumers in the One—Stop system. (Page 130-131) Title III

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on:

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;

—The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;

—The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; and

—The indicators of effectiveness in serving employers. (Page 299; 316-317) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~DRS agrees with the Council’s recommendation to continue to strengthen the link between the agency and the public school system, as this link is considered vital to the continued referral of students with disabilities. DRS continues to maintain a strong connection and working relationship with the West Virginia Department of Education, as well as the county—level Boards of Education. The agency has updated its Memorandums of Understanding with the WV Department of Education and all 55 County Boards of Education to reflect changes concerning Section 511 and pre-employment transition services (pre-ETS). With the implementation of WIOA, DRS has increased collaborative efforts with school staff at the state and local level, particularly regarding the provision of pre—employment transition services to high school students with disabilities beginning in the tenth grade. (Page 220) Title IV